DX LISTENING DIGEST AUGUST 2003 ARCHIVE

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DX LISTENING DIGEST AUGUST 2003 ARCHIVE

|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-157, August 31, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3h.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1197: RFPI: Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 on 7445 [nominal times subject to delay or pre-emption] WBCQ: Mon 0415 on 7415 WWCR: Wed 0930 on 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1197h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1197h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1197.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1197.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1197.ram UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIAL May I be allowed to issue a 'reminder' that if you are having any difficulty with Wordpad or Notepad, regarding Glenn's DXLD (or any other Text Files for that matter), that the best thing to do, seems to be to Download to your 'Favourite' Word Processer (Even a DOS one!). This is because Glenn very thoughtfully provides his DXLD primarily in Text (=.txt) form, which makes a VERY healthy contribution to its 'Universality'. You can also easily download to a Floppy Disk if you prefer, just make sure that either the Box at the top of the Save As shows Floppy A:\ or you can also insert, where it comes up DXLDxxxx. e.g. a:\dxldxxx, this of course can be used for other Partitions, Drives and Folders as well (Ken Fletcher, 0950UTC=1050UTC+1 August 30th 2003, BDXC-UK) ** AFGHANISTAN. Looks like autumn, also on the bands. AM was highlighted by India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka last week. QTH this time: Jalasjärvi, Western Finland. Rx: Racal RA-1792, Yaesu FRG-100. wires: 700 m 100 grad, 500 m 180 grad, 500 m 270 grad, 700 m 290 grad. 1107, often 1630-, R. Afghanistan, Kabul. New 400-kW unit seems to be in top condition, but how long. 1296, every evening 1700-, Azadi R, Kabul. VOA Afghan programming, Dari & Pashto. Funniest moment was when the lyrics of country & western song were translated into local language by the speaker. Great signal. BBC sign-on 1927 UT spoils a bit of the fun (Jari Lehtinen, Lahti, Finland, Aug 20, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** ANGUILLA. After a modest absence, Caribbean Beacon on 11755 with Dr. Gene Scott program at 2100 tune in. Signal as strong as ever (Dale Thomas, location unknown, Aug 30, hard-core-dx via DXLD) You mean 11775, also confirmed here Aug 31 at 1948, poor, but better than WWCR 13845; more than modest, about a month (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ARGENTINA. BRAZIL? Olá amigos, Existe alguma estação brasileira na "X Band", ou programação retransmitida por alguma emissora do exterior? Escutei hoje, por volta das 2330 PY, emissão brasileira religiosa (pentecostais) em 1610 kHz. O nome do programa era "Encontro com Jesus". Fiquei intrigado, até gravei trechos da transmissão em MP3. A emissora também dispunha de anúncios: sobre material de contrução, "Eletrônica Miller", etc. Citado endereços "Rua Bélgica, 654, Jd. São Luiz", "Av. República Argentina" duas vezes, uma como "Bairro Morumbi 1" e "Jd. São Miguel", "Foz do Iguaçú". Telefones "525-1730, 3025- 5574". Tel do programa "525-0999". O máximo de sinal era 43333, com interferência da Rádio 9 de Julho. Fica a questão para a turma MW-DX, HI! 73! (Flávio Archangelo, Jundiaí -SP, Aug 30, radioescutas via DXLD) Archangelo, Esta emissora está em Puerto Iguazú, Argentina; transmite em espanhol e português. Você poderá ouvi-la também em 6215 kHz como Radio Baluarte. Em Onda média (1610 kHz) se identificava como Rádio Maranatha; não sei se mantém os dois nomes ainda. 73 (Samuel Cássio Martins, São Carlos SP, ibid.) ** AUSTRALIA. After some discussions with Roger Broadbent from RA, detailed HF freq information is now included on the RA web site. the schedules may be found at: http://www.abc.net.au/ra/hear/ 73 (Glenn, VK4DU, Aug 31, EDXP via DXLD) Like pulling eyeteeth --- I guess that`s progress, but you still have to pretend your are in some target country, such as Christmas Island, and get only the transmissions for your area, and in local time! Is it still too much to ask for a comprehensive transmission schedule on one page showing all broadcasts in all languages, in UT? USA (never mind Canada), in three versions, East Coast, West Coast, and Central, is found under EAST PACIFIC, where else? But yay, the Great Center finally gets recognized, tho times are in UT -6, currently observed nowhere in the Central zone! We`d like to take it as a fraternal condemnation of DST --- But nice anyway for the non- Arizonan Montagnards, who are thus inadvertently recognised (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. Hundreds of employees at Australia's national radio and TV broadcaster ABC stopped work in Sydney in protest at the suspension of a presenter who had written an article for a major newspaper. More than 300 staff downed tools to take a vote on whether to take further industrial action if the Religion Report's presenter Stephen Crittenden was not given his job back. Crittenden was suspended six weeks ago for "serious misconduct" after his article appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald. --- Read more? http://tinyurl.com/lrs3 http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/08/27/1061663852060.html (via Georges Lessard, CAJ-list, via Ricky Leong, DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. The Howard government's attack on the editorial independence of the ABC, as reported in Saturday's New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/30/international/asia/30AUST.html (Chuck Albertson, Seattle, WA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) AUSTRALIAN PRIME MINISTER TAKES ON BROADCASTING SERVICE http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/30/international/asia/30AUST.html?ex=10 62820800&en=e40c055a2de379fa&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) Same: AUSTRALIAN PRIME MINISTER TAKES ON BROADCASTING SERVICE August 30, 2003 By JANE PERLEZ http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/30/international/asia/30AUST.html?ex=10 63263806&ei=1&en=866361855f2ffafc SYDNEY, Australia, Aug. 25 - The government of Prime Minister John Howard is in a battle with the publicly financed Australian Broadcasting Corporation, accusing it of "biased, and in particular anti-American" coverage of the war in Iraq. Australia sent combat troops to Iraq, and the conservative Mr. Howard's battle with the well-regarded broadcasting system has focused public attention on the importance he places on Australia's relationship with the United States. The Ministry of Communications released a bill of particulars against a popular morning current affairs radio program, AM, citing 68 examples of what it contended was biased coverage during the conflict in Iraq. Among the complaints were that the program gave too much attention to accidental killings of soldiers by their own troops and to civilian casualties and that it gave too little prominence to successes, including the "strategic achievements" of the Australian troops, the ministry said. The system, known to Australians as ABC or just Auntie, includes a radio network and a national television channel. It is patterned after the British Broadcasting Corporation, including a multi-tiered system to review complaints. ABC's ombudsman, Murray Green, looked into the accusations and issued a report that rebuffed the government. Mr. Green found that only 2 of the 68 citations had merit: one story about the tenor of the daily Pentagon briefings veered toward sarcasm, he said; another dealing with President Bush's decision not to watch the televised first night of the bombing of Baghdad was too speculative. Mr. Howard, like Prime Minister Tony Blair of Britain, is now waging political wars at home against both the public broadcasting system and against those who contend that the government exaggerated the extent of Iraq's inventory of weapons. A parliamentary inquiry that opened in the capital, Canberra, last Friday somewhat mirrors the British inquiry into the intelligence dossier that the BBC charged had exaggerated the threat posed by Iraq to make a stronger case for war. But statements by an Australian intelligence analyst, Andrew Wilkie, that Mr. Howard's office overstated the threat from Iraq's weapons have failed to raise anything like the firestorm that similar accusations raised in Britain. Mr. Howard appears to be benefiting from the fact that Australians supported their soldiers in Iraq, even if they were not largely in favor of sending them. Also, unlike Mr. Blair, Mr. Howard brought almost all combat soldiers home once the war was over. In his report, Mr. Green said he compared the 68 news reports the government found objectionable with reports on the same subjects filed by the international wire services, major American news outlets and statements by the Bush administration. In some cases, the wording of the ABC radio reports was exactly the same as that of the wire services and the American reports. For example, the ministry complained that the ABC had said the war was likely to result in "hundreds of thousands" of refugees. Mr. Green pointed out that wire services carried the same prediction based on public statements by the International Committee of the Red Cross. Many of the complaints turned out to be what some commentators here belittled as nitpicking, but what others said established a pattern of bias. The Howard government was not deterred by Mr. Green's findings. It sent its accusations to a five-member independent complaints review panel of literary and public service luminaries, which is now considering the case. If the government does not get its way with the review panel, it is likely to take the matter to the governing board, where most of the members are appointees of the Howard government. To drive home its displeasure with the ABC, the government last month turned down a request for an increase in the budget for this year. Unlike the BBC, which raises revenue from individual home license fees as well as the government, the ABC is entirely dependent on the government. Unlike the Public Broadcasting System in the United States, the ABC has no provision for private sponsorship of programming. There has been much speculation in the Australian press about why the Howard government has persisted with the case. Mr. Howard has criticized the ABC many times since coming to office in 1996, but this is the first time his government has charged a program with being unfair toward the United States. Many commentators have concluded that Mr. Howard is unhappy because the ABC is no longer the custodian of conservative views that he remembers hearing on the radio when, as a youth, he was molding his own political outlook. In those days, the ABC radio news opened with a piece of heraldic music, "Imperial Fanfare." Cricket matches from Britain were faithfully relayed for days on end, and the coronation of Queen Elizabeth was broadcast live from Westminster Cathedral in 1952. The organization is highly esteemed by Australians, who ranked it in a survey last year as second only to charities as a cherished institution - well above big business, which supports the Howard government. "Howard is fighting a cultural war with the ABC," said Gregory Hywood, a columnist in The Sydney Morning Herald. "He thinks it is biased to the left and wants to move it to the center, and he is using funding and continual complaints of bias for leverage." Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company (via DXLD) ** BELGIUM. Hello Glenn, I've seen that you used my Dutch language message in DXLD. Here is a translation that is probably of better use. Seen in Radio Vlaanderen Int`l 'Onder Ons' leaflet. RTBF is transmitting again via Waver. They are using the a.o. old VRT/RVI transmitters. RTBF transmits only on one single frequency. They use 9970 kHz the whole day long. Transmitting on one single frequency is not really a habit in the short wave world but without switching they hope to save the obsolete parts. (end quote) It was not specified what 'the whole day long' means but their web page at http://www.rtbf.be/ri/ says that 9970 is on air between 0400 and 1900 UT. So it is again possible to hear a Belgian transmitter-site on short wave. 73, (Guido Schotmans, Belgium, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Tnx, Guido; but I thought RTBF had been using 9970 for quite some time now after a brief break (gh, DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. 4780.96, Radio Tacana, Tumupasa, 0230 - 0250, Aug 27, Spanish, Musical program, man announcer, tc, ID "4780 megahertz, banda de 60 metros, ésta es Radio Tacana", Very weak signal, better in LSB. 6054.46, Radio Juan XXIII, San Ignacio de Velazco, 2129 - 2135, Aug 27, Spanish, female announcer, news program, IDs "gracias por estar junto a Radio Juan XXIII" "Radio Juan XXIII presenta...", 23332 (Nicolás Eramo, Argentina, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. 5045, R. Guarujá, 30 Aug 2338-2353, A few soft ZY romantic pop ballads, but mostly talk by live M announcer who liked to play the "Guarujá Guarujá, Brasil" shouted by M jingle often!! Gave a TC at 2346. Played a soul song at 2349 with M announcer voice-over again giving many "Guarujá"s and many IDs. Although there was something on 3235, I couldn't //. This frequency so nice it was an easy copy!!! (Dave Valko, DXpedition somewhere in PA? -- see EUROPE, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) Could have been PR romantic pop ballads (gh) Prezados, Seguindo a sugestão de alguns colegas da lista, fiz uma visita hoje à Rádio Guarujá, aqui de Florianópolis, para questionar o motivo de não responderem aos IR's enviados. Fui muito bem recebido pelo sr. Carlos Alberto Silva, executivo de contas da emissora, que me disse que tem respondido a todas as correspondências que recebe. Mas que atualmente tem recebido apenas cartas do exterior, nenhuma do Brasil. O que pode estar ocorrendo, segundo ele, é que os IR's chegam para setores da emissora que não dão importância e não encaminham a ele. Conversamos por um bom tempo e ele me garantiu que a emissora tem muito interesse em receber os IR's, pois assim fica sabendo da qualidade do sinal e das transmissões. Me disse que costuma responder com adesivos e cartas confirmatórias. Me mostrou inclusive uma correspondência de um dxista de Hannover (!) para quem respondeu enviando uma edição do "Dicionário Ilhéu". Ganhei alguns adesivos e a sugestão de repassar à lista o nome e endereço do sr. Carlos, para quem devem ser encaminhados os IR's. Aqui vai: Rádio Guarujá AM Rua Nunes Machado, 94 - 10º andar Centro - Florianópolis - SC CEP 88010-460 A/C Carlos Alberto Silva Um forte abraço a todos (Marcelo Herondino Cardoso, Florianópolis - SC, radioescutas via DXLD) IR = reception report; v/s given Amigo Marcelo, Que excelente iniciativa foi a sua! São atitudes como esta que demonstram o verdadeiro espírito radio escuta. A tua informação será de enorme valia para todos do nosso hobby. Nunca perca este entusiasmo ! Parabéns ! Um abraço (Adalberto, PY4WTH, Barbacena, MG, ibid.) ** BRAZIL. Hello Glenn! Many DXers have had for the last weeks problems with a religious station on 6060 kHz. Here in Quito I´m hearing Radio Tupi, Curitiba on 6060.18v kHz in // with 11765.03 kHz. Some months ago I also heard Tupi, Curitiba on 9565 (don´t remember the exact freq.) in // with these 2 frequencies. Tupi has the program "A Voz da Libertação" and "Iglesia Dios es Amor". I checked the ID this morning on 6060.18v kHz at 1058 UT = "Radio Tupi". 73s de (Björn Malm, SWB América Latina, Quito, Ecuador, Aug 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. Radio Canção Nova prepares the Second International Promoting Day to Canção Nova Communication System on September 13th. - ' D Day '. It will be one special day where TV, Radio and Internet will be live, all day long chatting, transmitting through TV and Radio commentaries from every part of Brazil and world about the initiatives to promote this communication system. If you want to receive our QSL confirmation, you can send us a recording to: Radio Canção Nova P.O. Box 57 Cachoeira Paulista SP, Brazil 12630-000 Or MP3 recording to: alemfronteiras@cancaonova.com Live contact during the day; just type: http://www.cancaonova.com/chat and chose Radio AM room radio reports to: alemfronteiras@cancaonova.com See you there. We confirm radio reports on the air and 100% QSL back. Program: Além Fronteiras (Beyound Boundaries) Every Saturdays: 22:00 to 23:00 (GMT) AM 1020 khz- SW 49m 6105 kHz -SW 60m 4825 kHz - SW 31m 9675 kHz - (Eduardo de Moura, RCN, dxing.info via DXLD) Beware: religious station (gh) ** CANADA [and non]. Loveline --- REUTERS OTTAWA --- A Vancouver radio station was reprimanded yesterday for running an episode of a U.S. show whose host mocked the Holocaust by saying "Burn those Jews. Gas 'em in the shower, baby." The Canadian Broadcast Standards Council said the broadcast by Mojo Radio last December had "exceeded any reasonable level of propriety" and ordered the station to make a public apology. The episode of Loveline featured a call from a telephone sex operator who wanted advice on how to make her clients stay on the phone longer. Adam Carolla, one of the show's hosts, suggested she use words like "Holocaust," "Vietnam" and "cancer" to dampen her clients' ardour. The sex operator then speculated she might tell a client, "Well I'm wearing a nice black garter. Mmm, just thinking about the Holocaust right now." Carolla laughed in response and said: "Yeah, yeah, burn those Jews. Gas 'em in the shower, baby. Yeah, yeah ... send 'em on the train to Krakow." The standards council said it understood the "intended humour" in the concept of advising a telephone sex operator to use words like "Holocaust" to prolong conversations with clients. "When, however, the hosts progressed to the level of `Yeah, yeah, burn those Jews. Gas 'em in the shower, baby,' and so on, even in aid of their sarcastic view of the ignorant `telephone actress,' they exceeded any reasonable level of propriety," it said in its judgment. "The laughter of the hosts directed at the notion of the concentration camp trains and lethal `showers,' which combined to exterminate 6 million persons, accentuated the inappropriateness." In its defence, the radio station said the use of the word "Holocaust" had been designed to make fun of the caller (Via Harry van Vugt, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RADIO BROADCAST RULED IMPROPER [same story] http://tinyurl.com/lnwk (Toronto Star Aug 28 via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** CANADA. SOFT LANDING --- VANCOUVER (CP) - Less than four months after being fired, popular open-line radio host Rafe Mair has landed a new gig. The irascible Mair, the bane of B.C. and federal politicians, was dismissed from Vancouver station CKNW after 19 years, apparently after his producer complained about the way he treated her. On Tuesday, Mair will launch a public affairs-oriented show on competitor 600 AM - CKBD - in his old morning time slot. Mair's first guest is scheduled to be B.C. Premier Gordon Campbell. Mair, 71, was a cabinet minister in the Social Credit government of Bill Bennett before becoming an open-line host. He was fired from top-rated CKNW in early June in what was called an internal matter that did not reflect on the quality of Mair's show. Fill-in host Peter Warren took Mair's 8:30 a.m.-11 a.m. slot until recently, when Bill Good, whose show had followed Mair's, was moved to the earlier slot. In an interview at the time, Mair suggested his firing was due to a clash of styles with Corus Entertainment, which took over CKNW a few years ago. His show had also been carried outside British Columbia on Corus's radio network. He said a rift with his on-air producer acted as a catalyst. She had allegedly complained Mair forced her to have coffee with him, to get his coffee and carry a bag of shoes down some stairs. Mair denied forcing her to have coffee or get his coffee but admitted telling her that she was acting like "a little girl with her knickers in a knot." Mair, who started in radio in 1984, became known for outspokenness on such issues as electoral reform and environmental threats to B.C. salmon stocks. He won a Michener Award for meritorious service to Canadian journalism in 1994 for his successful, year-long campaign to stop Alcan from completing a billion-dollar hydro-electric project in northern British Columbia because of its threat to salmon and the environment (via Harry van Vugt, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, DXLD) ** CHINA. BEIJING 2008 OLYMPIC BROADCASTING DEAL SIGNED | Text of report in English by official Chinese news agency Xinhua (New China News Agency) Beijing, 31 August: The organizers of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games signed a frame agreement for the establishment of the Beijing Olympic Broadcasting Co. Ltd (BOB) with the Olympic Broadcasting Services S.A. (OBS) here on Sunday [31 August]. The agreement, a crucial document for the successful broadcasting of the Olympic Games in Beijing, was signed by Hein Verbruggen, chairman of OBS and Liu Jingmin, executive vice president of the Beijing Organizing Committee (BOCOG). According to the frame agreement, the Beijing Olympic Broadcasting Co. Ltd will be jointly established by BOCOG and OBS. The new establishment will be in charge of producing the International Television and Radio Signals for the Olympic Games, building and operating the International Broadcasting Centre and necessary facilities and equipment at other venues. "The frame agreement establish a new era for the Beijing Olympics." said Verbruggen, also the chairman of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Coordination Commission of the 2008 Beijing Olympics. "It will assure us to provide high quality services in broadcasting of Olympic Games. I hope the BOB will play a key hole in the highly regarded field of the Games with the cooperation of the OBS in the future," he said. IOC President Jacques Rogge, who arrived in Beijing on Sunday morning, BOCOG President Liu Qi and BOCOG Executive President Yuan Weimin were present at the ceremony. Source: Xinhua news agency, Beijing, in English 1206 gmt 31 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** CUBA. Back in July a bunch of us saw Cuban TV one afternoon on ch 5 and also color bars on ch 4. Jesús Pérez in Havana sent a letter with comments on those receptions. He writes: -------------------------------------------------------------------- What you watched on channel 5 that day at 5:59 pm was Telecubanacan from Santa Clara city in the center of the country. That transmitter on ch 5 is very strong. On that frequency of ch 5 they broadcast both Perlavisión from 4 to 5 pm and then TeleCubanacan from 5 to 6 pm and after that the transmitter starts running the Tele Rebelde national network with its central studios in Havana. Perlavisión is in Cienfuegos city but it also uses the Santa Clara city transmitter tower on ch 5 from 4 to 5 pm and also during the same period of time Perlavisión also uses the Matanzas city transmitter tower on ch 13. Then, after that at 5 pm TeleYumuri local station in Matanzas city starts its transmissions on their ch 13 frequency till 6 pm. ||| The color bars that you and other members of the club have been receiving on your TV sets on ch 4 was from the transmitter which is outside Havana City for "Canal Educativo", which is the only station here using color bars for long minutes. ||| Canal Educativo uses the frequencies of ch 4 and 12 for Havana city and Havana county. That station uses UHF frequencies for the rest of the country. Jeff, that's your answer re the color bars (Mike Bugaj, CT, Aug 27, WTFDA via DXLD) Thanks to Jesús for this information. However, I'm still a little confused. First of all, I've seen color bars from the direction of Cuba on channel 4 several times on weekday afternoons; but according to the Cubaweb site, the educational network comes on at noon. Second, I saw educational programs from the direction of Cuba on channel 4 at 1440 CT on April 30th (which would indicate that the educational channel is on at least some afternoons). Third, does the channel 5 in Santa Clara run a Phillips PM5544 TP all day, prior to s/on? (Danny Oglethorpe, Shreveport, LA, ibid.) ** DENMARK. ``Daemp Radioen`` -- see RADIO STAMPS below ** ECUADOR. 4815, R. El Buen Pastor, 30 Aug 1001-1029, Choral NA at tune-in, 1003 LA Pop and instrumental music with live M in Quechua giving opening ``Radio Alli Michic`` ID announcement with mention of "música del sur" and campesina. Then HC campo music with same live M host in Quechua. 1009 program segment with race car and rooster SFX and talk by M and W mixed with campo music. Mention of campesino and "Radio Michic" at 1006. 1014 brief canned Spanish announcement by M with mention of "frecuencia popular", followed by SFX of knocking on a door and rooster crowing repeatedly. 1015 canned Spanish simple ID by M as "En ?? R. El Buen Pastor, 4815 kilohertz onda corta". Another Quechua ID, more campo music and announcements by live M host. Good and still doing well by 1029 tune-out (Dave Valko, PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** EUROPE. Went up to a new remote QTH for a micro-DXpedition. The site is a reclaimed surface mine, so laying out the Beverage was relatively easy. Used 300' laid across the tall grass at 180 degrees. Changed direction to 40 degrees for the Power 41 special NA transmission. PIRATE, 6245v, Power 41, 31 August 0156-0255, Noted a het here (6245.45) while I still had the antenna aimed at South America. Quickly redirected it to 40 degrees and found the signal had drifted up to 6245.76 when I returned at 0159. 0200:50 sign-on with "Axel F Theme" by Harold Faltermeyer, 0203 opening announcements by M announcer. 0204-0207 "Eye of the Tiger" by Survivor. 0207 clear IDs by M over music; "This is Power 41, low power..." and mention of US. 0210 more IDs. During another announcement from 0213 to 0217, caught this "...once again... 17...9...5... number. Power 41. We're broadcasting..." Another song, then another announcement at 0220-0222 with M giving phonetics (address??). 0232-0235 "Bette Davis Eyes" by Kim Carnes. 0235 IDs, mention of meterband, e-mail. 0237-0241 "Africa" by Toto. Then continued with more ID, song announcements and unrecognizable songs. At 0253, announcement again with mention of "write to us", 1 IRC, address, and ID. Weak with horrible ute QRM right on top from 0200 to 0230, and also a lot of QRN. The signal did weaken slightly towards 0300. In clear conditions, free of the QRM and QRN, I think this could've been copied 90% despite weak signal (Dave Valko, DXpedition somewhere in PA?, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** GERMANY [and non]. The Berlin-based home shopping station Kaufradio announces that it is testing DRM on 1485; see the enclosed press release. This is or at least used to be a single frequency network of three transmitters at Berlin-Frohnau, the Schäferberg site (Berlin- Wannsee) and at Rüdersdorf. I guess Kaufradio is put on 1485 permanently for the duration of the IFA fair; however, no such explicit statement is made in the press release. Kaufradio is otherwise carried on the 1.5 GHz DAB bouqet covering Berlin and the surrounding region. This bouqet is at present promoted by carrying the individual programs one after another in a rota system on 104.1, an FM frequency otherwise reserved for special event stations. Two years ago a special IFA program was carried on 104.1; this year the 97.2 frequency will be used for this purpose, not to speak about DAB: The IFA-Radio program is sponsored by the DAB marketing initiative. Re. 693: Recent observations indicate that the audio (reported as either Deutschlandradio Berlin or pop music nonstop) is in the clear, but apparently there are two additional, indeed encrypted data streams (Kai Ludwig, Germany, Aug 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: FUNKAUSSTELLUNG: KAUFRADIO TESTET DIGITALE MITTELWELLE Berlin (ots) - Der neue Shopping-Radiosender Kaufradio testet seit heute die Verbreitung über die digitale Mittelwelle (DRM). DRM steht für Digital Radio Mondiale und ist ein Verfahren, das es erlaubt, in den derzeitigen AM-Bereichen (Kurz-, Mittel- und Langwelle) digital zu senden. Die dabei erreichte Klangqualität ist um einiges besser als die des bisherigen Mittelwellen-Radios und wird allgemein als UKW-ähnlich bezeichnet. Ausgestrahlt wird das deutschlandweit neue Verbraucher- und Serviceradio in Berlin über Mittelwelle 1485 kHz. "Wir sind stolz, als einer der wenigen privaten Sender neben den großen Stationen wie DeutschlandRadio und Deutsche Welle, die neue Technologie testen zu können", sagt Kaufradio-Geschäftsführer Oliver Dunk. Mit DRM sei weltweit ein Sendeverfahren verabschiedet worden, das die Kurz-, Mittel- und Langwelle wieder attraktiver mache. Daher ist Dunk überzeugt, dass es bald eine Renaissance der Mittelwelle geben wird: "Bald haben wir Empfänger, die DAB-(Digital Radio) und DRM-Empfang ermöglichen. Das Radio wird digital." Im Jahr 2005 wird es DRM-fähige Geräte zu günstigen Konditionen im Handel geben. Das prophezeit der kaufradio-Chef. Der Shoppingsender plant perspektivisch sein Programm neben DAB auch über die digitale Mittelwelle zu verbreiten. Kaufradio ist der erste Hörfunkshoppingsender in Deutschland. Er wird seit dem 20. August 2003 in Berlin im Digital Radio (DAB) und zeitweise auf UKW 104,1 gesendet. ots Originaltext: Kaufradio Digitale Pressemappe: http://presseportal.de/story.htx?firmaid=52376 Für Rückfragen, Interviewwünsche und Fotos: kaufradio - der neue digitale sender c/o PART OF SUCCESS, Sebastian C. Strenger, Kleine Hamburger Straße 16, 10 117 Berlin Tel.: +49 (0)30 - 28 44 55 55 Fax: +49 (0)30 - 28 44 55 44 Mail: strenger@part-of-success.de http://www.kaufradio.de (via Kai Ludwig, DXLD) I'd be interested to know if any UK listeners have noticed QRM in recent evenings on 693 kHz, where a transmitter in Berlin is currently testing DRM in readiness for the IFA exhibition. Yesterday evening the BBC 5 Live signal in Naarden, about 20 km SE of Amsterdam, was almost wiped out in the late evening by what I presume was a DRM test. Fortunately I do not depend on 693 as I can get the station FTA [?] on satellite, but I'm curious to know how far the DRM signal is getting, and if it noticeably degrades the BBC signal in the UK. I know there will be some wry smiles amongst some of you :-) (Andy Sennitt, Holland, Radio Netherlands, MWC NL Aug 27) Last night I noticed severe digital interference on BBC R5 on 693 kHz around midnight. It sounded like strong jamming in the background. Apparently this was some sort of DRM test from the Funkaustellung exhibition in Germany. Here in the Reading area the signal strength on 693 and 909 kHz is much the same, but I always prefer to listen on 693 kHz because Droitwich has far better audio (6 kHz bandwith) compared to muffled 909 kHz from Brookmans Park (4.5 kHz bandwidth). Would be interested to know if anyone else in the 693 kHz coverage area is having problems with this DRM noise at night. Hopefully it will stop by 3rd September when the Funkaustellung ends. I would encourage anyone hearing it to complain to reception@bbc.co.uk --- hopefully they if they get enough reports they will be able to protest to the German authorities about it. The level of interference here last night was totally unacceptable (Dave Kenny, UK, BDXC-UK Aug 30) Re: DRM interference on BBC R5 last night. The 692/693 kHz channel used once by GDR stations at Wachenbrunn and later in new ITU plan from 1978 at Berlin Uhlenhorst, both with 250 kW of power. In Continental Europe both GDR transmissions suffered always also from the British co-channel signals, in past 44 (f o r t y four) years. After the collapse of the GDR regime, 693 kHz usage by Germany ceased approximately eight years ago. So the BBC listeners in Western Europe profit by the silenced German transmitter at Berlin (ex-Uhlenhorst), now located at Zehlendorf north of Berlin since that date. 693 kHz at Zehlendorf was used by [now bankrupt] MEGARadio for a short period of few months only during 2002 (wb Aug 30) When the GDR was on 692/693 it was not really audible in the UK under the BBC stations; maybe they used a directional transmitter then? The interference only seemed to start when Mega Radio launched. However this DRM noise is much worse than Mega Radio; it`s just like having jammer on the frequency continuously. I live within the coverage area of BBCR5 on 693 and my reception is being totally ruined by the DRM noise! If DRM becomes widespread I really fear, having heard 693 kHz, that it`s going to wreck MW and SW DXing. Very bad news (Dave Kenny, UK, BDXC-UK Aug 30) The dreaded DRM noise from Germany is audible again tonight (Saturday) on 693 kHz. I noticed it from tune-in at 10.50 pm. Once more it is totally ruining reception of BBC R5 here in Reading - it sounds just like having an old fashioned jammer in the background. I've emailed BBC Reception Advice to report the problem and would encourage others to - their address is reception@bbc.co.uk (Dave Kenny, UK, BDXC-UK Aug 30) 693 kHz - I hear RAI2 Milano Italy only here in Stuttgart, this morning and on daytime. Will check channel tonight towards U.K. and Berlin (wb, Aug 31) (all via Wolfgang Büschel, DXLD) De IFA Exhibition in Berlin loopt tot 3 september en heeft voor de aardigheid op 693 khz een DRM station in de lucht gebracht dat 's- avonds de BBC in Engeland moeilijk hoorbaar maakt (Max van Arnhem, Aug 30, BDXC via DXLD) More under DRM below ** GERMANY. Another page with pictures of transmitter sites in eastern Germany: http://home.snafu.de/macs/radio/sender.htm To pick out the AM's: http://home.snafu.de/macs/radio/britz.htm Berlin-Britz. First and seventh picture: Cross dipole for vertical incidence radiation, in the past used for 990 during nighttime. http://home.snafu.de/macs/radio/stallp.htm Berlin Stallupöner Allee. http://home.snafu.de/macs/radio/orburg.htm Zehlendorf. First picture: Main mast and the three masts of the trideco antenna in one shot. http://home.snafu.de/macs/radio/leipzig.htm Wiederau near Leipzig. First and second picture: Carrier of UHF antennas to the left, mast to the right TV/FM carrier and also self-radiating antenna for mediumwave. Pictures # 8, 9 and 10: Trideco antenna now used for 783 with noticeably poorer performance than the pipe mast (ground-/skywave congestion). Picture # 11: 51 metres tall mediumwave mast, a standard design found on most mediumwave sites in the former GDR for powers up to 20 kW. # 12: Former trideco antenna with the actual antenna wires obviously pulled down (Kai Ludwig, Germany, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HONDURAS. 3340, R. Misiones Internacional [sic] (presumed), 31 Aug 0046-0147, Alternating spiritual religious talk by W in Spanish and M in English(!!), similar format to KJES!!! Ended at 0101. Then, canned deep-voiced M over music, sometimes accompanied by W announcer until 0105. 0105-0147 nonstop soft romantic or religious songs. Finally same live W in Spanish again at 0147 with mentions of Palabra. No IDs heard. Fairly good signal but the QRN was too high. Have been hearing this regularly lately but just can't ID (Dave Valko, Dxpedition somewhere in PA? -- see EUROPE, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) 3340, Radio Misiones, 0115-0145 with "Radio Misiones" ID by OM, religious music but no ments de Honduras. Per Malm logs (Bob Wilkner, FL, Aug 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDONESIA. 3516.7 (RSPK-Ngada) Aug 24 1341-1400* 24231-23231 Indonesian?, Music and talk by woman, 1359 announce by woman. 1400 s/off (Kouji Hashimoto, Yamanashi, JAPAN, Japan Premium via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL WATERS. Subject: World Mission Radio Dear Friends: Is there someone in your ministry who was connected with World Mission Radio which broadcast via Radio Caroline about 1988? Thank you (Bill Harms, USA, Aug 16 to Stg. Johan Maasbach Wereldzending via DXLD) Dear Bill, Please, let me know why you want this information. David Maasbach, Stg. Johan Maasbach Wereldzending/ Johan Maasbach World Mission Foundation Apeldoornselaan 2, 2573 LM Den Haag, HOLLAND tel. +31-(0)70-3635929 fax +31-(0)70-3107111 http://www.jmwz.com e-mail: information@jmwz.com Global Prayer Network: http://www.gpnetwork.com Hello David: When I lived in Germany in the late 1980's I heard a radio station that I believe was World Mission Radio, and I received a QSL card from the station. Unfortunately, the information on the card did not indicate the name of the station. You can see a copy of the card at http://home.comcast.net/~billqsl/w_mission_radio.html and http://home.comcast.net/~billqsl/WMR_via_R_Caroline-f.jpg I see that you have the same address and phone number as what is on the card. So it looks like there is a connection. I would like very much receiving an official confirmation that this card actually came from your office because the name of your mission does not appear on the card. Thank you. (Bill Harms) Dear Bill, I am sorry that I cannot confirm your question! The police force from England, France & Holland have taken Radio Caroline on WMR out of the air in the late 80. It is many years ago that this happen and that is what I remmember (David Maasbach, Stg. Johan Maasbach Wereldzending / Johan Maasbach World Mission Foundation, Aug 29 to Harms via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL WATERS [and non]. NEW HURRICANE LIST IS UP - SEEKING ADDITIONS/CORRECTIONS --- Utility World (Hugh Stegman) The Utility World Hurricane Frequency List has been revised for 2003. There are a lot of minor changes. The list is taken seriously, and additions/corrections are always sought. More than one emergency manager has used this list or its several variations, so accuracy is essential. I would advise that people replace older copies, to eliminate some very old misinformation that still propagates around the net, such as Miami Monitor still being on HF. (Hasn't been in many years.) As always, the list lives at http://www.ominous-valve.com/hurricne.txt [correct!] (Hugh Stegman, WUN, Aug 29 via F. W. Ripken, BDXC via DXLD) ** ISRAEL. As of September 1, the 1700 UT broadcast will be extended to 15 minutes. (1700-1715 instead of 1700-1705). That's 1-1:15 PM Eastern [daylight time]. http://bet.iba.org.il/?lang=23 Israel radio announcement Israel radio announced Sunday that from Monday, September 1, the English news will be broadcast from 8 to 8:15 p.m. [Israel Time] 31.08.2003 14:11 (Doni Rosenzweig, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** KOREA NORTH. 6072.34, R. Pyongyang, A het long before 1100 30 Aug, then 1101 M announcer briefly followed by the R. Pyongyang IS. Fairly strong but weak modulation and QRM from 6070 (Dave Valko, PA, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH [non]. NORTH KOREA WANTS SOUTH KOREA TO DROP RADIO PROGRAM THAT IT VIEWS AS SUBVERSIVE. . . http://famulus.msnbc.com/FamulusIntl/ap08-28-225546.asp?reg=PACRIM (AP via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) Viz.: RADIO LIBERTY KEEPS ON AFTER SALVATION CLOSURE By SOO-JEONG LEE, Associated Press Writer SEOUL, South Korea (AP) -- Every day, a South Korean public radio program broadcasts news, hit pop songs, talk shows and lectures over its northern border -- material that North Korea says it can't tolerate any longer. KBS's Radio Liberty program was created in 1948 to provide Koreans living in Russia, China, and North Korea with news of Korea. It used to contain condemnations of North Korea. Now it features interviews with North Korean defectors describing their new lives in South Korea, and provides information such as the number of computers in the two Koreas. Many South Koreans are unaware of the program. But for decades, North Korea has considered it a propaganda tool aimed at destabilizing the isolated communist state. Last month, North Korea halted its own three-decade-old anti-South propaganda radio, the Voice of National Salvation, and demanded that South Korea reciprocate by nixing the KBS program. KBS said it would not comply. "Since our program is one of the few means of providing truth to North Koreans, we have no intentions of halting our programs," Yoo Woon-sang, chief producer at KBS's radio overseas service department, said this week. "North Korea's hidden intentions seem to be to prevent outside information from coming into its country," said Koh Yu-hwan, a North Korea expert in Seoul. The pressure to end the South Korean broadcasts came as North Korea held talks this week with the United States, South Korea, China, Russia and Japan to discuss its nuclear program. A U.S. government official said the North threatened to carry out a nuclear test. North Korea tolerates no independent news media and no public Internet access. Control of information buttresses Pyongyang's totalitarian rule over its 22 million people. In past weeks, North Korea has accused Washington of waging "psychological warfare" by sending transistor radios into its territory and boosting airtime of the Washington-based Radio Free Asia and the Voice of America. In North Korea, tuning into private radio broadcasts is banned. North Koreans in possession of private radios must report to authorities, who mechanically alter them to catch only local stations. Those caught listening to outside radio broadcasts can be sent to prison, according to North Korean defectors. Nonetheless, the number of North Koreans listening to outside broadcasts is rising with the help of radios smuggled from China, they say. People also remove the frequency jammers [sic] on their state- issued radios. "For many North Koreans, South Korean broadcasts make more sense than the local ones, and by listening to them, they spot inconsistencies in their regime," said Lee Joo-il, a 38-year-old defector who arrived in Seoul in 2000. For decades, the two Koreas waged fierce propaganda battles. The sides used balloons to scatter leaflets on each other's territories. Loudspeakers traded slander across the 2.5-mile-wide Demilitarized Zone separating the two countries. Radio stations infiltrated each other's populaces with political programs. They featured interviews of defectors, who typically described the countries they left behind as "hell" and how they were enjoying a new life in a "paradise." In both Koreas, it was illegal to listen to those broadcasts. Following a historic 2000 inter-Korean summit, such propaganda subsided. In July, the two sides even agreed to consider ending "slanderous broadcasts." North Korea's state-run media, which can be monitored in South Korea, still issues saber-rattling remarks against the United States and is full of praises of its leader Kim Jong Il, although its anti-South Korean slander has dwindled with progress in reconciliation (AP via Mike Cooper, Aug 29, DXLD) ** KOREA SOUTH. Hi Glenn, The new station is called Arirang FM (as it is run by Arirang TV), but the Web site at http://www.arirang.co.kr/english/index.asp does not mention what the frequency is :-( 73, (Andy Sennitt, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NEW ZEALAND. Here is a broadcast you do not seem to have in your listings. It is the official broadcast (Monthly) of the New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters http://www.nzart.org.nz/nzart/Update/Broadcast/ (Chris Wright, New Zealand, Aug 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: The NZART Official broadcast is made on the last Sunday of each month, except December when it is made on the Sunday before Christmas. The broadcast is made on 3900 kHz, and on the National System and local VHF repeaters. The broadcast is made at 2000 hours NZT, with a repeat at 2100 hours NZT. [Sun 0800 and 0900 UT currently; 0700 and 0800 during DST] Members and Branches are welcome to submit material to ZL2BHF, c/o NZART Headquarters, P O Box 40-525, Upper Hutt, for inclusion in the Broadcast. There is also a special Official Conference Broadcast made on the Sunday of the New Zealand observance of Queens Birthday weekend at 2000 hours NZT. The next Official Broadcast will be on Sunday the 31st of August 2003. Recent Official broadcasts are available here in MP3 format. Contact Jim Meachen if you have any comments: July 2003 OB in MP3 format 2.8Mbytes June 2003 OB in MP3 format 3.1Mbytes Conference 2003 OB in MP3 format 2.2Mbytes (via Chris Wright, DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. Radio New Zealand Int`l was not audible here Friday night (0630 8/30), and the RNZI Web site confirms that their SW transmitter is off the air due to a technical fault. Might be back on 0800 Sunday, 8/31 (Chuck Albertson, Seattle, WA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RNZI Has A Major Transmitter Fault. RNZI has been off air since at least yesterday [Aug 30th]. This message is on the website http://www.rnzi.com RNZI short-wave transmitter is off the air with a serious fault - we regret this interruption to our Pacific Service. We expect normal service to resume on Sunday at 0800 UT (Barry Aug 31) (later) ... I have just arrived at home from work at 1000 UT after recording yet another symphony concert, and I checked for RNZI on 9885 kHz. I heard nothing! (1008 UT, Barry Hartley, New Zealand, BC-DX Aug 31 via Wolfgang Büschel, DXLD) My morning check showed RNZ off air this a.m. at 0900. No het found so believe to be off air at this time (Bob Montgomery, swprograms via DXLD) FWIW, I couldn't hear them last night either, Bob. I monitored 17675 starting at around 2330 just to see when fade-in would commence. I was hearing them, but not well, around 0100-0200 or so (only an S3 signal with lots of noise). Sometime after that during the early part of the next hour, I lost them completely. To be honest, the signal had been so weak that it was hard to tell if the transmitter had gone off or the noise level on 16m just overwhelmed the signal. After reading your report, however, I now suspect it was the former. RNZI has had what I would call a higher than comfortable number of transmitter drop outs over the last few months (John Figliozzi, NY, Aug 30, swprograms via DXLD) Noted still off air last nite on 17675 and also this a.m. on 9885. Wondering if they have adopted new freq not listed yet. Can't seem to find them (Bob Montgomery, PA, Aug 31, ibid.) ** NIGERIA. VON used 17800 many years ago when they first got their high-powered transmitters. Also pays to check 9690, which seems to be in use periodically (Craig Seager, ARDXC via DXLD) Changed from 15120 to 17800 kHz on August 27/28th. Is an old VON frequency, also used by the station about 20 to 25 years ago. In 1983 used 7255 9690 11770 15120 and 17800 kHz. All these old units end rot in rust a decade ago. VON set up very new SW transmitter units few months ago on 15120 and 11770 kHz, and from July also on 9690 kHz. 73 (Wolfgang Bueschel, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** PAKISTAN: MORE THAN 30 PRIVATE RADIO, TV CHANNELS LICENSED | Text of report by Associated Press of Pakistan (APP) news agency Islamabad, 29 August: Minister for Information and Broadcasting Shaykh Rashid Ahmed on Friday [29 August] informed the National Assembly that PEMRA [Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority] has granted 26 licences to private Pakistani companies for FM radio stations and two TV channels for telecasting purely educational programmes while three satellite TV stations, ARY Digital, Indus Vision and AVT Prime, have been granted permission to operate from Pakistan. He was responding to a question of Mohammad Hanif Abbasi about the number of local radio and television channels functioning in private sector. The minister said two licences for FM radio stations located at Islamabad and Sialkot have been issued to the university for educational purposes only. Out of these, two radio stations have started test transmission. He said during the first phase, 26 licences including five in Karachi, three each in Islamabad/Rawalpindi and Lahore, one each in Peshawar, Multan, Vehari, Sukkur, Sarai Naurang, Gujrat, Sialkot, Abbottabad, Hub Chowki, Muridke, Changla Gali, Gwadar, Bahawalpur have been issued for FM radio broadcast. To another question about operating of more private radio and TV channels, Shaykh Rashid said PEMRA has finalized the process of granting licences for FM radio stations in cities other than those included in the first phase. He said the second phase would be completed within the next one and a half months. Details would be available after the process mandated by PEMRA Ordinance is completed, he added. To another question about any recruitment in PTV and Radio during the present regime, the minister said no recruitment has been made in the Pakistan Television Corporation and Pakistan Broadcasting Corporation and Shalimar Television Network during the present regime. However, PTV hires the services of resource persons on a consolidated payment basis in different areas of its operations to fill the professional gaps resulting from no recruitment for so many years. Source: Associated Press of Pakistan news agency, Islamabad, in English 1243 gmt 30 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) CYBER WING TO COUNTER PROPAGANDA, NA TOLD PEMRA grants 26 licences for FM Radio, 5 private TV channels PBC to resume Balochi bulletins from Islamabad soon ISLAMABAD: Information Minister Sheikh Rashid Ahmed has said that the Information Ministry has established a cyber wing which not only projects Pakistan's point of view and policies on its website but also takes measures to counter propaganda against Pakistan... http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_30-8-2003_pg7_27 (Daily Times via Jill Dybka, TN, DXLD) ** PERU. ACERCA DE RADIO VIRGEN DEL CARMEN, HUANCAVELICA El colega peruano Rubén Contreras Espinoza me cuenta que Radio Virgen del Carmen está operando desde Huancavelica por su frecuencia habitual de 4886 kHz pero en forma restringida. Ellos transmiten por la mañana desde las 1100 UT hasta las 1500 y, los fines de semana, desde las 1100 a 1400. Estos son los programas que irradia: 1100-1200 un programa de agricultura 1200-1230 La hora Cultural Educativa 1230-1300 La Universidad en el Aire, programa de la Universidad de Huancavelica. Actualmente la emisora está asociada a Radio Católica Mundial. La programación de la emisora es netamente religiosa (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentina, Aug 31, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** ROMANIA. Bonjour à tous, Radio Roumanie Internationale et Raymond Aupetit nous ont fait parvenir ceci: "JOURNEE DE L'AUDITEUR 2003 Chers amis, le dimanche 2 novembre, nous vous invitons à fêter ensemble LA JOURNEE DE L'AUDITEUR SUR RRI. V 1 - Nos amis du monde entier se sont certainement déjà habitués à célébrer aux côtés des journalistes de RRI la Journée de la Radio roumaine par un programme spécial, réalisé par la contribution directe de ceux qui, tout le reste de l'année, sont fidèles à nos ondes. V 2 - Cette année, notre Journée s'annonce spéciale, parce que le 1er novembre, la Radio roumaine fête ses 75 ans. V 1 - Alors, il serait gentil de faire un petit cadeau à cette vieille dame. V 2 - Elle ne veut pas de produits de jouvence, mais plutôt un cadeau symbolique qui porte votre signature! Nous vous invitons donc à nous communiquer votre opinion sur le rôle que la radio joue aujourd'hui dans "la société de l'information", aux côtés d'Internet, des offres multimédia, de la télévision transfrontalière, de l'immense nombre de périodiques à la portée de tous. V 1 - Selon vous, comment les radios publiques internationales peuvent-elles s'acquitter de la mission d'informer un auditoire extrêmement divers et dispersé, mais qui souhaite une information directement à la source sur tout ce qui doit marquer la destinée contemporaine de l'humanité? V 2 - Et nous, en tant que journalistes à RRI, que pouvons-nous faire à l'avenir pour mieux répondre à vos attentes? V 1 - Nous attendons avec intérêt vos pensées sur le sujet proposé, à l'adresse de RRI, 60 - 64 rue du Gl. Berthelot, BP 111, secteur 1, Bucarest, avant le 15 octobre prochain, date de la poste. Vous pouvez également nous écrire par fax, au n +40.21.223.26.13, ou par courriel: fran@rri.ro V 2 - Ceux qui souhaitent intervenir sur nos ondes avec leur voix dans nos programmes spéciaux consacrés à la Journée de l'Auditeur sont priés d'expédier leur contribution enregistrée sur cassette audio ou de nous faire connaître, dans un délai raisonnable, leur numéro de téléphone, ainsi que le jour et l'heure quand ils sont disponibles pour l'enregistrement. V 1 - Nous vous attendons tous, chers amis, à la "table ronde" du 2 novembre, sur le thème "Le rôle de la Radio publique dans la société de l'information", l'échange d'opinions organisé par RRI pour la Journée de l'Auditeur." En ce qui me concerne, quelques questions trouvent chez moi quelques résonnances (comme une antenne). Donc, une cassette audio sera enregistrée. Bonne Fête R.R.I. Daniel Wantz Union des Ecouteurs Français --- Radiodiffusions, utilitaires, radio- écouteurs, radioamateurs, techniques... Courriel: tsfinfo@magic.fr Web: http://www.radiocom.org U.E.F.: B.P.31, 92242 MALAKOFF Cedex, FRANCE (via Bill Westenhaver, QC, DXLD) V2 and V1 want to say?? ** SAUDI ARABIA [non]. Sounds like Al-Islah are still on shortwave; 15705 jammed, but a bit of weak talk heard in LSB. Can anyone confirm? (Hans Johnson, WY, Aug 30, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) No time Yes. S/off at 2000. Jammer still there alone at 2010. 73, (Mauno Ritola, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) CLANDESTINE (NORWAY TO SAUDI ARABIA). 15705, R. Al-Islah (presumed), 1800-2000*, sign-on with March-like songs. M announcer in language at 1806 but just too weak. Back to instrumental music at 1807. Came back at 1930 and noted a bit stronger with M announcer host and speech excerpts. M vocal singing at 1954. Men announcers then, but cut off in mid-sentence at 2000:33. Weak signal with quick QSB. Heavily jammed but still getting through with some audio (Dave Valko, Dunlo PA, 30 August, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** SOMALIA. Somalia Media Page --- Hello Mr. Glenn Hauser, Your media profile for Somalia was very well done. But there were some omissions of Puntland regional media. Puntland Newspapers Yamayska-- Galkacyo based private weekly newspaper. http://www.yamayska.com Puntland Post-- Bosaso based private newspaper. I'm not sure if it just internet based or printed as well in Puntland. http://www.puntlandpost.com Yool-- Bosaso based private newspaper. Sooyal-- Bosaso based private newspaper. War Ogaal-- Weekly Puntland based private newsaper. For reference for the last three newspapers see: http://www.freemedia.at/wpfr/Africa/somalia.htm ***** Sahan-- Private newspaper in Puntland Bossaso Bureau at: Tel # 6224 or 826111. Listed in a previous BBC Country profile: http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/world/africa/country_profiles/newsid_1072000/1072592.stm/ Cut and paste entire link to web browser. ***** Television/Radio Section Somali Broadcasting Corporation (SBC)--Private TV broadcaster based in Bosaso (Bari). Substation in Garowe(Nugal) and Qardo(Bari), all in Puntland. SBC Radio-- Private Puntland based FM Station. Both were shut down by the Puntland government in May 2002 but were reopened in May 2003. Here is the news link from the UN IRIN News report: http://www.irinnews.org/report.asp?ReportID=34022&SelectRegion=Horn_of_Africa&SelectCountry=SOMALIA Cut and paste entire link to web browser. ***** Radio Midnimo-- (Bosaso) based FM station. Reference: http://www.africaonline.com/site/Articles/1,3,43386.jsp Radio Galkacyo was included but the link wasn't. Please include: http://www.radiogalkayo.com ****** Puntland maps: http://www.radiogalkayo.com/banner/puntlandmap.php http://iquebec.ifrance.com/rolf1/info/nif/map008.gif Keep up the good work! Sincerely, (John Lewis, Aug 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Tnx, but my only `good work` in this case is re-publishing the work of Chris Greenway, BBC Monitoring, presumably what you refer to, and I wish people would cite issue numbers, back in DXLD 3-100. Please pay attention to the credit lines and do not try to attribute to me the work of others (gh) ** SOUTH AFRICA. MUSIC ``TORTURE'' CLAIMS HALT S AFRICAN TREASON TRIAL JOHANNESBURG, South Africa (Reuters) - The stop-start treason trial of 22 white South African right-wingers was again halted Monday, this time over defense claims that prison authorities were "torturing" their clients with loud popular music. Last week, 13 of the defendants, charged with seeking to overthrow South Africa's black-led government, complained loud "black" music piped over prison loudspeakers was driving them crazy. Judge Eben Jordaan postponed the trial Monday for one day to give defense counsel Piet Pistorius time to ready an application forcing prison management to stop playing Metro FM radio, which broadcasts a mixture of urban contemporary music. Pistorius said prison authorities had ignored Jordaan's earlier request to management to turn off the music. The group, dubbed the Boeremag or Afrikaner force, is charged with orchestrating a campaign of bomb attacks and the planned assassination of former President Nelson Mandela. Pistorius said the music was having a "drastic psychological effect" on his clients, not only hampering trial preparations but also infringing on their human rights, the South African Press Association reported. In a letter to prison management, the men complained that the music was being "forced upon them" 15 hours a day, "at horrendous noise levels," SAPA said. Pistorius also made further applications for a delay over accusations the prosecution had intercepted privileged defense information. Proceedings in South Africa's first post-apartheid treason trial were due to start in mid-May, but it has been bogged down by wrangling over procedural details that look likely to postpone the calling of the first witness for several weeks (REUTERS Aug 26 via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** SRI LANKA. THE FIRST FOOTPRINT ON THE BEACH WAS MINE After years of turmoil, Trincomalee in north-east Sri Lanka is opening up to tourism again. Go now and you'll have its beaches to yourself, says Jane Knight, Saturday August 30 2003 The Guardian http://observer.guardian.co.uk/travel/story/0,6903,1032493,00.html But did they mention the Deutsche Welle? Of course not! 73- (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** TAIWAN. RTI Global Exchange Mailbag Time bridges the gap between you and CBS. Each week we carefully select letters from our friends worldwide, read them on the air, play song requests and answer questions. RTI Global Exchange Every month, we pose a new question to listeners as part of our Global Exchange segment. If we choose your letter to read on the air, you will receive a souvenir and your answer may be shared in Taipeiwave. September What is the most unforgettable thing someone has ever said to you? Send entries to natalie@cbs.org.tw or to PO Box 24-38/ Taipei, Taiwan (RTI website via Swopan Chakroborty, Kolkata, India, DXLD) ** TIBET. CHINA (Tibet). 9490, China Tibet People's Broadcast Co. (presumed) 1104-1114 Aug 31. Talk by YL in English, until music at 1112 with voice-overs by OM and YL. At 1114 the program changed to Chinese. SINPO 23332 (George Maroti, NY, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** TIBET [non]. V. of Tibet today Aug 31, 1215-1300 UT heard on 15660 kHz, but couldn't trace any second channel of the broadcaster; 21560 was empty. Lousy conditions, maybe VOT moved back from 21 MHz band to 15 MHz (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** UGANDA. UGANDA REOPENS CHURCH-OWNED RADIO STATION Last Update: Sunday, August 31, 2003. 6:01am (AEST) http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/s935574.htm The Ugandan Government says it has unconditionally reopened a church-owned radio station it shut down in the north-east of the country last June after accusing it of abetting a rebellion in the region. "We reopened Radio Veritas on Saturday and asked the management to take up their obligation of informing the public," Information Minister Nsaba Butulo said, who later used the same Roman Catholic radio station to address the public in the Teso region. "We have, however, emphasised to them and they accepted that this should not be done at the expense of security and the security of our forces," Mr Butulo said. The head of the radio, Roman Catholic Father Ethanasius Mubiru, confirmed the announcement, saying Butulo and other government officials went to the station on Saturday morning and announced it was being reopened on the orders President Yoweri Museveni. "We immediately returned on air and we have been broadcasting since 10:00 am on Saturday," Mr Mubiru said. Ugandan police stormed the studios of Radio Kyoga Veritas FM on June 22 and stopped broadcasts, after accusing it of airing news about rebel incursions, instilling fear and abetting subversion. One of the programs featured interviews with people who had been abducted and released by Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) rebels. "We asked them whether they were mistreated while in captivity, and they said no, interviews government officials said was promoting rebels," Mr Mubiru said after the radio was ordered closed. The radio, owned by Soroti Catholic Diocese's Integrated Development Organisation (SOCADIDO), features development and pastoral programs and had reported on the spate of attacks by the LRA in the north-east districts of Katakwi, Kaberamaido and Soroti. In one of the attacks in the region, the LRA raided a girls school where they kidnapped more than 100 schoolgirls, over a dozen of whom are still missing and believed to be in rebel hands. The LRA rose up against the Ugandan Government in 1988, ostensibly to replace it with a regime based on the biblical Ten Commandments, but it is infamous for the cruelty of its campaign, marked by abductions and brutal killings of civilians. The rebel campaign has displaced more than 800,000 people in the north and north-east Uganda, forcing them to live in squalid camps dotting the entire region. -- AFP (via Mike Terry, DXLD) FM, WTFK? Not SW ** UKRAINE. Glenn, Following is from Alexander Egorov of RUI. "No one frequency is absolutely available to North America from Europe on 9 or 7 MHz for time period 2300-0400. For B03 schedule I plan use 5905 kHz." 73, (Kraig Krist, VA, Aug 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. WELCOME TO THE FESTIVAL OF BBC BAITING Rod Liddle, Wednesday August 27, 2003, The Guardian Lordy, but you have to feel sorry for the inhabitants of Edinburgh. Having scarcely ridded themselves of a prolonged infestation of hilariously wacky Irish comedians, last weekend the skies above Holyrood Castle suddenly opened and a vast sack of London media monkeys and moppets was deposited upon the city, thousands of them, jabbering endlessly, hugging and petting each other and, late at night, behind the George Hotel, in George Street, having swallowed 12 spritzers apiece, vomiting copiously into their free Sky TV canvas goody bags. "When I hear the words culture supplement, I reach for my revolver," the locals muttered darkly to themselves as they watched Tamsin and Sara and Charlotte and Ben empty the ATMs and climb, still jabbering, into reluctant taxis to travel the 85 yards from their hotels to the conference centre for the morning's keynote session: "TV - is it vacuous shite, or what?" at the Edinburgh international television festival. . . http://www.guardian.co.uk/print/0,3858,4741049-103680,00.html (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U K. BBC TO LAUNCH ON-LINE ARCHIVE OF SHOWS By DAVID AKIN, Friday, Aug 29, 2003 The British Broadcasting Corp. plans to make much of its vast television and radio library, including portions of shows such as Dr. Who and Monty Python's Flying Circus, available for free on the Internet. It's an initiative that the BBC hopes will encourage other public broadcasters to do the same. The CBC, Canada's public broadcaster, already has a section on its Web site that contains clips from historically significant radio and television broadcasts... http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPPrint/LAC/20030829/BBC29/TPEntertainment/ (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) Thought you'd like to see this explainer on how the BBC could digitize and post its archives online. 73- Bill Westenhaver TAPED AT THE BBC --- CAN THE BEEB PUT ITS ENTIRE ARCHIVE ON THE WEB? webhead By Paul Boutin Posted Tuesday, August 26, 2003, at 4:24 PM PT For those of us still debating whether to shell out the 40-odd bucks for Fawlty Towers: The Complete Collection on DVD, BBC Director- General Greg Dyke may have settled the matter this weekend. At the end of his speech to an annual TV industry conference in Edinburgh, Scotland, Dyke announced that the Beeb plans to put its enormous TV and radio archives online and to allow anyone to download them --- free --- for non-commercial use. "Under a simple licensing system, we will allow users to adapt BBC content for their own use," Dyke said. "We are calling this the BBC Creative Archive." Giving away the BBC's content online is an eye-popping proposal, in part because it's such an ambitious project. The BBC produces eight TV channels and 10 radio networks, and it broadcasts the news in 43 languages worldwide. It's been doing television since 1936, and radio since 1922. How much of the Beeb's voluminous output could it really put online? Dyke and the BBC press office have refused to give out further details, but Beeb staffers had already discussed the project with two of the Net's leading big brains, Stanford law professor Lawrence Lessig and Internet Archive founder Brewster Kahle. Lessig chairs the Creative Commons project, which has drafted a set of free license agreements for people who want to give away their writing, art, or other works online without having their intellectual property claimed and resold by someone else. In both technical and legal terms, Kahle and Lessig agree: It would be easy for the BBC to put its future programming online, but tougher to pull old tapes from the vault. Kahle's napkin math on the project goes like this: DVD-quality video requires 3 megabits to 5 megabits of data per second. Over a year, that works out to about 10,000 gigabytes of disk space to store the ouput of one BBC channel, not including reruns and off-air time. That sounds like a lot --- 10 terabytes --- but it's not uncommon for a single array of disks in a corporate server room to hold hundreds of terabytes at the ready for instant access. Kahle's estimate, based on his 9/11 Television Archive project, is that a rack of low-cost Linux machines could store and serve one channel-year of television, plus a backup copy, on less than $50,000 worth of disks at today's prices. By the time the BBC gets rolling, you might as well cut that number in half: Disk prices have been falling even faster than CPU speeds are rising, halving every nine months by some estimates. If that rate continues, in three years, a year's worth of BBC One would fit on less than $4,000 of disk space. Serving those bits to Web surfers worldwide could be done by expanding the Beeb's existing deal with Akamai, which operates a global network of high-speed Web servers. (MSNBC, which served 85 million video clips during the Iraq war, is another Akamai customer.) With today's production software, digitizing the Beeb's shows to disk as they air or uploading a copy of each segment separately as it's produced would be easy. But what about the old shows? They can be digitized en masse from tape at an in-house cost of about $15 per hour of material, Kahle estimates. That adds up to around $100,000 per channel per archived year, which suggests it may be better to cherry- pick the best of the Beeb rather than try to upload the whole thing. The real roadblock to putting the old shows online isn't technical. It's legal. The Creative Archive's license could allow unlimited viewing, editing, and reuse of the digitized BBC programs, which are funded by an annual TV fee (don't call it a tax unless you're ready for a pub brawl) on UK viewers. The archive's license would contain specific language to prohibit resale or any use the Beeb sees as an attempt to cash in on Britain's public property. Here's one of the many thorny questions the project will raise: If Google crawls and indexes the whole thing, does that count? Whatever the new license's terms, though, it can't just be applied retroactively to existing material. As record companies and book publishers have already learned, the technical work of digitizing and distributing old works is far easier than resolving legal agreements that were crafted in the analog era. Until BBC lawyers go through the exhaustive work of clearing the rights to redistribute the old shows online, we won't know if the Creative Archive will include John Cleese classics or just old News 24 clips. Paul Boutin is a Silicon Valley writer who spent 15 years as a software engineer and manager (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** U K. The BBC's Annual Report has just been published and it seems they should spend more on UK radio!! SATURDAY 30th August 2003 TV BBC One - £859m BBC Two - £367m Radio Radio 1 - £17m Radio 2 - £21m Radio 3 - £30m Radio 4 - £65m Radio 5 - £54m BBCi on the internet - £72m On-air trails & Navigation - £26m http://www.bbc.co.uk/info/report2003/ With regard to the World Service (funded differently): "This division runs 43 language services financed directly by the UK Government, BBC Monitoring and the commercial television channel BBC World. The full BBC World Service & Global News review is in PDF format. Key points include: BBC World Service celebrated its 70th anniversary, and surveys showed it to be the most trusted and objective international broadcaster providing the greatest breadth and depth. Coverage of the war in Iraq war was provided by its biggest ever operation. BBC World Service played a pivotal role providing independent information to the Arab world. Audiences to short wave are falling and those to FM rebroadcasts and the internet service have risen." (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U K. M GIBLIN sends in a local press cutting about the BBC station in Ottringham, Humberside: "In 1943 Ottringham was home to the world`s most powerful radio transmitter carrying BBC Overseas and Home Services, including the wartime speeches of Winston Churchill. The Ottringham station was built mainly to transmit BBC radio broadcasts overseas, and transmitted across the whole of occupied Europe. It proved almost impossible for the German occupiers to jam, and may even have been used to transmit secret coded messages to resistance fighters. The station was heavily guarded and well camouflaged and did not sustain a single hit during the whole of the war. It also transmitted popular British programmes, and it was said that locally the signal was so strong that locals could listen using only a tin bath and metal spoon!" (via Mike Barraclough, Sept World DX Club Contact via DXLD) MIKE BARRACLOUGH has researched further: In a series of articles on black propaganda and the Aspidistra transmitter published some years ago in Contact MICHAEL BURDEN reported that "Throughout 1943, "Aspidistra" continued to relay the BBC European Service but early in that year it could no longer claim to be the `biggest Aspidistra in the world`. For, on 12th February 1943, the BBC brought into service a high-power Long Wave station on the east coast of England, situated at the village of Ottringham on the north bank of the Humber Estuary. The station consisted of 4 x 200 kW transmitters which had the facility to he coupled to give a combined output of 800 kW. This made Ottringham the most powerful radio station in the world at that time, and ensured that the BBC was heard with good reception in Germany, even during daylight hours on a standard domestic receiver. It operated on a frequency close to the German national "Deutschlandsender" home service. A Google search found Arthur Dungate`s home page, http://www.bbctv-ap.freeserve.co.uk/home.htm where he recalls listening to the BBC European Service from Ottringham on 167 kHz with 200 kW after the war in Blackpool. The internet site http://www.subbrit.org.uk/rsg/sites/o/ottringham has a lot of detail on the site including two photographs of one section some of the original basement rooms in the control centre which still remain intact. Details of the Aspidistra site in Crowborough, with recent photographs are also linked to. The site was 94 acres with seven buildings and several 500 foot transmitter masts. It was owned by the Government, not the BBC. The transmitters were housed in 4 heavily protected surface buildings, possibly with earth revetments. These were driven and fed from a 5th building while the 6th building was the Central Combining House which contained the circuits to combine 200 kW at a time to a maximum 800 kW output. Although it was tested to 800 kW it never ran on programme to that level, 600 kW being the maximum used. The station was designed to broadcast with 200, 400, 600 or 800 kilowatts with up to four separate programmes simultaneously. The fourth transmitter was used to relay the Home Service to the East Riding and Lincolnshire. The station continued in service until well after the war but closed on 15th February 1953 because neither channels nor funds were available for it to continue in service. The site was dismantled shortly after closure and the transmitters were moved to Droitwich where they carried Radio 1 and Radio 4 on medium wave and Radio 2 on longwave well into the 1970`s. One of the aerial masts in still in use at Brookmans Park; the others are believed to have gone to other BBC HF sites. The site of the masts has returned to farmland, the rest of the site was cleared of buildings and is now an industrial unit, storage yard and lorry park. As a boy I lived in nearby Withernsea between 1952 and 1963 and can recall, when I was about 8, being taken round the Ottringham site. A local family friend, who was a farmer, was considering buying the land and took my father, his bank manager, accompanied by me, around the site as he was looking for a loan to cover its purchase (Sept World DX Club Contact via DXLD) ** U S A. Re WRMI: BOY do I feel stupid now. Figured I was helping out and was totally wrong. I'm new to shortwave. I'll just crawl under a rock now... The show was something like "Apocalypse Chronicles". Radio of course faded out when host said his name. I see from today`s DX-Digest that it wasn't true. Sorry for wasting your time. Later (Steve, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Steve, Please don`t feel that way. No harm done; we are getting to the bottom of the item since you now say it was Apocalypse Chronicles. Well, of course something bad is always about to happen as far as they are concerned! (Glenn to Steve, via DXLD) ** U S A. A very good, "must read" article about Ibiquity's situation and the future of digital radio (actually discusses the problems with adjacent channel hash on AM!): http://www.radioworld.com/reference-room/guywire/gw-08-28-03.shtml (Harry Helms, W7HLH Las Vegas, NV DM26, NRC AM via DXLD) ** U S A. BRUCE PENNINGTON; GAY ACTIVIST HAD RADIO PROGRAM By Claudia Levy, Washington Post Staff Writer, Thursday, August 28 Bruce Pennington, 56, a chef, teacher and former radio broadcaster who was honored in June at Washington's annual gay pride celebration as a "Capital Pride Hero" for 35 years of activism in the city, died Aug. 26 at the Hospice of Washington. He had AIDS and had suffered a stroke. Mr. Pennington, an early member of the Gay Liberation Front in Washington, was a host of the "Friends" radio program from 1973 to 1982. The program, one of the first aimed at a gay audience, was launched on the Georgetown University radio station, WGTB-FM, and picked up later by Pacifica Radio, WPFW-FM... http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A56697-2003Aug27?language=printer (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** VIETNAM [non]. unID 7380 1321-1328* 8/30. Talks and music here in Asian language; ended at 1328 after a final song. Carrier went off a few minutes later. Was looking for Degar Radio - may have been them, although they are sked to 1400 (John Wilkins, CO, Cumbre DX via DXLD) This observation is correct, Degar Voice ends at 1330 now (instead of originally 1400), confirmed by Mauno Ritola, Finland. 73s, (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED [non]. Re: DXLD 3-156, 6069.7 with the religious network `A Voz da Libertação`. Per info available at PERU ON SHORTWAVE 1992- 2002 --- Monitored by Henrik Klemetz (1992-1998) and Rafael Rodríguez R. (1998-2002) (35 pages of pdf by frequency), http://homepage.sverige.net/~a-0901/hkperu-2.pdf the transmitter belonging to Radio JSV, in Huánuco, Perú, started relaying La Voz de la Liberación way back in 1998. (Previously, this shortwave transmitter had been idle for a good number of years). Some programs may be local in character, originating in Lima or even Huánuco, while others are relayed from Brazil. If in doubt, the São Paulo feed can be monitored at http://www.ipda.org.br/ (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, Aug 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. 7571.95, Asian at 0030 Asian music, weak audio, fade with carrier remaining 0130+ (Bob Wilkner, FL, Aug 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) {probably Pakistan} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ RADIO STAMPS ++++++++++++ RADIO LICENSING: STAMPS, REMINDERS, SLOGANS The Aug 25 issue of Linn`s Stamp News has an article by this title on page 30, by David A. Norris, with five interesting illustrations, including the Danish slogan cancel from 1955 with a humorous cartoon drawing and inscription ``Daemp Radioen``, meaning ``Turn Down Your Radio``. I remember getting a bunch of those way back when R. Denmark had an external service and even a mailing list. Linn`s doesn`t seem to put much online, so check your library. Tnx to Mike Cooper for a hard-copy clipping (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES / DRM +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ IFA [non] I am just back from Berlin. Messe Berlin staff accepted neither the membership in a magazine's editorial board nor regular editorial contributions for a public broadcaster as sufficient for a press accreditation, contrary to the officially publicized guidelines. No idea if they would like to see an order from the director itself; anyway, I have still some second-hand news to offer: The promoted "special announcement" of DRM consortium and World DAB contained basically a common marketing in future, so nothing spectacular. Actual DRM transmissions: 693 DRM-only, 177, 603 and also 855 AM/DRM simulcast. My observations at Berlin fully confirmed the first findings I made on 177 for this frequency as well as for 603 and 855: the DRM component disturbs the analogue one noticeably, and it appears that hardly anybody is convinced of this mode. DAB: I was told that it appears to be widely recognized now that the idea to replace FM by DAB in the coming years (i.e. to shut down FM in 2010 or so) is merely wishful thinking. The already mentioned DAB promo on 104.1 is indeed operational with the weird RDS PS code _100_DAB. At 2000 UT the just carried program was abruptly cut off, followed by silence for at least 15 minutes, so the rotation works not really perfectly. After 2000 I also remembered to check 97.2 for the special IFA-Radio service and found only an open carrier. Not exactly convincing either. So much in a short, best regards, (Kai Ludwig, Germany, Aug 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Much more under GERMANY above EURORADIO 2003 - CALAIS, SATURDAY 13 SEPTEMBER 2003 (This is one I attended a few years ago, and it was excellent - Mike). Euroradio 2003 commemorates twenty years of Radio Caroline's famous ship the Ross Revenge and will take place in Calais, France on Saturday 13 September 2003. Guests will include Peter Chicago Associated with Radio Caroline for many years during her offshore days, firstly as engineer on the Mi Amigo, when he was persuaded to jump ship from RNI. Chicago worked as transmitter engineer on the Ross Revenge and was on board during the infamous 1989 raid. Nowadays he works in broadcast engineering. Paul Graham A veteran of numerous offshore and free radio projects, Paul has worked in Irish radio, as well as deejaying on the Ross Revenge, during the time she started to drift. He now works in radio consultancy. Tony Campbell A former trawler captain and lifelong supporter of Radio Caroline, Tony got the opportunity to captain the Ross Revenge during the mid 1980's and the time of Eurosiege. Nowadays he runs nature sightseeing trips around the inland waters of Essex. He is also a talented artist. Dennis Jason If you've seen photos of the Ross Revenge, taken from the top of the 300 foot mast, you may also see part of the foot, of the man intrepidly climbed the mast to take the picture. Dennis Jason, as well as being a deejay, is an accomplished photographer. Euroradio starts at 2.00 pm local time [1200 UT], features a selection of offshore radio videos playing during the afternoon. We'll also be talking to our special guests. The Offshore Echo's [sic] Boutique will be open during the event, featuring a wide range of offshore radio related merchandise. In the evening there is a special Euroradio dinner, with fine French cuisine including wine, at the Georges V restaurant. Details at http://www.offshoreechos.com (via Mike Terry, UK, DXLD) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ NEW RADAR SYSTEM WARNS OF ICEBERGS -- ALSO GUARDS AGAINST SMUGGLERS DEAN BEEBY, Canadian Press, Saturday, August 30, 2003 HALIFAX (CP) -- A cutting-edge radar system has begun providing early warnings of icebergs to the Hibernia oil rig off the East Coast. And the unique technology, more than a decade in the making, will soon be guarding against drug smugglers, illegal immigrant traffickers, foreign fishing vessels -- potentially, even terrorists -- lurking far out to sea on Canada's Atlantic seaboard. The radar uses the ocean's salty surface as an electronic conduit to track vessels and aircraft as far as 370 kilometres into the North Atlantic. The so-called "surface wave" system hugs the curvature of the earth, reaching to the very edge of Canada's 200-nautical-mile economic zone, unlike traditional radar technology, which is limited to lines of sight less than a quarter that distance. Two unmanned research installations in Newfoundland, at Cape Race and Cape Bonavista, are currently undergoing a $5-million upgrade that will make them the first in a two-coast network designed to increase Canada's maritime security. "It's been very promising -- it has tracked vessels in near real time out to significant ranges," said Lt.-Cmdr. Greg Bannister, the navy officer in charge of the project. "It's quite an achievement for Canada." The Newfoundland stations are already tracking threatening icebergs for the operators of the Hibernia oil rig. "That's the first practical application in the private sector," said Brian Smith of Raytheon Canada Ltd., the Waterloo, Ont.-based firm that since 1996 has been jointly developing the system with National Defence. The concept of surface-wave radar has its origins in Britain during the Second World War, but the concept was impractical until the advent of powerful computers that can decipher the signals. Canada's system is currently unique in the world, with competing technologies some 18 months to two years behind, says Smith. With National Defence as a partner, Raytheon has begun marketing the system to the United States. A demonstration was given in the Bahamas last year to a private-sector American company. And this summer in Key West, Fla., the U.S. Coast Guard was shown how the radar operates using a portable version. "The United States is very interested in the technology," Smith said in an interview, though there have been no contracts signed yet. Meanwhile, National Defence has been given $43.1 million to build as many as six additional sites on both the East and West coasts, with construction expected to begin in the summer of 2005. Internal military documents, obtained under the Access to Information Act, show the favoured locales are Baleine, N.S., in Cape Breton; Little Brehat and Taylor's Bay Point, Nfld.; and Ucuelet and Nootka Island, B.C. These "would provide continuous coverage of the seaward approaches to the St. Lawrence Seaway and Strait of Juan de Fuca," says the document. The network has been scaled back significantly from the 21 sites first envisioned. Canada currently relies on patrol aircraft, coast guard ships, conventional radar and other means to survey some 244,000 kilometres of coastline. Each day, about 1,700 vessels operate within Canada's 200-nautical-mile economic zone -- and not all of them announce their presence. Surface-wave radar installations cost about $5 million each to build and less than $200,000 a year to operate. Signals will be fed by telephone lines to a navy intelligence centre in Halifax. West Coast signals will be processed at Esquimalt, B.C. Costs are a fraction of the bills for military Aurora flights, coast guard patrols and fisheries surveillance flights, which run into the millions. For example, a single radar site could be operated for a tenth or less the cost of Provincial Airlines surveillance flights carried out on the East Coast for the federal government, an internal document estimates. The system has limits. Electromagnetic interference at night reduces the range, for example, and high waves can mask the presence of smaller vessels, such as fishing trawlers. Surface-wave radar is also ineffective over Arctic ice. At the same time, the signals are not affected by weather and the system provides real-time tracking, with updates of vessel locations every five minutes or so. The developers say surface-wave radar can act as an early-warning system to direct patrol aircraft and ships only to suspicious or distressed vessels and planes, a more efficient use of resources. The system can even be used to measure distant ocean currents to help build a clearer picture of the ocean environment. The data is not considered classified and can be readily used as evidence in court cases, unlike some electronic intelligence information that is regarded as highly sensitive and unavailable for prosecutions. "The navy will be using the data within the next year," says Bannister. "It's very impressive." Some facts and figures: Technology: Surface-wave radar uses the salty surface of the ocean as a conduit for its high-frequency signals. As a result, the signals hug the Earth's surface, travelling much farther than standard radar, which extends only to the horizon. History: The concept of surface-wave radar has been known since the Second World War, but only recently has computer technology allowed clear interpretation of the signals. Stations: Two experimental stations at Cape Race, Nfld., and Cape Bonavista, Nfld., built in the mid-1990s, currently undergoing $5- million upgrades to become fully operational. The data is already being used to track icebergs. Future: Up to six additional stations are planned for the East and West Coasts, the first being built in the summer of 2005. The project budget is $43.1 million. Savings: Unmanned stations can be built for about $5 million each, and operated for under $200,000 a year -- far less than for surveillance aircraft and coast guard ships. Prosecutions: Radar data is not classified and can be used in court to prosecute offenders, such as drug traffickers and ships that spill oil. © Copyright 2003 The Canadian Press (via Jill Dybka, DXLD) WTFK?? Note the above uses *high* frequencies, but along the surface, so presumably any ionospheric propagation would be minimised or incidental??? (gh, DXLD) POWERLINE COMMUNICATIONS ++++++++++++++++++++++++ BPL (PLC) INTERFERENCE TO AM BROADCAST STATIONS? Here's the ARRL's position on BPL interference to medium wave broadcasting: (Chuck Hutton) Hi, Charles, None of my tests nor the claimed frequencies seem to affect below 2 MHz, so for the most part, I think AM BC radio will be okay. 73, Ed Hare, W1RFI, ARRL Lab, via Hutton, NRC-AM via DXLD) I think some caution is advised. I think many would believe (and I am NOT saying that Ed is, or is not, among them) that AM broadcasting QRM issues are just concerned with heavy interference to local signals. If there can be something like a 40 to 60 dB range between "local signals" and "DX-interest signals" you can easily come up with the scenario in which "no interference was noted" because the test site was able to copy a local signal cleanly, while the DX signal could have been covered up with some lower-level noise.. I think frequently, SW, VHF and HF Ham/BC are treated as a medium of weak-signal interest, whereas AM is not. But we in NRC and IRCA, for two, know better. Didn't Bruce Conti just recently report here serious problems on the AM BC band from this interference while at a demo site? Will a different s/n ratio standard be applied to AM than to HF? With the convention on, some discussion of this may have to wait a few days (Bob Foxworth, NRC-AM via DXLD) I doubt that even one "official" individual has tuned a receiver to anywhere in the MF AM broadcast band while measuring BPL HF QRN in the vicinity of powerlines. I've had dealings with W1RFI with powerline QRN in the past and he never really impressed me. I still think BPL is a threat to our hobby, especially the top 1/3 of the MF spectrum. 73, (Thomas F. Giella, KN4LF Space & Atmospheric Weather Forecaster Website Designer, 4208 Thackery Way, Plant City, FL, USA 33566, ibid.) I own an ICOM IC756PRO Ham rig. It is a great rig (on the ham bands) and supposed to be a sound to light receiver. 150 khz to 300 Mhz. I have this rig at my office which adjoins the Sarasota Airport. The outer marker transmitter for the Instrument Landing System is on 242 khz. Power is 25 watts. I cannot pick it up on this receiver. ARRL's own testing lab showed that this receiver needs 9.2mv to obtain a satisfactory s/n ratio at 1.2 Mhz. A receiver of this quality should be down around 0.5mv for a decent signal. They never mentioned this terrible performance. On the higher end of the AM band, I can sit in my office and receive 1600 from Key West during the day. Nice Salt water path to Sarasota for only 500 watts. Same with WWL out of New Orleans. Comes in great all day long. But 620 out of St. Pete has noise on the signal here. Did anyone read the glowing report printed in QST regarding IBOC and WOR? Never did they ever talk to any AM DXer to add balance to that report. It was nothing but repeating WOR's propaganda. So, I've learned to take any report from the ARRL with a grain of salt (Paul Smith, W4KNX, Located in Sunny Sarasota, Florida, ibid.) Yeah, that QST report on IBOC was a real piece of work. What was truly amazing was how they repeated the claims that you can add that huge digital component to an analog signal and still have everything fit into the same bandwidth as the analog signal alone. I knew ham radio was going straight to hell when they lowered the code speed for the Extra from 20 wpm to 5 wpm, and there's your proof (Harry Helms W7HLH Las Vegas, NV DM26, ibid.) I've discovered through Internet research that products already exist to remove BPL from power mains before it enters the house. Low pass filters allow the 50/60 Hz AC in while blocking high frequency interference. The claim is that BPL will not only interfere with broadcast reception, but it will also cause interference or stress to other household appliances and electronics such as programmable devices in microwave ovens, coffeemakers, etc. and audio/video equipment. One particular filter device is installed outside at the meter and provides USB outputs for connection to the computer. If (or should I say when) the FCC approves BPL, the public utilities should be required to install low pass filters on the meters of every non- subscribing household. In terms of AM broadcast interference, I expect that BPL will only worsen an already bad situation for AM listeners on the road. AM is already significantly compromised by powerline noise in suburbia. For the most part around here, AM is only listenable on the interstate highways where powerlines aren't overhead. In terms of DXing, a noise-reduced outdoor wire should do the job, just as it does now in terms of isolation from household interference. IBOC will likely represent a bigger challenge for MW DXing (Bruce Conti - Nashua NH, ibid.) You're right - until some real MW DXers say it's OK, it's not guaranteed to be OK. But Ed's note is still good news. I identified myself as a DX'er in my email to him, so at least he should have understood that the question is not "will local signals be trashed?". It was Fred V, not Bruce C that reported noise as best I remember. What was missing from Fred's report is something saying how much noise was there with no BPL. It's tough to say what Fred heard without a bit more information - maybe he heard a noisy system like Ben D's. And remember that with the modulation scheme used in BPL, there is no (repeat no) energy transmitted in MW frequencies (Chuck Hutton, ibid.) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ CUMBRE PROPAGATION REPORT A similar story to past reports. Flare activity has been very low over the last week, however the solar wind speed was elevated through until Aug 26 due to a coronal hole causing active/storm geomagnetic conditions and degraded propagation at mid and high latitudes. However periods of active conditions have persisted all week especially at higher latitudes with some absorption noted. Similar conditions should prevail for the next week with degraded propagation again forecast from Sep 3. A previously active region is returning to the eastern limb of the sun and may again produce some flares that will move into a geoeffective position over the next few days as well. Prepared using data from http://www.ips.gov.au (Richard Jary, SA, Aug 30, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) Book Review "THE HIGH LATITUDE IONOSPHERE AND ITS EFFECTS ON RADIO PROPAGATION", R. D. Hunsucker, J. K. Hargreaves, October 2002, Cambridge University Press, 617 pp. --- Here's what the publisher had to say about this great addition to the Space Weather field. The physical properties of the ionized layer in the Earth's upper atmosphere enable us to use it to support an increasing range of communications applications. This book presents a modern treatment of the physics and phenomena of the high latitude upper atmosphere and the morphology of radio propagation in the auroral and polar regions. Chapters cover the basics of radio propagation and the use of radio techniques in ionospheric studies. This book includes many examples of the behavior of quiet and disturbed high latitude HF propagation (SEC User Notes July via DXLD) AURORA OUTLOOK Earth is heading for a solar wind stream flowing from a coronal hole on the sun. Our first encounter with the stream could take place on Sept. 2nd, so that's when sky watchers should be alert for possible auroras. Visit Spaceweather.com for more information and updates (via Ary, BDXC, Aug 30 via DXLD) TIP FOR RATIONAL LIVING +++++++++++++++++++++++ MAKING THE WORLD SAFE FOR . . . THEOCRACY? By DOUG SAUNDERS, Saturday, August 30, 2003 - Page F3 http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20030830/DOUG30/TPFocus/ (Toronto Globe & Mail via Gerald T. Pollard, DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-156, August 29, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3h.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1197: WWCR: Sat 1030, Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 on 9475 RFPI: Sat 0800, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 on 7445 [nominal times subject to delay or pre- emption] WRMI: Sat & Sun 1800+ on 15725 WINB: Sun 0031 on 12160 [for last time] WRN: Rest of world Sat 0800, Europe Sun 0430, N America Sun 1400 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1197h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1197h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1197.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1197.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1197.ram ** ALASKA. LF beacon gathers additional reports: A low-frequency (LF) beacon in Alaska has drawn confirmed reports from Canada and California. WD2XDW experimental beacon operator Laurence Howell, KL1X, in Anchorage, has reports from Steve McDonald, VE7SL, on Mayne Island near Victoria, British Columbia, and from Mike Silvers, KB6WFC, in Daly City, California. WD2XDW is on the air 24/7 at 137.77350 kHz using very slow-speed CW (called ``QRSS``) -- one dit every minute. McDonald said a week of monitoring had previously yielded ``small bits and pieces`` of the beacon signal, but conditions between British Columbia and Alaska turned excellent the morning of August 17. McDonald said the WD2XDW signal faded abruptly as the sun hit the D layer. McDonald is using an ICOM IC-R75 receiver and a J310 active whip at 25 feet (ARRL August 27 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** ANTARCTICA. 15475.99v, R. Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel, LRA36, 0100-0104 28 Aug, LA music, unreadable M announcer in Spanish, more music mixed with soft-spoken W and with same M announcer. Alternating M and W to at least 0120, but just below a readable level. Possible mention of Buenos Aires at 0110 by M. Faded down after 0115. Signal picked back up around 0140, but dropped back down. Seemed to go off at 0204. Gradually drifted also. Tnx to Gabriel Iván Barrera and Arnaldo Slaen for this special broadcast announcement (Dave, Valko, PA, 28 August, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Straggler A reminder of LRA36`s webpage: http://www.fcapital.com.ar/esperanza/pagina_otras.htm (via Adiel Bregado, SP, radioescutas via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. This is an interesting set of statements that Glenn reported (notes on RA Feedback Aug 22). Serving both external and internal audiences is certainly a challenge. I hope they continue to realize that just putting the national 24-hour feed (which normally wouldn't have repeats) on shortwave is not the answer. With today's digitizing of everything, even for production, I would think it ought to be "easy" to produce multiple feeds, albeit with the occasional "hiccups" of mistakes (such as those regularly pointed out among the various BBCWS feeds). A computer list of programs is all it should take to determine the schedule for a feed -- - perfect for the technofile in each office, leaving the actual program production to those who do it best. It can't be that more expensive or challenging, unless of course they haven't yet upgraded to an all-digital production methodology (such as RNW recently announced). But back to the original point of the message --- the program changes. It is too bad that we'll lose unique programming from yet another international broadcaster. The economy is affecting everyone. Cheers from Iowa, "where dreams come true" (Kevin Anderson, swprograms via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. Glenn: (With regard to your recent news about RA...) According to John Westland, English Service Exec. Producer, RA's program changes have been scaled back and there will be no modifications to the schedule until the weekend of 6/7 Sept. RA has renegotiated deals with music producers that will permit RA to maintain its weekday music programs for the time being. Weekend changes (from 6/7 Sept.) include the following: Music Show with Andrew Ford -- adding a first run at 0405 UT Sat in addition to its current 1205 UT broadcast. (It's a two hour package.) Business Show -- moves to 0005 UT Sat and is packaged during that hour with Ockham's Razor and Lingua Franca. Background Briefing -- adds an airing at 1005 UT Sat starting 13 Sept. Airing 6 Sept at this time will be a special forum on "smart societies". Keys to Music -- This is a new educational program, produced for ABC Classic FM and presented by Graham Abott and airing at 0005 UT Sun, with a repeat at 1005. The program's description says it "is designed to demystify fine music." (John Figliozzi, NY, Aug 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. NEED CASH? BECOME A CHARITY, ALSTON TELLS ABC By Annabel Crabb Communications Minister Richard Alston yesterday travelled to Ballarat to give the ABC board his latest idea on how the broadcaster can raise money - become a registered charity. . . http://www.asiamedia.ucla.edu/Weekly2003/08.26.2003/Australia6.htm (The Age Friday, August 29, 2003 via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. ABC JOURNALIST UNDER ATTACK --- By Marcus O'Donnell ABC staff yesterday threatened industrial action unless disciplinary proceedings against religion correspondent Stephen Crittenden were halted immediately. Crittenden, the presenter of Radio National's Religion Report, was taken off air six weeks ago and suspended on full pay following his publication of an article in the Sydney Morning Herald. The article explored `the clash of civilisations` stemming from the rise of fundamentalist Islamic movements and the west's militant response. . . http://www.ssonet.com.au/showarticle.asp?ArticleID=2557 A piece on the ABC's Stephen Crittenden from the Sydney Star-Observer, their major gay paper. (I hadn't realized that Crittenden was openly gay.) 73 (Bill Westenhaver, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ANGRY ABC STAFF WALK OUT OVER SUSPENSION By Barney Zwartz August 28, 2003 http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/08/27/1061663850604.html (via Jilly Dybka, Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. Hi Glenn, While typing this message about Voice International, Darwin, I`m listening to the CD of Finnish tango legends. On SW I heard I heard the VOICE INTERNATIONAL from Darwin on three frequencies: 13685 kHz in English signing off 15 UT. Hindi service with excellent reception on 13635, scheduled 11-17. The third frequency 7180 kHz is a bit mystery for me. Nice reception noted yesterday 1510 UT with in Bahasa Indonesian programme. Somehow Voice International, Darwin offers much stronger and clearer reception than HCJB Kununurra ever. 73`s (Jouko Huuskonen, Turku, FINLAND, Aug 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. HCJB on 15405, 1700-1730 Aug 29. Instead of scheduled Urdu program, nonstop religious contemporary music. English announcement that "normal programming will be continued as soon as possible" At 1730 s/off in middle of music (Silvain Domen, Belgium, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BELGIUM. Gelezen in RVI 'Onder Ons' --- De RTBF is opnieuw via Waver aan het uitzenden, ondermeer met de oude zenders die de VRT/RVI hebben opgegeven. De hele dag door op één frequentie 9970 kHz. De hele dag uitzenden op maar één frequentie is in de wereld van de kortegolf een beetje ongewoon. Maar hoe minder er geschakeld wordt, hoe kleiner de kans dat er iets kapot gaat. 73, (Guido Schotmans, Belgium, Aug 28, BDXC via DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. Radio San Miguel en los 4906.58, a las 0321, el 29/08, SINPO 3/3. En virtual "colisión hertziana" con R. Zambia en 4910. El pasado 23/08 la capté en 4905.56, es decir, un poco más abajo (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Yaesu FT-890, Antena TH3MK3, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOLIVIA. Amigos DXistas en Conexión Digital! Consulta número. 1: 4600.35 kHz --- aquí en esta frecuencia supongo que transmita Radio Perla del Acre, Cobija, pero parece que nunca se identifique. Perla del Acre ha estado fuera del aire durante largo tiempo. Hace, no recuerdo la fecha exacta, aproximadamente 1 mes comencé a escuchar esta señal siempre con OM-DJ y música. La última vez yo noté Perla del Acre era en la frecuencia de 4600.33 kHz. Alguien en la lista tiene una identificación positiva? (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, Aug 29, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. 5045, 0104 24/08 R. Guarujá Paulista, Guarujá (SP). Música "La Bamba", "Love is in the air". Programa "Pickup Musical" com Edson Nunes, "os grandes sucessos de seu ídolo preferido". "Straight from the heart" com Bryan Adams. Programa "Viver e Reviver" com Maria Eli. ID ``ZYK590 1550 KHz; ZYG860 3235 KHZ Ondas Tropicais; ZYG850 5045 KHz Ondas Curtas - Rádio Guarujá Paulista - A Rádio da família - falando para o Brasil". Música Let's Twist Again com Chubby Checker. - 54454 (Marcelo Herondino Cardoso, Florianópolis - SC, radioescutas via DXLD) ** CHINA. China is the world`s 800-pound gorilla, in terms of both audience size and Internet interdiction technology. Xiao Qiang, executive director of Human Rights in China, an international non- governmental organization, told On Line Journalism Review that the People`s Republic ``can dedicate unlimited resources to devleopment and deployment of censorship and surveillance technology. It is impossible for a relatively small number of technically savvy users, Xiao said, ``to defeat state censorship through grassroots efforts without external help.`` Some Internet blocking technology, ironically, is thought to be supplied to Beijing by U.S. firms. The BBG`s Ken Berman, testifying at the Capitol Hill hearing of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, explained some of the measures being taken to counter the jamming of VOA and Radio Free Asia websites. ``What we have essentially instituted,`` he said, ``is a two-prong `push-pull` program that consists of separate but related efforts: ¨ The `push` component consists of pushing e-mail news to those users in China who would find the news interesting or a complement to China`s official, approved news stories. (The e-mails get through because they circumvent the central Internet Service Providers thoroughly filtered by Chinese authorities.) ¨ The `pull` component consists of circumventing an elaborate matrix of Chinese filtering and content filtering techniques to permit users to access the VOA and RFA websites and pull internet content into the browsers of their computers. Because of the support by the Office of Engineering, says VOA East Asia Division Director Jay Henderson, the VOA Chinese Branch now sends more than a sesquimillion e-mails a day. ``We`ve easily surpassed our goal for this year and hope that at the rate we`re going,`` Henderson adds, ``we might reach five million a day long before our 2005 deadline to attain that goal.` As for the `pull` element of the program, one each of those e-mails sent, there are links with two to six different proxy sites, those not prohibited by Chinese censors. The proxy sites contain a wealth of information, including VOA and RFA websites, and can be changed from day to day, just as broadcast engineers over the years have switched from some frequencies to others to confuse jammers. The struggle is onging. Reporters San Frontières, in a report just released, notes that Chinese specialists in April sent e-mails containing specially designed viruses to the VOA Chinese website, and that other sites such as those of the Falunggong movement and pro- Tibet organizations, also were attacked. The Australian TV network ABC reported on April 23 that its website also had been blocked for the first time, just a few weeks before the Dalai Lama was to visit Australia. But countermeasures to blockage of the Internet and the courage of people with a need to know have combined to demonstrate again that no nation can seal itself off electronically in the digital, satellite age of communications. Radio Free Asia Vice President of Programming Dan Southerland says China`s decision to finally announce the gravity of the SARS crisis came after a retired military doctor, Jiang Yanyong, revealed to RFA and Time Magazine that those infected in Beijing were ``a dozen times more numerous than top Chinese officials had admitted`` between January and April 2003. ``As unfortunate as SARS is,`` engineer Ken Berman observes, ``it has been a boon to the freedom of Internet information movement. Our news is anxiously followed, the VOA and RFA Chinese language traffic has doubled, and has allowed Chinese citizens free and unfettered access to a wide range of previously censored information. E-mail news (as of June 5) includes daily SARS reports and statistics, and links to the World Health Organisation and other sites.`` In the end, VOA`s Jay Henderson told the Commission`s June hearing, ``let us ask the Chinese every day between now and the opening of the 2008 Olympics in Beijing how they can expect the world to send its best athletes into their care if their government thinks the proper response to a health crisis is to cover it up. I hope, `` he concluded, ``that the next time a SAES-like crisis hits China, the first response will be: `Let`s get the word out`.`` (from ``China, Iran and the Internet,`` by Alan Heil, The Channel, AIB, July 2003 via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. Armónico de otra colombiana: Radio Mundial (si mal no escuché), se repite en los 2740 kHz, segundo armónico de 1370 kHz OM, con locutor y locutora que hacían comentarios religiosos. Música religiosa. Mucho más fuerte que el armónico de Radio María en 3160 (29/08, 0417 UT). (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Yaesu FT- 890, Antena TH3MK3, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. Radio Habana Cuba: 27/08, a las 0417. 15230 (5/5), 11875 (5/5), 9550 (5/4), 11760 (3/2), 9600 (5/5 +40dB), 5965 (3/3). (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Yaesu FT-890, Antena TH3MK3, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. More about our new transmitters tests. 11760 kiloHertz, 100 kiloWatts beaming to the East Coast of North America in Spanish from 00 to 05 UT, and we may soon add the 05 to 07 UT segment in parallel with 9820 and 9550 in English. Be on the lookout for this new RHC additional frequency that will soon be on the air; again the frequency is 11760 kiloHertz and the time from 05 to 07 UT, with our English language program. {not 3 Sept but heard in early Oct anyway} Sad day for Cuban radio: both broadcasting and amateur radio in Cuba today are mourning the death of Eduardo Fernández, CO7RR, the founder of Radio Rebelde station that from the Sierra Maestra mountains in 1958 made daily broadcasts telling the people of Cuba and the Americas about the revolutionary war in progress at that time against the Fulgencio Batista dictatorship. Eduardo was a very dedicated and enthusiastic radio amateur operator, and for a number of years was the President of the Cuban Federation of Radio Amateurs. I met him in 1959, just as he came down from the mountains where he was what could best be described as the chief engineer of Radio Rebelde. Eduardo Fernández loved radio and it he helped every one he could to become a radio amateur. Among his favorite aspects of ham radio was operating using radioteletype, a mode that he simply loved. From the days of the mechanical teletype machines, Eduardo patiently explained to every Cuban radio amateur willing to listen, how radio teletype worked, and his participation in several international RTTY contests was always much expected, because at one time CO7RR and later his newer call CO2BB were the only RTTY stations operating from Cuba. A very modest and humble person, he was promoted to the highest military rank of the Ejército Rebelde, the Cuban Rebel Army that fought against Batista, where he was one of the Comandantes de la Sierra. Saying good bye to my long time friend Eduardo Fernández Rodríguez, CO7 Radio Radio, today at the Cristóbal Colón Cemetery in Havana several hundred Cuban radio amateurs joined workers of Radio Rebelde and the many friends and compañeros he had in the military. Adios, mi amigo Eduardo, we will always remember you on the air !!! (Prof. Arnie Coro A., CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited Aug 26, via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via DXLD) ** CUBA. NEW ANTENNAS AN EFFORT TO JAM U. S.-BASED RADIO MARTÍ? http://www.cubanet.org/CNews/y03/ago03/28e1.htm HAVANA, August 26 (http://www.cubanet.org) - The Cuban government has installed four large parabolic antennas in Palma Soriano, in easternmost Cuba, which experts have said could be intended to jam transmissions of U. S. -based Radio Martí. "The antennas are about six meters (about 19 feet) in diameter and have been placed in the tallest structures: the water tank on the roof of the Palma Hotel, the Popular Council building, about 80 meters (about 250 feet) high; another on the water works water tank, about 300 meters (over 900 feet) high; and the fourth on the roof of the printing plant, at more than 100 meters (over 300 feet) high," said Juan Carlos Cárdenas, a human rights activist in Palma Soriano. It is widely known that at San Felipe, in southern Havana province, there are several such antennas, as well as in several other places on the island (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) Versión original en español: http://www.cubanet.org/CNews/y03/ago03/27a1.htm Satellite jamming: See INTERNATIONAL VACUUM {more on this in Sept} ** CUBA [non]. CUBA LIBRE: HERNÁNDEZ TAKES REINS --- Radio Martí Has a New Director With a Familiar Mission --- by Steve Sullivan For the heads of most radio stations, success is measured in terms of revenue. But for Jorge Luís Hernández, success will come with the transition of one nation's government from communism to democracy. . . http://www.radioworld.com/reference-room/special-report/02_rwm_marti.shtml (RW Online Sept 1 via DXLD) ** ECUADOR. Radio Quito, 4919, SINPO 33322, a las 0348. Noto que ya no está 24 horas en la banda tropical. (27/08). (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Yaesu FT-890, Antena TH3MK3, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** EGYPT. The French service of Radio Cairo announced two e-mail addresses for its listeners: frenchprog@erti.org and oridi@hotmail.com (Mohamed Kallel, Tunisia, Aug 27 DSWCI DX Window Aug 29 via DXLD) ** FINLAND. POWER OUTAGE BLACKS OUT HELSINKI AND VANTAA ON SATURDAY EVENING . . .The blackout disrupted traffic and emergency response centres in Helsinki. Hospitals and airports reverted to back-up systems and avoided emergencies. Emergency response centres were flooded with telephone calls, and all calls to 112 could not be answered. Citizens have been instructed to listen to radio station Radio Suomi in the event of a power failure. However, even Radio Suomi was off the air for eight minutes beginning at 8.45 p.m. Normally, the Finnish Broadcasting Company (YLE) receives power from its own generators, but even this reserve stopped functioning for a short time. The generators failed to provide electricity, and the batteries that form the second back-up could not handle the entire required output. YLE head Arne Wessberg commented that the break in radio transmissions was unforgivable. "People have learned to rely on battery-operated radios during power cuts." YLE relays official statements from authorities during emergencies, but no such statement was prepared about the power outage on Saturday. . . http://www.helsinki-hs.net/news.asp?id=20030825IE3 (Helsingin Sanomat Aug 25 via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** GERMANY. Allerweltshaus Köln --- Quite interesting. The website (obviously not updated during the summer season) states that an Ethiopian group, an Uganda project called Vovi and a Kenya group called Tafungua http://www.tafungua.de meet there, to mention the ones that would fit to CIRAF 48, so to speak. I will try to find out more (Kai Ludwig, Germany, Aug 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. Relatively new gospel station Evangelische Missions Gemeinden Deutchland via DTK-Wertachtal on 6015 at 1730-1759 Thu/Fri only (Silvain Domen, Belgium, Aug 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. DEUTSCHE TELEKOM T-SYSTEMS SUPPORTS OVER 30 BROADCASTERS The HF facilities at Julich and Wertachtal are now used by over 30 broadcasters on a leased basis. The complete schedule, as a PDF file, updated to August 18, may be viewed, downloaded and printed at http://engradio.org/t-systems.pdf It was submitted by member Alokesh Gupta, India (EDXP Aug 29 http://edxp.org by permission via DXLD) ** GERMANY. DW preview Aug 29-30: One of the topics on Spectrum, DW's weekly look at developments in the fields of science and technology: European DX council: Each year, dedicated listeners manage to tune in to radio stations from thousands of miles away on the AM broadcast band. In fact, the AM band is where DXing began. Back in the 1920s, the first radio stations were keen to know just how far away they were being heard. So they asked for reception reports from listeners, and promised to reply to reports with souvenir postcards confirming that the listener indeed heard the station. In fact, the entire hobby of short wave listening grew from those beginnings. Today, there are hundreds of DX clubs around the world. The European DX Council was formed in 1967 in Copenhagen, Denmark; it is not a DX club, but an umbrella organisation of DX clubs in 17 European countries with a membership of some 6,000. Luigi Cobisi, Secretary-General of the European DX Council, told Rajiv Sharma just how popular the hobby is today (World Radio Network WRN-English-Newsletter@wrn.org (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** GUATEMALA? 4698.71, R Amistad (tentative). I think they may have reactivated. 1100 Aug 29 with a strong carrier, but almost no modulation. Anyone else hearing something here with perhaps better reception? (Hans Johnson, WY Cumbre DX via DXLD) UNID 4698.70, Latin first noted on 18 August with fair signal 1015- 1030, noted since with Latin programming. Also at 0030-0045 . Never pulled an ID, station prone to deep fades. This is regards to Hans Johnson question in Cumbre DX (Bob Wilkner, FL, ibid.) Amigos DXistas en Conexión Digital! Consulta número 2: 4698.75 kHz - La señal está muy débil y de mala calidad. Encontré esta señal hace aproximadamente 14 días y ayer en la mañana escuché el programa "Mañanitas de Amistad". Por esto creo que sea Radio Amistad, San Pedro de La Laguna (Guatemala). Probablemente ha estado fuera el aire durante bastante tiempo. La última vez yo capté Radio Amistad, estuvo en 4698.75 kHz. Alguien en la lista tiene una identificación positiva? (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, Aug 29, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** GUATEMALA. 4780, Radio Coatán, 1100-1131 frequent IDs by M over religious music, excellent signal "estudios de Radio Coatán... las palabras de Dios". Frequency and station ID 1130 [Robert Wilkner, FL, Aug 29,DX LISTENING DIGEST] ** HONDURAS. Música religiosa en 3340 kHz, 0352, SINPO 23221. (27/08). (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Yaesu FT-890, Antena TH3MK3, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HONDURAS. Radio Litoral fuera del aire (la medí en 4830.06, el 27/08), durante los días 28 y 29/08 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Yaesu FT-890, Antena TH3MK3, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Voz masculina, parecía un predicador. Cierre con marcha que asumo es el himno nacional, 3249.48 kHz, a las 0344 UTC. SINPO 3/2 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Yaesu FT-890, Antena TH3MK3, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Presumably Radio Luz y Vida (gh) ** INDIA. Glad to note this station AIR Thiruvananthapuram / Trivandrum 5010 kHz once again in the air. 1730 UT a five minute news bulletin in English. Then close down at 1735 UT with really nice reception. No trace of Madagascar. My Merriam Webster´s Geographical Dictionary (Third Edition) tells these facts about THIRUVANANTHAPURAM / TRIVANDRUM: Seaport city, Capital of Kerala, SW India, on Arabian Sea 140 mi. (225 km.) SW of Mandurai; pop. (1991c) 699, 872: produces copra; rope, textiles, soap; 18th cent. temple; observatory; zoölogical garden, museum, university; made of Capital of Kingdom of Travavancore mid-18th century. 73´s (Jouko Huuskonen, Turku, FINLAND, Aug 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDIA. CABLE TV HITS SNAG IN INDIA India is a democracy, yet it controls the availability of broadcast news tightly. At the same time it has enjoyed a highly unregulated cable TV industry. Now there are moves to change that, with the introduction of conditional access television that could throw the cable industry in the country into chaos. It is estimated that there are over 30,000 independent cable TV operators who have rigged up interesting networks by stringing cables from telegraph poles and between trees to serve subscribers owning around 40 million TV sets -- half the total estimate of television sets in the country. Fees are low, ranging from 50 rupees in smaller towns to 400 rupees in the big cities where there`s a choice of 70 or more channels. A key problem is that revenues often don`t find their way back to rights owners --- channel operators --- and that technical standards are often low, with unclear pictures at the subscriber`s home. To solve these issues, and a raft of others --- such as channels using inflated subscriber numbers to attract advertisers --- the Indian government is introducing a conditional access system. Due to start in July in four major cities including Delhi and Mumbai, subscribes will have to rent or buy a new set-to-box with CA technology installed. However, the launch has been thwarted by a shortage of set-top boxes, so it`s likely that it will be the end of the year before the system is introduced (The Channel, AIB, July 2003, via DXLD) ** INDONESIA. Info from Roland Schulze, Philippines, u.o.s.: 3325, RRI Palangkaraya, Jul 30 and a couple of days up to Aug 08, obviously problems with the transmitter or antenna, because the signal is very weak and sounds like 1 kW or less! (Schulze) 3344.8, RRI Ternate was off the air Jul 30-Aug 08 (Schulze) 4753.6, RRI Makassar was off the air Jul 30-Aug 08 (Schulze) 4870, RRI Wamena is not on the air regularly and local evening broadcast times vary (Schulze, Aug 08) 4874.6, RRI Sorong is off the air at present (Schulze, Aug 08) However, it was back on 4870.9, 0924-1005* Aug 15, Azan Magrib call to prayer started followed by 0929 lagu padang pasir (desert songs, i.e. Arabic style) then tedious information but with many mentions of Sorong from around 0935 until unceremonious close. Crazy frequency choice as RRI Wamena not far away on 4870 at similar strength. However, Sorong may have no choice but to use their very old 10 kW transmitter. The usual but extremely irregular transmitter on 4874.6 was first mentioned in WRTH in 1978 and before that 4871v was used. From 1986-88 both transmitters were used, 4871 in local mornings and 4875 in evenings but since then only 4875 (Foster in DXplorer) 4925, RRI Jambi is not on the air regularly and local evening broadcast times vary (Schulze, Aug 08) 9743.6, RRI Sorong has a new time schedule mostly with relays of RRI Jakarta // 9680 and 11860 (Schulze, Aug 08) Heard closing down 0759* Aug 15, just after HCJB 9745 had s/on. Before that was weak but clear (David Foster, Australia in DXplorer) (all: Aug 27 DSWCI DX Window Aug 29 via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM [non]. CUBA E IRAN COMPLICES EN INTERFERENCIA A SATELITE DE E.U. Los países que apoyan al terrorismo no solo amenazan los intereses de los Estados Unidos en tierra, mar y aire, ahora se han unido para atacar a propiedades de los Estados Unidos en el espacio sideral. Al tener éxito en bloquear la señal de un satélite de comunicaciones de los EEUU que se mantiene en órbita sobre el Atlántico, los regímenes de Cuba e Irán han desafiado el dominio de los EEUU en el espacio y la presunción del libre acceso a las comunicaciones de satélite que hacen posible el indisputado poderío militar de los EEUU. . . http://www.lanuevacuba.com/nuevacuba/notic-03-08-2001esp.htm (By J. Michael Waller, Insight Magazine, Washington, E.U.; Traducción: Joaquín Sueiro Bonachea, La Nueva Cuba, Agosto 28, 2003, via Óscar de Céspedes, FL, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Original in English: IRAN AND CUBA ZAP U.S. SATELLITES Posted Aug. 6, 2003, By J. Michael Waller News, information and other programming broadcast by satellite from the United States into Iran fuels the democracy movement in that Muslim country. State sponsors of terrorism not only threaten U.S. interests on land, at sea and in the air, but now they have teamed up to attack U.S. assets in space. By successfully jamming a U.S. communications satellite over the Atlantic Ocean, the regimes of Cuba and Iran challenged U.S. dominance of space and the assumptions of free access to satellite communication that makes undisputed U.S. military power possible. . . http://www.insightmag.com/news/449580.html (Insight Magazine via gh, also via Óscar de Céspedes, DXLD) ** IRAN. Satellite jamming: see just above ** ISRAEL. ARUTZ 7 INCREASES ENGLISH BROADCASTS Mike Brand reports: Israeli commercial broadcaster Arutz 7 (Israel National Radio) has responded to recent cuts in the English language output of public broadcaster Kol Israel by expanding its own English language programming. The station, which describes itself as the Mideast's only independent newstalk network, now broadcasts in English in the mornings at 6.30 am Israel time (0330 UT) on mediumwave 1143 kHz and FM 105.2 MHz, in addition to evenings from 9.00 pm Israel time (1800 UT) on mediumwave 1539 kHz and FM 98.7 MHz. Live broadcasts can also be heard via the station's site http://www.israelnationalnews.com (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 29 August 2003 via DXLD) ** JAPAN [non]. Radio Japón en 9660, el 28/08, a las 0506, emitía su servicio en español para América Central. El problema: este servicio debe salir por la frecuencia de 11895. Lamentablemente, las antenas de los 9660 no está dirigidas hacia esta zona. Severamente interferida. SINPO 3/2. 73's y buen DX (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Yaesu FT-890, Antena TH3MK3, DX LISTENING DIGEST) via Guiana French ** KOREA NORTH. Re Voice of Korea on 6070: This frequency originates not from the foreign service transmitter centre Kujang but is listed as Kanggye 250 kW, obviously sharing the transmitter with KCBS 6100. Observations by Olle Alm left hardly a doubt that this is one of the Brown Boveri transmitters from the closed Swiss sites obtained by North Korea (Kai Ludwig, Germany, Aug 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** KOREA SOUTH. ENGLISH RADIO SET TO GO ON AIR http://times.hankooki.com/lpage/nation/200308/kt2003082818193011990.htm SEOUL (Yonhap) -- South Korea's first English-language radio station will begin broadcasting next week on the southern resort island of Cheju, a state-run cable television station said Thursday. Arirang TV said it will air 18 hours of FM stereo programs per day, mostly consisting of up-to-the-minute news on traffic conditions, weather and South Korea's tourist attractions and culture. The launch of English-language radio from Monday is part of the government's plan to boost the nation's image and tourism industry after last year's successful hosting of the FIFA World Cup finals, Arirang TV said. The station began its English-only television programs in 1997, but has yet to air radio programs. It aims to establish similar English radio stations in Seoul and Incheon [sic] next year and in all major cities and provinces by 2006 (via Mike Terry, DXLD) Not only WTFK, but what is the *name* of the station? Geez (gh) ** MONGOLIA. 4865v, Mongol Radio and TV, Dalanzad (presumed), 1300- 1400*, Aug 08 and 09, Mongolian talks by man and woman, typical Mongolian music. The audio is terrible, and the crystal is defect, so it drifts from 4864.90 to 4865.20 (Roalnd Schulze, Philippines, Aug 27 DSWCI DX Window Aug 29 via DXLD) 4895, Mongolian Radio, *2100-2104, Aug 20, Interval signal repeated several times till 2102, then an announcement and National Anthem (choir singing) followed. At 2104 male voice in studio started speaking. 35333. Much weaker on 4830 (I've been able to make a conclusion about program equality only during the Anthem.) Moreover, there was a strange tone signal on 4830 (Dmitiri Mezin, Kazan, Russia, in Signal via Aug 27 DSWCI DX Window Aug 29 via DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. Change to RNZI Schedule Effective 9/1/03, Radio New Zealand International is going to a 24 hour schedule, and a new weekday Pacific current affairs magazine, ``Dateline Pacific,`` will join the schedule several times a day. As a result, please note the following changes to the information provided in this month`s SW Guide section (p. 55): 0308 M-F Dateline Pacific 0330 M New Music Releases; T Mailbox/RNZI Talk, W Tradewinds, H World in Sport, F Pacific Correspondent 1100 M-F Pacific Regional News 1108 M-F (as 0308 M-F) 1130 M-F (as 0330 M-F) 1300 S/A RNZ News, M-F (as 0300-0400 M-F) 1308 S Tagata o te Moana, A New Music Releases 1335 S/A tba 1400 D RNZ News 1405 S Touchstone, M-F relay National Radio, A In a Mellow Tone 1430 S Hymns 1500 S/A RNZ News, M-F (as 0300-0400 M-F) 1508 S/A Forces Radio 1600 D RNZ News 1605 S/A relay National Radio, M-F Mana Tagata 1630 M-F relay National Radio Additional information will appear in October`s SWG. In the interim, consult RNZI`s web site at http://www.rnzi.com (Sept MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) ** NIGERIA. Thanks to a tip in the latest DXLD 3-155 have just tuned in to Voice of Nigeria on new 17800 kHz. Strong and clear in English at this time (2145 UT on Thursday 28th). 73s (Dave Kenny, UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 17800, V. of Nigeria 8/28 2235-2300*. Program "Global Peace", with man discussing "using democracy to achieve peace in Africa"; 2245-54 YL with news; 2255 "Mental Vision" feature; 2259 closing anmt, address, anthem. Good signal (John Wilkins, Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Drake R-8. 100-foot RW. Cumbre DX via DXLD) I was listening at the same time, Aug 28 from 2100 with a program on the arts, 2200 five minutes of news, and a mix of other features, plus numerous program promos giving several airtimes for each. But I never heard a frequency announced. If they were going to make a big move from 15 to 17 MHz, they should have been promoting it for at least a week in advance, at least on their own air, if not in press releases to the shortwave/DX media! Why am I not surprised that still on Aug 29, http://www.voiceofnigeria.org/frequency.html claims to be on 15120 with no mention of 17800. The female continuity announcer was relatively easy to understand, but not many of the other speakers, especially externally recorded actualities. Absolutely no interference, and a strong signal tho with some flutter, but the modulation as usual was not up to par. Nothing on 15120. However, on Fri Aug 29 around 1717 there was again a strong but very undermodulated signal, language uncertain, on 15120. By 2100 recheck, nothing on 15120, and a weak and very fluttery signal on 17800 again (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 17800, VON in English must be ex-15120. I haven't heard it for a few days. Thanx for that info! 11770, by the way, is not //7255. I heard them signing on at 1957 on 7255 a few times, but never before that time. Distorted yesterday (Thorsten Hallmann, Münster, Germany, Aug 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Voice of Nigeria is heard on air at tune in 0640 in English on 17800 today Aug.29. A very strong signal but co-channel with RFI via Issoudun in French. A presumed move from 15120, which is empty. 7255 is still operating and currently [0630] at fair strength in French. (Noel R. Green [Blackpool-UK], Cumbre DX via DXLD) Voice of Nigeria is still on 17800 kHz this morning (Friday 29th), heard in English from tune-in at 0845 UT with very strong signal. This frequency may replace 15120 kHz which is currently unheard. 73s (Dave Kenny, UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 17800, V. of Nigeria, Tnx CumbreDX tips, 2236-2247 29 Aug, Interview of M by W in English to 2242. Horrible audio sounding as though it was recorded from inside a cardboard tube!! 2243-2245 program promos for "African Forces", "From the Bookshelf", and "Literary Corner". 2245 ID by W followed by news. Strong but quite undermodulated. Wonder if this is the old 19 mb transmitter (Dave Valko, Dunlo PA, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** PARAGUAY? Re PIRATE (South America). 11420.3, R. Piranha Internacional --- Mmm... it could be Paraguay, too... since there is no jungle in Uruguay, for what we just call "monte" (meaning woods. It is last sentence about BC SW activity that has cue for me --- since Paraguay has most of the channels inactive (Nacional, Encarnación, etc. have been inactive lately, only América but on irregular basis), meanwhile Uruguay has kept its modest presence) (Horacio A. Nigro Montevideo - Uruguay, Aug 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. 4992.6, R. Ancash, Huaraz. Here in Chimbote there is a friend of mine working in R. Ancash and he helps me to get QSL verification for my friends. My address is: César Pérez Dioses, Correo Central, Chimbote, Peru (Pérez, Aug 27 DSWCI DX Window Aug 29 via DXLD) ** PUERTO RICO. La puertorriqueña "Notiuno", ha sido escuchada en los 910 kHz, a las 0406 UT, el 28/08, SINPO 3/3, con el programa "Contacto con Notiuno". Señal sostenida. También captada en los 760, con ID's como "Notiuno 630". Me llamó la atención que los programas de ambas frecuencias son diferentes en ciertos momentos y luego se enlazan entre sí. 810 AM, de Puerto Rico, con señal estable, el 28/08, a las 0427, con temas de Michael Sembello "Maniac" y Bee Gees "Night Fever" (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Yaesu FT-890, Antena TH3MK3, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** RUSSIA. 17705, new "Russian International Radio" program (Cf. DX- Window no. 225) via DTK (joint venture of Voice of Russia and private Russkoye Radio), popping on at 1356, Aug 24, just before published *1400. In mid-program, upbeat format, man talking; full ID at 1400, mentioned both "Radio Kompanya Golos Rossii" and "Russkoye Mezhdunarodnoye Radio," then seeming news by woman, into Russian pop vocals at 1406, ID again 1412, by which time reception had gotten noisy. Pretty good strength, tho still a little fady at this hour. Closed at 1500* after Voice of Russia IS. -- Also, 9405, maybe this one at 2045, Aug 23, poor signal under merciless RTTY, off at 2100, which is their published s/off time; seemed Russian, but nothing definitive on ID (Jerry Berg, MA, Aug 27 DSWCI DX Window Aug 29 via DXLD) "Russian International Radio" is based on an agreement on "strategic partnership" which the head of The Voice of Russia (VOR), Armen Oganesyan and Sergey Arkhipov, the president of the "Russian Media Group" (which owns Russkoye Radio), signed in February 2003. The new service is to be broadcast not only on MW & SW, but also on satellite for the Russian diaspora around the world. Oganesyan expects that the new service could more than double the audience of VOR's Russian language programmes which currently counts 100 million listeners worldwide. Russkoye Radio http://www.rusradio.ru is Russia's commercial network No 1. Not so long ago the station received an award by president Putin for promoting Russian language and culture (Bernd Trutenau in Dxplorer via Aug 27 DSWCI DX Window Aug 29 via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. Re ** VIETNAM [non]. Degar Voice (via Atamanovka, Russia) Atamanovka is the transmitter site east of Chita (cf. WRTH 2003 pg. 527 with exact coordinates). 73s, (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, DX LISTENING DIGEST) a.k.a.: Chita (Kai Ludwig, Germany, DX LISTENING DIGEST) The Atamanovka site is listed on the following page under Chita. http://www.mindspring.com/~ttmdoc/shortwave_radio_transmitters_in_.htm (Steve Lare, Holland, MI, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SAUDI ARABIA [non]. UK-BASED SAUDI OPPOSITION TV REPORTEDLY STOPS BROADCASTING | Text of report entitled: "TV transmission stops 'hopefully temporary'. Radio channel still beamed on the old frequency"; published by Movement for Islamic Reform web site on 29 August Transmission of Al-Islah [satellite] television has ceased once again due to pressure from the Saudi government on Eutelsat, [the company] which owns the satellite through which the channel broadcasts. Eutelsat used the pretext of some missing documents and chose the end of the week in order make it difficult for officials in charge of the channel to resort to lawyers or official and legal parties. The movement [MIRA] hopes that the channel's disappearance will not be for long and that steps will be taken to resume transmission and force the party that discontinued the transmission to pay compensation for the duration of the stoppage. We want to point out that transmission on the radio channel is still being carried on the old frequency: that is, 11096 with vertical polarity. Information for the radio channel: Satellite: Hotbird 6 Satellite Channel: 129 Bouquet: Deutsche Telekom Polarity: Vertical Symbol Rate: 27500 FEC: 3/4 Video PID: 8191 Audio PID: 74 Source: Movement for Islamic Reform web site, UK, in Arabic 29 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) What about SW??? ** SOUTH AFRICA. Estación en idioma inglés en 3255.05 kHz, la cual a todas luces parece ser africana. ¿Liberia, Botswana? Señal más fuerte a las 0427. Demasiada estática. Ya desvanecida a las 0500. (29/08). (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Yaesu FT-890, Antena TH3MK3, DX LISTENING DIGEST) BBCWS relay from RSA, scheduled 0300-0500 (gh) ** UKRAINE [and non]. Early checking of RUI's new 9810 kHz. August 29, 2003 --- 0000 UT 9805 nothing; 9810 Arabic type music; 9815 unID; 9820 R. Habana Cuba positive ID. 0015 UT same as 0000 0030 UT 9805 R. Farda positive ID; others same as 0000 UT 0045 UT same as 0030. Unable to check August 28, 2003 as we were having terrible thunderstorms, again. 73, (Kraig Krist, VA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. Achala Sharma, head of BBC`s Hindi Service has been awarded the World Hindi Honour at the seventh World Hindi Conference held in Surinam. Sharma has been recognized for her ``significant contributions to the development and popularity of the Hindi language in the field of broadcast and literature``. For 18 years, Sharma has been instrumental in turning BBC Hindi into a leading Hindi-language radio and online service. Among other achievements, she has to her credit two collections of radio plays, `Passport` and `Jaren` (Roots) which were recently released in London. She has also authored two novels and three collections of short stories (The Channel, AIB, July 2003, via DXLD) ** U K. A few months ago I posted a NY Post editorial on the Kelly affair stating (while holding my nose) that it made some good points. That editorial at least had some factual basis for its mostly measured assertions. Today, the Post published a follow-up editorial on the matter and it should be noted that the paper has reverted to its more common, less measured and less factual approach. In short, the editorial is a load of you-know-what. Here it is, annotated with my comments: http://www.topica.com/lists/swprograms/read/message.html?sort=d&mid=1714317527&start=17985 (John Figliozzi, NY, Aug 28, swprograms via DXLD) Further discussion, response by Joe Buch in next message: http://www.topica.com/lists/swprograms/read/message.html?sort=d&mid=1714318704&start=17986 (Joe Buch, ibid.) And John Figliozzi replies: http://www.topica.com/lists/swprograms/read/message.html?sort=d&mid=1714319051&start=17987 (swprograms via gh, DXLD) BRITISH OFFICIAL DENIES ROLE IN NAMING BBC SOURCE By Glenn Frankel, Washington Post Foreign Service, Thursday, August 28, 2003; Page A20 LONDON, Aug. 27 -- Defense Secretary Geoffrey Hoon testified today that Prime Minister Tony Blair's aides, and not him, were behind the government's decision to identify a British weapons expert as the source for a BBC report questioning a public intelligence dossier on Iraq's access to weapons of mass destruction. . http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A56091-2003Aug27.html (via Kraig Krist, DXLD) ** U S A. TRAILER PARK MINISTRIES MYSTERY SOLVED One of the longest running mysteries in North American pirate radio DX circles has revolved around The Voice of Trailer Park Ministries. First appearing on the shortwave bands in October 1989, this unusual religious pirate broadcaster created controversy right from the beginning. Host R. F. Fields transmitted religious sermons along with frequent station identifications. Those lengthy identifications normally were, ``Hello and good evening to all our radio friends, American Forces everywhere, and all the ships at sea. You are tuned in to Radio Voice of Trailer Park Ministry, America`s first shortwave pirate religious broadcaster. This is Rev. R. F. Fields.`` However, for more than a decade there has been some controversy about what the actual identification of this station is. Some DXers, including your editor, heard the ID as Radio Voice of Kramer`s Park Ministry. The station announced no address, and thus it had no means of responding to correspondence from listeners. Further, R. F. Fields did not provide any answers to this puzzle by publicizing his station. All of this coy mystery has now come to an end. As we see here, R. F. Fields has now been sending out QSL sheets for ancient receptions of his station by many DXers. They clearly show that Rev. R. F. Fields` station actually is called The Voice of Trailer Park Ministries. Further, Fields claims to be ``The only certified sane radio preacher.`` The text of his QSL sheet reads, in part: THE VOICE OF TRAILER PARK MINISTRIES Reverend Doctor R. F. Fields ``The only certified sane radio preacher`` ``I am sorry to take so long to send this QSL. My radio station has been off the air for over 4 years because an evil neighbor at the Shady Grove Trailer Park called the Orlando Police and said that my radio station interfered with watching Saturday Night Live and the police came out and talked to me and then they came back with a socialist worker and talked to me again and then they came back with the socialist worker and a ambulance and the ambulance drivers chased me and caught me where I was hiding under a doublewide down the street and strapped me down to a stretcher and took me to the hospital and the doctors at the hospital said that I has (sic) loose screws in the steel plate that the Army doctors put in my head after I was shot in the head by an artillery shell in the Vietnamese War and that they needed to fix the screws and that my brain needed a rest. They fixed the screws and put me in the State Hospital for my brain to rest and the nurses at the State Hospital would not let me get online because they said that I got agitated too easy and that my brain would not rest if I got online so I didn`t get to look up my reception reports until now because a doctor at the state hospital gave me a piece of paper that says I am certified sane and told me that they were letting me loose and I can get online now.`` ``I am sending out QSLs to my old listeners now and I want you to know that I am going to get me a new True Light Trailer and Emergency Drive-In Church after I get out of the half-way house where I live now and I will be able to return to the airwaves this fall or winter with an improved station and better coverage so listen for me around 6955 kHz on holiday weekends and other weekend nights around November and December 2003.`` Fields` QSLs also reveal that the station uses a B&W 5100B transmitter with crystal control and 120 watts. The signal is fed into a vertical antenna. As you see here, Fields has future plans to return to the shortwave broadcasting bands. If you hear this one, you will tune in one of the most mysterious pirate stations that has ever bounced a signal off the ionosphere. Also, you will know that the operator of this one actually has a sheet of paper providing medical certification that Rev. Fields is in fact ``The only certified sane radio preacher.`` If you hear him, let us know! (George Zeller, Outer Limits, Sept MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) ** U S A. Hey Glenn! LOVE DX Digest. Right, currently listening to WRMI out of Miami, USA, up here in Alberta, Canada. (My laptop battery charging nearby is adding an interesting background noise.) Figured I'd pass on that they're talking about cutbacks, and are recommending you keep up at their website http://www.wrmi.net as there are big changes afoot, including, amongst other things, frequency changes. Don't know if this is of use for DX Digest, but you ask for people to submit news, so there you go:) Keep up the good work (Steve, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Steve, Thanks for the news, but I am wondering if this really concerns WRMI itself, or some program carried by the station? When did you hear it? Was it Jeff White of WRMI or someone else speaking? Nothing new at the WRMI site, with the program schedule still dated July 1 Regards, (Glenn to Steve, cc to Jeff White, via DXLD) Glenn -- I don't have the slightest idea what Steve is referring to. As you say, maybe it's some program we broadcast (IBC? Christian Media Network?). We certainly haven't said anything like that, that I can recall (Jeff White, WRMI Miami Aug 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [non]. 15650, Pan American Broadcasting, 1430-1445, broadcasts in Arabic under the name ``Catholique Broadcasting Radio``, 55444. The address as heard: PO BOX 144, Michigan, Victoria 3132 USA (Mohamed Kallel, Tunisia, Aug 27 DSWCI DX Window Aug 29 via DXLD) The ZIP-code is not complete. They can also be contacted by e-mail at gbernald@panambc.com (DSWCI Ed) 3132 is an Australian postcode, and indeed Google search on ``Victoria 3132`` produces a town called Mitcham! (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. MORE ABOUT CLASSICAL MUSIC ON RADIO Glenn: Having been the PD of five classical FM stations in the Monterey - San José - to San Francisco area over a period lasting a total of 27 years, I can say that this niche format is becoming harder and harder to "service". If you look at the posts to the newsgroup rec.music.classical.recordings you will see that almost no one agrees with anybody else, and that the really dedicated, advanced listeners are INCREDIBLY fussy to the point of neurosis. And even the ordinary "civilian" listeners who used to call and write the stations I worked for often contributed only criticism, never helpful support. It seems to me that this art form is so "delicate" that mass broadcasting to try to reach a common demoninator is next to impossible -- at least in this culture. Perhaps in the thirties, when the opera came on once a week, the Philharmonic-Symphony of New York and Boston Symphonies and Philadelphia Orchestra had their two hour network hookups, and when records of things like the Beethoven Seventh Symphony cost the equivalent of a working man's ENTIRE week's wages, broadcasting a LITTLE bit of mass-appeal classical music made sense. I think historians agree that perhaps 10% or even more of the overall audience heard at least SOME classical music, via radio. Now it's down to 1% --- or less. Figuring the change in population demographics, the number is still appallingly tiny. And if -- in that 1% of the total audience -- the listeners are SO fragmented, cranky, bigoted, opinionated, and picky - - you can see that it will be hard to generate audience satisfaction, station loyalty, and appreciative listeners who will provide supportive feedback to sponsors. Stations are much more likely to get a letter complaining about something than one praising an element in the broadcast. And the letters are all so self-cancelling! One guy HATES the harpsichord and baroque music; another one complains if Stravinsky or Copland or Messiaen are aired. I have even had people write that they dislike Mozart but like Haydn, and vice versa. What is one to MAKE of that? How can you SERVE these people? Now, given the perhaps 2 to 5 mile TOTAL radius of the mono coverage of an LPFM transmitter -- or the -- say -- 1 mile coverage of the stereo multiplex signal with any decent fidelity -- how are you going to reach enough folks to develop a satisfactory audience base? Especially if a large percentage of them -- that is, of the couple of dozen of souls in total -- seem to HATE so much music by so many composers of specific styles, and dislike so many artists' interpretations? Streaming via the web is such a great disappointment. As you pointed out, even the big players like the BBC cannot produce a reliable stream for something like the Proms concert. And can a web stream even BEGIN to deal adequately with the sonic demands of Mahler's Eighth? On the other hand, you can go to the neighborhood Tower store and pick up -- say -- the Sony Essential Classics CD edition of Mahler's Eighth conducted by Michael Gielen (an excellent performance, all contained on one disk) and acquire the piece for about $5-6. The sound is superb, better than ANY possible FM or web transmission; and it's not even a modern recording! It is from an analogue master tape that dates from 1981; yet it's VASTLY superior to the transmission capabilities of state-of-the-art FM stereo. It would be a tremendous technical challenge for a 100 kW multiplex stereo station to transmit this CD without significant compression or reduction in tone quality to a coverage area radius of about 20 miles; outside of that, the signal would be hissy, noisy, and unstable. How many folks are going to be in the coverage radius of the LPFM station that would have the temerity to play the Mahler Eighth? What damage is going to have to be done to the musical characteristics of Mahler's scoring in order to make the work intelligible? Is it worth the effort? Does it promote the culture of music with a significant impact to really help sustain it? I say no. It's time to face facts. Classical music survived BEFORE broadcasting. Schubert quartets were played and loved before Fessenden, De Forest, and Armstrong. They'll be played and loved long after DRM and IBOC are obsolete. We do not require the efforts of ineffectual, flickering, and inconsequential pipsqueak FM signals to keep "culture" alive in our hearts. All we require is the will to seek it out, each in our own individual way, be it via studying singing or playing, attending musical performances, or going to the public library for its available resources. Yours, (Steve Waldee - "reformed" radio station program director, Aug 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. LPFM: ALL THAT FUSS FOR NOTHING? Report Seems to Indicate That FM Dial Could Accommodate More LPFM Channel Allocations by Mario Hieb, P.E. The FCC has released a new study that could change the face of FM radio as we know it. Radio World asked me to study the report and share my observations. The report gives a green light to low -- power FM stations that would operate without third -- adjacent-channel protection to existing stations, and could open the door to more -- lenient assignments of full -- power FMs and FM translators. Lab tests also showed LPFMs are not likely to interfere with digital receivers; the HD Radio signals remained robust, Mitre stated. . . http://www.radioworld.com/reference-room/special-report/01_rw_lpfm_4.shtml (RW Online Sept 1 via DXLD) ** U S A. MAKING WAVES: COMMUNITY RADIO FOR A COMMUNITY THAT CARES LIVING By Kelly Crowley, Roundup staff reporter Tuesday, August 26 A "labor of love" is how John and Lu Carpino refer to their unique radio station, KRIM 96.3 FM. Nearly 20 years together, John and Lu Carpino have embarked on a new venture as the "co-management team" of KRIM 96.3 FM. "John has his forte and I`m his sidekick," Lu said. "We make a good team." Unlike the vast majority of radio stations, KRIM is a public radio station with a multi-format, which means that when you tune in to 96.3, you may hear anything from folk and reggae to jazz and blues. "We were approached by the Payson Council of Music Arts who had obtained a license for low-powered FM," Lu said. "Because of our combined experience in radio, they asked us to assist them in getting it started." Steve Bingham, president of KRIM received the first FCC low-powered FM license in the state of Arizona. When he told John that it would be a multi-format station, he got very excited. "All types of music are valid," John said. "We are trying to expand Payson`s musical horizons and do it in a way that is successful. We rely on community support, so we play music that is tasteful." "It`s kind of like a daily music lesson," Lu said. KRIM first went on the air waves amidst the Rodeo-Chediski Fire. "It was trial by fire," Lu said. "We started going to all the fire briefings and putting them on the air," John said. Between their motley mix of music, John and Lu updated evacuees on the fire. The two joke that while few Payson residents had discovered their new radio station, most of the evacuees were tuned in. "That`s how part of our mission statement came to be," Lu said. "I just happened to say, `community radio for a community that cares` -- and it stuck. Music and public service have always been a big part of life for the Carpinos. Nearly 20 years ago, the two met while they were both teachers in Yuma. "John was performing one night and I was there with some friends who encouraged me to get up on stage and sing with him, " Lu said. "The rest is history." The Carpinos have been a Payson fixture for years, performing, broadcasting and working in the Payson school district. But when the opportunity to run a public radio station came their way, they had to grab it. "Public radio is a beautiful thing," John said. "We are offering something totally special and unique to this area and the community is embracing it." KRIM has started a new alliance with the Sedona Cultural Center and the Putumayo world music label. Because of this new friendship, they have been able to interview international stars from their studio. "We were able to have Oliver Mtukudzi, Zimbabwe`s number one star, on our station -- talking to people in Payson," John said. "Music really is the universal language and we`ve slowly been expanding our selection to include world music -- French folk songs, Mexican music, South African music." No doubt, listeners will hear music that they won`t on stations that play the same top ten tunes every few hours. "I like discovering acts that I`ve heard about but never reach the top of the charts -- the hidden gems," John says. "If you want the top of the charts, you`re listening to the wrong station. We play quality artists with quality songs." Although they expose listeners to the lesser-known artist, the Carpinos still love to play the old favorites. "I`m a Flashback Fridays kind of girl," Lu said. Flashback Friday features music from the 50`s, 60`s and 70`s. While a large part of KRIM`s mission is to expand musical awareness, the fact that it is a public radio station also carries with it a responsibility, according to John and Lu. KRIM is radio by the people, for the people. "We are public radio which is a very different animal than commercial radio," Johns said. "We are a non-profit station run by a non-profit organization." "The station belongs to the community and they dictate what direction we go in," Lu said. The Carpinos have been pleasantly surprised by the positive feedback from the public. "People have really supported us and thanked us for bringing this kind of music variety to Payson," Lu said. The Carpinos make an effort to do a lot for the community through the station. "Part of our mission is to promote the creative and musical arts," Lu said. Several local and regional bands such as Hans Olsen, the John Scott Band, Code Blue and Walkin` Cane Mark, even the high school choir, have visited the KRIM studio and treated listeners to a live performance. John and Lu frequently invite representatives from local nonprofits to come on their morning show, Good Morning Payson, and talk about their organizations or an issue of interest in the community. "Town Manager Fred Carpenter comes in once a month to talk town business and play some music," Lu said. Every Friday morning, KRIM has a trivia game they do in conjunction with the Mazatzal Casino to raise money for charities in town. "When we connected with the casino, Mark Kaplan and I were able to iron out the details of our trivia game," Lu said. "For every correct answer, $10 is donated to a nonprofit." KRIM and the casino have already raised more than $2,000 for organizations such as the Time Out Shelter, the Salvation Army and the Rim Country Literacy Program. "Mark does a great job writing the trivia questions," Lu said. "We all have a good laugh and raise money for local charities." John and Lu Carpino have been a complementary duo since they first harmonized on stage 20 years ago. "John has his forte and I`m his sidekick," Lu said. "We make a good team." John`s creative ability and Lu`s business savvy have resulted in Payson`s very own community radio station -- the only one of its kind in the state. KRIM 96.3 BROADCAST SCHEDULE [UT -7 yearound] Monday through Friday 6 - 7 a.m., House Blend 7 - 10 a.m., "Good Morning Payson" with John and Lu Carpino. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m., KRIM`s House Blend. A wonderful mix of light jazz, folk, blues and contemporary album cuts, spiced-up with some tasty hidden gems. Monday through Sunday 6 - 7 p.m., KRIM`s Classical Music Hour ... the music of the masters. 7 - 8 p.m., Big Band Serenade. The best in big band, swing & classic jazz Monday through Thursday 8 p.m. - 12 Midnight, Jazz in the Pines. Friday and Saturday 8 p.m. - 12 Midnight, T.G.I.F. & S. - Blues, Blues Rock and great Album Rock Sunday 6 - 9 a.m., Classical, Baroque and Renaissance 9 a.m. - 4 p.m., House Blend 4 - 5 p.m., The Arizona Music Scene 5 - 6 p.m., Local music spotlight Sunday 8 p.m. - 12 Midnight, Jazz in the Pines Saturday 6 a.m. - 2 p.m., The "Acoustic Siesta" ... our finest blend of acoustic music. 2 - 4 p.m., Bluegrass, Folk and Americana. 4 - 6 p.m., Reggae Under the Rim, Reggae & World Music Seven days a week 12 midnight - 6 a.m., The Night Shift ....Blues, Cool Jazz, Folk and Americana Don`t miss Thank You Thursdays and Flashback Fridays on Good Morning Payson, "Just Ask Lu" Wednesdays at 9 a.m., plus "Trivia Time," Fridays at 10 a.m. Copyright (c) 2002 The Payson Roundup, all rights reserved (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. FCC BLACKLISTS rfb FOR GOOD By IAN BISHOP Reformer Washington Bureau WASHINGTON -- Even with the community squarely behind them, operators of radio free brattleboro will never receive a federal broadcast license, federal regulators said Tuesday. http://www.reformer.com/Stories/0,1413,102~8862~1593867,00.html (Brattleboro Refoermer, Aug 27, via Jill Dybka, DXLD) http://www.thetranscript.com/Stories/0,1413,103~9054~1594492,00.html (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. ANNOUNCEMENTS Labor Day Specials, Monday (9/01) [UT -7] Songs that Work, 9 AM-Noon... An exploration of great American songwriting. Hosted by Liza Richardson. Work Song: A Labor Day Special, 1-4 PM... A look at American music that reflects life and work. Hosted by Rene Engel. Bob Hope: Thanks for the Memories, 4-5 PM... A remembrance of Bob Hope's life and career. Hosted by Susan Stamberg. The Music Makers: Gospel Into Soul, 7-9 PM... A private look behind the public persona of Patti LaBelle. Hosted by Whoopi Goldberg. Chocolate City, 9 PM-Midnight... A special three-hour edition. Hosted by Garth Trinidad (KCRW weekly previews via DXLD) HPFM, webcaster ** U S A. RADIO LISTENERS FACED WITH STATIC BY JULIEN GORBACH keysnews.com http://keysnews.com/285079715769926.bsp.htm Keys residents must wade through a sea of static at the left end of their radio dials because, for the past three years, a National Public Radio member station and a local Christian group have been at loggerheads over a federal license to transmit here. WLRN is the Miami-based station that carries NPR, the nearly 30-year- old, nonprofit content provider featuring news programs and talk shows. The station currently broadcasts to the Keys with four "translators"-- devices that are much less powerful than radio transmitters, and are rendered even less functional by the unique elongated geography of the islands. A person driving from Key West to Marathon has to switch channels three times to follow WLRN's broadcast, picking it up from the translators in Key West, Big Pine Key and Grassy Key. Christian radio listeners struggle with the same problem. Even in the areas where the translators are located, reception is uneven at best. On Feb. 17, 2000, WLRN applied for a license from the Federal Communications Commission to build a transmission facility in Marathon. Responding to the public notice, two more groups filed applications before the deadline, in late April and early May. The first was Broadcasting for the Challenged, a Memphis-based company. The second was Tower of Praise, a nonprofit based in Big Pine Key that has for years been interested in setting up a Christian radio station. All three groups are competing to transmit on 91.5, the last local channel that engineers have determined is still available for noncommercial broadcasts. The FCC never decided who should receive the license because its rules for judgment were challenged. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Washington, D.C. Circuit will hear the challenge next month. Regardless of the whether the rules are upheld or overturned, neither possibility promises good news for NPR fans in the Keys. Under the current system, Tower of Praise has the best shot at the license because the rules favor local applicants. If the rules are overturned, it would take about two years for a new system to be adopted, according to the FCC. WLRN manager Ted Eldredge said he has to explain the problem every day, when Keys residents call in to complain. With nearly 22 million listeners each week, NPR's audience equals the circulation of the top 42 American newspapers combined, according to NPR spokeswoman Jessamyn Sarmiento. "I am very frustrated," Eldredge said. "We have spent the best part of two years trying to find any alternative, and there is nothing that is affordable." Tower of Praise President Steve Lawes asked what National Public Radio was when he was reached about the issue. Lawes, the pastor at the Vineyard Fellowship Church in Big Pine Key, said he was under the understanding that his competitors were Broadcasting for the Challenged and the Miami-Dade school board. WLRN is licensed to the school board, and the board is the entity listed on the station's application. Eldredge said Tower of Praise had been unwilling to negotiate over the license, but Lawes said he knew nothing about negotiation attempts. "It's possible the lawyers all talked, I don't really know," he said. "I don't believe we have viewed ourselves as standing in anybody's way." Lawes believes the real problem is the lack of frequencies. He considers all three applicants legitimate, and said he would be willing to work with them to find a solution. "I am pretty amenable, I think," he said. Representatives of Broadcasting for the Challenged did not return numerous calls for comment. But the company, which has applied for hundreds of licenses nationwide, is generally willing to negotiate with its competitors, according to Marc Hand, managing director for Public Radio Capital, a nonprofit that assists public radio stations expand service by coordinating efforts on a national level (Keysnews.com via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** U S A. Public radio pioneer Phil Goodman, W5YVT, SK: Philip I. Goodman, W5YVT (ex-K4FXB), of Marietta, Georgia, died August 23. He was 70. Goodman was instrumental in establishing the Georgia Public Radio Network -- known formerly as Peach State Radio -- in 1985. The network now includes 15 stations statewide. An Amateur Radio operator since 1953, Goodman was an ARRL Life Member. He`d served as a communications officer in the US Navy and was an avid electronics enthusiast (ARRL August 27 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. MOVING DAY PART 3 A few months ago I wrote about stations moving on the radio dial to new frequencies. This month, I`m writing about stations that move in the traditional sense – from one city to another. These moves are usually trivial – moving from one suburb to another, etc.. But, occasionally the moves are significant. These changes can seriously affect your ability to DX certain frequencies. An example: WHTE-1690 is the expandedband permit for WDDD-810 Johnson City, Illinois. Johnson City is in extreme southern Illinois, roughly 80 miles southeast of St. Louis and roughly 300 miles south of Chicago. Obviously this station will not be a serious impediment to DXing 1690 in Chicago. Indeed, WHTE could actually be DX for a Chicago listener. However, WHTE has applied to move to Berwyn, Illinois. Berwyn is in northern Illinois; it actually borders on the city of Chicago. If the move is granted, 1690 won`t stay open in Chicago for long. AM moves are relatively simple. The station must show that it can operate with the requested power and antenna at the new location without interfering with other stations, and while providing a ``city grade`` signal across the new city. These are essentially the same conditions that would need to be met if a completely new station were proposed. Only one additional requirement is imposed: the move cannot deprive the original city of its only operating radio station. (WHTE has applied to move coöwned station WDDD-FM from Marion, Illinois, to Johnson City. This would ensure Johnson City would still have a radio station. Marion would still have WGGH-AM and WAWJ-FM.) For FM and television, another step is necessary. FM and TV stations can only be established on channels that are ``allotted`` to the community from which the station proposes to operate. For example, the owners of station WJOI-FM, Springfield, Tennessee, have applied to move the station to Oak Grove, Kentucky. Before they can move the station itself, they must move the station`s 94.3 FM allotment. Only after the new allotment is granted can the station apply to modify its license to specify the new city. It should be noted that translators and low-power TV stations are not required to use allotted channels. They may change city at will (provided interference-protection limits are met). As I noted above with regard to WHTE-1690, sometimes one change in one community triggers more changes. (Some recent moves in Alabama have triggered nearly a dozen changes in two states.) Often these ``cascading`` changes are purely administrative. In WHTE`s case, WDDD- FM already provides a ``city-grade`` signal to both its existing city (Marion) and the proposed new city. (Johnson City). The WDDD tower won`t move, and the station will remain on 107.3 FM. Chances are the only things that will change at WDDD-FM are the hourly identification announcement and the location of the ``public file.`` (Doug Smith, American Bandscan, Sept MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) ** U S A. AL FRANKEN: THROWING PUNCHES AND PUNCH LINES, by Howard Kurtz http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A56418-2003Aug27?language=printer (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. RADIO LAW: ANOTHER RF APPROACH TO ALERT MOTORISTS OF LOCAL EMERGENCIES SIDELINED The FCC`s Office of Engineering and Technology took only three days to dismiss the latest attempt to gain experimental access to broadcast frequencies for alerting motorists of nearby emergency situations. This time, TV Channel 7`s spectrum was in the cross hairs. The proponent was ``EVA,`` short for Emergency Vehicle Alert. While you won`t find this case mentioned in the FCC`s Daily Digest but the full scoop is available in cyberspace at http://www.earthsignals.com/add_CGC/EVA.htm (CGC via Amateur Radio Newsline Aug 29 via John Norfolk, DXLD)) ** U S A. RADIO INTERFERENCE CAUSES STATIC Local emergency communications hampered By JENNIFER FUNK, Staff writer PORT CLINTON [Ohio] -- Off and on interference on countywide emergency radio channels has prompted local Emergency Management Agency officials to ask for help from the federal government. Ottawa County EMA Director Jim Greer wants the Federal Communication Commission to pinpoint the source of the interference and "take the necessary steps to stop" it.. . . http://www.portclintonnewsherald.com/news/stories/20030827/localnews/140864.html (via Jilly Dybka, TN, DXLD) ** U S A. FCC INQUIRY TO STUDY TOWER IMPACT ON MIGRATORY BIRDS The FCC has initiated a Notice of Inquiry (NOI) to gather comment on the impact communications towers may have on migratory birds. ``One of the FCC`s critical responsibilities is to manage the expansion of communications towers in a way that best preserves the country`s environmental resources,`` the FCC said in a public notice. The NOI in WT Docket 03-187 appears focused primarily on commercial antenna support structures. The FCC said that it`s unaware of any studies sufficient to support a reliable estimate of the number of migratory birds that may have died as a result of collisions with communications towers. The NOI seeks comments and information on scientific research and other related data relevant to migratory bird collisions with communications towers. ``While some literature suggests that certain factors--such as tower height, lighting systems, type of antenna support structure, and location—may increase or decrease the hazards that towers pose to migratory birds, there does not appear to be systematic research on an adequate scale regarding exactly how and to what extent, if at all, these factors contribute to any risk to migratory birds,`` the FCC said. The NOI is available on the FCC Web site http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-03-205A1.doc Interested parties may file comments via the Electronic Comment Filing System http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/ecfs/ ECFS (ARRL August 27 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** URUGUAY. See PARAGUAY ** VENEZUELA. Radio Amazonas ha sido escuchada en los 4939.66 kHz, a las 0345. Transmitía sólo vallenatos. SINPO 3/3. Inusual cierre a las 0404, ya que jamás está hasta tan tarde en onda corta. Con la ausencia de YVTO y de Radio Táchira del cuadrante, Radio Amazonas se convierte así en la única venezolana presente en la onda corta. (27/08). (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Yaesu FT-890, Antena TH3MK3, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VENEZUELA. CONATEL: 200 PETITIONS TO START ALTERNATIVE COMMUNITY MEDIA STATIONS --- Venezuelan telecommunications regulatory body (Conatel) general director, Alvin Lozada reports that he has received around 200 petitions to set up community broadcast stations. "Currently there are 26 community stations on the air throughout Venezuela ... 20 are radio stations and the rest local TV channels." http://www.vheadline.com/readnews.asp?id=10470 (via Jill Dybka, DXLD) ** ZIMBABWE. R. Netherlands Weekly Documentary, Sept. 3-6: Two years ago, the Zimbabwean government created the National Youth Service, allegedly to provide skills and teach patriotism to the southern African nation's youth. But the National Youth Service has a far more sinister goal: to intimidate and silence all opposition to President Robert Mugabe and his ruling ZANU-PF party. Former youth militia members recount the beatings, torture and murders they were forced to carry out. And victims speak of the youth militia's random and at times relentless persecution of anyone suspected of belonging to the opposition. Eric Beauchemin travelled undercover to Zimbabwe and reveals a chilling tale of brainwashing, political manipulation, and the undermining of an entire generation. Broadcast times (UT): Wed 10.00 (Pacific/Asia/Far East), 11.30 (Europe/East Coast USA), 12.30 (USA WRN), 13.30 (Europe WRN), 15.00 (Asia/West Coast USA), 18.00 & 19.30 (Africa), 21.00 (Europe), Thu 00.00 (North America), 04.00 (USA WRN) & 05.00 (North America), Fri 11.00 (Pacific/Asia/Far East/Europe/Eastern USA), 15.30 (Asia/West Coast USA), 19.00 (Africa), 21.30 (Europe), Sat 00.30 (North America) (RN weekly previews via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. unID - 5049.92 ARDS? 1153 8/29. YL talking, too weak to determine lang. If ARDS, down a bit from previous 5049.96. Something on 5050, also (John Wilkins, CO, Cumbre DX via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. Estación de los 5134 kHz, en LSB, está definitivamente en portugués, aunque hay demasiada estática para identificarla. Captada a las 0341 UT (27/08). (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Yaesu FT-890, Antena TH3MK3, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Luego: Hola Glenn, Ahora leyendo la lista me percato de que no es portugués. Sin embargo, las dos veces que lo he escuchado me ha parecido esa lengua. Lo que sí me extraña es que no usen el AM para las emisiones. ¿Desean cubrir más? Saludos, (Adán, ibid.) El uso principal --- si fuera Belarus` --- es para comunicaciones militares, también redifundiendo emisoras entre charlas para llenar la frecuencia y el tiempo (gh, DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. Re 6069.8v: Dear Noel, The programmes on 6020 and 6060 are not always the same. I noted the same program especially around 0700 or 0800, in relation to the 6069.8v. I listen at this moment at 2056 and 6060 is in // with 6069.7 with the religious network `A Voz da Libertacão`. At 2100 different program for a couple of minutes. From 2104 the same programme. According to `Radio List` published by DX Clube do Brazil, the station on this channel is ZYE765 R Capital from Rio de Janeiro also listed in a 2000 edition of TBL published by Willie H. Passmann. I only heard the ID on 6060 (Nicolás Eramo, Argentina, Aug 27 DSWCI DX Window Aug 29 via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. Amigos DXistas en Conexión Digital! Consulta número 3: 6370.02 kHz - he tenido en esta frecuencia durante largo tiempo una estación no identificada, probablemente transmitiendo desde Brasil (hablando português de Brasil). Solamente he notado la estación en las mañanas entre aproximadamente 1000 - 1100 UT. Una señal bastante débil. ¿Algien en la lista sabe algo? (Bjorn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, Aug 29, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ DRM +++ A couple of news items coming from the HFCC Conference: 1) There will be an NASB joint broadcast (of all members) in DRM and analog weekly, for 22 weeks, starting in the B03 season (probably the week of Oct. 26). More details soon. Also, NASB may make a proposal to host the first HFCC conference in the U.S. sometime in the not-too-distant future (Jeff White, FL, Aug 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I received this press release this morning by e-mail from MAYAH Communications... 2ND GENERATION RECEIVER FOR DIGITAL RADIO MONDIALE TO BE PRESENTED AT IFA IN BERLIN At the Internationale Funkausstellung (IFA) in Berlin from August 29th to September 2nd, MAYAH Communications, leading developer of high quality solutions for the broadcasting and telecommunications market, will introduce the 2nd generation receiver for the new Digital Radio Mondiale standard. As joint development of MAYAH, Coding Technologies, Himalaya and AFG, the DRM2010 will be demonstrated at the ARD/DW/ZDF stand in hall 5.3/Stand 03 (technical and scientific forum of the IFA). The new DRM2010 is a multiband receiver for reception of Digital Radio Mondiale programs in the Long-, Medium-, and Short-wave bands, and is also supporting conventional FM and AM analog reception. As the successor of worlds first consumer DRM receiver as introduced by Coding Technologies in 2002, the DRM2010 is smaller and less expensive. MAYAH's general manager Detlef Wiese about the strategic goals: "This matches exactly our core business. We apply our know how in the professional transmission market to a consumer product. The DRM2010 applies newest technology and is an excellent opportunity to bring the next mile stone to the successful project of Digital Radio Mondiale. The co-operation with all involved partners has resulted in a very innovative digital receiver." For further info: http://www.mayah.com/content/press/releases/130803-drm.html (John Figliozzi, NY, Aug 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ AQUA FM TUNES IN THE POOL --- I.J. Hudson, Tech Reporter The swimming season is ending at a lot of pools, but not at the Bethesda-Chevy Chase YMCA, and we went there to try out the Aqua FM. It was developed by Amphicom, a French company specializing in underwater communications and marketed by Aqua Sphere. It's a snorkel with a built-in FM radio. . . http://www.nbc4.com/technology/2432053/detail.html What every DX'er needs. Now if only we can get one that picks up the BBC World Service!! (Message from Tom McNiff, DXLD) POWERLINE COMMUNICATIONS ++++++++++++++++++++++++ Ireland looking at BPL ElectricNews.net http://www.enn.ie/frontpage/news-9372044.html reports that Irish Communications Minister Dermot Ahern has confirmed that the Irish government is launching a pilot program to deploy broadband Internet via electric power lines -- power line carrier communications (PLC) or what the FCC has dubbed ``BPL`` (Broadband over Power Line). The initiative -- part of a 50-million Euro project funded by the Communications Ministry -- would connect schools, homes and businesses in Tuam, County Galway. ``Powerline communications (PLC) systems have the potential to provide an alternative broadband infrastructure, which can compete with local fixed telephony, cable and wireless networks,`` Ahern said. The article asserts that PLC ``has been tested successfully`` in the US and Germany and that networks are operational in several areas. ``St Louis-based Ameren, for example, has been a leader in putting the technology in place and already thousands of people near the Missouri city are using PLC,`` says the article by Matthew Clark. It also notes that PLC trials are under way in Spain, Italy and Germany, while PLC is undergoing testing in Chile, Brazil and Singapore (ARRL August 27 via John Norfolk, DXLD) COMMENTARY ++++++++++ RUMORS OF DX DEATH GREATLY EXAGGERATED! Editorial by Doug Smith W9WI Tests of the new IBOC digital broadcasts have FM and mediumwave DXers nervous. Both AM and FM DXers are saying things like ``I`m going to catch all the DX now while I still can!`` I suppose some of you may wonder why there hasn`t been more concern expressed about IBOC in the pages of this magazine. Well, for one thing I don`t like to expend too much energy trying to change things I know can`t be changed... The LPFM (low power FM) proceedings made it obvious that when an industry with lobbyists wants something from government, they`ll likely get it. (I suppose scanner monitors can cite the ECPA and its amendments; and computer users can cite the DMCA.) If the National Radio Club can hire a team of Washington lobbyists, I suppose we might be able to stop IBOC. Somehow I doubt the NRC`s treasury could support such an effort. Existing broadcasters, and their lobbyists in the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), want IBOC. They seem to feel it`ll stem the gradual decline in radio listening by bringing CD-quality sound to the FM band and FM-quality sound to AM stations. Maybe more importantly, the IBOC system brings digital radio without changing the relative coverage areas of existing stations (unlike the Eureka system used in almost every other country that has digital radio). Radio hobbyists and media activists may try to stop IBOC, but without lobbyists bearing campaign contributions, I doubt they will have any effect. Why such a hullabaloo about IBOC? On the AM dial, the digital data is placed in the outer edges of the station`s assigned channel and in the adjacent channels. An analog station on 710 kHz occupies the area from 705 to 715 kHz; an IBOC station on 710 occupies 695-725. A listener with a good receiver can DX 700 and 720 even if he lives near an analog station on 710. If that analog station switches to IBOC, this listener will no longer be able to DX 700 or 720 kHz. On FM, IBOC stations do not spill into adjacent frequencies. However, they do occupy the outer portions of their existing channels. With analog, these areas are ``guard bands`` between stations. The effect is the same: it will prove impossible to DX frequencies adjacent to those used by IBOC stations. So chances are we will have IBOC in the United States. DXers have two choices: Live with it, or give up and take up a different hobby. DXers have learned to ``live with it`` before. Here are some of the developments that over the years have threatened to put an end to the DX hobby: • Seven-night-a-week AM broadcasting • The end of the typical midnight-6am silent period • Power increases on Class C channels, from 100 watts to 250 to 1,000 • FM • TV • Breakup of the ``clear`` channels • Radio Martí and the high-powered retaliatory broadcasts from Cuba • Docket 80-90 (which made hundreds of new FM stations and FM power increases possible) • Low-power TV • Low-power FM • The end of VHF TV in the U.K. • Blanket nighttime operating authority for most AM daytime-only stations • Internet ``radio`` • Cable TV • Satellite TV • Digital TV Yet the National Radio Club, International Radio Club of America, and Worldwide TV-FM DX Association are as strong as ever. People are still DXing. Sure, there are some things you can`t do anymore. You won`t hear California from the East Coast every night. You won`t log Hawaii with a table radio in St. Louis. Double-hop trans-continental TV skip is now a once-in-a-lifetime treat, not an annual event. Many (most) DXers don`t care. They get a thrill out of whatever they hear that`s new and unusual. Just in the last year, many DXers logged the Virgin Islands for the first time, thanks to the expanded AM band. The widespread adoption of unattended computer recording techniques have filled logs with new DX. Record-breaking 850-mile digital TV reception has been accomplished, and then surpassed when a digital TV signal was received via sporadic- E at a distance of over 1,050 miles. We have the first ever reliable report of reception of U.S. FM stations in Europe. And Australian DXers are receiving American UHF TV signals via reflection off the moon. DXers adapt. Wait and See Nor is it a foregone conclusion that IBOC will work. AM IBOC is still experimental; recent tests have left many participants unhappy with the ``codec`` – the software that ``tosses out`` redundant parts of the audio to make the data stream fit in the necessary bandwidth. Because of the adjacent-channel interference problems, the FCC is not allowing AM IBOC operation at night. For much of the year, commuters are driving home from work after sunset. These commuters are the most important radio audience. A digital radio system that doesn`t work at night isn`t going to work in the marketplace. Finally, IBOC is expensive for the station. At the very least, an expensive digital ``exciter`` is necessary. At many stations, the entire transmitter will need to be replaced. At some, an entire separate digital transmitter and antenna may be necessary. At AM stations, complete redesign of the antenna system may be required. Unlike AM and FM, IBOC is covered by patents. Those wishing to build IBOC receivers or transmitters must buy a patent license – and stations wishing to broadcast IBOC will also require this license. Many stations today (especially AM) can just barely afford to pay their existing bills. Extensive transmitter modifications and an IBOC patent license will be beyond their means. Many stations will remain analog. So, to be concise... IBOC digital broadcasting is coming. We can`t stop it. If it succeeds (and it may not), it will change domestic-band DXing. It will never eliminate it (Closing Comments, September MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) MUSEA +++++ HISTORY IN ACTION AT WTAG RADIO TOWERS Broadcast on site this Friday --- by Ria Megnin Holden --- For nearly 70 years, a small concrete building has kept watch over Shrewsbury Street and the WTAG-AM 580 radio towers broadcasting from its hill. This Friday, its doors will be open to the public for the first time in decades. A first-ever broadcast will be made from the site with WTAG`s "Breakfast Club" morning show stars Hank Stolz and Sherman Whitman. . . http://www.thelandmark.com/story.php3?story=6069 (Holden, MA, via Jill Dybka, DXLD) PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ VOICE OF AMERICA, A HISTORY --- BY ALAN HEIL Ask any shortwave listener the first station they heard, and chances are, they will respond ``Voice of America.`` Voice of America, A History, written by Alan L. Heil, Jr., is an in-depth history of the VOA`s founding in 1942 until its sixtieth anniversary. Mr Heil worked for the VOA from 1962 until he retired in 1998, serving (among other positions) as a foreign correspondent, chief of News and Current Affairs, and deputy director of programs. Using transcripts of radio broadcasts and numerous personal anecdotes, Heil has given the reader a closeup look into the major events of the past sixty years. The 540 pages provide a very interesting and enlightening story of the VOA through the wake of Pearl Harbor, the Cold War, the first steps on the moon, the Watergate scandal, civil war in Rwanda, and the intense drama of Tiananmen Square. Heil also relates the outbreak of HIV/AIDS in the 1980s, ethnic strife in the Balkans, the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, and the continuing struggles in the Middle East. Alan Heil portrays the VOA as an organization continually underfunded and constantly struggling against congressional investigations, reorganization and leadership purges in an attempt to reshape VOA programming. This is a human history of the Voice of America, told by someone who has been there. The VOA, known by millions of people around the world, has delivered the news with fairness and accuracy. This insider`s story, now told to the world, should be on the shelf of anyone seeking a vivid look at events that shaped our history. Alan Heil reminds hobbyists how grand radio listening really is. Voice of America retails for $37.50. For additional ordering information, go to the Columbia University Press http://columbia.edu or ask at your local book store for ISBN (0-231-12674-3) Gayle Van Horn (What`s New, September MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) MONITORING TIMES EXPRESS The monthly magazine costs $26.95 a year in USA for hard copy, but only $19.95 for PDF. This may be downloaded either in low- or high- resolution, the latter running some 20 MB, but no problem with a cable modem or better. Only a few pages of the print magazine are slick, suitable for color, but some illustrations printed only in B&W show up in color on the PDF. MC, Visa, Discover accepted: 1-800-438-8155 toll free in US and Canada; elsewhere 1-828-837-9200; fax 828-837-2216; 7540 Hwy 64 W, Brasstown NC 28902. Or see http://www.monitoringtimes.com/html/mtexpress.html for info about a free sample (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ QST DE W1AW PROPAGATION FORECAST BULLETIN 35 ARLP035 From Tad Cook, K7RA Seattle, WA August 29, 2003 To all radio amateurs Sunspot counts were up this week, but so were geomagnetic indices. Average daily sunspot numbers rose 33% over last week and the average daily planetary A index was up 18%. Solar flux remained about the same. This week didn`t have an extremely stormy day, such as August 18 last week, but the higher A indices were sustained through the week. Active geomagnetic conditions declined through the week, with the most active days August 21-23 (our reporting week runs Thursday through Wednesday). The active days started August 21 because that is when the earth entered a high-speed solar wind, which continued over the next few days. The moderate conditions should continue through this weekend. The latest reading predicts a planetary A index of 12 for August 29-31, Friday through Sunday. Monday has a predicted planetary A index of 10, but Tuesday, September 2 may become active again, based upon recurring conditions from the previous rotation of the sun. Solar flux is expected to remain around 125 through September 1, and then rise gradually to around 135 for September 3-4. The days are getting shorter, and soon it will be the fall DX season, bringing better conditions. The higher frequencies should be opening during the day and 80 and 40 meters will open earlier and more reliably after dark. As an example, over the path from California to Japan, a month ago 10 meters offered no reliable communication. Currently 10 meters may have an opening on some days from around 2100-0430z. But around the equinox, the same California to Japan path on 10 meters looks quite good, with much stronger signals and reliable openings from 2130 to 0130z. On the new 60 meter band from California to Georgia, a month ago signals were very strong from sundown on the west coast until sunrise at the east end. Strongest signals would be from 0400-1030z, with reasonable openings as early as 0130 and as late as 1230z. Currently the strongest signals should run from around 0330-1100z, with possible openings from 0030-1300z. Around the third week in September, strongest results should be from 0300-1100z, with openings generally good from 0000-1330z. September will also have much lower atmospheric noise on the lower frequencies. One caveat about the equinox. During this phase of the solar cycle, although HF propagation should be better, there is also a greater chance of severe geomagnetic storms and aurora. This is because around late September the interplanetary magnetic field near earth tips far to the south. This makes the earth vulnerable to solar wind. For more on the interplanetary magnetic field and how it affects geomagnetic conditions, see http://spaceweather.com/glossary/imf.html For more information on propagation and an explanation of the numbers used in this bulletin see the Propagation page on the ARRL Web site at http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/propagation.html Sunspot numbers for August 21 through 27 were 86, 126, 125, 132, 146, 124, and 116, with a mean of 122.1. 10.7 cm flux was 119.2, 120.9, 120.2, 116.4, 116.5, 120.8, and 125.7, with a mean of 120. Estimated planetary A indices were 53, 43, 44, 24, 21, 14, and 13, with a mean of 30.3. Copyright © 2003, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved (ARRL via John Norfolk, DXLD) ABSOLUTELY FREE, IN THE PUBLIC DOMAIN, FOR ALL RADIO HOBBYSTS AROUND THE WORLD... LA NUMBER UNO, ARNIE CORO'S DXERS UNLIMITED'S HF PLUS LOW BAND VHF PROPAGATION UPDATE AND FORECAST.... Solar flux still hovering around 120 units, and the A index still at rather high figures due to the most recent geomagnetic disturbances...The last week of August will take us into September, the month of the auroras in the northern hemisphere, so be prepared for some very interesting aurora E skip, and the classic auroral curtain reflection that is so noticeable on the 6 and 2 meter amateur bands (Prof. Arnie Coro A., CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited Aug 26, via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-155, August 28, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3h.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn DX LISTENING DIGEST JULY HTML ARCHIVE IS NOW COMPLETE: http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1197: WWCR: Thu 2030 15825, Sat 1030, Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 on 9475 RFPI: Sat 0130, 0800, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 on 7445 [nominal times subject to delay or pre- emption] WRMI: Sat & Sun 1800+ on 15725 WINB: Sun 0031 on 12160 [for last time] WRN: Rest of world Sat 0800, Europe Sun 0430, N America Sun1 1400 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1197h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1197h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1197.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1197.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1197.ram WORLD OF RADIO WATCH WMQM 1600 Memphis: no longer carried after August 23; had been Sat 1530 UT since the station went on last November. WINB 12160 Red Lion: the UT Sun 0031 time is cancelled after August 31. A replacement time is being considered. SOLICITED TESTIMONIALS Re: Listening to WOR. I always run a tape of WOR on its first airing on WBCQ at 2200Z Wednesdays. Typically I'll tune the Satellit 800 to 7415 at 2030Z, pop in a 120-minute cassette into an auto-reverse deck, and let it go. I then listen to the last 30 minutes of the cassette later in the evening. The 800 has 'line out' jacks that allows very good tape recordings to be made. An alternate is to program a VCR I have set up in the shack (an old model that doesn't require a TV screen to program). I often listen to the WWCR "DX hour" 0200Z Saturday nights, and notice the audio quality on both DX Partyline and WOR is better that the respective HCJB/WBCQ broadcasts; there is a slight 'resonance' to the audio and seems to enhance the listening quality. Don't know exactly what they do it but it is better. 73s (Ben Loveless, WB9FJO, Michigan) As to when I listen to WOR, my most common time to listen is the Sunday 0230 UT (0330 UT in winter) on WWCR-5070. I occasionally listen to the first run on WBCQ-7415 (2200 UT summer/2300 UT winter), but don't always get home from work in time to do so. Yesterday (27 Aug.) I did get home in time, but 7415 wasn't in at all, and I'm wondering if the transmitter was even on the air (The 17 MHz frequency almost always skips over us here). 73- (Bill Westenhaver, Montréal) I was barely able to confirm 7415 was on then, but not 17495 (gh) ** ANTARCTICA. LRA-36 DX Special, UT Aug 28 on 15476 at 0100: Let the fun begin! Sign on at 0100 with ballad by OM, then IDs at 0104. SINPO 34343. 15475.9 kHz. Lots of IDs up till 0111 when there is extended talk in Spanish by YL. Her voice sounds distorted, possible microphone problems? [Later:] 15475.95, LRA36 R. Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel, *0100-0205. At 0100, opened with a ballad by a male, then alternating IDs by a man and woman at 0104. Brief pop music, then more IDs. SINPO during the first 10 minutes was 34343. Long talk in Spanish by a female at 0111, however her voice was distorted. More ID's and pop music excerpts. By 0116 the signal had degraded to SINPO 24332. Another program or feature by a male at 0142. Although I couldn't hear any audio after 0200, their carrier was still on at 0205. The signal was consistently best on my 150 foot longwire pointed south. Thanks to Gabriel Iván Barrera and Arnaldo Slaen for making this special transmission possible (George Maroti, Mt. Kisco NY, Cumbre DX via DXLD) No joy on the west coast, nothing but static (Don Nelson, OR, Cumbre DX via DXLD) No joy in Wyoming either (Hans Johnson, Cody, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Nothing heard from LRA36 on 15476 0100-0200Z last night, band was pretty dead anyway. Used a Grundig Satellit 800 & Kenwood TS450 ham rig with multiband ham dipole 30' elevation, to no avail (Ben Loveless, WB9FJO, Michigan, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Nothing in central Illinois but static (Ron Trotto, Waggoner, Illinois, wdx4kwi, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Had a very weak carrier from tune-in slightly after 0100 to well past 0200 UT Aug 28, with occasional bits of audio, but it was on 15475, not 15476, so must have been something else, such as R. Rossii, Irkutsk, beamed 60 degrees (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I'm getting a het and the Lowe sync whine indicates a signal is there, but I don't seem to be getting any audio. Sometimes I think I hear voices, but that's another problem entirely. :-) Seriously, it sounds like a woman's voice at times. Signal (if that's what it is) is weakening with time. Barely there at 0140 (John Figliozzi, Halfmoon, NY (halfway between NYC and Montreal) Lowe HF-150 "stack" A/D sloper oriented west to east, hard-core-dx via DXLD) I heard some first traces of the audio (woman's voice as well!) at about 0113, but at once it became clear that the station is not LRA36. The carrier was on 15475 kHz sharp (not several hundred Hz above as typical for ARG). Well, it turned to be Radio Rossii via Irkutsk, scheduled on 15475 kHz at 2230-1000, 100 kW. Signal was gradually strengthening, leaving no chance to find a weak Argentinian. I'm located in Kazan, Russia, 49 E / 56 N 73's, (Dmitry Mezin, hard-core- dx via DXLD) LRA36, Radio Nacional Arcángel, 15476. The special transmission was mostly a bust here in Maryland, USA. The signal was barely over the noise floor S1. I heard bits and pieces of a man and a woman talking and a couple of times, possible music. 0100-0200 28 Aug 2003. I appreciate the effort to put this special transmission on and hope we can have another chance in the future (Bill Harms, MD, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 15474.90, LRA36, *0100 past 0128 (recheck) Aug. 28. Noted at 0100 with instrumental ballad sign-on, followed with announcements by male speaker at 0101, with long talks. Signal was just above the noise level and best heard on the sloper pointed due south. Rechecked at 0128 and heard a female with talks in Spanish (?) but audio was either distorted or they had a bad audio feed or something else. Signal was poor to marginal at best (Edward Kusalik, Alberta, Canada. Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) The exact frequency you give contradicts all the others, and LRA36`s usual position close to 15476, leading me to believe you were actually listening to Irkutsk, like me (gh, DXLD) I confirm that LRA36 was on the air on 28 August from *0100-0223*, according to personal communications with Base Esperanza. 73's GIB (Gabriel Iván Barrera, Argentina, DXing.info via DXLD) Perhaps you also need to confirm the exact frequency actually used on this occasion (gh, DXLD) ** ARGENTINA. Ich bekam soeben von Gabriel Ivan Barrera die folgenden Zeilen, nachdem ich ihm mitgeteilt hatte, dass die deutsche Sendung von RAE Buenos Aires z. Zt. nicht gehoert werden kann. Hier die deutsche Uebersetzung: "Rayen Braun hat zur Zeit gesundheitliche Probleme, durch (aphonia) hat sie ihre Stimme verloren, und sie wird zu der deutschen Sendung von R.A.E. zurueck kehren. Deswegen wird voruebergehend Spanisch statt Deutsch ausgestrahlt. Es ist sehr schwer, (in Buenos Aires) jemanden zu finden, der die deutsche Sprache sehr gut spricht, z. Zt. ist kein Ersatz fuer Rayen in Sicht." Currently Rayen Braun is with some health problems, she is having lost one's voice (aphonia), and she will return ASAP to German transmissions in RAE. Currently RAE is relaying Spanish programs in the meantime. And as final comments, here in Argentina is very difficult meet some people that speak very well the German language and Rayen currently have not replacement (Gabriel Iván Barrera, Argentina, via Uwe Volk, Germany, A-DX Aug 27 via BC-DX via DXLD) Strange; I thought the place was replete with German immigrants (gh) ** AUSTRALIA. NEW VOICE SPANS CULTURAL CHASM By Nicolas Rothwell, August 28, 2003 http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,7063442%255E7582,00.html When Richard Trudgen, a bushy bearded self-taught development expert, first arrived in north-east Arnhem Land he began to realise he was witness to the unfolding of a social crisis. It took two decades, though, before he came to his latest idea. He has just set up Australia's most shoestring media empire in a bid to change the pattern of turbulence in the indigenous communities around him. Trudgen, a driven figure who prefers results to theories, achieved fame three years ago when he published Why Warriors Lie Down and Die, an unsparing account of dysfunction in Arnhem Land, backed up by concrete proposals for remedies. On August 1, the most dramatic of his schemes to change remote communities fired into life: a short-wave radio station beamed across the vast eastern Top End, and covering with its footprint five communities and 90 outstations, or "homelands". "I said once," remembers Trudgen, "that I would crawl backwards naked down Pitt Street to get this radio service up – and that's almost what it took." The group Trudgen works with, Aboriginal Resource and Development Services, raised funds wherever it could, eventually securing some $280,000 for the basic operation, which sends out an exiguous signal, at one wavelength around the clock, from a transmitter station on Darwin's fringes, at Humpty Doo. The key to the idea, in keeping with Trudgen's arguments about development, is language. What's different about this station is that it provides its programs in the local Aboriginal language, Yolngu-matha. Its name, Djawarrkmirr Radio, comes from a word that once meant "town crier" in the dialects of Arnhem Land. Initial programs consist of detailed explanations of the diseases afflicting the Yolngu people of the region, discussions of economic topics, even local news. The aim is to turn the programming into a full-scale, language-based information network, with intensive participation from remote communities. "Our potential studio is as big as the telephone network," insists Trudgen. "People can participate from their homelands – everything said in English is translated at once into Yolngu-matha." For the team at ARDS, which has effectively turned itself into an independent media operator, radio is the way to unblock the failures of the system -- to empower and educate Aboriginal communities, not just in Arnhem Land but across the remote Centre and North. Trudgen's analysis of the crisis in traditional communities is still contentious, even though Why Warriors was enthusiastically circulated to the federal Cabinet when it first appeared. His view is that remote-area people are held back in great part because their language and conceptual schemes hinder them from grasping Western ideas and information: translation into their language is, then, the key to practical education, training and development. His book is a manifesto of his convictions: the radio network is a means to test them in practice. There are, unsurprisingly, teething problems. Broadcast systems have been allowed to decay in some areas, so relays are impossible; the short-wave signal is not ideal, since short-wave radio ownership is far from universal, and word the system is on air has yet to reach all target areas. Trudgen, though, believes he has the future in his grasp, if only he can spread his gospel: "Our aim is this: To educate the adult population to understand the world. If we can turn the adults, whose training has been neglected, into effective teachers of contemporary knowledge, then we will have 2000 informal instructors in the Yolngu world." For such teaching to be effective, it needs to be conducted in the special academic version of Yolngu-matha, which Trudgen does not speak well. Help from his partner in the project, Uniting Church minister Djiniyini Gondarra, is critical. But support from circles which might be expected to be supportive has yet to eventuate. The federal and Northern Territory governments pay lip service, but appear to regard the radio network as an alarming freelance intrusion into their spheres of operation: Trudgen, after all, envisages the creation of a vast "virtual classroom" with an alternative syllabus, and is scathing about current service delivery to the remote world. Trudgen's dream first took shape in a conversation with an old Yolngu friend 20 years ago, and has been expanding ever since. The game-plan now is to turn the signal into an AM/FM one, and to be ready for upgrade to satellite-to-digital-radio transfer, which would allow crystal-clear reception anywhere, and cost some $750,000 to establish. A high price tag for a shoestring operation, but next to nothing set against the vast sums poured into official development schemes in Arnhem Land. And Trudgen has more in store: an 1800 number for listener call-backs, even an expansion of the venture to other language groups in remote Australia. "If Aboriginal people across Australia whose second language is English could hear this signal now," he insists, "they'd be jumping up with joy and glee." (via Andy Sennitt, WORLD OF RADIO 1197, DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. ABC RADIO STAFF THREATEN ACTION OVER RIGHT TO PUBLISH By Barney Zwartz August 27, 2003 URL: http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/08/26/1061663794344.html I'm not sure what times "The Religion Report" is broadcast on RA. However, I believe it's still on CBC Overnight Thursdays at 2:30 AM (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. HCJB WORLD RADIO-AUSTRALIA LAUNCHES URDU BROADCASTS Posted by: newsdesk on Monday, August 25, 2003 - 12:56 PM For the first time, HCJB World Radio began airing programs in the Urdu language July 21, making additional Christian broadcasts available to more than 80 million speakers across South Asia. Urdu speakers live mostly in Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Nepal and Malaysia. The programs air from HCJB World Radio-Australia`s new shortwave site in Kununurra, ``The Voice of the Great Southland.`` Director of Ministries Dennis Adams says initial response to the half- hour programs, which air each morning and evening Monday-Saturday, has been positive. ``Since we started the Urdu broadcasts we have heard from Lahore, Pakistan, that various groups have been formed to listen to the broadcasts, followed by a time of discussion. That`s exciting news!`` The programs complement longtime Urdu broadcasts to the region from Christian organizations such as FEBA Radio and Trans World Radio. Urdu is the first language other than English to air from the Kununurra site. The Urdu program, called ``Danish Kadah,`` was commissioned by partner ministry Asia Aflame Network and produced by Pakistan Christian Radio Ministries. ``The program content is arranged into modules designed to teach Christian doctrines to believers and help in church planting,`` Adams says. Asia Aflame has organized an extensive follow-up network to respond to listeners` needs. The Urdu broadcasts began about six months after the Kununurra station went on the air in January in English. The English programs have attracted a loyal audience across the region with hundreds of listeners responding via letters and e-mails from throughout the South Pacific and South Asia. ``Our English programming is designed to provide a balance that moves between pre-evangelism, evangelism and Bible teaching,`` says Adams. ``There are programs that focus on the various cultures such as the music of Asia, the Pacific, New Zealand and Australia. We also have an Australian country music program, a tourism program called `Destinations,` and special programming for teenagers and younger children.`` ``The next language to go on the air is most likely Hindi, probably in April 2004,`` Adams says. ``Other languages will probably not go on the air until we have a second transmitter. Hopefully this will be sooner rather than later! We`re hoping to begin 2.5 hours of morning broadcasts to East Asia before the end of this year, subject to the completion of a new antenna.`` (HCJB World Radio, press release Aug 27 via DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. Emisora andina en 4905.56 kHz, a las 0239 UT, el 23/08. Locutor en evento público --- música de fondo --- menciones de la comunidad de Candelaria. Later: No había identificado: Radio San Miguel, en los 4905.56 kHz, captada el 23/08 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Riberalta (gh) 4906, Radio San Miguel, 0915-0930 Aug 27. Noted a man in Spanish comments, IDing and presenting musical selections. It looks like the station has settled on 4906 kHz rather than the 4905.50 frequency they were using the other day. Hopefully, the station will not slowly creep up the band to their old frequency over time? Signal here was fair (Bolland, Chuck, Clewiston Florida, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Desde la mañana del 18 de agosto 2003 es audible en la nf de 4905.4 variable a 4906.4 hasta hoy día 28 de agosto, Radio San Miguel, Riberalta, Bolivia, que había estado en los 4930.0 hasta la mañana del 16 de agosto 2003. Con ésta son 33 las variaciones de frecuencia que RSM tuvo hasta ahora y que se ubican en el rango de 4905 a 4930 kcs desde septiembre 1992 en que es audible en la banda de 60 metros (ex- 3310 hasta agosto 1992), siendo 2003 el año de la variación de mayor magnitud (4905v a 4930) = 25 kcs. Anteriormente el año de la mayor variación había sido 1998 con 5 kcs. Supera como saltarina del dial y en magnitud de rango de frecuencias a la otra muy variable Radio Huanta 2000 del Perú. Glenn, deseche mi info si hay otra con más datos estadísticos y precisiones. Chau (Emilio Pedro Povrzenic (pronúnciese Povéryenich, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. Re Guarujá log on 5054: Mark, do you mean 5045 on this one, as reported by others previously?? (Glenn to Mark Mohrmann, via DXLD) Yes Glenn, it is a typo. 5045 is correct. Thanks (Mark Mohrmann, VT, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. ¿Por qué se repetirá la peruana de 6020.34 kHz, en 6060.19 kHz, a eso de las 0530 UT? (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Already discussed recently as a Brazilian, carrying the ubiquitous Voz de la Liberación gospel huxter program in Portuñol; or did you check on two receivers to confirm they were synchronized, in parallel? (gh) ** CAMBODIA. 11939.4-11940.1, National R, Phnom Penh, *1155 open carrier, *1200-1235v*, Aug 05-14, reactivated with programs in Khmer, maybe only for tests. Also heard with open carrier *2355 and program from *0000. They start with a national hymn, ID and pieces of an instrumental National Anthem. The program length varies - the longest lasted 35 minutes. There are still modulation problems and drift in frequency. Weak signal with splatters from 11945 (Roland Schulze, Mangaldan Pangasinan, Philippines, direct, BC-DX Aug 11; and DSWCI DXW via BC-DX via DXLD) ** CHINA. China Radio International 0900-1100 Pacific broadcast in English was heard August 27th on 15210, not moved to 15250 as reported last month (Mike Barraclough, UK, Sept World DX Club Contact via DXLD) ** CONGO. Radio Congo en francés, a las 0534 UT, el 26/08, en los 4765 kHz. Tenía mucho tiempo sin oírla en esa frecuenca. "Golpeaba" bastante a Radio Kaduna en 4770 kHz. Llevo varios días sin poder escucharla en 5985 kHz, luego de que Family Radio deja el canal libre por unos minutos entre las 0445-0455 UT (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF BROADCASTING IN CUBA Manolo de la Rosa Hernández, Radio Havana Cuba Emma Almeda and Manolo de la Rosa from Radio Havana Cuba [caption] In 1922, in the month of October, station PWX was officially inaugurated by the Cuban Telephone Company, subsidiary of ITT. So began the first radio transmissions in Cuba. Since its beginning, this station and the others that came later were modeled after U.S. stations; that is, they were created as private entities without government participation. In 1934, with the penetration of great amounts of U.S. capital, radio achieved a high degree of development, and stations of considerably high powers began to be installed. This was necessary because commercial announcements filled the stations, almost all from the United States, because the large consortiums had sufficiently penetrated the economy of our country and took the place of any local advertisers. This occurred from 1930 to 1940 -- the commercial era. The decade of 1940-1950 was characterized by the appearance of large national radio networks, commercial competition between production companies and broadcasting plants, as well as the appearance of advertising agencies. This period was known as the monopoly, and it lasted from 1940 to 1959, when the Revolution took place. In the decade of the 1950s, a new phenomenon appeared that strengthened the development of the radio monopoly: television. This, without doubt, reduced the radio audience, especially in the nighttime hours. Nevertheless, by that time Cuba had reached a considerable development of radio broadcasting in comparison with the rest of Latin America. By the date that I mentioned -- 1950-1959 -- only two countries in Latin America had more stations (including repeaters of the national networks) than Cuba. These were Mexico and Brazil, which of course are much larger countries, geographically, than ours. Cuba had 156 stations, while Brazil had 630 and Mexico had 417. An interesting piece of information is that before the Revolution, 30 percent of the stations in the country were located in the capital, Havana. There were 31 stations in the city of Havana, and only one on the Island of Pines, now known as the Isle of Youth. There were four national networks: CMQ, CNC (Circuito Nacional Cubano), Unión Radio and Cadena Oriental de Radio. These four national networks, along with the rest of the local stations that operated in Havana, made up 64 percent of the country`s stations, principally in the provinces of Oriente and Las Villas. The mountainous areas of the country did not receive signals from these national networks because they were not fundamentally interested in that population, which did not have the economic power to buy products that were advertised in the capital. From the triumph of the Cuban Revolution on January 1, 1959 until May of 1962, radio and TV went through a brief transitional stage in which the media were transferred from private to state ownership. On May 24, 1962, law number 1030 of the Council of Ministers of Cuba created the Cuban Institute of Radio Broadcasting (ICR) an organization whose object was to control and operate all radio and TV broadcasts in Cuba. In 1976, as a consequence of acts by the First Congress of the Communist Party of Cuba, a new political-administrative structure was applied to the country, and the radio and television stations gained a new administrator called the Cuban Institute of Radio and Television (ICRT). On May 1, 1961, the shortwave station Radio Havana Cuba was created. Today, Cuban radio has six national networks: Radio Rebelde, Radio Progreso, CMBF Radio Musical Nacional, Radio Reloj, Radio Enciclopedia and Radio Taíno. Altogether, there are 71 stations. There are 18 provincial stations, and the rest are in the cities. There are 104 municipal studios, which are like stations without a transmitter. There are 1,130 hours of transmissions daily. Each day 3,011 programs are aired. Thirty-eight percent of the programming is news; 38.3% is music; 14.4% is varied programming; and 9.1% is radio drama. All national stations have their own web pages. They broadcast on AM and FM. Radio Rebelde also broadcasts some hours in the morning and at night on shortwave for Central America. Radio Havana Cuba broadcasts to the world on shortwave in nine languages. The AM and FM transmitters in the country are able to cover 98% of the nation`s territory. Television, for its part, has two national channels -- one called Cubavisión, and the other Channel 2 Telerebelde. There is a third channel which is educational, and very shortly a fourth channel -- also educational -- will be inaugurated (presentation at Mexican DX Encuentro via Jeff White, Sept NASB Newsletter via DXLD) Party line ** CUBA [and non]. Radio Martí only exists because wealthy Cubans have bought several congressmen over the past couple of decades in the US. Radio Martí is probably the worst possible example of how to engage in international broadcasting. It has hateful and racist overtones that a member of the US KKK can only explain (Max Power, WA, hard-core-dx via DXLD) I haven`t listened that closely. How is it racist? Cubans, whether dentro or fuera are multi-racial (gh, DXLD) Yawn..... We can only hope the Church of Fidel doesn't last any longer than its pontiff.... Here in Florida, the jammers of the most enlightened regime's Operación Titano seem to be winning on HF, mostly obliterating Martí, plus everything +/- 50 kHz, not to mention empty harmonics of Martí frequencies. Their MW counterparts stay busy also. One curious blobmitter blasts away at 820 kHz, and has for a few years now, with no evident clue as to what the target station might possibly be. The 1160 Radio Swan/ Americas jammer stayed on the air 15 years after that particular racist KKK station left the air, so targetless jamming might simply be a sign of utter centrally-planned incompetence on the part of the operators. All that notwithstanding, I'm curious as to which race Radio Martí might be overtoning against (David Crawford, Titusville FL, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. Super Q (4959.86) también se escucha hasta bien entrada las 0430 UT; lo malo es que un emisor de la VOA también está en ese mismo canal a partir de las 0400 UT, si no me equivoco (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) São Tomé ** ECUADOR. Radio Quito ha estado ausente de su frecuencia por un largo tiempo. A menos por acá no se le pude captar en 4919 kHz. Hace un año envié un reporte de recepción a radioquito@elcomercio.com y todavía espero por la QSL (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Continued under KOREA SOUTH ** ERITREA [non]. Voix of Democratic Eritrea, le 25-08-2003 de 1700 à 1800 UT sur 15670 kHz, SINPO 43334. Des informations en langues locales et à 1725 de la musique régionale et à 1830 changement de langue (Mohamed Kallel, Sfax, Tunisia, FRG-7700 + 20M, Aug 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** FRANCE. According to the homepage http://www.cielradio.com/ the French private radio broadcaster Ciel AM will open the mediumwave service on Paris 981 kHz, 5 kW already in August 2003. The Paris suburb/region transmitter location of Alfortville has not been used for any mediumwave service in the past. In September 2003 the common transmission wave of 1161 kHz will follow: Strasbourg Selestat ([maximum usable power of] 1000 kW, screening of 63 kW towards 90-130 degrees Bulgasria/Egypt. ITU plan shows maximum power radiation towards 20 degrees at 28-30 dB, minimum reduction of 14dB to Bulgaria/Egypt at 120 degrees, and of 10 dB towards UK at 300 degrees). And Toulouse 1161 kHz, 160 kW, will follow soon. [maximum power radiation at 22.1 dB] The given power figures are REGISTERED maximum usable carrier power in kilowatt, but don't reflect the present situation at the site. Instead TDF uses the transmtiter installations at Selestat with 200 [300, wb] kW and Toulouse with 100 kW of power. Until Dec 31, 1996 TDF did spread out the France Inter program from both sites (Dr. Hansjoerg Biener, Germany, Kai Ludwig, Germany, ntt Aug 15 via BC-DX via DXLD) ** GERMANY. Among the few changes asterisked in an 8/19 revision of the T-Systems = DTK schedule is something called AWH = Allerweltshaus Köln e.V. – another gospel huxter? Maybe not, unless a front; appears to be some kind of inter-cultural organisation as the name implies (gh) 17555 1500 1530 48 106 145 217 3456 030903 261003 JUL 100 AWH * 17555 1500 1559 48 106 145 217 17 030903 261003 JUL 100 AWH * (via Alokesh Gupta, India, Aug 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) So it`s Tue-Fri for half an hour, Sat and Sun for a full hour, silent on Mon, Starting Sept 3. Here`s their website I found: http://www.allerweltshaus.de/ where one thinks one is led to a welcome statement in English, but only gets this for a starter, nothing found about imminent brodcasts: Das Allerweltshaus Köln e.V. gibt es seit 1987. Als private Initiative von engagierten Einzelpersonen gegründet betreiben wir seit 13 Jahren ein interkulturelles Begegnungszentrum in Köln-Ehrenfeld und machen entwicklungspolitische Bildungs- und Öffentlichkeitsarbeit. Schwerpunkte unserer Arbeit sind die Bekämpfung von Rassismus und einer Politik der sozialen Ausgrenzung. . . (Glenn Hauser, WORLD OF RADIO 1197, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. 177 AM/DRM simulcast Today I finally had time to listen to 177 while running AM/DRM simulcast mode and to compare it with the AM-only 177 reverted back to around 1400. The digital component was obvious when tuning to 175 and 179, and also when tuning to 177 some background hiss remained audible. I also found the AM audio more muffled than otherwise, just as it was described from preliminary tests done on 855 in spring. In general the signal was weaker than in AM-only. Klaus Schneider gives on his http://www.drm-dx.de page 125 kW with a question mark; well, I would say this figure as AM carrier power would indeed fit to the observed signal level. Altogether the degradation of reception quality with this mode is quite obvious, and in general I got a feeling that the lively disputed IBOC in the USA must be of a quite similar appearance, although I guess the digital component of an IBOC signal is much more aggressive than the rather mild one on 177. A picture of the longwave transmitter inaugurated at Zehlendorf in 1999 can be seen at http://www.telefunken-sendersysteme.de/Produkte/AM_Sender/am_sender.html Behind the new transmitter what appears to be one of the three 250 kW PA stages of the old beast from 1956/1958 (which I understand is kept as a stand-by), in the left of the picture some pre-stages of the old rig. Also 693 was on in DRM today, as was Berlin-Britz 855. 603 is too weak here to say whether or not the simulcast mode was tested there, too. By the way, I couldn't detect any signal on 171. No more Radio Rossii from Bolshakovo? Bitrate of the DRM component on 177 today was a mere 13.2 kbps (Kai Ludwig, Germany, Aug 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HONDURAS. Hondureña reactivada en 3340 kHz, la cual capté el 22/08, a las 0004 UT, con un sermón religioso. SINPO 2/2 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, WORLD OF RADIO 1197, DX LISTENING DIGEST) R. Misiones Internacionales as just reported here, 2/3 x 5010 ** INDIA. AIR Bangalore Home Service on 10330 kHz in Hindi. For those listeners that enjoy music from India, listen to this frequency from 0030 UT (6:00 am local India time). Reception has been excellent here recently during the first half hour to one hour of transmission with delightful music. For example on Thursday August 28, carrier was on at 0015 UT. IS (same haunting melody as on External Service) was on at 0024 UT. A song at 0026 UT (is it the national anthem?). Spoken word at 0027 UT in Hindi; kilohertz was mentioned. Music at 0028 UT and man reading the news (I presume) at 0030 to 0035 UT. The rest of the broadcast audible here was music. No English was heard. Initially the signal was like a local at S20 to S30. By 0120 UT it was S9 and by 0140 UT it was very poor and soon faded out after that. The same quality of reception has been heard on previous nights this week. According to "The Shortwave Guide" Volume 2 the power is 500 kW, and it certainly sounded like it during the first hour. This out of band frequency is probably overlooked by many DXers, but it is worth listening to at present, at least here in Ottawa (Bernie O'Shea, Ottawa, Ontario, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDONESIA. 4870.90, RRI Sorong, 0938-1015. Noted program of music with a woman in Indonesian comments. At 1000 news, then back to music etc. Signal was fair to poor. This was on while RRI Wamena was also broadcasting - see below. 4869.95, RRI Wamena, 1000-1015. Tuned in at 1000 and noted steady music. As time passed, the signal improved, Using two receivers for this logging and hearing Sorong from one and Wamena the other. Signal was fair (Chuck Bolland, August 27, 2003, Clewiston Florida, USA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. Hi Glenn, just received via the NDB list... Hi All: Got this item from our local amateur radio reflector. If anyone hears it, a one-watt beacon from Mars would be "serious DX," even if that planet is now exceptionally close to ours (I observed Mars last night and could easily see its disc in 16x80 binoculars). 73, Andy Robins KB8QGF, Kalamazoo, Michigan USA MARS RELAY TRANSMITTER TEST SET (AUG 27, 2003) -- UNTIL AUGUST 29 NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) -- in cooperation with the Stanford Research Institute (SRI) -- will conduct a test of the Mars Relay transmitter aboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft now orbiting Mars. During the test, the spacecraft will transmitting a 1 W CW signal on 437.1 MHz for reception by the 46 meter dish at SRI. Amateurs with 70 cm EME-class stations using DSP techniques also may be able to detect this signal. ARRL member Andrew Bachler, N9AB, in Illinois was able to detect a similar transmitter aboard Mars Odyssey while it was on its way to Mars in June 2001 (see also, "New solar system record set"). This test will be somewhat more challenging as MGS will be 3 times further away. "MGS will be entering and exiting occultation--blockage by Mars with respect to Earth -- with each 118-minute orbit," says John Callas of JPL. "Furthermore, its UHF antenna -- with about 0 dBi of gain, EIRP ~30 dBm -- will only be viewable from Earth for a few minutes just before ingress and just after egress as it orbits." Callas says the viewing window is between five and 15 minutes. Details of the test timeline are available on the KM1P Welcome Page. Antenna pointing information can be generated with JPL's HORIZONS system. Announcements and discussions are available on the mars-net e-mail reflector. To join the list, send a message to majordomo@alum.wpi.edu with the words "subscribe mars-net" in the body of the message. The SETI League will issue a special extraterrestrial QSL card for documented successful reception of either Mars spacecraft beacon. _______________________________________________ Ndblist mailing list http://beaconworld.org.uk/mailman/listinfo/ndblist_beaconworld.org.uk 73, (via Eike Bierwirth, 04317 Leipzig, DL, DXLD) Find the current overall shortwave schedule on http://www.eibi.de.vu/ ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM [non]. The one-hour Mars Special was on KUNM Wed Aug 27 at 1400 UT, not 1500, sorry: anyhow, I, for one, could not get KUNM stream to work at 1500; has format really changed? I got it on WHYY at 0100 UT 28th while keeping another ear on 15476 and an eye on the southeast horizon, where Mars did brill later in the eve. Here it is again, on WUOT, Knoxville, as on their website Aug 27 --- we can only hope that the Friday referred to is the one coming up, Aug 29, as this is nowhere clarified; anyhow at 1600 --- or 1606 UT: SPECIAL -- SkyTour: Mars Close Up, Friday at 12 noon on 91.9FM. SkyTour is a one hour special on the science and the adventure of Mars, the obsession about life on Mars and the scientific expectations. Science and culture, facts and technology, commentaries, features, the latest from NASA, the ethics of exploring life on Mars, and much more. SkyTour is a joint production of WHYY and The Franklin Institute Science Museum (via Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRAQ. NEW IRAQI RADIO STATION BROADCAST FROM BAGHDAD | Text of report by Iraqi independent newspaper Al-Zaman on 28 August A new Iraqi radio station called the Voice of Iraq, was launched in Baghdad yesterday [27 August]. It broadcasts on 1179 kHz medium-wave and covers the capital, Baghdad, and cities close by reaching Al- Mahawil, Ba'qubah and Al-Fallujah. Al-Zaman has learnt that the station is supervised by the International Agency for Free Media, a media institution that was active abroad during the previous regime and was run by Iraqis and covered Iraqi news and domestic developments via the Internet. After completing a one-month trial period, the station now presents two in-depth newscasts and domestic reports in addition to a daily review of the press. Source: Al-Zaman, Baghdad, in Arabic 28 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH. 6070.4, V. of Korea 1233 Aug 28. Japanese talk; typical choral music at 1235. Fair signal, // 7580, which was good (John Wilkins, Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Drake R-8, 100-foot RW, Cumbre DX via DXLD) More QRM to CFRX ** KOREAS. POLICE PREVENT RELEASE OF BALLOONS CARRYING RADIOS TO NORTH KOREA Reporters Without Borders (Reporters sans frontières) called on South Korea today to explain why riot police prevented human rights activists releasing balloons that were to drop radio sets over North Korea. . . http://www.rsf.org/article.php3?id_article=7847 (via Jill Dybka, DXLD) RSF WANTS EXPLANATION FOR BAN ON BALLOON RADIO SCHEME Press freedom watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has asked South Korea to explain why riot police prevented human rights activists releasing balloons that were to drop radio sets over North Korea. "The government's job is of course to maintain law and order on its territory but how does sending tiny radio sets to North Koreans threaten South Korea's security?" asked RSF in a letter to South Korean Administration and Home Affairs Minister Kim Doo-kwan. Police prevented a score of activists releasing about 200 balloons carrying more than 600 radio sets on 22 August at Chulwon, near the North Korean border. A German doctor, Norbert Vollertsen, was roughed up by the police and hospitalised with a foot injury and bruises. He was trying to fill the balloons with helium despite the police ban. The project was launched by Korean-born American pastor Douglas Shin and Dr Vollertsen, who was deported from North Korea in 2001 for criticising the human rights situation there, and aimed to give hundreds of people in the north a chance to pick up Korean-language broadcasts by foreign stations, including Radio Free Asia, on the solar-powered sets. Radio and TV sets sold in North Korea can only receive the state-controlled media. According to the scheme's organisers, the South Korean foreign ministry had been told about the launch and had not formally objected. However, no official request for permission to stage it had been made. The law allows demonstrations to be banned if the organisers have already been involved in a violent demonstration or if the site of the protest is considered unsuitable (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 27 August 2003 via DXLD) ** KOREA SOUTH. [Continued from ECUADOR] En cambio, la KBS, desde Corea, me envió un CD e información sobre las frecuencias en tiempo récord. El paquete salió de Seúl el 22/07 y llegó a mis manos el 1ero. de agosto. ¡Insólito! Tan lejos y tan cerca (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** KURDISTAN. Voix of Kurdistan, le 25-08-2003 de 1700 à 1714 UT sur 8170 kHz, SINPO 35222. Les news en arabe et de la music kurde (Mohamed Kallel, Sfax, Tunisia, FRG-7700 + 20M, Aug 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) harmonique, 2 par 4085 (gh) ** MEXICO. For many many years I have enjoyed DXing the Mexican shortwave domestic stations at day on 49 meters, especially in winter when the D layer is weaker. A band scan today turned up nothing at all from Central Florida. Are they all gone now? 73, (Thomas F. Giella, KN4LF Space & Atmospheric Weather Forecaster Website Designer 4208 Thackery Way Plant City, FL, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Almost. This was discussed by Héctor García Bojorge on the Aug 22 RN Radio-Enlace, audio previously referenced here. 6045 R. Universidad de SLP was reactivated this summer; haven`t you heard?? 6010 R. Mil is supposedly active, but may be very low power. 6185 R. Educación is well heard, but only on air during the night 2300-1100 UT (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MONGOLIA. The transformation of the website of The Voice of Mongolia (resp. Mongolian National Radio) is continuing. A new English section was created http://mongol.net/vom/mnr2.htm containing an updated presentation of Mongolian Radio & TV. Among other things, the text is referring to the installation of new SW transmitters in 2003 (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, Aug 27, WORLD OF RADIO 1197, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: Radio Transmission Central Station: The history and development years of the Radio and Television Technical Center of Broadcasting Systems /RTVTCBS/ begins with the date of first Radio program was aired and broadcast throughout the country for the first time on 1 September, 1934. The central radio transmission station Khonkhor of Ulaanbaatar municipal area, and local transmission stations in Bayan-Ulgii, Gobi- Altai, Khubsgul, Umnugobi, Dornod and Dornogobi provinces are the structural parts of the RTVTCBS. The central radio transmission center was established in 1960, with short wave stations of 5, 25 and 50 kWt and a long wave station of 150 kWt followed by an expansion in 1978 with 100 and 250 kWt short wave stations, in 1984 a 500 kWt medium and long wave station which enabled the program no.1 of the Mongolian national radio to be broadcast in the central area of the country, and the programs of the "Voice of Mongolia" radio station to be broadcast internationally in English, Japanese, Chinese, Russian and Mongolian. In 1978-1979 local radio stations of large capacity were built through USSR technical and economical grant aid, providing the current broadcasting network which covers approximately 90 per cent of the total territory of the country at present. In 1967, when television was being evolved, the Television Central Station in Ulaanbaatar was established and the major channel programs of the Mongolian National Television are broadcast in Ulaanbaatar city and its districts through a 5 kWt capacity station, but for the broadcasting in the outskirts, municipal areas of Ulaanbaatar a 300 kWt station is installed on the mountain Chingeltei. The short wave radio network project provided by Japan grant aid is being implemented in 2003 at the RTVTCBS, shall enable modern technical facilities of 50kWt short wave station in Ulaanbaatar, and 10kWt short wave stations in Altai and Murun available to broadcast the programs of the National Radio on two channels. At present RTVTCBS has more than 200 employers, within 70 percent are professional engineers (via Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, DXLD) ** NIGERIA. VOICE OF NIGERIA heard in English from 2200 to 2300* UT on a possibly new frequency of 17800. Signal was good but the audio was low, heard female with ID, into news (Ron Trotto, wdx4kwi, Waggoner, Illinois, Aug 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ex-, or plus-15120? Yes, new! (gh) ** PAPUA NEW GUINEA. PROVINCIAL RADIO STATIONS GO OFF-AIR THROUGH LACK OF FUNDING | Text of report by Papua New Guinea newspaper The National web site on 28 August Three National Broadcasting Corporation [NBC] radio stations in the Highlands are off -the-air and one is likely to follow suit due to non-payment of electricity bills. Radio stations at Mt Hagen, Wabag and Chimbu. Chimbu and Wabag were off-air for almost a year and Hagen has been out for two months. Reports yesterday indicate that very soon, Radio Southern Highlands will go off-air. This was after PNG [Papua New Guinea] Power gave two days notice to the management of Radio Southern Highlands for a bill of more than 15,000 kina [4,400 dollars]. NBC staff from the affected provinces said that they encountered funding problems since the responsibility for funding of the radio stations were transferred to provincial governments. Radio Enga has been off air for the last eight months because the provincial administration was confused as to who should fund its operations. This station owes PNG Power 15,000 kina in electricity bills. Anna Pundia, the manager of Radio Western Highlands yesterday said the Western Highlands provincial government would meet their electricity bill of 29,853.59 kina which was owed since 17 July. Mrs Pundai said that the provincial executive council and the acting administrator, Michael Wandil, have approved a submission for this bill and they expect to be back on air by the end of this week. An announcer with the Radio Southern Highlands said they were still on air but received red light from PNG Power on Monday [26 August] to disconnect the power supply due to non-payment of 15,000-kina outstanding bills. Radio Chimbu has been off air since the beginning of this year but The National could not reach them due to communication problems. Source: The National web site, Port Moresby, in English 28 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) PAPUA NEW GUINEA, JAPAN SIGN AGREEMENT TO UPGRADE RADIO STATIONS | Excerpt from report by Papua New Guinea newspaper The National web site on 28 August Five of the National Broadcasting Corporation's provincial radio stations in the country will benefit from a 24.81m-kina aid project from the Japanese government. The five stations earmarked to undergo refurbishment and upgrading are Vanimo, Mt Hagen, Goroka, Lae and Kimbe. The Vanimo, Lae and Kimbe stations will be facilitated with modern medium wave transmitter equipment while the other two will be upgraded to modern FM radio stations. These stations are under NBC's Kundu Broadcasting Service. The Kundu service aims to promote the development and welfare of rural people through local programs. Yesterday, the PNG and Japanese governments signed and exchanged papers to improve radio equipment and facilities for these stations. [Passage omitted] Source: The National web site, Port Moresby, in English 28 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** PERU. Peruana en 5009.63, a las 0236 UT, el 23/08, con música autóctona, locutor de guardia (audio opaco) y demasiado "fade". Indentificándose como "Nuestra radio...". (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Presumably R. Horizonte (gh) ** PERU. Radio Los Andes has replied to a congratulatory message sent to radiolosandes@starmedia.com by way of Program Manager Padre Antonio Campos Castillo of the Prelature "Virgen de la Alta Gracia", who says he will be happy to receive my reports (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** RUSSIA. FIRST ELEVATOR TO BE RESTARTED AT OSTANKINO TV TOWER BY YEAR'S END | Text of report in English by Russian news agency ITAR- TASS on 27 August Moscow, 27 August: The first elevator will be restarted at Moscow's Ostankino television tower by the end of this year. A strong fire inside the tower three years ago claimed three lives and destroyed most of the equipment. "The world's second tallest television tower is returning to full- scale operation," the deputy director of the federal state unitary enterprise Russian Television and Radio Broadcasting Network, Irina Maslova told TASS on Wednesday. All electric equipment has been restored and the first elevator will be back in operation soon. Those who work at the 524-metre altitude from where the signal is broadcast, have to climb a narrow spiral stairway for at least two hours, Maslova said. All elevators will begin to function next year. The observation floor at an altitude of 350 meters above the surface will reopen. It will be equipped with mini-telescopes and screens providing a bird's eye view of the city. The once-famous restaurant, "seventh Heaven" will host the first customers. Federal budget spending on repairing the television tower will total 180m roubles [6m dollars]. Over the three years since the fire the tower's look has not changed at all. The fire that occurred inside the building on 27 August 2000, for a long time disrupted the normal broadcasting of five main television channels. It took twenty-four hours to eliminate the fire. The 51,000-tonne Ostankino television tower was built in 1967. For a long time it remained the tallest man-made structure in the world. Source: ITAR-TASS news agency, Moscow, in English 1440 gmt 27 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** SWEDEN. RADIO SWEDEN -- Coming up on Radio Sweden: Thursday: "S-Files" (repeat) Friday: Our weekly review Saturday: Special on food and culture Sunday: In "Sounds Nordic" Aeysha and the new (SCDX/MediaScan Aug 27 via DXLD) ** SYRIA. Radio Damascus. La radio da la république de Syrie a été entendue le 17-08-2003 à 1330 UT sur 13610 kHz avec une émission dirigée vers la population syrienne qui reste sur la valée du Jourdan ocupée par les Israéliens. L`émission s`appelle ``Terre et racine dirigée à notre frère en Joulan [sic] la chère.`` Le signale est 55454 (Mohamed Kallel, Sfax, Tunisia, FRG-7700 + 20M, Aug 27, WORLD OF RADIO 1197, DX LISTENING DIGEST) En français? Surely Arabic. WRTH 2003 does not show any external service on 13610 before 1700 in Russian, and the only French is at 1905-2005. SW Guide, however, shows 13610 in use at 0100-0300 to NAm --- anyone ever noticed that? And 0500-1600 to NAf, both in the green language, which would be Arabic, presumably domestic service relay? (Glenn Hauser, WORLD OF RADIO 1197, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SYRIA [non]. Arab radio, le 24-08-2003 de 1500 à 1530 UT sur 12120 kHz, SINPO 55555. Les émissions commencent avec du Kor`an; la première émission est `Parole des gens` (kalem el nes) et de la musique arabe avec une préférence pour le chanteur Abd Halim; la deuxième émission `entre nous avec les amitiés` (bini ou binek ma kales el hob). (Mohamed Kallel, Sfax, Tunisia, FRG-7700 + 20M, Aug 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** TURKEY. Voice of Turkey, English 0300-0400 [to NAm] changes from 11655 to 9650 August 31st per their programme schedule (Mike Barraclough, Sept World DX Club Contact via WORLD OF RADIO 1197, DXLD) Didn`t they fail to make that switch on time a year ago? (gh, DXLD) ** UGANDA. Radio Rebelde estuvo fuera del aire por un largo rato y por tal razón Radio Uganda pudo oírse en inglés desde las 0353 UT, en los 5026 kHz, el 22/08, con SINPO 2/1 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** UKRAINE [non]. Even though RUI doesn't begin using 9810 until September 1, 2003, I thought I'd check the frequency. RUI 9810 August 27, 2003 at 0000 UT = we have problems! 0000 UT 9805 what sounds like a jammer; 9810 hear a station, but I can not get ID; 9815 hear a station, maybe Arabic?; 9820 carrier, but no modulation. 0015 UT same as 0000 UT 0030 UT 9805 jammer and R. Farda?; other frequencies same as 0000 UT 0045 UT same as 0030 UT. Main problem is the broadcaster and jammer on 9805. I don't believe the broadcaster on 9810 will cause too much QRM to RUI. We were having terrible local thunderstorms so I can check again August 28, 2003 (Kraig Krist, VA, WORLD OF RADIO 1197, DX LISTENING DIGEST) From 1 September RUI will change 12040 kHz to 9810 kHz for its North American transmissions 2300-0400. Transmitter and azimuth remain the same: Mykolaiv, 1000 (500?) kW, 314 degrees (Alexander Yegorov, Ukraine, Aug 22, via Wolfgang Bueschel, DXLD) ** U K. Great show tonight [BBC Radio 2, Tue 1930-2030 UT, continued next week at same time]. Wonderful to hear the Caroline theme on the Beeb. Thanks to this programme, Radio London and Radio Caroline both received two mentions in the Radio Times dated 23-29th August, on pages 24 and 114. The following is what Susan Jeffreys has written about it in the current edition of Weekend - the television and radio guide in the Saturday edition of the Daily Mail. "Radio Caroline and Radio London both broadcast from stations off the British coast. While grey seas slapped away outside, a new breed of DJ`s - titans such such as Simon Dee (pictured in magazine article), Kenny Everett, and Tony Blackburn - brought a stream of pop music to young, grateful British ears. Before this happy dawn, you had to listen to Radio Luxembourg through a storm of static, or put up with the dreary outpourings of Sing Something Simple, pop arrangements by the Northern Dance Orchestra or Uncle Mac playing The Runaway Train and Big Rock Candy Mountain week after week. In the first of a two- parter, Pete Drummond looks at the beginnings of independent radio in the 1930s, with the gloriously named Captain Leanord Plugge." The Sunday Telegraph TV & Radio Guide previews the programme as follows. "In the 1930`s, only the BBC was authorised to use the British airwaves - until Captain Leanord Plugge, an unlikely broadcasting pirate, spotted a commercial opportunity. A radio transmitter in Normandy could reach England, allowing him to beam dance tunes and face-cream ads to Brittish citizens without fear of prosecution. Pete Drummond`s jolly two-part history names Plugge as the grandfather of radios London and Caroline, Kenny Everett and Tony Blackburn. And which BBC station epitomised the middle-aged easy listening these 1960s rebels scorned? The Light Programme, now Radio 2". MP. Also much in the press this morning. In the Daily Mail today, Martin Kelner had the following to say about the new pirate radio show. "The history of radio in Britain would have been very different without "pirate" broadcasters. They challenged the hegemony of the BBC, first from mainland Europe through stations like Radio Normandy and Radio Luxembourg, and later, in true pirate style, from ships moored in international waters off the coast. Radio`s 1 and 2, in fact, were born in response to Radio`s Caroline and London, which had 16 million listeners between them in the mid-sixties. The programme was also previewed in today`s edition of The Daily Telegraph, by Alexander Reynolds. "Pete Drummond sails into pirate radio history in the first of two parts on the phenomenon. Pirate "Euro-stations" of the Thirties matured into licensed giants like Radio Luxembourg. Tonight`s instalment focuses on the clash of the Titans: Caroline versus London. The Daily Telegraph preview has a photograph of the manager of the current UK land based version of Radio Caroline, sitting at the microphone in the station`s hired studios in Maidstone, Kent. The caption to the picture reads; "Pirate pioneer: Peter Moore of Radio Caroline, which is now enjoying a digital revival". Press extracts courtesy of http://usa.internations.net/pirategold/pirategoldnews.html (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. Glenn: As the retired program director, chief engineer, and sometime manager for five classical stations, I have been reading about LPFM in general, and this in particular, with some interest -- || WCNH-LP (94.7 Concord) ...Highland has struck a deal with New Hampshire Public Radio to provide access to NHPR's music library and other forms of support to the station, which will broadcast a 24-hour classical format to Concord and vicinity when it signs on, perhaps as early as October. That's what LPFM is supposed to be all about, we say ...|| I couldn't agree less. LPFM is NOT "all about" broadcasting classical music, which REQUIRES, demands, and is utterly dependent on wide dynamic range and frequency response. When you have squeezed a 100 w station in the sidebands of two high powered ones, you get neither one. So what will happen? The LPFM station trying to broadcast classical music must compress the signal to a 15 dB dynamic range. Then, the hiss from the original recordings will be oppressive, and somebody will get the bright idea to install a filter --- and the end result will be audio that is worse than a web stream. Now, add multipath. Far worse than a web stream. And add the sideband interference from adjacent high powered carriers. Infinitely worse than a web stream. Finally, TRY -- just try! -- to listen in a car, or on a portable set. Useless! LPFM will probably work for about two blocks around the transmitter and antenna site. I know whereof I speak: for five years I tried to put classical music on my university station, back in the early sixties. We had 80 watts from the top of a library building of 7 stories. Even with 20 dB of compression from the Gates limiter, you couldn't hear the signal two miles away. And that was in an unpopulated educational band with almost no stations; today the entire FM spectrum from one end to the other is just mush: the equivalent to driving from Santa Bárbara to Tijuana, wall-to-wall "town" without end. Even web streams are compressed to hell. For instance: WCPE. They have pleasant music, but the dynamic range is about 10 dB. It's worse than AM radio. When I was the CE and PD of classical KIBE, Palo Alto (back in the seventies) I tried to maintain a dynamic range on our AM signal of at least 27 dB, and a range of more than 35 to 40 dB on our FM transmission. We got top ratings and audience approval with wide dynamics, clean audio, brilliant highs, full, responsive bass. That was just before CDs hit the scene. A classical CD of orchestral music will have a dynamic range of 40 to 55 dB, typically; you simply cannot transmit that on LPFM and hear it clearly, cleanly, and intelligibly outside of the station's own CONTROL ROOM. After 27 futile years broadcasting classical music, I am extremely happy to enjoy it as it SHOULD be heard: from CDs, right on my own car or home players. No compression; no compromises; no dumbing-down to fit in to somebody's "concept" of programming or demographics, and no destruction of the audio. Classical music on FM is just about as obsolete as buggy whip technology. In fact, MONO FM transmission was actually better -- more honest -- for classical music than the lousy multiplex system we've been burdened with since 1961. Yours, (Steve Waldee - former radio CE and for twelve years, consultant to Orban Associates on the development of the AM and FM Optimod [tr] processing systems, DX LISTENING DIGEST) !! (gh) ** U S A. WBJX 1460 RACINE WI TOWER TOPPLED BY VANDALS Thanks to Tim Noonan for posting this on his excellent web site "Radio/DX Information from Wisconsin http://www.angelfire.com/wi/dxing/index.html "* WI Racine WBJX 1460 is silent as a result of vandals knocking down its tower. The station hopes to be back on from a temporary facility by the end of this week (Tim Cuprisin/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)" Here is the news story from Tim Cuprisin's 8/26/03 column: WBJX GOES SILENT Racine's WBJX-AM (1460), southeast Wisconsin's only 24-hour Spanish- language radio outlet, is out of commission after vandals knocked down its tower. Owner Robert Jeffers tells Inside TV & Radio that he hopes to have a temporary tower up and the station back on the air by the end of the week. Jeffers discovered that the tower had been toppled Monday morning when he noticed WBJX wasn't broadcasting. "In the last month, we've been having several cases of vandalism, and I've reported each one of them to police," he says. He doesn't have any idea who's targeting the station. "Usually, if it's kids, they try once or twice and they give it up," he says. (via Bill Dvorak, Madison WI, NRC-AM via DXLD) VANDALS DRIVE OFF RACINE STATION SPANISH STATION TO MOVE AFTER ITS TOWER IS TOPPLED By ALLISON L. SMITH Last Updated: Aug. 28, 2003 Original URL: http://www.jsonline.com/news/metro/aug03/165386.asp After vandals damaged the only 24-hour all-Spanish radio station in southeastern Wisconsin for the fourth time in less than a month, the station's owner said Wednesday that he will move operations from Racine to Milwaukee. Guy wires that stabilized the 200-foot transmission tower for Racine's WBJX-AM (1460) were cut Monday, causing the tower to topple and knocking the station off the air, said owner Robert Jeffers. "Where we're located now, we just don't feel comfortable or safe anymore," Jeffers said. "We've been considering moving to Milwaukee anyway to be closer to our advertisers, but this just makes our decision clear." This summer, vandals have waged an escalating war on the Latino station. First they cut its phone lines, then the electric cables, and recently sawed off the station's satellite dish, Jeffers said. Sheriff's deputies were called on each of the incidents but have yet to make any arrests or tell Jeffers of any leads, he said. "They said it's like finding a needle in a haystack," Jeffers said. Lt. Connie Mallwitz of the Racine County Sheriff's Department said Wednesday her agency has record of four reports of vandalism at the station since Aug. 6. She deferred further comment to the lead investigator on the case, who could not be reached. Jeffers said he has no idea of the perpetrators' identities, ages or motives. The station has not received any threatening calls or letters, he added. "I don't know if someone has a grudge against the station, or me, or doesn't like Spanish music," Jeffers said. Under a licensing requirement, the station's tower must remain in Racine. Only the studio and sales offices will shift to Milwaukee next month. The impending move is the second time vandals factored into Jeffers' decision to relocate, he said. In April 2001, a group of 12-year-old boys started a fire adjacent to the station's radio tower, then in Mount Pleasant. Several other vandalism incidents in 2000 and 2001 at its Racine offices and the tower site persuaded Jeffers to move a couple of miles north to the current location, 1661 Douglas Ave. Even after he moved to Douglas Ave., Jeffers said, vandals attacked the former location, smashing out all its windows and damaging the walls. "I don't know if the people now are the same people, but they seem pretty determined," Jeffers said. Jeffers describes the station he has owned since 1996 as a "ma-and-pa" business he runs with his wife, Patricia Martinez, who doubles as an afternoon on-air personality. "We're a small operation and don't have a lot of extra resources," Jeffers said. A temporary tower was being installed Wednesday, and Jeffers said he expects the station to resume broadcasting by Saturday. "This has been very challenging, because this is our livelihood," Martinez said. "But my husband and I are very optimistic people. You just keep fighting back tooth and nail and don't let anyone stop your dream." From the Aug. 28, 2003 editions of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) Meanwhile DXers in the area are going after all the other stations on 1460 (gh, DXLD) ** VENEZUELA. Las transmisiones de Radio Amazonas (4939.66) ahora sobrepasan la barrera de la 0130 UT. Se puede captar hasta incluso las 0300 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, WORLD OF RADIO 1197, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 4940, VENEZUELA, R. Amazonas, 0342-0408*, 27/08, Spanish, continuous pop music and ballads, OM at 0403 over music, sounding like NA, positive ID. Fair music, weak voice audio (Scott Barbour, NH, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** VIETNAM [non]. Degar Voice (via Atamanovka, Russia) changed from 7115 to 7380 kHz 1300-1400 (Tue/Thu/Sat). (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, Aug 27, WORLD OF RADIO 1197, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Atamanovka? Where`s that, a.k.a.? (gh, DXLD) ** WESTERN SAHARA [non]. ALGERIA, 7460.31, Polisario Radio "El Idaha el watania lljoumouria elarabia elsahrawia el watania". Yesterday night [Aug 18] around 2100-2130 I checked Polisario Sahara Radio on 7460.31 kHz, but thiny, very weak at this time of the year. No jamming from Morocco noticed so far. (later) On past three nights [Aug 18-20] I heard the Polisario Front Radio from probably Tindouf, Algeria on 7460.31 kHz, but very thiny poor S=1-2. Readable only few fragments of French language phrases. Always around 2100-2130 UT. This morning (Thur 21) the channel was empty at 0600 UT, but at 0700 UTC I noted a very weak signal, and a carrier on according measurement of my USB/LSB receiver settings (Wolfgang Bueschel, Stuttgart, Germany, Aug 21, BC-DX via DXLD) Yes, it has to be the Sahara station you are hearing around 7460, but signal strength here is also very much lower than it used to be, so something has altered. Perhaps lower power - re-directed aerials - or just a different location? (Noel R. Green, UK, BC-DX Aug 21 all via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. 4335.2-5, LA Station, 1040 Aug 27, Sounded like Peruvian. Andean folk music, with male announcer. 300 Hz upward drift over 10 minute period. Ute on top, best heard listening to LSB. Fair strength, but S9 static crashes (David Hodgson, TN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Naylamp reactivated as in previous issues UNIDENTIFIED. Emisora en portugués ¿brasilera?, en 5134 kHz, a las 0310 UT, el 23/08. Música y comentarios. Techno, rock y pop. Demasiada estática. En Lower Side Band (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Are you positive it was Portuguese? Belarus` relay of Russia reported on this distinctive frequency as recently as 3-143, 3-134 (gh) UNIDENTIFIED. Transmisor de efecto "burbuja", cambiaba de frecuencia con relativa constancia: 5660-5650-5640 kHz, a las 0224, el 23/08. ¿Será la radio zapatista interferida? (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) More likely jamming against V. of Mojahed, Iranian clandestine (gh) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ POWERLINE COMMUNICATIONS ++++++++++++++++++++++++ NASWA FILES REPLY COMMENTS ON BPL On August 20, 2003, NASWA filed reply comments with the FCC on docket ET 03-104 concerning the interference which deployment of Broadband PowerLine technology will cause. The full text of the filing will appear in the September issue (with any luck at all) of the NASWA Journal in the Tech Topics Column. The response says in part: "There are several common threads that have been expressed by multiple BPL proponents that deserve further comment. Many of the proponents of using HF frequencies for BPL transmissions have made the point that their systems work at currently authorized Part 15 signal levels and should, therefore, be immediately authorized for commercial deployment. They assert that interference, if it occurs, can be mitigated by providing notches in the spectral mask for frequencies that are used for amateur radio. Many proudly proclaim that no complaints of interference from their technology have resulted from their test demonstrations. NASWA addresses each of these assertions in this response. (snip) "BPL must not be deployed commercially unless and until the industry clearly shows in open demonstrations that their systems will not interfere with shortwave radios operating on self-contained whip antennas in close proximity to home power wiring. Only after successfully demonstrating that BPL will not interfere with shortwave reception on ITU and FCC-allocated international broadcasting frequency bands, at existing Part 15 levels, can any prudent consideration be given to increasing the authorized levels. The test demonstration setups should be used to directly measure the available interference-free margin of a particular BPL implementation and those results used to guide establishment of any relaxed limits." ~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-., (Joe Buch, DE, Aug 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) -*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^ Here is an excerpt from a filing with the FCC by a SWL who lives in that area from the FCC web site. He used a Sangean-909/Radio Shack DX- 398: Dear Sirs, In the matter of Docket Number 03-104 (Broadband over Power Line) Reply to comments. In an earlier submission to this NOI (ref.1), the United Power Line Council, proponents of Broadband over Power Line (BPL), made the following (excerpted) statement: (snip) (1) A Field Study In order to garner a real feel for BPL's radiation effects, on August 15th. 2003 an expedition was made to Emmaus, near Allentown Pennsylvania, one of the current test sites for BPL, administered by Pennsylvania Power and Light (PP&L). Being reasonably certain that this controlled limited test environment was actually operating within the terms of Part 15, the endeavour was not to measure the actual amount of radiation, but to realistically establish its effects in context on very common, normal and expected usages of the spectrum the BPL scheme employs. With no advance information as to the exact whereabouts within Emmaus of the tests, the intention was to methodically cruise the town searching for noises not attributable to normal and known interference sources, using a portable short-wave receiver of good and known performance (ref.2); to that end, a fairly elaborate route had been mapped out. It proved entirely unnecessary. The noise took no finding. On arrival and on the very first pass down Main St., at the intersection with Second St. (pretty much in the centre of the town) strong interference attributable to BPL was heard. It took the form of irrythmic clicks, scratches and noise bursts, discernible between 3 MHz and 18 MHz, 'peaking' at around 6 MHz. Within those very broad constraints, it was completely broadband in character; there was no frequency checked free of the noise. It was very easy to track which power lines were carrying the BPL, and which weren't, and to easily scope out the limited 'service area' downtown. A small regimen of common, normal and expected uses of the radio spectrum was attempted at various locations within and just outside the BPL 'service area', varying from being parked directly under the power lines, on the opposite side of the road, in driveways of properties served, adjacent roads etc. Results in summary, for anywhere within the 'service area': Reception of typical amateur single-sideband and CW (Morse) transmissions on the heavily utilized HF bands at 3.5 MHz, 7 MHz, 10 MHz and 14 MHz was rendered almost completely impossible. Aeronautical service transmissions at around 6.6 MHz, 10 MHz and 13 MHz were inaudible. Reception of all but the strongest shortwave broadcast transmissions was seriously impaired. Those which were unimpaired were extremely strong (propagationally 'single-hop') signals from within North America, with intended target areas (with the exception of Radio Canada International) outside of the US. A few blocks away from the 'service area' the above common, normal and expected usage of the spectrum was unimpaired except for the usual radio noises found in an urban environment such as power-line noise, TV line frequency harmonics and computer/monitor products; amateur signals and normal to weaker broadcast stations were readily copiable, and the aeronautical stations which had propagation at that time of day were plainly audible. It is to be emphasized here that the deterioration in availability to the spectrum for these common, normal and expected uses was not subtle; it was not a matter of a 'worsened noise floor'; it was not 'a bit of interference'; it was almost complete obliteration. The BPL made *BAD* interference. (snip) Respectfully submitted, Stephen H. Dove Aug. 19th. 2003, DSP, P.O. Box One, Elm, PA 17521, USA ~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-., (via Joe Buch, swprograms via DXLD) -*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~ DRM +++ A cat is jumping out of the bag: http://www.drm-national.de/html/ifa_2003.html The HECA conditional access and encryption system. Quite interesting. During the recent days 693 was already fired up shortly, and indeed a DRM freak reports that he was unable to decode audio. Otherwise not only 177 will be used for analogue/digital mixed mode transmissions but also 603. By the way, I think they run 177 in the simulcast mode today for some time, there was some noise that probably was no local noise and the modulation itself appeared to be fainter and more muffled than usual. I am not sure about this observation because I was listening indoors only, but in just a couple of days we will know anyway (Kai Ludwig, Germany, Aug 23-25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) see also CONVENTIONS, next: CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ NATIONAL RADIO CLUB, DALLAS TX, LABOR DAY WEEKEND, WEBCAST Glenn: A heads up to the N.R.C. Convention's live broadcast starting around 2 PM [CDT?] on Friday from Dallas TX. The link to the audio is at http://www.nrcdxas.org right at the top left column (Fred Vobbe, OH, NRC, DX LISTENING DIGEST) CLANDESTINE RADIO SYMPOSIUM 12 SEPT - BOURNEMOUTH UNI Anyone with a special interest in clandestine radio may be interested in attending the DEHS (Defence Electronics History Society) Symposium on Clandestine Radio to be held on Friday 12th September (9.30 am-4.30 pm [BST]) at the Bournemouth University, Talbot Campus. Registration fee (for non DEHS members) is £16 - but you need to send in your remittance very quickly (by Aug 29 or not long afterwards according to the lady I spoke to at the University). Speakers will talk about: Polish Clandestine Radio in WWII German Clandestine Radio in WWII The Romney Marsh Clandestine Station Clandestine Radio in the Cold War Period Radio Surveillance in Modern Times. Full programme details at: http://histru.bournemouth.ac.uk/CHiDE/Events/Symposium.htm Registration/remittance form can be printed from: http://histru.bournemouth.ac.uk/CHiDE/Events/Symposium_registration.htm (via Dave Kenny, Aug 27, BDXC-UK via WORLD OF RADIO 1197, DXLD) EUROPEAN DX COUNCIL PHOTOS EDXC Hallo zusammen, Fotos von der EDXC-Konferenz sind auf der Homepage des RMRC, http://www.rmrc.de zu finden (Rubrik RMRC- Fotogallerie, oder direkter Link http://www.rmrc.de/gallery (Markus Weidner-D, A-DX Aug 19 via BC-DX via DXLD) 2003 MEETING OF MEXICAN DXERS AND RADIO LISTENERS --- by Jeff White NASB Exhibit Very Popular at Mexican Shortwave Meeting [caption] As the first part of a three-continent publicity campaign, the NASB inaugurated a major exhibit at the 2003 Meeting of Mexican DXers and Radio Listeners in Tizayuca, Hidalgo State, July 31-August 3. Assisted by my wife, I took the NASB exhibit from Miami to Mexico City on July 31, where a minibus met us to make the two-hour journey north to the town of Tizayuca. The exhibit, which is on loan to the NASB from member station WSHB, consists of five large interconnected panels which were laid out in a zig-zag pattern across the tops of two tables. On the panels were photos and posters from all of our member stations, plus many of our associate members and two organizations to which we belong -- DRM (Digital Radio Mondiale) and AIB (the Association for International Broadcasting). The space on the tables in front of the panels was filled with dozens of program schedules and other brochures from our members and associate members. Many NASB members sent promotional materials such as pens, pins, keychains, stickers, T-shirts, bags, programs on cassettes and CDs, books, etc. Depending on the quantity of the items on hand, we either placed them on the tables for people to pick up, or we put them in one of two (free) raffles that were held during the meeting. We also placed some of the items in small gift bags which were given to everyone who filled out one of our NASB listener survey forms. (More about that later.) Some of our associate members such as Thales, TDP and Merlin sent limited quantities of certain brochures about their transmitters and other services, and we tried to distribute these mainly to the radio station representatives and others who would likely be potential users of their services. (Thales` credit-card-size mint boxes were popular, and there were enough for everyone!) Altogether we took nearly 200 pounds of brochures and promotional items to the event, for which we have to thank all of our members and associate members for their tremendous cooperation. Many items were completely exhausted. Those that were leftover were stored for use at the next NASB exhibit at the SWL Winterfest in Pennsylvania next March, or in some cases were given to the organizers of next year`s Mexican DX Meeting for distribution there. Time-sensitive items like program schedules and calendars were given to leaders of Mexican DX clubs to take back to share with their members in various parts of the country. Purposes of NASB exhibit The primary purpose of taking the exhibit to this four-day event was to tell shortwave listeners in Mexico about NASB and its member stations and associate member organizations. It`s safe to say that few, if any, of the listeners were aware of NASB`s existence beforehand, although many of them were familiar with some of our member stations which broadcast to Mexico and Latin America. Another major purpose of our presence there was to make contacts with the representatives of Mexican DX clubs, publications and DX programs on Mexican radio stations to make them aware of NASB`s existence so that we can provide them with press releases, articles and other items in the future in order to receive free publicity for our members within their publications and programs that reach shortwave listeners throughout Mexico. This was the ninth annual meeting of Mexican DXers and DX clubs. These meetings in Mexico are the largest and best-organized of their kind in Latin America, which is one of the three primary target areas of our NASB member stations. There are some regional meetings of this type in countries like Brazil and Argentina, but no annual national meetings that we are aware of. Over the years, the ``Encuentros`` as they are called in Spanish (meaning ``meeting`` or ``gathering``) have become more well-known, and despite the long travel distances and difficult economic conditions in Mexico, as many as 80-100 DXers often sacrifice as much as a month`s salary to attend these meetings. This year`s meeting was a bit smaller, with 60 or so attendees, perhaps because it was held in a relatively small town with only one hotel that was largely already full with a bakers` convention, so many of the shortwave listeners had to stay in hotels in Pachuca -- the capital of Hidalgo state -- about a half-hour`s drive north of Tizayuca. Nevertheless, listeners travelled to the Encuentro from as far as Chihuahua state in the north (near the Texas border) to Chiapas in the south (bordering Guatemala), and from Nayarit along the Pacific coast to Veracruz on the Gulf of Mexico. And many of the attendees are club leaders, publication editors or radio program producers, so they will be sharing their experiences with other shortwave listeners throughout the country who were unable to attend the meeting. Also in attendance were several shortwave stations. Besides the NASB, representing 18 shortwave stations plus our associate members, there were representatives from China Radio International, Radio Educación (a shortwave station belonging to the Mexican Ministry of Education), Radio Mil (a well-known commercial station from Mexico City which has a shortwave outlet), two program producers from Radio Havana Cuba, the recently-replaced ex-director of Radio Mexico International (the government`s official shortwave station), and my wife Thaïs who was representing Radio Miami International. All of the shortwave broadcasters sat together in a Broadcasters Forum session where they were able to give updates on their station programming and plans, and listeners could ask questions of all the broadcasters. It might have seemed like rather strange bedfellows at the head table, but it was remarkable how well everyone got along together because of our shared passion for shortwave radio. There was a large exhibit -- even larger than ours -- from the folks at Radio Shack in Mexico City, who now have more than 70 stores throughout Mexico and sell a full line of affordable shortwave receivers under the Radio Shack and Grundig brand names -- the same as in the States. There were various seminars at the Encuentro, beginning with a basic introduction to shortwave radio (by the meeting organizer himself, Martín Herrera) for those new to the medium -- an explanation of frequencies, propagation, DXing, etc. John Killian, a biology professor from Virginia, talked about shortwave radio as a medium for learning languages (having just spent two weeks with his wife Kathy at a language school in Oaxaca prior to the Encuentro). Manolo de la Rosa and Emma Almeda from Radio Havana Cuba presented an overview of broadcasting in Cuba and the history of Radio Havana Cuba. (You`ll find the text of part of that presentation elsewhere in this Newsletter. [CUBA above]) Manolo and Emma are very popular among Mexican shortwave listeners, as they are the hosts of RHC`s weekly DX and listeners` mailbag programs, respectively. Emma also produces the daily morning news program in Spanish. Personally, Manolo is an old friend of my wife and myself since the first time we met at the European DX Council Conference in Barcelona in 1991, while he was ``on loan`` to Radio Moscow`s Spanish-language service. On Saturday, August 2, the Mexican listeners celebrated both ``Mexican DXers` Day`` and Manolo`s 61st birthday with a birthday cake and local pastries called ``pastes`` filled with meat, beans or pineapple sauce. Manolo had produced a special edition of his DX program ``En Contacto`` dedicated to the Mexican DX Meeting, which was played on loudspeakers in the meeting hall during the festivities. I was also asked by the meeting organizers to give a presentation about NASB and our participation in the recent HFCC (High Frequency Coordinating Committee) Conference in Johannesburg. I first explained a bit about the history of the NASB, its activities, and a brief profile of each member station and associate member. Then we presented a half-hour video of our trip to the HFCC in South Africa in February, another short video in Spanish provided by member station WEWN, and finally a raffle of some of the station souvenirs that members had provided us for this event. Everyone seemed to enjoy the presentation quite a bit. We saved the T-shirts from WEWN and VT Merlin Communications, as well as some of the other souvenirs, for a separate raffle the next day, where there were also items from the other stations present, plus the BBC, Radio Taiwan International and Radio Netherlands. DRM exhibition a PR success; listeners very impressed Perhaps the most ``newsworthy`` event at the Encuentro was the first- ever demonstration in Mexico of DRM digital shortwave radio. From a public relations standpoint, I think the DRM presentation was a great success. Engineers César Fernández and Rafael Grajeda of the Society of Radio Listener Engineers of Veracruz gave a very complete talk about DRM, covering the technical aspects of how it works as well as the practical aspects of what it means to shortwave listeners and how they can pick up and decode DRM transmissions. The general message was that DRM has the ability to revolutionize shortwave broadcasting and listening during the coming years. Engineer César Fernández demonstrates Ten-Tec DRM Receiver [caption] Unfortunately, the live special transmissions from Radio Netherlands in Bonaire and Deutsche Telekom in Jülich were not quite as successful as we would have liked, since we were only able to get short bits of audio intermittently, although the audio quality of what we did hear was excellent. César Fernández has been in touch with Jan Peter Werkman of Radio Nederland to try to determine if the difficulties were due to antenna azimuth, power levels, software problems or other causes, and we left the Ten-Tec RX-320D receiver with the engineers from Veracruz so they can continue to experiment with DRM reception from various sites. Ten-Tec provided the receiver to the event free of charge in exchange for the publicity they received. (See http://www.tentec.com for more info on their DRM-ready RX-320D receiver.) César was planning to travel to Holland and Germany shortly after the Encuentro, and he hoped to be able to meet personally with Jan Peter and with Guenter Hirte of Deutsch Telekom T-Systems to discuss the results in further detail. Incidentally, Veracruz was chosen as the site for next year`s Mexican National DX Meeting (in August of 2004), so the engineers will have plenty of time now to prepare another live demonstration for next year`s meeting with the same equipment. In spite of the limited success of the live audio demonstration, César and Rafael presented excerpts from the audio field tests on a DRM promotional CD-ROM so that participants could hear comparisons between analog and digital shortwave signal quality, and the listeners were extremely impressed. The basic reaction was: ``Shortwave has never sounded so good.`` Incidentally, Ms. Ana Cristina del Razo, ex-Director of Radio Mexico International (the government-owned shortwave broadcaster), was in attendance, and she indicated that she is planning to do a chapter about DRM in a university thesis she is working on about shortwave radio in Mexico. We were able to provide her with publicity materials on hand from DRM, Merlin, etc. We also provided DRM publicity materials to a reporter from the press office of the Municipality of Tizayuca, who was planning to distribute an article about the event to many newspapers and media outlets throughout the region. The President of the Municipality was present to officially inaugurate the meeting. NASB and the Encuentro organizers would like to thank everyone from DRM, VT Merlin, Radio Netherlands, T-Systems, Ten-Tec, VOA, etc. who helped make this DRM demonstration possible. I mentioned earlier that NASB distributed a shortwave listener survey to everyone at the event in Tizayuca. Forty-seven persons completed the surveys and returned them to us. This isn`t an extremely large sample by any means, but it was large enough to see some definite trends and tendencies, and I think you`ll find the results fascinating. This should certainly give some important audience background information and perhaps some programming and other ideas to our NASB stations that are broadcasting to Mexico and Latin America. An English translation of the survey and results, along with analysis and explanation, follows this article. It will be very interesting to compare these results with those at the SWL Winterfest in North America and at the European DX Council Conference in Europe if we conduct similar listener surveys at those events next year. Cultural aspects of the meeting Of course the meeting was not all business and hard work. A local orchestral group performed Mexican folk music at the meeting hall on Thursday afternoon during registration. A trio of musicians went from table to table at a welcoming party at a nearby restaurant on Thursday night, as participants sampled regional food specialties from Hidalgo. At the official inauguration on Friday morning, a local folkloric dance group called Hueyhueycoytl (that`s ``old coyote`` in the indigenous Náhuatl language) led by Professor Mariano Sánchez Ruíz performed regional folk dances in brightly colored costumes. Many participants took a side trip to a new fruit drink bottling plant in Tizayuca -- just one of many important industrial concerns in the area -- and on Sunday morning a large group from the conference took a bus trip to the nearby Teotihuácan archaeological zone to see some spectacular pre-Columbian pyramids. At the official closing of the meeting on Sunday afternoon, a vote was taken and next year`s meeting site was chosen. The 2004 Encuentro DX will be in the port city of Veracruz, on Mexico`s Gulf coast, probably the first weekend in August. As soon as details are announced, they will be posted on the website: http://www.aer-dx.org/encuentro Survey of Shortwave Listeners in Mexico --- by Jeff White This survey form (translated into Spanish) was given to participants in the 2003 Mexican National Meeting of DXers and Radio Listeners in Tizayuca, Hidalgo State, from July 31-August 3. The survey was completely confidential. Participants were asked to not put their name on the form. A small bag of souvenirs from NASB members was given to those who filled out and returned the survey to us during the event. Approximately 60 persons were at the meeting, and 47 returned the survey. This is obviously a rather small sample, but even so, some definite trends and tendencies can be seen. The analysis and explanatory comments in italics below are those of the survey`s author, Jeff White. . . (Sept NASB Newsletter via DXLD) Those interested in the survey, as well as the illustrations accompanying this article, should check the NASB website later at http://www.shortwave.org/news/NEWSLETTER_0309.PDF (gh, DXLD) ### QSLing and CONTESTS +++++++++++++++++++ AWR WAVESCAN September DX Contest, full details: http://english.awr.org/wavescan/scripts/ws452.htm (via gh, DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ POSSIBLE EXTENDED TROPO PROPAGATION? Walter Blanchard, G3JKV, writes that the weather forecast for this weekend indicates that a large warm anticyclone is building over the eastern Atlantic, with strong ridging to Newfoundland. ``By Monday, the 1st of September,`` Walter writes, ``the airmass could be tolerably homogenous over the Great Circle path Ireland to Newfoundland. There is of course absolutely no guarantee that it will produce abnormal refraction or ducting, but if anyone is looking for trans-Atlantic possibilities and has the right gear ready it could be worth switching on. It might just be this year`s only opportunity judging by previous years - this type of situation has never before occurred later than late August.`` (Radio Society of Great Britain GB2RS Main News script for August 31, posted August 27 on uk.radio.amateur by G4RGA, via John Norfolk, DXLD) SOLAR DATA FOR THE PERIOD FROM THE 18TH TO THE 24TH OF AUGUST compiled by Neil Clarke, G0CAS. http://www.g0cas.demon.co.uk/main.htm Solar activity was `very low` on the 20th and 23rd. It was `low` on the remaining days, except the 19th, when two small M-class solar flares occurred. The largest solar flare of the period was an M2/2F on the 19th. Solar flux started and ended the period at 116 but in between increased to 121 on the 22nd. The average was 117 and the 90- day solar flux average on the 24th was 127, the same level as last week. X-ray flux levels varied little day to day and averaged B3 units. Geomagnetic activity started at severe storm levels, with an Ap index of 86 units on the 18th. This activity would appear to be the result of a solar flare that took place on the 14th. Activity hardly had time to return to quieter levels when activity increased to sub-storm levels due to a coronal hole, with Ap indexes of 53, 43 and 44 on the 21st, 22nd and the 23rd respectively. The average was Ap 41 units, which makes it the most disturbed week so far this year. The ACE spacecraft saw solar wind speeds increase from 380 kilometres Per second on the 20th to 830 by the 22nd and 23rd. Particle densities were high, varying between 15 and 30 particles per cubic centimetre until the 23rd, when they declined to 3 particles per cubic centimetre. On the 18th Bz varied between minus 25 and plus 8 nanoTeslas, but the following day varied between minus 8 and plus 20 nanoTeslas. Those high geomagnetic figures obviously spelled trouble for HF Propagation and, from the 18th onwards, bands above 14 MHz were of little use for long periods and even 14 MHz was somewhat depressed. However, the HF operator`s loss was the VHF fraternity`s gain. Widespread auroral working at 50 and 144 MHz occurred on the evening of the 17th, most of the 18th and the afternoon and evening of the 21st. Also on the 18th an auroral E opening to Scandinavia took place with good signals on both 28 and 50 MHz. The 50 MHz beacon, JW8SIX, on Svalbard Island, in locator JQ94 was heard at good strength in northern England. This was an excellent opportunity to work well above the Arctic Circle on 50MHz. Also heard from the UK were beacons on the Faroes and in Greenland. A few stations on the east coast of North America were also worked. Visual auroral displays were reported in North America as far south as California. And finally the solar forecast. This week solar activity is expected to be mostly low. Solar flux is expected to be around the 130s. Geomagnetic activity is expected to be mostly unsettled but could become more disturbed around midweek due to a recurring coronal hole. MUFs during daylight hours at equal latitudes should be around 21 MHz for the south and 18MHz for the north. The darkness hour lows should be about 11 MHz. Paths this week to Australia should have a maximum usable frequency, with a 50 per cent success rate, of around 19 MHz. The optimum working frequency, with a 90 per cent success rate, should be about 14 MHz. The best time to try this path should be between 0800 and 1100 UTC. Sporadic E can now only be expected on the occasional day, with virtually no chance of an opening at 144 MHz. The RSGB propagation news is also available in a Saturday update, Posted every Saturday evening and for more on propagation generally, See http://www.rsgb.org/society/psc.htm Radio Society of Great Britain GB2RS Main News script for August 31, posted August 27 on uk.radio.amateur by G4RGA, via John Norfolk, DXLD) FORECAST OF SOLAR AND GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY 27 AUGUST - 22 SEPTEMBER Solar activity is expected to range from very low to low levels during the period. There is a slight chance of isolated moderate activity from returning Region 424 after 28 August. No greater than 10 MeV proton events at geosynchronous orbit are expected during the period. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux is expected to reach high levels on 05 – 07 September, 10 – 12 September and again on 20 – 22 September. The geomagnetic field is expected to range from quiet to major storm levels. A returning coronal hole high speed stream is expected to produce active to major storm conditions on 02 – 05 September. Minor storm levels are possible from a smaller high speed stream on 08 – 09 September. Toward the end of the period a third coronal hole high speed stream is expected to return with active to major storm levels possible on 17 – 21 September. :Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt :Issued: 2003 Aug 26 2211 UTC # Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Environment Center # Product description and SEC contact on the Web # http://www.sec.noaa.gov/wwire.html # # 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table # Issued 2003 Aug 26 # # UTC Radio Flux Planetary Largest # Date 10.7 cm A Index Kp Index 2003 Aug 27 120 12 3 2003 Aug 28 120 12 3 2003 Aug 29 125 12 3 2003 Aug 30 130 12 3 2003 Aug 31 130 12 3 2003 Sep 01 130 15 3 2003 Sep 02 130 30 5 2003 Sep 03 135 30 5 2003 Sep 04 135 25 5 2003 Sep 05 130 15 3 2003 Sep 06 130 15 3 2003 Sep 07 130 15 3 2003 Sep 08 130 25 5 2003 Sep 09 130 20 4 2003 Sep 10 130 20 4 2003 Sep 11 130 15 3 2003 Sep 12 125 15 3 2003 Sep 13 120 12 3 2003 Sep 14 115 12 3 2003 Sep 15 115 12 3 2003 Sep 16 115 12 3 2003 Sep 17 120 40 6 2003 Sep 18 120 30 5 2003 Sep 19 120 30 5 2003 Sep 20 118 25 5 2003 Sep 21 118 20 4 2003 Sep 22 118 15 3 (from http://www.sec.noaa.gov/radio via WORLD OF RADIO 1197, DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-154, August 26, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3h.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn DX LISTENING DIGEST JULY HTML ARCHIVE IS NOW COMPLETE: http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1196: RFPI: Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 on 7445 [nominal times subject to delay or pre-emption] WWCR: Wed 0930 on 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [NO LOW VERSION THIS WEEK; SORRY] [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1196h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1196h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1196.html FIRST AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1197: Wed 2200 on WBCQ 7415, 17495-CUSB Thu 2030 on WWCR 15825, Sat 1030, Sun 0230 on WWCR 5070 Sat 0130, 0800, 2330 on RFPI 7445 Sat 1800+ on WRMI 15725 Sun 0031 on WINB 12160 SOLICITED TESTIMONIAL I hear WOR on WWCR 5070 on Sat evening, 0230 UT Sun. I get COM on RFPI when I can. This past week RFPI was weaker than norm on 7445. Can`t hear on 15039. I'm using terminal at the Mt. Prospect public library (William Hassig, Mt. Prospect, IL, Aug 25) See COSTA RICA ** ANTARCTICA. 15476 kHz, LRA36 Radio Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel, from Base Esperanza, will carry out a very special transmission next Thursday UTC August 28, between *0100-0200v*, this with reason of the 83 Anniversary of the birth of the Argentine broadcasting on August 27 (local time). The activation at this time, have been possible thank to my personal requirement for to give to the DXers & SWL's the opportunity to listen LRA36 in another schedule different to the usual one of 1800-2100. The blocks of the mentioned transmission, have been prepared in collaboration between Arnaldo Slaen and me. A QSL of LRA36 is being printed now, please send your reports directly to LRA36 in Base Esperanza. The outpower will be 3 kW as minimun. Comments also by e-mail to LRA36: lra36@infovia.com.ar (Gabriel Iván Barrera, Argentina, via Hans Johnson, Aug 25, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. This week`s Feedback on R. Australia was primarily an interview by Roger Broadbent with John Westland about the programing changes upcoming. A net cut of 2 percent in funding across the board will lead to all these changes, since the only place left to cut is in programming, primarily ``bought-in`` music programs that RA cannot produce itself. This is a pity, since musical relief is needed from the talk-heavy RA. On weekdays, repeated on weekends, have had shows specialising in Aussie pop, folk, blues, indigenous, country, fine music, and jazz. All but one or two of those are external productions. Cancelled: Blacktracker, which is unique to RA amongst the ABC networks; and Fine Music Australia, which was hardly adequate at 25 minutes a week to deal with classical music, but the producer made good use of the time available. Classical music causes the transmitters to work harder [?] so maybe 25 minutes is all they should be subjected to. However, some good replacements are in hand from ABC Classic FM network; but the scheduling will be different. Classic FM already has an internet-only jazz show which RA plans to take on and thus make it available on air as well. Two weekend programs are being cancelled since their funding arrangement is expiring, and one of the producers has already left RA: Australian Express, and Go Zone. Radio National`s weeknight eclectic music program, The Planet, now M-F at 2200-2400 AET (1200-1400 UT) will get a replay early Saturday afternoon, and a new Keys to Music will appear on Sundays. This will be a 1-hour educational show about classical music, with extracts, on how it is constructed, what makes it work, etc. The changes start Sept. 1 and the compulsory ones should be completed by the following weekend Sept. 7. A few more phased changes will go on beyond then, but ASAP in order that RA meet its budget figures by yearend. Having a 24-hour service puts RA in the company of much larger international broadcasters such as BBC and VOA; this has its advantages and disadvantages. When RA was shortwave-only, there was not so much a problem of running the same shows at different times for different targets. Now there is a variety of platforms. 24-hour local FM relays are in places such as Suva, and soon somewhere else. In Honiara, time is shared with SIBC. It`s more difficult to coördinate programming coming from partner nets in ABC, something like 3-D chess. Has to become a `local` radio station. On Wantok FM in Honiara, RA inserts special local announcements (for continuity as it alternates with SIBC programming). Technology makes it easier to have multiple streams, but this takes a lot of technological and human resources, which detract from producing own programs instead of adapting those from elsewhere. Only for WRN does RA re-package programming designed for its particular audience, available via WorldSpace to Asia at: 0000 UT M-F; 1300 and 1930 daily. It is too expensive for RA to have its own fulltime channel on WorldSpace. WRN`s channel ID there is 1302. In response to a would-be listener in Thailand, it was announced that the new evening service in English to that part of the world on SW will be at 1400-1600, including a repeat of the ``PM`` programme. RA now has much more control over its webpage [about time!! gh] and will keep the program info updated. More specific details of the changes, which are being kept to a minimum, will be on the website and on future Feedback programmes. Feedback`s page has been changed somewhat. Now there are transcripts available back thru May, including last week`s show about ARDS, and audio for that show is also available now: http://www.abc.net.au/ra/feedback/default.htm (RA Feedback, 0305 UT Aug 24, notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOLIVIA. Re DXLD 3-153: R. Tacana is Bolivia, not Peru. Original tip, by Hermod Pedersen does not indicate the country, and station was mentioned as 'Radio Tancana'. (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Sigh --- I wish they would not leave out the country (gh) ** BRAZIL. Radio Difusora, Macapá. 8-25-03 4915 kHz 0415-0430 UT; light pop format; ID at 0424. SINPO 44133. Using my aluminum rain gutter as antenna (John Sandin, Merriam, KS, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. 3235.07, Rádio Clube Marília, Aug 18/19, 2325-0100, announcer with time checks, pop music, ads, jingles and announcements, many mentions of "Marília", tentative ID mentions "1550 khz AM", positive ID 0828 Aug 19. Fair to good signal both days. [what became of Guarujá Paulista?? But see 5054 -- gh] 3365.02, Rádio Cultura, 0840, Campo vocals, announcer with time checks and ID's, phonecalls from listeners. Very good signal. 4874.96 (tentative), Radiodifusora Roraima, Aug 24, 0916-0957, talk, pop vocals (maybe religious), announcements and ads with mentions of "Roraima", 0957 tentative ID, good strong signal but terrible QRN. 5054.00 (presumed), Rádio Guarujá Paulista, Aug 24, 0045-0103, pop music vocals, announcements, ads and jingles, announcer with telephone talk, 0103 sudden splatter from WWRB 5050. Good signal with terrible QRN (all: Mark Mohrmann, Coventry, VT, NRD 535D V-Beam 140m @180 deg. http://www.sover.net/~hackmohr/ DX LISTENING DIGEST) {correxion: 5045} ** CAMBODIA. FM RADIO STATION LAUNCHED IN NORTHWEST PROVINCE Cambodia's national television station carried in its 0500 gmt newscast on 26 August, a report on the inauguration of a radio station in Banteay Meanchey Province, northwest Cambodia, close to the Cambodian-Thai border. The report said that State Secretary Khiev Kanharit and first deputy governor of Banteay Meanchey Province, An Sum, inaugurated the FM 96.5 MHz radio station on 23 August. The construction of the radio station started on 4 July 2002 on a 47 metre by 100 metre plot of land next to Phnum Svay hill in Kou Than village, O Ampil commune, in Sisophon District. The report also says that the one-story masonry building housing the radio station is 16 metres by 20 metres with 11 rooms, including two broadcasting studios. The station is equipped with a 90 metre antenna and a 10 kW transmitter. The radio station is powered by two 100-kW generators. The total cost of the radio station is 210,000 dollars. According to Kung Bun-puoy, director of the radio station, initially the station will air two main programmes: short and major local news; and entertainment, including song requests. He also said, the station plans to extend the broadcast time to 16 hours a day, from 0600 to 2200, and add more programmes, such as education, health, general knowledge, and foreign news. Source: Television Kampuchea, Phnom Penh, in Cambodian 0746 gmt 26 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** CANADA. Lots of radio stations streaming special reports on Kelowna forest fire; Standard Radio in B.C. producing 24-hour coverage of forest fires: http://www.thesun.net/kelowna (CKUT International Radio Report Aug 24, notes by Ricky Leong via DXLD) ** CANADA. SPECIAL LABOUR DAY PROGRAMMING ON CBC RADIO This Labour Day, Monday Sept. 1, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., CBC Radio is setting aside its regular schedule to highlight the best of what the network's all about. The day will overflow with programming highlights from the past few months, along with a variety of new material designed to give listeners a behind-the-scenes glimpse into how radio is made and how CBC connects with Canadians. Radio One programming highlights include a rebroadcast of - and an update on - Karen Levine's award-winning documentary, Hana's Suitcase; a hilarious game show for obsessive radio listeners called The Pronunciation Challenge; a mockumentary on that classic CBC Radio institution, the Time Signal; a recurring segment called Thrills and Spills, in which various CBC Radio employees describe their most memorable moment; Bill Richardson welcoming Shelagh Rogers to Vancouver and this year's CBC True North concert from Ouje-Bougoumou, Que. Your favourite CBC Radio hosts, including Shelagh Rogers, Bill Richardson, Anna Maria Tremonti, Stuart McLean, Mary Hynes and Michael Enright, will meet up with each other throughout the day to guide listeners on a unique tour of the network. RadioTwo highlights include a roundup of award-winning music from the Junos, Grammies and Oscars on Music & Company with Tom Allen. Take Five host Shelley Solmes spins special requests from a number of her fellow CBC radio personalities, and In Performance features the Hannaford Street Silver Band as they celebrate their 20th anniversary with a concert of rousing marches, virtuoso solos, cherished classics and big band jazz. These specials provide a great way to spend the last day of summer - the best way, in fact - with CBC Radio at your side. For a complete listing of the day's events please visit http://www.cbc.ca/radioguide (via Ricky Leong, DXLD) ** COSTA RICA. RFPI reception --- Dear Glenn, I live in Morelos, Mexico and lately (matter of weeks) have great difficulty raising RFPI 7145 kcs -- depending on time of day it is frequently either inaudible or unreadable, due to interference from programs in Chinese language which counterpoint the Costa Rican broadcast. I imagine they have enough problems lately, and your being the most knowledgeable source of DX info available, I wonder if you could cast some light on this situation. The RFPI signal is sometimes also overpowered suddenly by a broadcast in Spanish of unknown origin. Since I can hear you only occasionally on this frequency, I hope I can learn more about it on your World of Radio website? (Ken Tepfer, Aug 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Ken, No doubt you meant to say 7445 --- if you had been trying 7145 you certainly would not get RFPI. RFPI has shared 7445 with Taiwan for a long time. There is a clash normally in the morning hours from a few hours before sunrise until a bit afterwards. There should be no problem in the evening (except maybe briefly around sunset in unusual conditions), or in the daytime if you are close enough to get any signal at all from RFPI. Possibly RFPI`s power is lower than usual, which would put them at a disadvantage versus Taiwan. I have no idea about the Spanish interference on 7445. Does it seem to be a broadcast or intermittent two-way communication?? What times do you hear this? I am not sure if you are aware that RFPI is going thru another crisis which could disrupt normal operations: http://www.saverfpi.org and http://www.rfpi.org Regards, (Glenn to Ken, via DXLD) Dear Glenn, Of course 7455 and not 71... Thank you for detecting my mistake. I tend to listen quite early so notice the Taiwanese interference a bit more. Still there is an occasional break-in in Spanish that is not local but broadcast quality, I will try to pay more attention to the content next time and I am aware of RFPI's recent problems but don't see how it relates. I think they've had to abandon their 15040 kc frequency or maybe shut down for maintenance which may have something to do with their problems with the landlord, University for Peace in Costa Rica. As you probably know their 40m operation is 30kw while the 19m only 10 kw, but the latter works fine for me here especially during the day so I hope it can be restored soon. Thanks again for your prompt reply. I'll try to furnish relevant DX news when I can (Ken Tepfer, Morelos, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 15 MHz has been off since the beginning of August due to some technical problem, lack of parts, after one day of experimentation on 15115 instead (gh) Glenn, a quick question: Am I crazy, or is RFPI's signal wildly variable? Some nights, it's fine, some nights, it's barely there. I'm aware of the properties of propagation, but even this seems extreme. What's the output at RFPI? Is it only 30 kW? Also, any idea what happened to the scheme they had to rejoin 15 MHz? A funny thing to note: The music you use for WOR is from the same recording session or MIDI file as my son's mid-1990's computer-based game "The Adventures of Curious George". Each time your show opens, I smile a little, as I think of George scurrying around getting into trouble. Thought you might appreciate that trivia. Keep up the good work! (Todd Van Gelder, Maryland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Glenn, we have been running on very low power the last three days and just got it up to 15kw yesterday. This has been caused by a blocking capacitor failure and the new parts should be here on the 7th. In the mean time the provisional parts will allow us to run half power (James Latham, RFPI, Aug 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Thanks Glenn. Good, comprehensive reporting and follow up as always! (Todd Van Gelder, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** COSTA RICA. RADIO RELOJ PARA TODOS --- La emisora se ennfocará en la familia y alista una radiioemisora para nicaragüenses Ni ser la primera en deportes ni la primera en noticias. Ahora a Radio Reloj lo único que le interesa es cumplir su nuevo lema: ``La primera en el corazón de la familia costarricense``. La estación asegura estar recuperada de una racha en la que la mala administración y los rumores de cierre le embarrialaron el camino y anuncia que está en planes de expansión y que los miles de nicaragüenses residentes en el país están en la mira. Por eso el Grupo Reloj ya está haciendo las primeras pruebas de 730 AM Una Radio sin Fronteras, estación que se dirigirá a los pinoleros que viven acá. Pero lo anterior no quiere decir que la empresa descuidará a los ticos y por eso radio Reloj terminó de pulir su perfil y eliminó muchas horas de deporte (fútbol) para retomar al público familiar que había sido el fuerte de la estación por décadas. . . (Tetsuya Hirahara, who visited San José 28 July to 2 August, 2003, ``El Tiempo Hechicero`` DX News, Aug, via Radio Nuevo Mundo via DXLD) ** COSTA RICA? Re 3-153 the unID on 6230: Hello Glenn! Our house is up-side-down for the moment and I just can´t find my notes - perhaps I heard REE (España) on 6200.3 kHz (the unID frequency from Roland Åkesson July 24). I did not state for sure "Costa Rica" in the Swedish version of my scan but "Perhaps C.R.". Excuse me for the mess! 73s from (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. Re: 1060 Radio 26? OK - Final Judgement, total wisdom. Confirm new 1060 outa the Workers' Paradise as Veinte Seis, R. 26. Announcement on hour and half hour gives freq's as 1220, 1230, 1240. Bearings to 165 - 170 degrees from this QTH, consistent with other R. 26 lines in direction of Matanzas - Cárdenas metro area. Good signal today even with local stink bomb 1070. Best, (Paul Zecchino, 25 2300Z AUG 03, Englewood, FL, Manasota Key via Terry Krueger, FL, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Cool, good work. A week or so ago, an e-mail source in Miami (semi- suspect he's really in Cuber-proper) reported this as a new 26 feed. I began checking and confirmed something from Cuber (is) here but what with the local TIS etc. on the channel -- day and night -- it was too rough for me to ID without spending any great time on it (which I don't seem to have). (Terry L Krueger, Clearwater, Florida, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. The latest big radio story from eastern Germany: On Saturday (Aug 23) at 2159 UT, so roughly at midnight CET, the station formerly called Project 89.0 digital was rebranded into 89.0 RTL. At the same time the format was completely changed from New Rock to CHR. The change was revealed to the press only a few days in advance and not at all to the audience. No any announcements were made on the air; the contents on the http://www.fettesradio.de website were simply deleted a few minutes after midnight and replaced by a white, otherwise empty page until a redirect to the new http://www.89.0rtl.de site was established. This unannounced change caused a remarkable uproar of listeners; a bulletin board for radio freaks is literally overflowing from myriads of posts on this matter. Basically the posters emphasize that they are tired of all the uniform music played on all the CHR and AC stations around. The former Project 89.0 digital also had a heavy rotation and was voice-tracked for most of the day, so the only difference was the music format. I think it is notable that already such a difference is sufficient for many people to consider a station as an alternative one. Some background: In 2001 Radio Brocken, a state-wide commercial broadcaster in Sachsen- Anhalt (headquarters at Halle), decided to replace the soft AC format they until then, well, narrowcasted via DAB (Eureka-147) by a New Rock format. As a special coup they applied for and were allowed to transmit this program also on their main FM frequency 89.0, a far- reaching 60 kW outlet from the Brocken mountain. This appears to be strange, but the main program suffered from poor ratings, and it was actually a competitor for another station belonging to the same group, Hit-Radio Antenne from Hannover, broadcasting from the western side of the Harz mountains (Torfhaus site). So Radio Brocken put up with the loss of coverage. The FM split-away was officially justified as DAB promotion measure and limited for the period of one year, but nevertheless the new station was called after the FM frequency Project 89.0 digital, and -- of course! -- Radio Brocken was allowed to continue the Project 89.0 digital FM service beyond the original one year limit. In the meantime major shares on AVE, the company owning Radio Brocken, were sold to RTL, and even internationally reports spread that RTL intended some reorganization. This is now the first obvious result, and it is a banana republic behaviour; the 89.0 frequency was never put on tender as it would be necessary for a reallocation taking a proper course. I think this is basically the result of Radio Brocken being in serious economic trouble. A bankruptcy of this state-wide station is something that must be avoided for political reasons, and so the media authority obviously permits almost anything Radio Brocken (with its new backer RTL) applies for, including the establishment of a second FM network without any formal frequency allocation procedure (Kai Ludwig, Germany, Aug 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. A few days go I took the opportunity of a business trip to visit the Bayerischer Rundfunk mediumwave transmitter at Hof. The station is located in the western outskirts of Hof, on the road leading to the Nürnberg -- Berlin highway, and it is quite a walk from inside the town. The station grounds are also used as meteorological station; I think the transmitter in use today is no longer housed in the original station building but instead in a container next to the building, judging from a noisy fan inside this container. Nevertheless there are two satellite dishes mounted on the old station building, one of them likely being the actual audio source. Furthermore there are also FM antennas aiming at two different sites, certainly the backup for cases of satellite service failures. Years ago the transmitter was described to me as an old tube rig and the STL as a postal office line with 7 kHz audio bandwidth, but both statements could be obsolete by now; from hearsay, Bayerischer Rundfunk feeds the mediumwave transmitters via the Astra ADR output now to get rid of audio delay problems, and the mentioned container looks like the home of a current solid-state transmitter rather than an old beast. The mast is placed outside the old station fencing, fed not directly but through separate wires. This design already led to conclusions that the mast is only a carrier for the actual antenna, but judging from the insulator arrangement indeed the whole mast radiates, especially as the foot of the mast itself is obviously placed on an insulator. Walking back into the town on the main road I passed military barracks, reminding me of pictures showing the demolition of the RIAS transmitter. Indeed the location of the former RIAS site is described as the western outskirts of Hof, but unfortunately time did not permit an archaeological search for remains of this much larger transmitter. (40 kW on 684 7-18 local time only, shut down in September 1994, masts blown up only three months later. Site not identical with FM site Großer Waldstein, also listed as Hof in RIAS times.) (Kai Ludwig, Germany, Aug 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRAQ [and non]. THE MEDIA IN IRAQ - UPDATED 26 AUGUST 2003 New publications continue to appear in Iraq since the fall of Saddam Husayn's regime in April 2003. At the time of writing, more than 180 newspapers and other publications are available. Many of the new papers are published by lesser-known organizations. The Iraqi Media Network (IMN), operated by the Coalition Provisional Authority, continues to dominate domestic broadcasting. The role of the IMN in shaping post-war national broadcasting in Iraq, and the extent of its powers, came under the international spotlight at the beginning of August, when senior IMN official Ahmad al-Rikabi, head of US-backed Iraqi TV, resigned. Rikabi complained that inadequate funding prevented the station from competing with rival channels from Iran and the Gulf states. The US authorities have appointed Simon Haselock as media commissioner to govern broadcasters and the press in Iraq, establish training programmes for journalists and plan for the establishment of a state- run radio and TV network, the Washington Post newspaper reported on 19 August. Haselock's last appointment was as spokesman and media supervisor for UN authorities overseeing Kosovo. An FM radio station describing itself as Iraq's first independent music station has been heard in Baghdad. Across Iraq as a whole, however, independent radio and TV stations have been slow to emerge. International broadcasters such as the BBC, Radio Monte Carlo-Middle East and the US-run Radio Sawa are all available on FM in Baghdad and some other Iraqi cities. Internet services are on offer in the capital, and the state internet service provider, Uruklink, is back in operation after several months offline. The Paris-based organization Reporters Sans Frontières (RSF) on 23 July published a report on developments in Iraq's media in the previous four months. The full report can be seen on the RSF web site, http://www.rsf.fr The following new Iraqi press and broadcast sources have been traced since the previous 1 August 2003 issue of "The media in post-war Iraq": NEW RADIO BROADCASTS IN IRAQ SINCE 1 AUGUST 2003 IQ4 Radio Iraq -- In Baghdad, a previously unidentified FM radio station on 104.1 MHz playing continuous Arabic and Western pop music was observed on 16 August with the following announcement in English: "This is IQ4 Radio Iraq, Iraq's first independent music station, 104.1 FM". New Iraq Radio -- The previously unidentified radio station broadcasting in Arabic and Kurdish on 657 kHz mediumwave in Baghdad has now been identified as New Iraq Radio, Voice of the Iraqi Media Network. The US surrogate broadcaster Radio Free Iraq has been observed on a new FM frequency in Baghdad, 102.4 MHz, which is listed on their web site as 102 MHz. With the arrival of Polish troops in Iraq as part of the international stabilization force, public Polish Radio is setting up a correspondents' unit in Iraq and plans to start broadcasts for the Polish military contingent in the country, Polish radio reported on 9 August. NEW IRAQI PRESS SINCE 1 AUGUST 2003 . . . [exhaustive section snipped for DXLD) POST-WAR BROADCAST MEDIA --- RADIO FM BAND IN BAGHDAD (MHz) 89.0 - BBC World Service in Arabic 89.9 - Iranian Payam network in Persian 90.1 - Iranian Voice of the Mujahidin in Arabic 92.3 - Continuous US pop music - no identification announcements 93.0 - Iranian Javan (Youth) network in Persian 93.5 - Radio Monte Carlo-Middle East 95.0 - Radio Freedom from Baghdad in Arabic (operated by the PUK) 97.1 - Unidentified Western music 97.4 - Continuous US pop music (as 92.3) 97.7 - Continuous US pop music (as 92.3) 98.1 - BBC World Service in English 98.3 - Baghdad FM Radio 100.4 - US Radio Sawa in Arabic 101.6 - Iranian Javan (Youth) network in Persian 102.4 - Radio Free Iraq (RFE/RL) 104.1 - IQ4 Radio Iraq in English 107.8 - American Forces Network in English AM/MEDIUMWAVE (kHz) 531 - (Iranian) IRIB Radio Sarasarye network in Persian 540 - Radio Kuwait Main Programme in Arabic 558 - IRIB Radio Farhang network in Persian 576 - IRIB Arabic Service 585 - (Saudi) BSKSA General Programme in Arabic 612 - IRIB Arabic Service 630 - Radio Kuwait Koran Programme in Arabic 657 - New Iraq Radio, Voice of the Iraqi Media Network in Arabic and Kurdish 666 - IRIB Radio Sarasarye network in Persian 693 - US Information Radio in Arabic 711 - IRIB Ahwaz regional in Arabic 720 - Voice of the Mujahidin in Arabic 756 - Information Radio in Arabic 783 - BSKSA 2nd Programme in Arabic 819 - Syrian Arab Republic Radio Main Programme in Arabic 855 - BSKSA Koran Programme in Arabic 864 - Radio Nejat in Persian 873 - BSKSA Koran Programme in Arabic 900 - IRIB Radio Sarasarye network in Persian 909 - Radio Nahrain 936 - BSKSA Koran Programme in Arabic 954 - Radio Qatar in Arabic 972 - IRIB Radio Sarasarye network in Persian 1000 - Voice of the Worker Communist Party of Iraq 1026 - Iraqi Media Network - Radio Baghdad in Arabic 1053 - Republic of Iraq Radio, Voice of the Iraqi People in Arabic 1089 - BSKSA 2nd Programme in Arabic 1134 - Radio Kuwait Main Programme in Arabic 1161 - IRIB Arabic Service 1170 - (US-run) Radio Farda in Persian 1188 - IRIB Radio Payam network in Persian 1224 - IRIB Arabic Service 1242 - Radio Sultanate of Oman 1251 - IRIB Radio Sarasarye network in Persian 1269 - Radio Kuwait Modern Arabic Music Service 1278 - IRIB Kermanshah regional in Persian 1296 - Voice of Azerbaijan in Azeri - Radio Liberty relay 1305 - IRIB Bushehr regional in Persian 1314 - (US-run) Radio Free Iraq via Abu Dhabi 1332 - IRIB Tehran regional in Persian 1341 - Radio Kuwait 2nd Programme in Arabic 1395 - Voice of Armenia in Armenian 1422 - BSKSA Foreign Language Programme in French 1440 - BSKSA General Programme in Arabic 1449 - IRIB World Service in Russian 1467 - BSKSA General Programme in Arabic 1476 - Emirates Radio, UAE, in Arabic 1485 - IRIB Radio Sarasarye network in Persian 1503 - IRIB Radio Sarasarye network in Persian 1521 - IRIB Radio Farhang network in Persian 1530 - IRIB Radio Sarasarye network in Persian 1539 - (US-run) Radio Farda in Persian 1548 - (US-run) Radio Sawa in Arabic 1566 - Radio of the Land of the Two Rivers in Arabic 1575 - Radio Al-Mustaqbal 1575 - Radio Asia, UAE, in Urdu 1593 - VoA English/Kurdish/Persian + Radio Free Iraq Iraqi Media Network, Voice of New Iraq - operated by the Coalition Provisional Authority. Has also identified as Republic of Iraq Radio from Baghdad and Voice of Free Iraq (Sawt al-Iraq al-Hurr). Broadcasts on 98.3 MHz FM in Baghdad. On 27 May 2003 the station was observed on 1026 kHz announcing as Iraqi Media Network-Radio Baghdad. Shamin Rassam, an Iraqi-American, directs IMN's FM radio outlet as well as news bulletins on the mediumwave station, according to the Washington Post. IQ4 Radio Iraq In Baghdad, a previously unidentified FM radio station on 104.1 MHz playing continuous Arabic and Western pop music was observed on 16 August with the following announcement in English: "This is IQ4 Radio Iraq, Iraq's first independent music station, 104.1 FM". Radio Nahrain -- Since the end of March 2003, Radio Nahrain, also known as Twin Rivers Radio, has been transmitting on FM on 100.4 and 94.6 MHz from a location south of Basra. It has also been monitored on 96.0 MHz and 909 kHz mediumwave. The station is operated by British forces, but was due to be taken over at some stage by the Coalition Provisional Authority. With the arrival of Polish troops in Iraq as part of the international stabilization force, public Polish Radio is setting up a correspondents' unit in Iraq and plans to start broadcasts for the Polish military contingent in the country, Polish radio reported on 9 August. Voice of Freedom, Voice of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan radio in Arabic and Kurdish is operated by the PUK. It broadcasts daily from 1000-1900 gmt on 95.0 MHz. The station identifies on air as "Radio Freedom". Turkomaneli TV and radio was launched in Kirkuk in April 2003 and broadcasts on behalf of the Iraqi Turkoman Front. Turkomaneli Radio opened radio stations in Talla'far and Mosul on 6 and 8 May respectively, the Iraqi Turkoman Front newspaper Turkomaneli reported on 11 May. Dangi Komal-Kirkuk radio broadcasts on 1341 kHz in Kurdish, Arabic and Turkish to Kirkuk on behalf of the Kurdistan Islamic Group. The Worker-Communist Party of Iraq's "Radio Bopeshawa" is reportedly back on the air. The internet site of the Worker-Communist Party of Iraq http://www.wpiraq.org reports that Ila al-Amam (Forward) Radio [usually rendered as Radio Bopeshawa, meaning "Forward"], voice of the Worker-Communist Party of Iraq, broadcasts for one hour a day on shortwave from 1100 gmt (half an hour in Arabic and half an hour in Kurdish), to the areas of Arbil, Kirkuk and Mosul. The same programme is repeated between 0500-0600 gmt the next day. Identifies on air as "Voice of the Worker Communist Party of Iraq". The following are among stations in operation before April 2003 that continue to be heard inside Iraq: Voice of the People of Kurdistan, operated by the PUK Voice of Iraqi Kurdistan, operated by the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) Radio Azadi, Voice of the Communist Party of Iraqi Kurdistan Ashur Radio - The station reportedly began operation in April 2000 and is operated by the Assyrian Democratic Movement, an opposition organization in northern Iraq. It broadcasts in Assyrian and Arabic on shortwave, reportedly from a transmitter in Azerbaijan. Voice of the Iraqi People, Voice of the Iraqi Communist Party - The station broadcasts from northern Iraq, possibly using Kurdish facilities. Voice of the Mojahed, the Mojahedin-e Khalq Organization's radio, may still be located in Iraq. This radio broadcasts via shortwave, satellite and with archive audio files on the Internet. Following the fall of Saddam Husayn, the station was observed to have ceased broadcasting for a few days in April. The station is currently heard on various shortwave frequencies and on the Telstar 12 satellite at 15 degrees west, on frequency 12588 vertical, in parallel with the terrestrial frequencies. The web site of the radio station is at: http://www.iran.mojahedin.org Al-Mustaqbal [The Future] radio is operated by the Iraqi National Accord. TELEVISION The Iraqi Media Network launched on 13 May. The Washington Post reported on 11 May that the US planned a nationwide Iraqi TV network to succeed the airborne Towards Freedom TV. The programme, initially for two hours but projected as a 24-hour full-service network, includes 30 minutes of news each night, including a local news segment, the report said. The station began broadcasts amid squabbling between its US and Canadian advisers, and complaints from its Iraqi journalists about "American censorship", international agencies reported. Since around 20 June the Iraqi Media Network TV has broadcast to Iraq from Eutelsat W1, located at 10 degrees east. The role of the IMN in shaping post-war national broadcasting in Iraq, and the extent of its powers, came under the international spotlight at the beginning of August, when senior IMN official Ahmad al-Rikabi, head of US-backed Iraqi TV, resigned. Rikabi complained that inadequate funding prevented the station from competing with rival channels from Iran and the Gulf states. The IMN's director, George Mansur, said in an interview with the French news agency AFP on 22 August that the network had received new equipment and would broadcast 24 hours a day "within a few weeks". "The move is hoped to end weeks of squabbles at the channel, seen by many as nothing more than a mouthpiece of the coalition authorities in Iraq," the AFP report added. According to the Washington Post, the IMN's television network is capable of reaching about two-thirds of Iraqi homes. Karbala - a local TV channel was launched on 16 April, according to United Arab Emirates Abu Dhabi TV on 6 May. Similar small-scale local channels are reported to be operating in Najaf and Kut, according to BBC News Online reporter Tarik Kafala, who visited the stations in June 2003. Ninawa TV was launched in mid-July 2003. The Baghdad newspaper Al-Ittihad reported on 14 July that an independent radio station called Ninawa Radio also operates in the city. Freedom TV [Al-Hurriyah TV] is a PUK-sponsored television station that began test transmissions from Baghdad on 30 April. A PUK statement said viewers can access Freedom TV on UHF channel 38 from 1700-2200 gmt. Mosul TV was the "first station" to resume transmission in Iraq after the overthrow of Saddam Husayn, Dubai-based news channel Al-Arabiya TV reported on 10 May. Kirkuk TV channel started broadcasts on 23 April "under the supervision of the coalition forces", according to a report by the Iraqi Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) newspaper Brayati on 25 April. Turkomaneli TV and radio was launched in Kirkuk in April 2003 and broadcasts on behalf of the Iraqi Turkoman Front. Turkomaneli Radio opened radio stations in Talla'far and Mosul on 6 and 8 May respectively, the Iraqi Turkoman Front newspaper Turkomaneli reported on 11 May. The Mojahedin-e Khalq Organization's (MKO) "Vision of Resistance TV" (Sima-ye Moqavemat) which was relayed by the former Republic of Iraq Television before and after normal broadcasting hours has not been reported on the air recently. Reportedly the studios were in Ashraf, north of Baghdad in Central Iraq. The only MKO TV programmes being traced at present are via satellite on the station "Simaye Azaidi Iran National TV" (Vision of Freedom National Iran TV), which is not located in Iraq but which the sat-address.com web site gives UK-based contact details. The web site is http://www.iranntv.com and satellites are the trans-Atlantic Telstar 12 at 15 degrees west (12588 MHz vertical), beamed to Europe and the Middle East. KurdSat, the television station of the PUK, has expanded its broadcasts to Kirkuk and Khanaqin. The KDP's television station Kurdistan TV now beams its programmes to Kirkuk and Mosul. The Iraqi newpaper Al-Qabas reported on 3 June that eight million satellite dishes would be imported from the United States, Japan, Korea and China. TV BAND IN BAGHDAD (sound frequencies in MHz ) VHF 194.75 - Iraqi Media Network Television 222.75 - Iranian Television First Channel UHF 484.75 - Iraqi Media Network Television 508.75 - Iranian Television First Channel 532.75 - Iranian Television Regional Service 604.75 - Iraqi Media Network Television 644.75 - Patriotic Union of Kurdistan Radio (in parallel with radio transmission on 4025 kHz) IRANIAN BROADCAST MEDIA ACCESSIBLE IN IRAQ -- TELEVISION The Iran-based Al-Alam TV channel in Arabic and English is a 24-hour news channel transmitted on four satellites (Arabsat, Asiasat, Telstar and Hot Bird satellites) and can be received in Europe, the Middle East, Asia and America. Al-Alam broadcasts into Baghdad from a powerful transmitter about 150 km away, just over the Iran-Iraq border. It is the only foreign channel that can be viewed by Iraqis without a satellite dish. That has sent its viewership soaring among Iraqis, who cannot afford a satellite dish and receiver. The Arabic channel began broadcasting in February 2003. English content currently is limited to horizontal news subtitles or news tickers. The station has a web site at http://www.alalamnews.com Sahar Universal Network 1 and 2 television, Iran's external satellite TV service on the Hot Bird 1-6 satellites, is viewable across Iraq and includes Arabic programming. It broadcasts on the 13 degrees East Hot Bird 1-6 satellite daily at 0500-2300 gmt. Its web site is located at http://www.sahartv.com Vision of the Islamic Republic of Iran television in Arabic is based in Tehran and sponsored by the state-run Vision of the Islamic Republic of Iran. It broadcasts daily to Iraq on the satellite parameter 11172 MHz V (6.8 MHz) 62 degrees East Intelsat 902. Al-Thaqalayn TV --- This channel, affiliated to an Iranian cultural institute of the same name, is targeted at viewers in Iraq and broadcasts religious programmes, the Tehran Times newspaper reported on 14 July. People in Iran's Ilam Province can watch the programmes as well, the report noted. Resistance Channel - this TV channel is called "Al-Estiqamah TV" in Arabic; in April 2003 it was reported to be using the facilities of Iranian radio and TV, including the aerial of Iran's Education Channel, to broadcast to Iraq. The station was inaugurated in early April 2003 by Ayatollah Baqr al-Hakim, the head of the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq [SCIRI], according to the Tehran- based Baztab web site. The channel was untraced when checked from 5-7 July 2003, and may no longer be operational. A search of internet sites on 6 July revealed that the channel has left Intelsat 902, Hot Bird and Arabsat. RADIO Voice of the Mujahidin --- First observed on 17 April and broadcasting in Arabic, the station's content suggests that it is operated by the Iranian-backed Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SCIRI). In addition, the station is transmitting on one of several frequencies used by Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting for its external transmissions. Has been heard on 90.1 MHz FM, in parallel with 720 kHz. The content generally parallels that of the main SCIRI web site located at http://www.majlesaala.com Voice of the Islamic Republic of Iran (VIRI) external service in Arabic can be heard on mediumwave and shortwave inside Iraq as well as via the Internet at http://www.irib.com Voice of Rebellious Iraq - broadcasts in Arabic and supports the Iranian-sponsored Shi'i group, the Supreme Council of the Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SCIRI); believed to transmit from Iran. The station was untraced when checked from 5-7 July 2003. INTERNATIONAL MEDIA Major international radio and television stations, such as pan-Arab satellite television stations, the BBC Arabic and World service radio, the Paris-based Radio Monte Carlo-Middle East, US Radio Sawa and US- sponsored Radio Free Iraq are available in Iraq. BBC World Service is now 24 hours a day in Arabic on FM in Baghdad and Basra. The FM frequencies are 89.0 MHz in Baghdad and 90.0 MHz in Basra in Arabic. In Basra, the World Service can also be heard in English on FM on 88.0 MHz and 98.1 MHz. Radio Monte Carlo-Middle East is now on FM on 93.5 MHz in Baghdad for 24 hours a day. Radio Sawa is on FM in Baghdad (100.4 MHz), Arbil (100.5 MHz) and Sulaymaniyah (88.0 MHz), as well as on 1548 MW. Since mid-May 2003, Libya has been broadcasting specifically to Iraq in Arabic. The shortwave broadcasts carrry the following announcement: "This is the general centre for broadcasts beamed from the Great Jamahiriyah: A message to the people of the two rivers [Iraq]." Libya broadcasts to Iraq daily on 17600 kHz at 1200-1300 and on 7245, 9605, and 11660 kHz at 1800-1900 gmt. Syrian Arab Republic Radio is the Syrian state-owned radio's external service. It broadcasts on shortwave on 12085 and 13610 kHz. It has also been heard in Iraq on the MW frequency of 819 kHz between 1100 and 1145 gmt. Its satellite parameters are 11572 MHz H (7.2 MHz) on 16 degrees East Eutelsat W2, and 3803 MHz LCHP 40.50 W NSS 806. Its broadcast times are from 1100-1145, 1350-1450, 1830-1915 and 2215-2315 gmt. Radio Kuwait is the state-owned Kuwaiti radio. It can be received in Iraq on the MW frequency of 540 kHz 24 hours. Voice of Israel is Israel's state-owned radio. It broadcasts daily in Arabic on shortwave at 0300-2115 gmt on 5915 kHz and 12150 kHz. Access to all broadcast media is limited by the availability of electricity, radio and TV sets and the satellite equipment. INTERNET Uruklink, the Iraqi state internet service provider, was observed back in operation on 12 July after several months offline. The web site at http://www.uruklink.net includes links to live audio streams from the BBC Arabic Service, Radio Sawa and Radio Monte Carlo-Middle East. The US-led Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) that is administering postwar Iraq has a web site http://www.cpa-iraq.org The web site carries transcripts of speeches by CPA administrator L. Paul Bremer and other officials, fact sheets on Iraqi ministries, public service announcements, press releases and official documents such as regulations and orders issued by the CPA. An official source at the Ministry of Transport and Communications announced at the end of June 2003 that internet services to private subscribers in Baghdad would be resumed soon, and would be "free of charge", Al-Shira newspaper reported. Source: BBC Monitoring research 26 Aug 03 (via DXLD) ** IRELAND. RTÉ TO LAUNCH LONGWAVE SERVICE ON 1ST OCTOBER Lennie Kaye, Technical Operations Manager (Radio) at Irish public broadcaster RTÉ, has told Media Network that the official launch of the longwave service of RTÉ Radio 1 on 252 kHz is planned for 1 October 2003. The transmitter has been testing in recent days, leading to a spate of E-mails to Media Network and other media sites. RTÉ acquired the transmitter from its previous commercial owners, TEAMtalk, when that station closed on 31 July last year. The longwave service is intended primarily for Irish expatriates living in the UK. At the same time, RTÉ has expanded its radio services on the Sky Digital platform by adding the stereo version of RTÉ Radio 1 on the Electronic Programme Guide (EPG) at 910. The existing Radio 1 service on EPG 892 has been re-named "RTE Europe" as it's carried on the Astra 2B satellite which has a wider footprint than the new stereo service on Astra 2D that covers mainly Ireland and the UK. The RTÉ Europe service carries the same alternative programming at certain times as the mediumwave transmitter in Ireland on 567 kHz (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 26 August 2003 via DXLD) RTE are testing 252 again today from 10am UTC, probably for most of this week if it's anything like last. They are putting out RTE Radio 1 as on their internet feed at http://www.rte.ie (Posted by Paul Strickland on August 26, 2003 at 06:34:39, LW Messageboard via DXLD) RTE is back on longwave 252 kHz again this morning (Tuesday), heard from tune-in at 1030 UT with a relay of RTE Radio 1. It seems stronger today than during the tests last week. 73s (Dave Kenny, UK, Aug 26, BDXC-UK via DXLD) ** IRELAND [non]. RTÉ ALL IRELAND HURLING AND FOOTBALL FINALS 2003 ON SHORTWAVE Irish public broadcaster RTÉ has announced the shortwave frequencies for coverage of this year's All Ireland Hurling and Football Finals. The broadcasts will take place at 1425-1625 UTC on Sunday 14th and Sunday 28th September 2003 as follows: to North America on 13785 kHz to Central & South America on 15275 kHz to West Africa on 17860 kHz to Northeast Africa & the Middle East on 21590 kHz to the Far East & SE Asia on 7485 kHz (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 25 August 2003 via DXLD) ** ITALY. EUROPEAN MUSIC RADIO 49 METRES 5775 KHZ SUNDAY NIGHTS Dear EMR listener, It is time now for EMR to hit the air waves once again, this time we are via the Italian Radio Relay Service on 5775 kHz just outside the 49 metre band. The first transmission date is the 31st of August 2003 at 2000 to 2130 BST with hit music and IDs to Europe. All transmissions will be repeated within 7 days of the Main broadcast. EMR will be on the air every 3rd Sunday night of the month until April 2004 on the same channel from the 21st of September 2003. Starting in September 2003 EMR will be introducing a new jingle Package and programme schedule. All correct reports via E-mail will be verified with a free QSL card via post. EMR E-mail Address - emr@blueyonder.co.uk THESE ARE THE ON AIR DATES FOR EMR ALL TRANSMISSIONS ARE ON 5775 KHZ AT 2000 TO 2130 BRITISH STANDARD TIME. [1900-2030 UT until Nov, then 2000-2130 UT] 2003 DATES 31st AUGUST 2003 - Repeated 6th of September 21st SEPTEMBER 2003 - Repeat - (to be confirmed) 19th OCTOBER 2003 16th NOVEMBER 2003 21st DECEMBER 2003 2004 DATES 18th JANUARY 2004 16th FEBRUARY 2004 15th MARCH 2004 19th APRIL 2004 [1900-2030 again] There may be some transmissions on 13840 kHz sometime before April 2004. GOOD LISTENING AND GOOD RECEPTION 73s (TOM, EMR, Aug 24, BCLnews.it via DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH. ACTIVISTS THWARTED IN N. KOREA RADIO BALLOON BID SEOUL, Aug 22 (Reuters) - South Korean police on Friday thwarted a group of activists trying to launch balloons carrying transistor radios into North Korea in a bid to undermine the communist government, an activist said. Speaking by telephone from near the border between the two countries, activist Rev Douglas Shin said Norbert Vollertsen, who works on behalf of North Korean refugees, was slightly hurt in a scuffle with police, who said the demonstrators did not have a permit for a balloon launch rally. "We were told this morning that the government would not interfere, but in Cholwon we were told there was a change of orders," said Shin, a Korean-American human rights campaigner. He said Vollertsen had injured his knee in the scuffle. Local police could not immediately be reached for comment. The group of mainly South Korean activists had gathered at Cholwon, a town 80 km (48 miles) northeast of the South Korean capital, to try to fly more than 20 balloons, each six metres (18 ft) tall and carrying about 30 small radios, into North Korea. The "Give the Ear to a North Korean" campaign was aimed at overcoming North Korea's strict ban on its people receiving outside broadcasts. North Korean radios and televisions are built so they can only tune in to government channels, which run mostly martial music or praise of reclusive leader Kim Jong-il. The Voice of America and South Korea's KBS -- both government-run broadcasters -- air programmes aimed at North Korea, but face jamming. Vollertsen is a German doctor once decorated by North Korea for humanitarian work there, but was expelled in 2000 after condemning the communist state's human rights record. He has since campaigned to help North Koreans refugees in China secure asylum in South Korea and other countries, and helped plan a spate of incursions by North Korean refugees into foreign diplomatic missions in Beijing last year. Friday's incident came as the two Koreas, the United States, China, Japan and Russia prepared to meet in Beijing next week in an attempt to defuse the North Korean nuclear crisis. REUTERS (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** MADAGASCAR: PRIVATE RADIO BREAKS STATE RADIO MONOPOLY OF NATIONAL COVERAGE | Excerpt from report by Malagasy independent newspaper L'Express de Madagascar web site on 25 August A [private] Malagasy radio station is now relayed on satellite. This is the good news offered by MBS [Madagascar Broadcasting System, owned by President Marc Ravalomanana and managed by his daughter, Sarah Ravalomanana] to radio listeners in Fianarantsoa [southcentral town]. This is an unexpected development. Indeed during a seminar on media legislation which we attended in Antananarivo in the year 2000, the manager of a private station had asked whether he could resort to satellites to relay his broadcasts to all corners of Madagascar. [Passage omitted] His request obviously was turned down by [Ratsiraka regime] officials who attended the seminar, and who clearly were eager to leave the venue of the debate without having to give an answer inappropriate to the prevailing situation [pluralism of information]. However, satellites may now be used to compete with the national radio station [broadcasting in short wave and therefore audible countrywide]. [Passage omitted] The [national radio station's] monopoly of national news coverage is now a thing of the past. Several parts of the national territory will now be covered by two stations: RNM [Malagasy National Radio] and Radio MBS which broadcasts simultaneously to Mahajanga [northwestern port], Toliara [southwestern port], Tolagnaro [southeastern port], Fianarantsoa [southcentral town] and, of course, to SAVA [Sambava, Antalaha, Vohemar, Andapa: vanilla-producing region on northeastern coast]. [Passage omitted] Regarding the radio's programmes, a MBS official said 60 per cent of them would be those of the MBS HQ in Anosipatrana [Antananarivo neighbourhood]. Live news bulletins [broadcast by MBS HQ in capital] are broadcast at 1230 [0930 gmt] and 1830 [1530 gmt] and the evening news will be rebroadcast the following day at 0615 [0315 gmt]. The official also said "the news bulletins in French will be broadcast from today (21 August)". He said the first trial on satellite took place on Friday 8 August, adding that the radio transmits daily [on satellite] from 0500 [0200 gmt] to 2300 [2000 gmt]. Source: L'Express de Madagascar web site, Antananarivo, in French 25 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** MEXICO. DX PROGRAMS (in Spanish) [primary surnames --- primer apellido --- are in caps to avoid confusion by non-Mexicans] DX 21 c/o Radio Mexico International Calle Real de Mayorazgo #83 Colonia Xoco, Del. Benito Juárez 03330 México, D.F., MEXICO Telephone: +52-5-628-1731, 628-1730 Fax: +52-5-604-6753 Contact persons: Alejandro JOSEPH, Juan José MIROZ E-mails: rmi@eudoramail.com, rmi@imer.com.mx Websites: http://www.imer.gob.mx http://www.imer.gob.mx/cartas/rmi/pdf Airtimes: Tuesday and Friday 2030-2045 UT on 9705 and 11770 kHz (subject to change) Note: This is the DX program of station XERMX, Radio Mexico International -- the Mexican government`s international shortwave station. We have been told that "DX 21" is more of an amateur radio program produced by members of the Radio Experimenters Federation and intended to introduce listeners to the world of amateur radio. In the past, Radio Mexico International has had other DX programs of more interest to shortwave listeners (including in English). At press time, the station was going through some major budget cuts which were causing changes in personnel and programming, so perhaps there will be changes in its DX program(s) in the near future. Encuentro DX c/o XEOI Radio Mil Onda Corta Apartado Postal 21-1000 04021 México, D.F., MEXICO Contact persons: Dr. Julián SANTIAGO Díez de Bonilla, Héctor GARCIA Bojorge E-mails: jusadiez@hotmail.com bojorge@servidor.unam.mx Website: http://www.nrm.com.mx/estaciones/radiomil/DX.html Airtimes (Central Mexican Time): Friday 1725; Saturday 0830 and 1930; Sunday 0900, 1725 (or 1825) and 2305 hours on 6010 kHz. Add five hours for UT in summer; add six hours for UT in winter. [see previous issue for schedule in UT, apparently rounded off times. Jeff White`s interview on Radio Enlace mentioned that gh`s Spanish DX report was also heard within this program, news to me --- gh] Note: Encuentro DX is actually a group of shortwave listeners in the Mexico City area. They produce a weekly DX program with the same name for the shortwave frequency (6010 kHz) of the popular commercial AM station Radio Mil in Mexico City. Dr. Julián Santiago speaks excellent English, has lived in the United States, and used to produce a regular DX program in English (which unfortunately no longer exists) for the government-owned Radio Mexico International. At press time, Radio Mil was about to move its studios to a new location on the outskirts of Mexico City, and it was unknown if Encuentro DX would be able to continue producing a weekly DX program for the station. In any case, the group will continue to exist as a local DX club. Sintonía Libre c/o Radio Educación (XEPPM) Angel Urraza 622, Colonia del Valle 03100 México, D.F., MEXICO Alternate address: Apartado Postal 21-465, CP 04021 México, D.F., MEXICO Main telephone: +52-5-1500-1050 (direct number to Shortwave Department +52-5-1500-1073) Studio telephone: +52-5-1500-1060 Other telephone numbers: +52-5-559-6944, +52-5-559-8075 Director General: Ms. Lidia CAMACHO Camacho (telephone +52-5-1500- 1051) Assistant Director for Production and Programming: Ms. Perla Olivia RODRIGUEZ Reséndiz (telephone +52-5-1500-1063) General e-mail addresses: radioeducación@yahoo.com informes@radioeducacion.edu.mx E-mail for Director General: direccion@radioeducacion.edu.mx E-mail for Asst. Director for Production and Programming: polivia@radioeducacion.edu.mx Website: http://www.radioeducacion.edu.mx Broadcast schedule for shortwave frequency (6185 kHz): 1800-0600 Mexico City time daily (add five hours for UT in summer; add six hours for UT in winter) Broadcast schedule for "Sintonía Libre:" Monday 1830-1900; Tuesday 2030-2100; Wednesday 2230-2300; Friday 1830-1900; Saturday 2030-2100; Sunday 2230-2300. These are local days and times. Add five hours for UT in summer; add six hours for UT in winter. Note that "Sintonía Libre" is actually a weekly program. The new program is first broadcast on Wednesday; the other days and times are repeats. Note: The Mexican government operates two shortwave stations. Radio Mexico International is the main international broadcasting station, although its technical facilities and signal are variable from fair to poor at press time. Radio Educación (i.e. Radio Education) is operated by the Ministry of Education, and its shortwave facilities are in very good shape with a good to excellent signal at local nighttimes when there is no co-channel interference. The station is quite committed to DXers and provides excellent coverage of Mexican DX events such as the Annual National Meeting of DXers and Radio Listeners. The station is quite popular among shortwave listeners in Mexico. (It was tied for sixth place in the NASB listener survey.) The station broadcasts in Spanish, with some English and French (Jeff White, 9th Mexican DX Encuentro report in Sept NASB Newsletter via DXLD) ** NICARAGUA [non]. See COSTA RICA, R. Reloj ** NIGERIA. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMMISSION SHUTS ITV/RADIO, BENIN This Day (Lagos) August 23, 2003 Posted to the web August 25, 2003 http://allafrica.com/stories/200308250220.html Lagos --- National Broadcasting Commission (NBC) has suspended the operations of the Independent Radio and Television, Benin. The chief public affairs officer of the commission, Mr. Ahmed Abdulkadir, in a statement said the suspension is due to the unprofessional conduct of both stations which relayed martial music on the radio and television stations following the death of a staff of the communications outfit on Thursday, August 21. "A lengthy broadcast of Martial Music, without accompanying educational or entertainment information, usually signifies a threat to political/ administrative situation in Nigeria, and should not be indulged in by a station for any reason whatsoever." The offence contravenes the Nigeria Broadcasting Code, which states that no station should, "broadcast information immediately leading, or likely to lead to a breakdown of law and order." The station's act, according to the statement, did cause panic in Edo and threatened to lead to a breakdown of law and order in the state and beyond, as its signals cover Edo, Delta, Ondo and Ekiti states. [sic -- something missing] w being investigated by the commission, the law-enforcement and security agencies (via allafrica.com via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) This Benin is a part of Nigeria, not the separate country formerly known as Dahomey (gh, DXLD) ** PERU. R. Victoria, Lima, 6020: in addition to the religious program La Voz de la Liberación, theyhave original info programs as follows: ``Radioperiódico Nuevo Mundo`` at 1200-1300 and 0000-0100 and ``Revista del Mediodia`` at 1730-1830, both M-F. Time may vary by dayf rom 5 to 15 minutes. In ``Radioperiódico Nuevo Mundo`` we can hear a sole ad for ``Producciones Monte Sinaí``. According to the telephone book, the station has two addresses: one is Arica 248, which corresponds to the national headquarters of Iglesia Pentecostal Dios es Amor, and the other is Reynal 320, as announced on the news. R. Nacional del Perú, Lima, 850 and 103.9: According to the ``Indicadores de Desempeño del Plan Estratégico Institucional 2002-2006, al Cuarto Trimestre 2002`` dated 05/02/2003 prepared by Oficina General de Planificación y Desarrollo, Instituto Nacional de Radio y Televisión del Perú at http://www.irtp.com.pe/irtp/archivos/05-02-2003/IDPEI_02-06_CT2002_Pl.pdf ``Radio Nacional AM went off the air from June 10 (2002) due to inundation at the transmitter site. So it was necessary to move the transmitter to transmitter site of Radio la Crónica. Due to the lack of budget for acquisition of three-phase power supply, it is not possible to put into operation. . .`` As reported in the last THDXN, Radio Nacional-AM was back on the air in late April 2003 [on 850 or 1320?? -gh] R. Unión, Lima, 880 and 6115: According to visit, I was told that their office\studios had moved from San Isidro to Miraflores. New QTH is José Pardo 138, Edificio Neptuno, Piso 16, Miraflores, Lima. Phone numbers, e-mail address, website appeared in 2003 yellow pages are no longer in use. I wonder if this unavailability is related to this move? Librería Nuevo Mundo: ``Los tres temas menos conocidos de la Radiodifusión Mundial``, by Enrique Ramírez Cortez, published by Universidad de Piura in 2000. ISBN: 9972-48-034-8. 144 pages in total. Price 25 Nuevos Soles (= US$7.2) --- This is an introductory book of a wonderful world of DXing by a Peruvian DXer. The prologue is written by Gabriel Iván Barrera. Theme 1 ``Historia de la radio``, Theme 2 ``Diexismo``, Theme 3 ``El lado oculto de la radio, la radiodifusión ilegal`` -- Interesting (Tetsuya Hirahara, who visited Lima 19 June to 28 July, 2003, ``El Tiempo Hechicero`` DX News, Aug, via Radio Nuevo Mundo via DXLD) ** PERU. R. Reina de la Selva, Chachapoyas; QSL card, personal letter, program table and photo in 52 days. The photo was ruin of pre-Inca in Chachapoyas. V/s José David Reina Noriega (Yukiharu Uemura, Kanagawa, Japan, Radio Nuevo Mundo Aug 12 via DXLD) Note Reina spelling ** PERU. A couple more Visitation Certificates collected by Takayuki Inoue Nozaki on his travels around Peru are reproduced in Radio Nuevo Mundo; compare to DXLD 3-130 for Nor Andina, with quite similar wording, sic with mistakes, minus the strikeovers I can`t reproduce: RADIO FRECUENCIA - VH - 4ta D.C. / ``La Voz de Celendín`` / Jr. José Gálvez 710 --- Celendín [letterhead] ``C O N S T A N C I A D E V I S I T A Hacemos constar que en la fecha 05 de Enero del año 1995 fuimos horadios con la presencia de nuestro distinguido amigo TAKAYUKI INOUE NOZAKI, quien en forma heroica y pacentera viene recorriendo muchos lugares de nuestro País el Perú, visitando especialmente diferentes medios de comunicación de las cuales una es Radio Frecuencia VH. ``LA VOZ DE CELENDIN``. Como muestra de gran reconocimiento y agradecimiento a la vez me permito elogiar la labor especial de nuestro distinguido vicitante y a nombre de todo el personal que laboramos en dicho medio de comunicación quiero desearle mucha suerte en esta magna tarea de difundir a todo el mundo las noricias que el aspecto comunicativo sigue extendiendose cada dia más y en diferentes categorías. Desde la Provincia de Celendín Región Nor Oriental del Marañon Republica del Perú Transmitimos el presente como un recuerdo para nuestro amigo aquien siempre lo recordaremos y le invitamos a que siempre nos escuhe en su Peis el JAPON. Celendín, 05 de Enero de 1,995.`` [Station circular rubber stamp, signed by Fernando Vázquez Castro, Director-Gerente] By 2001, a new letterhead had a new logo, a large V, perhaps of solar panels, overlain by two identical striped cylinders, presumably communications satellites which presumably Radio Frecuencia VH does not directly employ. The address, now moved to the bottom of the page, had changed to: Jr. José Gálvez No. 1030; tel (044) 855149. This time the message is a bit more succinct, apparently on the same typewriter, but better typist with no strikeovers: ``Por la presente hacemos constar que el sr. TAKAYUKI INOVE, nos visitó a nuesro pueblo Celendino en la fecha del Mes de Octubre, un día Sábado 06 de Octubre del 2001. Fue grato el momento que pasamos juntos relatando bonitas experiencias tanto de su Pais como el nuestro, nos sentimos muy emosionados y al mismo tiempo que le agradecemos muchisimo por sus gratas noticias de que en varios Paices del mundo hacen lo posible de escucharnos demostrando así su jovi. Como muestra de nuestro gran agradecimiento le extendemos la presente para los fines que crea conveniente. Celendín, 06 de octubre del 2001 [same stamp seal and signature]`` A third letter is reproduced, apparently a partial data QSL form, which reads in part [sic]: ``Anuestros Distinguidos Oyentes del Extranjero: Muy señroes Mios: Es grato el momento de saludarlos muy cordialmente y hacer amplia nuestras felicitaciones a cada uno de Uds. Por tener la amabilidad de captar nuestras ondas de RADIO FRECUENCIA V.H. ``La voz de Celendín`` en la frecuencia de los 4485 KHZ. OC. En forma sucinta comparto nuestra reseña histórica: Surgimos con un pequeño oscilador de apenas cinco vatios de potencia, artefacto que empesamos hacerlo funsionar con acumuladores de energía razón que no existia fluido eléctrico en nuestro medio, posteriormente adquirimos un trasmisor de 150 vatios de potencia en OC. El cual funsionaba solamente en horario nocturno. Hace aproximadamente 6 años que nuestra provincia cuenta con fluido eléctrico en las 24 horas del día servicio indispensable que nos sirvio para instalar nuestro equipo trasmisor de 500 vatios de potencia en la A.M. con la que funsionamos desde las 5.00 de la mañana hasta las 6.00 P.M. y desde las 18 horas nos proyectamos al eter en la frecuencia internacional de los 4485 KHZ.OC. hasta las 22 horas en hora peruana. En la mayoria de nuestras programaciones y/o en los diferentes horarios es nuestra caracteristica presentar la música Nacional de nuestro País (Folklore Bernacular Peruano). Con la inmensa alegria que nos causa el saber que nos escuchan en diversos paises del extranjero les escribimos estas breves notas dando muestra de nuestra amistad con uno de nuestrso amigos Q.S.L. Esperamos siempre tener noticias, nos suscribimos a cada undo de Uds. Atentamente.`` (From an exhaustive report in English on Radio Frecuencia VH, resulting from TIN`s visits, ``Por las Rutas del Perú (47)`` in Relámpago DX No. 139, March 2003, via Radio Nuevo Mundo, Aug 12, retyped by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. Re 3-153, R. Los Andes, 5030: One syllable seems to be missing from Thomas Nilsson's translation. It should read, "From a couple of our members,..." [not coup!] (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, DX LISTENING DIGEST) See also BOLIVIA ** RWANDA. Special broadcast last night of R Rwanda on 6055 on occasion of the national presidential elections. 6055 R Rwanda, 26th of August, 0005-0100, national language, election results (as far as I could understand), nice African music, ID, some QRM by RAI on 6060, blocked by REE at 0100; SINPO 43423. Audio clip with a nice piece of music and ID (122 KB) on my homepage. vy 73 (Michael Schnitzer. Homepage: http://home.arcor.de/mschnitzer/ Location: Hassfurt, Germany, dxing.info via DXLD) ** SERBIA & MONTENEGRO. MIOMIR GRUJIC by Matthew Collin, Sunday August 24 2003, The Observer [unaccented and untransliterated Serbian names sic] The Serbian radio disc jockey Miomir Grujic, better known as Fleka, who has died aged 49, was one of the pivotal figures in Belgrade's avant-garde art scene and counterculture. In western Europe, he was best known for his vocal performance on a recording by the electronic rock band The KLF - The Magnificent, which appeared on the War Child charity album, Help (1995). But in Serbia, Grujic was renowned for his involvement in a huge variety of art, music and media projects dating back to 1980 and the communist regime of Tito. His late-night radio broadcasts on the independent station Radio B92, which was shut down four times in the 1990s by Slobodan Milosevic's government, were both radical and bizarre. Radio Bat, as his show was called, began in 1989 and mixed Grujic's surreal monologues with garage-punk, electronic music and psychedelic rock. Keen to awaken his listeners' unconscious and to hold a mirror up to what he called the "ugly face" of Belgrade in the Milosevic era, Grujic invited heroin addicts, criminals and people with AIDS to phone in and participate in long philosophical discussions. His aim was to discover truth and a sense of freedom amid the repression, militarism and isolation his country was enduring. "I want to be some kind of transformer, some kind of idiot, some kind of madman," he said. "I want to provoke people and make them react." His final broadcast, in 1999, came one day before the Nato bombing of the city began. Grujic was the central character in Marc J Hawker's 1995 documentary for Channel 4, Zombie Town. He resembled a veteran rock 'n' roll star as he growled his satirical pieces to camera, gold teeth flashing, eyes hidden behind dark sunglasses. Although blind as the result of a long-term debilitating illness, Grujic was a charismatic presence. Bill Drummond of The KLF describes him in his book, 45, as having a captivating, guttural tone "like a Slavic Howlin' Wolf", adding, "Some voices, whatever words they are saying, have that instant sound of authority, of being the real thing. Fleka had it." Grujic was asked to contribute a voiceover to The Magnificent, The KLF's drum-and-bass cover version of the theme from the film The Magnificent Seven as a replacement for Robbie Williams, who had turned down the offer to participate. The song later became a protest anthem during the mass demonstrations against the Milosevic government in 1996. Before Radio Bat started, Grujic had already established himself on the art and music scene in Belgrade. From 1983 until 1990, he worked as the programming director of the student nightclub Akademija. Like his radio show, Akademija was chaotic, innovative and unique in Belgrade. The music was inspired by the clubs Grujic had visited during a year spent in London in 1979 and the decor took its influence from American graffiti artists such as Keith Haring and Futura 2000. Born in Sabac, west of Belgrade, Grujic studied law and painting, and graduated from the Belgrade Fine Arts Academy in 1985. He approached all his enterprises as art projects, particularly Urbazona, a series of literary and artistic events that ran from 1993 until his death. He also edited an art magazine, 4F; founded a not-for-profit record label, Trotorock; exhibited his own artworks in Belgrade galleries; wrote for the theatre and television; and produced illustrations for the Serbian daily newspaper Danas. He is survived by his ex-wife, Jovana, and his son. Miomir Grujic, broadcaster and artist, born June 1 1954; died July 11 2003 Copyright Guardian Newspapers Limited (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** SUDAN [non]. 17660, Sudan Radio Service, sent letter verie on Education Development Center, Inc. letterhead, in 6 days for E-mail report to jgroce@edc.org which I also sent by postal mail with CD and in which I requested postal reply; also small EDC sticker. V/S Jeremy Groce, Radio Programming Advisor. Good verie statement, tho no details. Indicated questions should be sent via leteter or to srs@edc.org Tnx Scott Barbour for address, which is: 1000 Potomac Street, NW, Suite 350, Washington, DC 20007 (Jerry Berg, MA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** SWEDEN. ELECTION SPECIAL ON R. SWEDEN It was announced on Radio Sweden last Sunday that there will be a special program on Sunday, September 14 dealing with the national referendum (that takes place that day) on joining the European Community's single currency (i.e. the "euro"). It will air in place of "Sounds Nordic", a youth culture and music show that goes out each Sunday except for the first Sunday of the month, which is reserved for the listener contact program "In Touch with Stockholm". Broadcast times and frequencies from http://www.sr.se/rs/ (John Figliozzi, Aug 26, swprograms via DXLD) ** UKRAINE. George Poppin reports that he could hear no trace of RUI on 12040, in the 0000-0300+ UT period on Aug 21 and 22, and asked Alexander Yegorov: Alexander, Do we need new frequencies? (George J. Poppin San Francisco) Dear George, thank you for the report. Propagation has become bad on 12040, so from 1 September we will pass to 9810 kHz. Please, keep on the monitoring, and indicate QRMs on this frequency (Alexander Yegorov, RUI, via Poppin, DXLD) Glenn, Following info about RUI received from Alexander Yegorov on August 26, 2003. "Due to bad propagation for last period on 12040, RUI will change it to 9810 from 1 September." 73, (Kraig Krist, VA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. THE SMUG, UNRESPONSIVE BBC Thank you for publishing Barbara Captijn's letter ("The BBC Has Much to Answer For," Aug. 19), in which she bemoans the BBC's failure to respond to her complaints about anti-American reporting. This has been my experience as well. BBC Radio 4, the station to which I listen in the morning, is certainly self-satisfied: It often bills itself as objective and, according to presenter John Humphries, "civilizing." I have, however, been struck by the pervasive anti-American (and, incidentally, anti-business) views in much of its reporting. This seems to be the case regardless of whether stories are economic reviews of the U.S., reports on Iraq, or even the "thought for the day." Frequently, U.S. policy will be slated without U.S. officials giving any reply or mention being made that officials declined to comment. An example of this, in my experience, is the issue of prisoners being held in Guantanamo Bay. Perhaps the U.S. is indeed doing the wrong thing here, but it would be nice if U.S. representatives were given the opportunity to defend their country's position. I have also noticed that on cultural programs, which are otherwise pretty good on the BBC, Americans who are invited to speak are often clearly ambivalent about the United States. There is, of course, no problem giving airtime to critics of the U.S., but it gets a bit much when nearly all the commentary is one-way traffic. I have e-mailed the BBC a couple of times and have received no acknowledgment. Even some of my geeky friends have complained about the difficulty of e-mailing the BBC, and so I thought that perhaps my e-mails went astray. However, following Ms. Captijn's letter, I suspect the BBC may have some policy of not responding to or acknowledging the receipt of e-mails. But even if there is such a policy -- and even if there are good reasons for it -- the BBC displays a smugness that could only come from an enterprise with guaranteed access to taxpayer funds. Michael Schewitz, London, Updated August 26, 2003 (Letter to the editor of Wall Street Journal, via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U K. Why would the Conservatives want to close the BBC website? 73- Bill Westenhaver TORIES WOULD CLOSE BBC WEBSITE Tom Happold, Tuesday August 26 2003, The Guardian The Conservative party would switch off a swath of the BBC's digital services, including its website and the youth channel BBC3, if it won the next general election. The party's culture spokesman, John Whittingdale, told Guardian Unlimited Politics he was "not persuaded" of the case for a public service website and that he was "not convinced the BBC needs to do all the things it is doing at the present", including providing "more and more channels". "As a free-market Conservative, I will only support a nationalised industry if I'm persuaded that that is the only way to do it and if it were not nationalised it would not happen." Mr Whittingdale's comments will be seen within the BBC as a glimpse of what it can expect from the Tories' review of the corporation. The party launched the review, chaired by the outspoken former chief executive of Channel Five, David Elstein, earlier this year. "The BBC cannot continue doing what it's always done when everything around it in the broadcasting world has ultimately changed. "So you need to review what the BBC is there for, what is it providing that the market will not provide," he said. "Now I think there are certain functions that a public service broadcaster still needs to fulfil and that wouldn't be provided otherwise be done by the marketplace - it is public service broadcasting. "But I am not persuaded that there is necessarily a case for a public service website. I'm not persuaded that anything on the BBC site could not be provided elsewhere, [for instance] the newspapers are mostly providing sites, which provide news and comment. "They [the newspaper sites] are essentially trying to provide for the same market and therefore you can argue why does the licence fee payers need to be financing the BBC to do it when there are other commercial organisations who are doing the same thing." "The BBC site is fantastic but that's because it's had a lot of money thrown at it." Of the BBC's other digital services, Mr Whittingdale said: "I don't accept that the BBC should go on providing more and more channels. "I'm certainly not convinced that the BBC needs to do all the things it is doing at the present nor am I convinced it needs to £2.7bn of licence fee payers money to do it." "I watch BBC3 occasionally and it does not look particularly distinctive, and it looks pretty downmarket, to me - a pale shadow of E4. Mr Whittingdale also renewed his call for the BBC to come under Ofcom, the independent broadcasting regulator, claiming the "Kelly episode is a ghastly illustration" of the continuing problem of the corporation regulating itself. "Ofcom should have always been given the power to regulate the BBC, and had they done so then any complaints about bias or content would have ultimately gone to a body who are seen as separate from the BBC," he said. Copyright Guardian Newspapers Limited (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** U K. 'ROGUE RADIO WAVES' LOCK OUT DRIVERS ISABEL COCKAYNE July 29, 2003 19:36 http://tinyurl.com/l2ic Dozens of shoppers were stranded in Thetford today after their cars locked them out. Immobilisers and electric locking systems shut down, locking several people out of their cars parked at the Forest Retail Park. The mystery mass lock-out has been blamed on rogue radio waves. Although it is unclear where the radio waves were transmitted from, the incident is to be investigated by the Radio Broadcasting Commission. Sainsbury's staff provided cups of tea and help for stranded families, who had to wait for mechanics to fix the problems (EDP24 News via Jilly Dybka KF4ZEO, DXLD) ** U S A. ENGINEER GARLINGER HONORED BY SOCIETY OF BROADCAST ENGINEERS (This article was posted August 8, 2003 on RW Online, and is reprinted here by permission. Doug is a former vice-president of the NASB.) Douglas Garlinger is SBE's Broadcast Engineer of the Year. He will be honored during the society's national meeting on Oct. 15 in Madison, Wis. Garlinger, CPBE, CBNT has been employed by LeSea Broadcasting Corp. as director of engineering since 1980. LeSea operates the World Harvest Television Network, eight full-power TV stations, four LPTVs, two FM stations and three international shortwave stations. It also has two satellite uplink networks overseas. Garlinger wrote SBE's "Introduction to DTV-RF" and co-wrote its "Television Operator's Certification Handbook." He was SBE Educator of the Year in 1994 (Sept NASB Newsletter via DXLD) If Garlinger is such a hot engineer, we wonder why WHRI audio has been perpetually muddy, and a lot of downtime lately. Perhaps he is preoccupied with (D)TV (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. LIBERAL RADIO CHAT MOVING AHEAD A fledgling liberal talk-radio network launched by a Chicago venture capitalist hoping to counter the genre's rightward tilt is close to agreements that will put it on the air in at least seven cities, including Chicago. AnShell Media LLC, named for financier Sheldon Drobny and his wife, Anita, is wrapping up affiliation deals with stations here and in New York; Los Angeles; Boston; San Francisco; Boise, Idaho, and Albuquerque, NM. AnShell CEO Jon Sinton wouldn't identify the stations, but said he expects to announce the deals this week. Posted on 08/24/2003 - (A Web-only article from ChicagoBusiness.com via DXLD) ** U S A. NEW BUILDING BRINGS PUBLIC RADIO TOGETHER BIGGER FACILITY MEANS KPR STAFF CAN WORK AT COMMON LOCATION By Terry Rombeck, Journal-World, Tuesday, August 26, 2003 [KANU, 91.5, Lawrence KS] [illustrated] When you have a CD collection that includes 30,000 discs, moving and organizing it is no small task. That's one of the challenges facing workers at Kansas Public Radio this week as they complete their move from Broadcasting Hall on campus to a new building northwest of Memorial Stadium. . . http://www.ljworld.com/section/citynews/story/143395 (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) + previous story: http://www.ljworld.com/section/citynews/story/126867 (via gh, DXLD) ** U S A. POWELL'S LEADERSHIP HAS FCC BUFFETED ON ALL SIDES By MARILYN GEEWAX, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Aspen, Colo. -- As one of his first acts in office, President Bush picked Michael K. Powell to head the Federal Communications Commission, the agency that regulates phone service and broadcasting. The choice was popular. Many predicted that the bright, politically well-connected son of Secretary of State Colin Powell was on a career track that would lead to a Cabinet post, then the governorship of Virginia, and then perhaps higher office. Now the honeymoon is over. And consumer advocates are calling for his resignation. Powerful members of Congress, including many of his fellow Republicans, are pushing legislation that would undercut a key FCC decision that eases decades-old restrictions on media ownership. The FCC's decades-long tradition of unanimous rulings on major issues is in tatters following 3-2 votes on the media rules and on local telephone deregulation -- all in an atmosphere of partisan sniping among commission members. As the aftershocks of those votes continued to rumble last week, so did questions about Powell's leadership and the FCC's ability to set clear policies for communications. On Thursday, the FCC issued final rules implementing a February decision on how much regional telephone companies must share their networks with competitors. It was widely expected that some companies will fight the rules in court. A day earlier, Powell launched a counteroffensive against criticism of the media ownership rules, saying the FCC would take steps this fall to increase local programming and ensure minority voices were heard. But that move only seemed to fuel the firestorm around Powell. FCC Commissioner Michael Copps, a Democrat who opposed easing media ownership rules, issued a statement mocking Powell's localism initiative, saying it was "a day late and a dollar short." Consumer advocates were equally dismissive. "I have to say, my mind boggles" at the thought that Powell believes the localism effort could muffle opposition to his stance on media ownership, said Jeff Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy, a media watchdog group. "I think Powell is desperately trying to salvage his political career, and his ego, by trying to prove that media concentration isn't really a problem," Chester said. No consensus-building His admirers urge him to stay on the job but shake their heads at his tactical missteps. They say Powell, though brilliant in many ways, has been slow to figure out how to build political support before making controversial decisions. "He can only do so much on his own," said William Daley, president of SBC Communications Inc. and former secretary of commerce under President Clinton. "To be very frank, he needs stronger allies in the administration and stronger allies on the Hill." Last month, the House voted 400-21 for a bill restoring a 35 percent cap on national broadcast audience, which the FCC had voted to raise to 45 percent. In the Senate, a bipartisan group is pushing legislation to erase all of the FCC's media ownership rule changes. The votes followed criticism from lawmakers that Powell had given little regard to public opinion before the FCC approved the media rules. "A bare, three-member majority of FCC commissioners has employed a 'damn-the-torpedoes, full-speed-ahead' strategy to hammer through one of the most far-reaching policy decisions in the history of media," said Sen. Fritz Hollings of South Carolina, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Commerce Committee. Speaking last week at the Aspen Summit, an annual technology conference, Powell repeatedly expressed dismay that lawmakers and other officials make decisions based on "emotional preferences" for government protections. "It's amazing," he said, that many Americans want a heavier government hand "despite how compelling the case is that capitalism and free markets around the world have provided greater prosperity." Despite the controversy, Powell's allies say he should stay the course. "When you are making big changes, there are going to be rough spots," said Tom Tauke, senior vice president for public policy at regional phone company Verizon Communications. "But if you're going to succeed, you can't just walk away. You have to instead redouble the efforts. And I think that's what he is doing right now." In the trenches Powell himself shrugs off speculation that he would resign, which first surged last February when some political pundits suggested that President Bush had urged fellow Republican Commissioner Kevin Martin to provide the deciding vote against him on the telephone deregulation decision. To fight for deregulation, "I think you better be prepared to be a really muddy infantry soldier," said Powell, a former Army platoon leader whose military career was cut short by serious injuries suffered in a training accident. He said he knows he must "take three steps forward, get shot back two, but keep going forward." FCC Commissioner Kathleen Abernathy, who also spoke in Aspen, said she believes Powell will continue serving and that the commission will be able to work well under his guidance in coming months. "I think he's a strong leader," she said. The current controversies "will settle down" before long and the commissioners will be able to put aside partisan disputes, she predicted. "We're all mature adults," she said. "We'll go forward and do our jobs." (c) 2003 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Aug 24 (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. A co-worker at WSM sent this --- he also did a lot of TV. This says a lot about the state of local television newscasts. in fact it could easily be expanded to include the garbage now being passed off as news on CNN and most of the rest of the so-called network news sources (Tom Bryant) ANOTHER VIEW: Ted Mandell --- The ten little secrets of local TV news From Indianapolis Star Op-Ed page: Aug 12 Dear Paula Anchorwoman, attractive, upbeat reader of our nightly local TV news: The charade is over. It's time for your viewers to let you and your happy-face sidekicks in on a little secret. We're not the naive, non-thinking couch potatoes you think we are. While you smile and tell us about the dangers of eating peanuts for men with oversized prostates, let me give you a history lesson in local news. After growing for 40 years and then rotting for the next 20, local TV news coverage has fueled this fear-stricken, head-buried-in-the-sod society of ours for long enough. It's time for an overhaul. Local news coverage was established to inform the public as part of a Federal Communications Commission license to broadcast. It was not intended to be a sea of teasers, shameless self-promotion and smarmy personalities. Let me whisper a few other secrets into your earpiece: * Delivering a sentence with dramatic pauses and roller-coaster nuances does not make the story important. Just read the script and quit auditioning for the next local production of Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night." * The word "live" is a TV term from the 1970s and has no meaning in today's televised world. Neither does "exclusive." We also don't care if you "brought it to us first." No one is interested in hearing, "As we reported to you first last week." Quit bragging like an 8-year old boy. * No matter how many double dopplers, future tracks and weather guarantees, the meteorologist is only correct about half the time. And zero-percent accountable. Those aren't weather labs. They are pre-fabricated weather models sent from a consulting company. The weather reporter can stare at the Vegas-sized bank of video monitors all day long, but that won't make him capable of predicting Mother Nature with the pinpoint accuracy you claim. This just in, sky-view cameras don't show us anything at night except street lights. * Speaking of accountability, teasing a story with a question -- Could your garage door kill you? Do you know what's in your sink drain? Is your child safe playing in your front lawn? -- is blatantly irresponsible and unnecessarily provokes fear in the viewer, at least until after the commercial when we find out there's really nothing to fear. Stop asking me questions. I'm tired of screaming the answers back at you. * My city is not as dangerous as you make it out to be. The insistence in putting a beat reporter on the steps of the courthouse gives the daily impression that my neighborhood is full of rapists, thieves and arsonists. We're tired of seeing the same slow-motion footage of a low-life leaving the courthouse elevator every night. Ninety-nine percent of the people in my hometown are law-abiding citizens. Quit magnifying the few criminals. * There is no such thing as an anniversary of a murder. Move on and throw the old footage away. We don't want to see it. * Every story in the world is not logically linked to another. These waves of child abductions, plagues of Internet predators and flocks of armed schoolchildren are nothing more than an ocean of local muck- diggers desperately seeking some connection of every horrific event to their own hometowns. * Being "live on location" does not mean you have information to provide to the public. It means you have a satellite truck. Schools are closed at night. So are city halls and churches. What are you doing standing out in the dark? Hey, Belinda Standup, get out of the cold and back in the studio. * The newsroom isn't live, either. The cat's out of the bag. You're not answering impromptu, probing questions from your anchor. You're just reading a teleprompter of prepared text -- usually written at a third-grade level. * It's time to fire the pricey news consultant who has turned your 30-minute show into a clone of the other 150 newscasts he services around the country. Inventor of the insipid three-day special investigative report every sweeps period, his idea of creative marketing is slapping a cheesy slogan on your news team. "Taking Action For You," "We're There for You," "Together Making a Difference" -- Thanks, but no thanks. I think I'll go it alone. * * * * * Mandell teaches in the Department of Film, Television and Theater at the University of Notre Dame (via Tom Bryant, TN, Aug 24, WTFDA Soundoff via DXLD) ** U S A. About the blackout and radio --- Just think, for over 24 hours over 50 million folks were without power. It was stated over and over again that radio came to the rescue. Not local radio like it should have been except in a few instances, but the super big name Class A stations that gave us information. TV was almost worthless to those in the affected area because not too many people had battery operated TV, but if you own a car, you own a battery operated radio. Stations like WINS, WCBS, WJR, WTAM among others were able to put out information that was needed and used FAR BEYOND their normal primary service area. A case in point was that all the Toledo OH news talk stations were dark and the only real information filtering in was from WJR in Detroit. Toledo is not in their primary service area. Same for areas in upstate New York and most other affected areas. Let's fast forward a few years and say IBOC has been adopted by most stations. How would the folks in Toledo been able to listen to WJR if WSB in Atlanta was blasting it's IBOC sidebands as interference. Or how about WABC? What if both of them were on IBOC. WJR would be pretty much worthless to the folks that wanted and needed that information. I have written a letter to my US representative Katherine Harris (yup, that one) Asking that IBOC be looked at again in light of the fact that AM radio was about the only place people turned to during the blackout. Maybe all of us can do the same (Paul Smith, W4KNX, Located in Sunny Sarasota Florida, http://www.amtower.com NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. A HELPFUL TOOL FOR IDING PBS STATIONS While trying to ID WCTE-22 this AM I got forwarded to the PBS page. Note in the URL the calls and date. I found out that if I switched just the calls I could get another station's schedule right away for the same day (since I didn't change that part of the URL). While I've found some stations don't register (e.g., KXNE) you can try the network's flagship station and usually do fine. Some of the listings even have logos for the network or station! You might find this useful IDing which PBS station is which during skip or trops. Here's the link for WCTE's schedule within pbs.org; try changing calls and see! http://www.pbs.org/whatson/stations/daily.html?station=WCTE&date=2003-08-25 (Matthew C. Sittel, Bellevue, NE, Aug 25, WTFDA via DXLD) ** URUGUAY? PIRATE (South America). 11420.3, R. Piranha Internacional, full-data B&W card with "QSL" letters over Piranha on front, in 17 months after an E-mail verie at time of reception saying to send no postal mail. V/S Jorge R. García also enclosed 2-page personal letter with blue piranha logo, and CD of show aired in 1994 from Europe. Letter dated Mar 13, 2003 but hand carried to Europe and mailed from Sweden. From the letter: "We can't tell much about our exact QTH from where our operation are made, but I can tell you it is from the Rio de la Plata region, but not from Argentina! Also it's true when we say that we transmit from the jungle! We have also in several periods been the only short-wave broadcaster in the country!" (John Sgrulletta, NY, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** U S A. Out on Long Island, we're told Best Broadcasting's W208AU (89.5 Massapequa) has signed on, and it's not simulcasting WCNJ (89.3 Hazlet NJ), the station it applied to relay. Would you be surprised if we told you it was bringing in religious programming by satellite? We're not; the primary station there is WWBM (89.7 Yates GA), which itself has just signed on the air. Wonder if this will be the next big satellator primary? Up in VERMONT, Radio Free Brattleboro isn't staying silent --- and they want to make sure everyone knows about it. Forced off the air earlier this summer by FCC inspectors, the community station put out the word last week that it would sign back on Friday afternoon at 5 on a new frequency, 107.9, and that's just what they did, with a burst of media attention that landed them in every trade publication and even the Boston Globe. The RFB folks are making the case that, having been shut down for lack of "authority to broadcast," they've now obtained that authority - not through FCC channels but through a petition that they say has been signed by 2,000 people (in a town of barely twice that population) and through support from the local government and even the local paper. They also say - apparently with a straight face - that they have no idea whether or not the FCC will notice that they're back on, or care. Soapbox time: We've got to wonder at this point whether the RFB gang is more interested in broadcasting or in protesting. They must surely realize that all the publicity they've generated for their relaunch will draw an FCC van just as fast as it can get up the road from Quincy, and if they believe their lawyers that the "community authorization" defense will carry any weight in court, they need better lawyers. What's more, Brattleboro is one area where legal LPFM stands an excellent chance of finding available frequencies - and with 100 watts, a legal RFB could have covered the area much better than its 10-watt pirate signal ever did. (Even part 15 AM broadcasting has some potential in compact Brattleboro, yet RFB apparently rejected that idea with barely any consideration.) So we're left to conclude that RFB would rather make a big noise than seriously contemplate a future as a legal broadcaster, which is a shame after five years of what was reportedly some decent programming for an area without a huge amount of local broadcasting. By contrast, over in NEW HAMPSHIRE a new LPFM is about to launch under the aegis of some people much more interested in broadcasting than in fighting. WCNH-LP (94.7 Concord) is licensed to "Highland Community Broadcasting," which turns out to be a project involving Harry Kozlowski, PD of Concord's WJYY/WNHI, his wife Ginger, composer Patrick Lee Herbert and his wife Caroline, and Manchester musician Chris Lonsberry. Highland has struck a deal with New Hampshire Public Radio to provide access to NHPR's music library and other forms of support to the station, which will broadcast a 24-hour classical format to Concord and vicinity when it signs on, perhaps as early as October. That's what LPFM is supposed to be all about, we say (Scott Fybush, NE Radio Watch Aug 25 via DXLD) Sources? ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-153, August 25, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3h.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn DX LISTENING DIGEST JULY HTML ARCHIVE IS NOW COMPLETE: http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1196: RFPI: Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 on 7445 [nominal times subject to delay or pre-emption] WWCR: Wed 0930 on 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [NO LOW VERSION THIS WEEK; SORRY] [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1196h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1196h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1196.html WORLD OF RADIO, CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL schedules updated: http://www.worldofradio.com/radioskd.html MASTER SCHEDULE IN TIME ORDER, with additional programs: http://www.worldofradio.com/wormast.html ** ANTARCTICA. LRA36 TRANSMISIÓN ESPECIAL 15476 kHz, LRA36 Radio Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel, tal lo anunciado previamente, ahora les puedo confirmar 100% que se emitirá una transmisión especial el próximo jueves 28 Agosto, entre *0100-0200v*, ésta, con motivo del 83º aniversario del nacimiento de la radiodifusión argentina el próximo día 27 Agosto (hora local). Esta activación en el citado horario, ha sido posible gracias a mi requerimiento con el propósito de darle a los diexistas y radioescuchas, la oportunidad de escuchar a LRA36 en un horario distinto al usual de 1800-2100 de lunes a viernes. Los bloques de la mencionada transmisión, han sido preparados en colaboración con el amigo y colega Arnaldo Slaen y quien escribe. Les comento además que actualmente está siendo imprimida una tarjeta QSL de LRA36. Por favor, envíen sus reportes directo a LRA36 en Base Esperanza. La potencia de salida sera de 3 KW como mínimo y si las condiciones clim'aticas son buenas, posiblemente con un poco más. Comentarios a LRA36 por e-mail a: lra36@i... [truncated by yahoogroups] 73's GIB (Gabriel Iván Barrera, Argentina, Aug 25, Noticias DX via DXLD) Special broadcast confirmed at a time when propagation may be more favorable than the usual 1800-2100 schedule. UT Thu Aug 28 *0100- 0200v* on 15476; apparently only in Spanish, with 3 kW or maybe a bit more if they can push it (gh, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ARGENTINA. Reference 5400.00, La 101 Dear Sir, The information given lately in your bulletin is not correct. The frequency of 5400.0 kHz belongs to the Argentine Armed forces and it is frequently used for communication with the Antarctic bases, also the frequencies of 15820.0 and 29810.0 (can have other). The frequency of 5400.0 is for the night and can be listened in LSB rebroadcast of different stations AM and FM from Buenos Aires city. Usually heard LS4 Radio Continental (590 kHz), LRL202 Radio Diez (710) and others, usually rebroadcast sport or cultural events and news. In 5400.0 USB can be listened LTF2 - LTF3 - LTF7 that are stations of the Army, with family or operative traffic. The frequency 15810.0 is for the day and it is the most used one. In LSB rebroadcast the stations from Buenos Aires, and in USB usually family traffic (RX on 14694.0). Generally the weekends and sometimes both signals at the same time. The freq. 29810.0 LSB it was listened in the southern summer and now it is not operative. Greetings (Tony Paredes via mail, SW Bulletin Aug 24 via DXLD) What`s not correct? Is he denying that La 101 was among the stations relayed, as it was certainly logged by more than one DXer?? (gh, DXLD) 5400-lsb, 0121-0145, LA 101, Aug 25. Playing oldies US Pop tunes. Johnny Be Good at 0116 and then Runaway at 0119 then to male announcer with comments in Spanish. Signal in lsb at S6 level with some slight fades but nice copy. At 0125 switches to Latin tunes. One time pip at boh and possible ID and promos. Then to news items. Intro as 'Infomativo Continental' Then weather at 0134, Ad for movie at 0135. Then ID heard as exclusivo Radio Continental. 0136 'Dancing in the moon light' tune. US oldies continued past 0145 (Bob Montgomery, PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) So if it was relaying R. Continental when you heard it, why do you call it La 101? (gh, DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. 5927.1, 18.8 -2356* Radio Minería, closed down after a pass of ads (among others Farmacia Cristal) to the tones of the film theme of Bridge over River Kwai, Q2. HeP 5952.5, 17.8 2330, Radio Pio XII, Q3, with Spanish Mass by foreign preacher, speaking Spanish almost like me... Even worse the singers sang also like me. Also a Spanish version of John Brown was performed. What do Catholic listeners in the third world have to withstand? HeP 5952.5, 19.8 0000, Radio Pio XII, Q4, almost boomed in when I fixed a new wire in my beverage all the meters where the cows as usual had eaten up. Gorgeous ID in Aymara, I guess and some Spanish ads, among others for a machine workshop in Oruro (located some bus hours away (if there had been not too much rain) when no buses at all run). HeP (Hermod Pedersen, Malmö, Sweden, SW Bulletin Aug 24, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOLIVIA. New Bolivian radio station on 4780.96 kHz! Radio Tacana, provincia Iturralde, departamento Pando. Aug 19 2003 - 0245 UT. It is absolutely impossible to have check on which stations are old or new, but to 100%. Radio Tacana ought to be a new one (correct me if I am wrong!). July 1 all in SWB got info direct from Quito via "SWB América Latina" regarding a new unID LA on 4780.89 kHz. Surely the same station as the one logged now: Radio Tacana. I don`t know if Tacana has been off air during the period from July 2 until now. Maybe it is hard to hear. The program with OM-DJ was nice music and frequent IDs. "Radio Tacana está transmitiendo en 4780 m(!)Hz banda de 60 metros onda corta". "Desde la provincia de Iturralde, el departamento de Pando en 4780 m(!)Hz banda de 60 metros onda corta transmite Radio Tacana". Also heard the following morning. Quito 20/08/2003 03:32:20 p.m. (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin Aug 24, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) Note: earlier written by BM as Tacána, I suppose to make clear where the stress in this unfamiliar name goes, tho no accent is really needed there (gh, DXLD) ** BRAZIL. 9665, 24.8 0525, Rádio Nacional do Brasil med sin experimentella utlandsservice "para os paises de língua portuguesa". Nu Música Popular Brasileira. 3-4 CB (Christer Brunström, SW Bulletin Aug 24, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) Rádio Nacional do Brasil noted on August 24 on 9665 kHz at 0606 with "Memoria Musical". Announced as an experimental transmission "para os paises de língua portuguesa". At one time they mentioned Portugal, all the Portuguese-speaking nations of Africa and East Timor (they forgot Macau). Email: radionacionaldobrasil@radiobras.gov.br (Christer Brunström, Sweden, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. E a Rádio Guarujá Paulista, de Guarujá (SP), resolveu investir mesmo em ondas curtas! Em 22 de agosto, o diretor da emissora, Orivaldo Rampazzo, entrou em contato com o coordenador do DX Clube do Brasil, Caio Fernandes Lopes, de Itajubá (MG), para confirmar que a programação da emissora já estava ativa em 5045 kHz, que é antiga freqüência da Rádio Difusora, de Presidente Prudente (SP). Não deu outra: às 0250, em Cochabamba, na Bolívia, o dexista brasileiro Rogildo Aragão captava o sinal da emissora, na nova freqüência! São os dexistas brasileiros gerando notícias de emissoras brasileiras! BRASIL - A Rádio Educadora, de Limeira (SP), foi captada, em Porto Alegre (RS), pela freqüência de 2380 kHz. Em 23 de agosto, às 0305, levou ao ar a seguinte identificação: "ZYK 531, Rádio Educadora, a rádio do povo!". Também tem sido monitorada, no Rio de Janeiro (RJ), por Sarmento Campos. BRASIL - Em mais um trabalho voluntário, Paulo Roberto e Souza, de Tefé (AM), informamos que a Rádio Clube, de Belém (PA), emite, em 4885 kHz, de segunda a sexta-feira, entre 0800 e 0400. Aos sábados e domingos, entre 1000 e 0400. O telefone é o seguinte: + 55 91 3084 0138. A direção postal é: Avenida Almirante Barroso, 2190, 3º andar, CEP: 66093-020, Belém (PA). E-mail: timaocampeao@expert.com.br BRASIL - A cidade de Porto Alegre, capital do estado do Rio Grande do Sul, tem três emissoras que emitem em ondas curtas: além de Gaúcha e Guaíba, tem a Rádio RGS, que pertence ao Sistema LBV Mundial que, atualmente, pode ser acompanhada, em diversos horários, pela freqüência de 11895 kHz. Uma dica é acompanhar a emissora quando há jogos de futebol dos times porto-alegrenses Grêmio e Internacional. Durante a jornada esportiva, a Rádio RGS apresenta a seguinte identificação: "Você ouve a LBV, a nova onda do futebol gaúcho!" BRASIL - Desde Ribeirão Preto (SP), Roberto Rufino informa que a Rádio Ribeirão Preto, conhecida como 79, já está com nova programação no ar. Agrega que a emissora pertence aos jornalistas José Luiz Datena e Jorge Kajuru. O prefixo da emissora, para a freqüência de 3205 kHz, em 90 metros, é: "ZYG 861". (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX Aug 24 via DXLD) ** CAMBODIA. 11940.1, 0004 Aug 24, National Voice of Cambodia, tent. the one signing on abruptly at this time with Asian language, two DJs and brief music interludes; within 4 minutes had wandered down to 11940.03 and kept drifting down very slowly to 11939.96 by 0015. Audio distortion, slight at first, increased gradually. Subject to signal surges rather than QSB. Despite these technical issues, the signal was better than over recent years (Paul Ormandy, ZL4TFX, NZ, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. KOREAN-LANGUAGE RADIO PROGRAMME TO BEGIN BROADCASTING IN VANCOUVER | Text of report in English by South Korean news agency Yonhap Seoul, 22 August: A Korean-language radio programme will start broadcasting for South Korean expatriates in Vancouver, Canada next month. The programme, Vancouver-radio Seoul, is to be offered from 7.00 to 9.00 [local time] each weekday morning on an FM frequency of 96.1 MHz, according to a press release by the station. Broadcasting will begin 11 September, coinciding with Chusok, Korea's fall harvest holiday. Its programming will feature news, health information, English lessons, as well as details on local community events. "Vancouver-radio Seoul will faithfully carry out its role as a bridge linking South Korean culture to its Canadian counterpart," the press release said, adding it will drastically increase its airtime in the near future. As of end of July, Vancouver was home to 62,700 South Korean immigrants, according to the Foreign Affairs and Trade Ministry. This year marks 40th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between South Korea and Canada. Source: Yonhap news agency, Seoul, in English 0631 gmt 22 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** CHINA. Complementing the programme in this week's Radio Times (23rd-29th August) is a rare example of that venerable publication actually devoting no less than four pages to an article on radio. Emily Buchanan, presenter of Radio 4's "A World in your Ear" has even picked her top ten best global radio stations for the article. Pity neither she nor anyone else gives any mention of good old shortwave here though (Mark Savage, BDXC-UK via DXLD) And she puts China Radio International in her top ten claiming it gives you "everything you wanted to know about China". How absurd. She even emphasizes her choice by a picture of their website. The slightest bit of research on her part would show her that the station is a propaganda outlet of the Communist Party; it unashamedly admits this. "Everything you wanted to know about China" - such as the treatment of ethnic minorities, their policy in Tibet, jamming of foreign broadcasts, blocking of internet sites, imprisonment and "re- education" of citizens for publishing critical articles, breach of internationally accepted health and safety standards in Chinese factories etc etc etc. Does CRI report on this? Of course not, and they jam the stations that do (Mike Barraclough, BDXC-UK via DXLD) ** CHINA. ANALYSIS: CHINA MEDIA LIBERALIZATION DEBATE PITS REFORMERS AGAINST CONSERVATIVES | Text of editorial analysis by Peter Feuilherade of BBC Monitoring Media Services on 21 August In recent months, the issue of media reform has filled thousands of column inches in the Chinese press. Officials from all levels of the Chinese Communist Party, right up to the Politburo, are involved in the current debate. The liberalization of the media is "still a sensitive topic in an otherwise rapidly reforming nation", in the words of the Hong Kong newspaper South China Morning Post on 14 August. More than 2,000 newspapers and 9,000 other periodicals are currently published in China. Chinese State Council spokesman Zhao Qizheng noted during a visit to Russia on 18 August that the number of mass media groups in his country has increased tenfold during the last 20 years. China today has more than 3,000 TV channels and 450 radio stations broadcasting in Chinese and other languages, as well as some 47,000 web sites, Zhao Qizheng said in remarks reported by the Russian news agency Interfax. President Hu Jintao, addressing a Politburo session in Beijing on 12 August, said that with China's accelerated opening-up to the outside world, it was time to find ways to expand what he called the "culture industry" - a term grouping audiovisual entertainment, the news media and book and magazine publishing. Rounding up the prevailing Chinese official view, the South China Morning Post said: "The central government has largely accepted that as it stops subsidizing the industry, many media organizations should be treated as profit-driven economic entities. But the level to which the government relaxes its control will remain to be seen... Media observers said that the session essentially primed the Politburo to think in terms of how to make domestic media machinery more efficient while retaining party control over ideological matters." Analysts recalled that the central government is considering opening up China's domestic media to foreign investment. One proposal would allow foreign investors to take a stake of up to 40 per cent in mainland media firms. They would be entering a lucrative market. Official statistics show that China's media business has grown in volume by more than 25 per cent annually for three years in a row, a growth rate significantly higher than GDP growth. According to the most conservative estimate, China's publishing industry and media have advertising markets valued at 100 gigayuan (over 12bn US dollars) annually. The media reform debate follows a government directive banning mandatory subscriptions to unwanted party newspapers in rural communities, in order to reduce farmers' financial burdens. As a result, up to 1,000 papers affiliated to the Communist Party and government organs at all levels will be forced to close down or to consolidate. According to media sector experts cited by the official Chinese news agency Xinhua on 17 August, introducing a "survival mechanism" into China's newspaper industry and pushing newspapers and periodicals into market competition are the essence of the ongoing reform. "In China, newspapers and periodicals have always been rare resources. However, some newspapers and periodicals are operating without enough readership and producing no adequate social benefits and economic returns, thereby wasting an enormous amount of social resources," the Xinhua report added. Conservative party members remain staunchly opposed to any such plan, the South China Morning Post reported analysts as saying. As Reuters news agency explained in a dispatch on 10 July, "the struggle pits the Politburo's progressive media head Li Changchun, backed quietly by President Hu Jintao, against the hardline propaganda department led by Liu Yunshan, tied closely to Hu's powerful predecessor Jiang Zemin". However, analysts believe that while discord within the new Communist Party leadership could stall the drive to reform, the financial consolidation of the Chinese media is unlikely to stop. Source: BBC Monitoring research 21 Aug 03 (via DXLD) ** COSTA RICA. 6230.00 kHz: I think it was RÅ, Roland Åkesson, Sweden who in Glenn Hauser`s "DXLD" had an unID Spanish on this frequency. I have checked this frequency regularly without any results but a week ago I heard Spanish and REE (España)-IDs. So probably a harmonic from REE, Costa Rica (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin Aug 24, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) I don`t find any 6230 mentioned, unID or otherwise in July or August DXLDs to date ?? And harmonic of what? Certainly not 3115 (gh) ** CUBA. CASTRO LAUGHS OFF US PLANS TO STRENGTHEN TV MARTÍ Cuban President Fidel Castro says he is not concerned by the latest plan by the Bush administration to raise the profile of its TV Martí service. Last week the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) announced that it would shortly start beaming Radio and TV Martí into Cuba free- to-air via Hispasat. The BBG says a growing number of Cubans are receiving TV via satellite. The programming of TV Martí is also being revamped, with a heavy emphasis on news and information programmes. On the entertainment side, Major League baseball games will be broadcast on TV and Radio Martí, including the playoffs and World Series. But Castro predicts that the initiative will fail, like earlier efforts. "Up to now, experience has shown that it has gone badly," he said. "I read something about that and I was laughing. They are always inventing something." (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 25 August 2003 via DXLD) ** CUBA [and non]. O dexismo transpõe as barreiras ideológicas e políticas. Recentemente, o programa Rádio Enlace, da Rádio Nederland, levou ao ar entrevista feita por Jeff Whitte com o locutor da Rádio Havana Cuba, Manolo de la Rosa. Ocorre que Whitte é o proprietário da Rádio Miami Internacional, emissora que recebe interferências propositais do governo que comanda a Rádio Havana Cuba. Conversaram apenas sobre a oferta de receptores de ondas curtas na ilha de Fidel, entre outras amenidades (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX Aug 24 via DXLD) Escuchar el programa actual: http://download.omroep.nl/rnw/smac/sp_radioenlace.mp3 ** CZECHOLSOVAKIA. Re: Source?? CZECH RADIO MARKS 35TH ANNIVERSARY OF BATTLE FOR RADIO STATION --- This article is from the official Radio Prague Web site. 73, (Andy Sennitt, Netherlands, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ECUADOR. All my receivers are spread out by the wind, all my notes are put where I can`t remember and all my antennas are down. A hard hit for an avid DX-er. The 5 Indian building workers from Riobamba keep on to turn everything upside down. Several of our members are interested in my way of recording stations; please look at a short description in frontpage of SWB. So the contribution from Avda La Prensa 4408 y Vaca de Castro is only some short notes (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin Aug 24, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) See BOLIVIA, COSTA RICA, HONDURAS, PERU ** ECUADOR. Looking ahead to the B-03 season (and before) on HCJB: will drop most broadcasts to Europe at end of September, except the one-hour morning broadcast in German, but that will change frequency. Spanish frequency to Mexico will probably change, but not much else, says frequency manager Doug Weaver, as he heads off to HFCC, also representing HCJB Australia, which has its own frequency manager, Ernie Frankey (sp?), who recently moved there from Pifo, and works more or less independently of HCJB Ecuador. BTW, Ken MacHarg`s Tip for Real Living this week lasted 4:50, plus intro and outro (DX Partyline 0002 UT Sun Aug 24 on WINB 12160, notes by Glenn Hauser for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ECUADOR. Má notícia: a partir de 30 de setembro, a HCJB - A Voz dos Andes deixará de emitir, entre 0800 e 0900, em 9745 kHz, em português, para o Brasil. O corte faz parte dos planos de economia da emissora, conforme a apresentadora do DX HCJB, Eunice Carvajal. A programação em espanhol da HCJB - A Voz dos Andes leva ao ar o programa Aventura DX-ista também nas segundas-feiras, a partir de 0200, em 9745 kHz. O programa apresenta novidades das ondas curtas (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX Aug 24 via DXLD) ** FRANCE. La semaine prochaine (du lundi 25 au vendredi 30 août), France Culture diffusera une série de 5 émissions intitulées "La grande aventure des radios internationales". Du lundi au vendredi de 7h00 à 8h10 (0500 à 0610 TU) 25 Août 2003 Dans l'entre-deux-guerres, les ondes crépitaient, s'évanouissaient, revenaient en force, maintenaient un lien serré avec les expatriés et les coloniaux, répandaient aussi l'idéologie fasciste. Les programmes sur ondes courtes ont eu une importance capitale durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale (" La Voix de l'Amérique ", " Les Français parlent aux Français "). Durant la guerre froide, elles ont été massivement utilisées par Radio-Moscou et Radio-Pékin. Mais, à l'Ouest, elles ont aussi représenté un remarquable levier contre le système communiste (la BBC, Radio-Liberté, Radio-Europe libre). Elles ont transmis l'information, ont modifié les perceptions culturelles et artistiques (jazz, variétés, rock), ont pleinement participé au débat international. Le rôle des ondes courtes dans les rapports Est-Ouest. Des archives radiophoniques et des extraits récents d'émissions de radios internationales illustreront ce sujet. Les ondes courtes ont joué un rôle considérable auprès des élites et des opinions publiques dans les pays de l'Est durant la période des rapports Est-Ouest. Cela, notamment, lorsque le bloc communiste a été traversé par de graves crises internes : insurrection de Budapest (1956), printemps de Prague (1968), émergence du mouvement syndical Solidarité en Pologne (1980 et les années suivantes). A chaque fois, les principales radios américaines (surtout, Radio Europe libre) ont eu des comportements politiques différents. Il ne faut pas non plus oublier que ces radios (la Voix de l'Amérique, Radio Europe libre, Radio Liberté, la BBC. ..) ont exercé une influence notable sur les sociétés communistes : jazz, musiques de variétés, rock, débats d'idées. Finalement, leur rôle a été autant culturel que politique. 26 Août 2003 Les journalistes de radios sur ondes courtes. Des archives radiophoniques et des extraits récents d'émissions de radios internationales illustreront ce sujet Les ondes courtes ont joué un rôle considérable auprès des élites et des opinions publiques dans les pays de l'Est durant la période des rapports Est-Ouest. Cela, notamment, lorsque le bloc communiste a été traversé par de graves crises internes : insurrection de Budapest (1956), printemps de Prague (1968), émergence du mouvement syndical Solidarité en Pologne (1980 et les années suivantes). A chaque fois, les principales radios américaines (surtout, Radio Europe libre) ont eu des comportements politiques différents. Il ne faut pas non plus oublier que ces radios (la Voix de l'Amérique, Radio Europe libre, Radio Liberté, la BBC. ..) ont exercé une influence notable sur les sociétés communistes : jazz, musiques de variétés, rock, débats d'idées. Finalement, leur rôle a été autant culturel que politique. 27 Août 2003 Le poids des progrès techniques et le renouveau international. Des archives radiophoniques et des extraits récents d'émissions de radios internationales illustreront ce sujet Contrairement à ce que l'on peut imaginer, les radios internationales ont connu un renouveau essentiellement technique bien avant les bouleversements internationaux de 1989-1991. Que l'on pense à la diffusion par satellite, au relais par le câble ou à l'écoute sur modulation de fréquence. Ces prolongements géographiques et ce confort d'écoute ont exercé une influence sur le contenu des programmes. Par exemple, de plus en plus souvent, ces radios internationales se consacrent au traitement cde l'actualité (de préférence aux programmes), quand elles n'adoptent pas le principe de l'information continue. La couverture des crises majeures et des conflits armés (guerre d'Irak, 2003) en est-elle meilleure ? L'accent sera mis, entre autres, sur la BBC. 28 Août 2003 Radio France Internationale -- Des archives radiophoniques et des extraits récents d'émissions de radios internationales illustreront ce sujet Pourquoi et comment Radio France Internationale a-t-il constitué un effort majeur de l'audiovisuel public français, au début des années 80? Quelle a été l'évolution des priorités et des moyens ? Le mode de financement, les capacités techniques, la politique des langues utilisées, la relation aux auditeurs. Le virage significatif de l'information continue. RFI peut-elle jouer un rôle diplomatique --- Comment caractériser ses relations avec les gouvernements, notamment africains. Quel rôle joué par le site Internet. 29 Août 2003 La grande aventure des radios internationales La France et l'audiovisuel extérieur. Des archives radiophoniques et des extraits récents d'émissions de radios internationales illustreront ce sujet Pourquoi la politique de la France à l'égard de son audiovisuel public extérieur a-t-elle été si hésitante ou si changeante, au cours des récentes décennies ? Pourquoi un audiovisuel public dynamique et ambitieux est-il un élément de la puissance internationale -- Sur quels moyens, financiers, techniques et humains doit-il reposer? Quelles sont les raisons qui ont présidé au lancement prochain d'une chaîne télévisée française d'information continue ? Quelles sont les conditions de sa réussite ? Qui doit-elle associer, pour quels objectifs (f1tay, fr.rec.radio - 22 août 2003 + site Internet de France Culture) (informations issues de http://perso.wanadoo.fr/jm.aubier via DXLD) ** GUIANA FRENCH. Leônidas dos Santos Nascimento, de São João Evangelista (MG), descobriu uma maneira de receber os cartões QSLs da Rádio França Internacional: ele envia os informes diretamente para o TDF Outre-Mer, localizado na Guiana Francesa. Teve vários relatórios respondidos. Escreveu para: TDF Outre-Mer, Boîte Postale 7024, 97307, Cayenne Cedex, Guyane. Na Internet: http://www.tdf.fr E-mail: fabrice.esnay@tdf.fr (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX Aug 24 via DXLD) {do they also QSL from here for other TDF/RFI sites??} ** HONDURAS. Reactivated station in Honduras! 3340.00, Radio Misiones Internacional[es], Comayagüela. Aug 23 2003 - 0400 UT. Religious by OM and soft, quiet music. A reactivated station which I never have logged before. A somewhat dull audio so I had to turn up my MFJ-616 a bit to catch the ID at 0400 UT (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin Aug 24, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) As I recall, this was previously explained as 2 x 1670, the frequency which is normally tripled for the intended output frequency 5010 (gh, DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM [non]. Look for a special one-hour program on public radio stations circa Wednesday August 27, for the Mars opposition; so far I`ve run across it listed for 1500 UT on KUNM, and 0100 UT Thu on the producing station, WHYY http://www.whyy.org/skytour/ : SkyTour: Mars Close Up --- One-Hour Astronomy Special on WHYY-91FM Wednesday, August 27, 2003 at 9 p.m. [EDT] The red planet Mars comes within 34 million miles of Earth for the first time in nearly 100,000 years on August 27, this year. This will be the best opportunity for observing Mars for everyone on our planet. The next close approach comes in 2829. In addition, NASA will launch two Mars rovers due for arrival in January 2004. SkyTour: Mars Close Up provides accessibility to the subject of Mars to everyone - regardless of age, training, or equipment. The show treats listeners to information about Mars that is relevant, comforting, timeless, enlightening, and even uplifting to the human spirit. The show features interviews, fact-nuggets, music, and astronomical quips. SkyTour strives to introduce some listeners to a lifelong pursuit of knowledge about the night sky. WHYY marks the close approach of Mars with a television special, as well. WHYY TV12 brings you "Bouncing to Mars," Tuesday, August 26, 9 p.m. The show takes you behind the scenes to tell the story of the design and development of NASA's twin Mars Exploration Rovers (via Glenn Hauser, Terra, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL WATERS [and non]. August 23, 2003 Radio: Ian Johns Ruling the waves http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,1442-783875,00.html A new series capturing the golden age of pirate stations is a reminder of the value of those radio rebels of yore. Radio 2's new series The Radio Revolutionaries (Tuesday, 8.30 pm [1930 UT]) allows us to get misty-eyed for a time when listeners weren't deserting the BBC because of Sara Cox, but because of its lacklustre pop selection. In the Thirties Radio Normandy invented the disc jockey to challenge the BBC 's Reithian gloom-ridden Sabbath schedule. In the Sixties, pirate ships such as Radio Caroline were forcing Auntie into a mini- dress. In the Seventies and Eighties, neglected soul, reggae and acid house inspired a new breed of London towerblock pirates. Nowadays the capital's airwaves are so crammed that drum'n'bass and UK garage radio rebels broadcast from the suburbs. Of course it's easy to romanticise the pirates - they are knowingly breaking the law, possibly disrupting emergency services' wavelengths and failing to pay royalties. But they are tapping into a niche audience of 15 to 30- year-olds that Radio 1 is struggling to hold. Nowadays this age group can satisfy their musical cravings through digital stations and music TV, and the ultimate in DIY radio, the iPod, on to which your whole CD collection can be downloaded - and without the babble of daytime presenters. If the job of daytime radio is to provide background noise while we do something more interesting, then Radio 1 may be doing its job. But Radio 2, in which genuine characters talk intelligently while playing music from a variety of genres and eras, has seen its listenership rise above 13 million, which might say something about how to spin the platters that matter to its audience. Certainly the pirate stations, which by their nature attract strange characters, are capable of throwing up some fresh voices. DJs currently beavering away in semi- obscurity such as Dom Da Bom, Miss Giggles and the optimistically named Aylesbury Allstars might one day join such pirate-spawned luminaries as Roy Plomley, Kenny Everett and Trevor Nelson and get a national radio gig. And they probably won't even need to change their names. Unlike John Ravenscourt, who found that Radio London wanted a snappier moniker - but at least we got John Peel (via Mike Terry, DXLD) Thanks for saving me the trouble to buy today's Times, Mike. Pity this otherwise interesting article is flawed though by another "fact" some sub has missed! ``And they probably won't even need to change their names. Unlike John Ravenscourt, who found that Radio London wanted a snappier moniker - but at least we got John Peel.`` I think Mr Johns must be getting confused with a tube station on the District Line (Ravenscourt Park), rather than Ravenscroft which is actually John Peel's real name. Listeners to the June BDXC Tape Circle of course heard a rare example of JP broadcasting under that real name in his early career. By the way, complementing the programme in this week's Radio Times (23rd-29th August) is a rare example of that venerable publication actually devoting no less than four pages to an article on radio. Or should that be radios? Pages 24-28 are a mixture of an advert for digital radio manufacturers posing as editorial, and some helpful links to various websites and a glossary on the numerous different methods of receiving "radio" these days. Emily Buchanan, presenter of Radio 4's "A World in your Ear" has even picked her top ten best global radio stations for the article. Pity neither she nor anyone else gives any mention of good old shortwave here though (MARK Savage, BDXC-UK Aug 22 via DXLD) see CHINA ** ISLE OF MAN. From Hans Knot: 'A dear friend of Radio Caroline died yesterday - he was Sir Charles Kerruish, who was an MHK, then Speaker, then president of Tynwald until very recently. But in the 1960s he was the one who dared to stand up to the Labour Government and say, we will not have your Marine Offences Act, and we will not have it in the Isle of Man. We want Radio Caroline to stay. The world's press came to the Isle of Man that day to hear the plucky Manx Parliament take the stand against Wilson; even Ronan came and was in Tynwald that day to hear it. Sir Charles then flew to London to argue the case for Caroline with the Post office and with the Home Office, who were responsible for relationships with the dependencies like the Isle of Man. Harold Wilson was furious and got the Queen to sign a special order, never before or since used, to force the Isle of Man to accept the law, but it took a while longer - Caroline North was immune until the end of August 1967. Sir Charles only retired from Manx Politics a couple of years ago and was still a firm believer in freedom. He passionately believed that the Isle of Man should have its own radio station, which is where we will come in with the new station on Long Wave 279 (via Mike Terry, Aug 24, DXLD) ** ISRAEL. The updated Summer Kol Israel schedule (post last week's changes) is now available at: http://www.israelradio.org/summer03.htm The IBA website hasn't been updated yet (Daniel Rosenzweig, Aug 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: ISRAEL RADIO INTERNATIONAL --- KOL ISRAEL OVERSEAS SERVICE SCHEDULE From March 30 to October 25, 2003 [one hour later from Oct 3] 0400-0415 9435 Europe + N. America 15640 17600 Australasia and S. America 1010-1020 15640 Europe + N. America 17545 17525 S. Europe, N Africa 1700-1705 15640 Europe + N. America 17545 1900-1925 17545 Europe + N. America 15615 11605 15640 Africa (English portion only, via DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ISRAEL. IBA MANAGEMENT CONSIDER BAN ON ARABIC TERMS Management at the Israel Broadcasting Authority are considering a new journalistic policy of replacing references to the Palestinian "intifada" and the "hudna," or truce that collapsed last week, with their Hebrew equivalents. Amongst other changes under consideration are replacing references to "the radical Islamic movement Hamas" with "the terrorist organisation Hamas" after the group claimed responsibility for last Tuesday's suicide bombing that killed 21 passengers on a Jerusalem bus. Journalists would also be asked to refer to Palestinian activists as "terrorists," or "mehablim" in Hebrew, whether they are accused of carrying out attacks on occupied Palestinian territory or in Israel itself. The occupied West Bank would be called by its biblical name, Judea and Samaria. The IBA has stressed that no final decision on these proposals has been taken (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 25 August 2003 via DXLD) I thought ``J&S`` was already SOP at IBA (gh, DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH. From today's New York Times.. The article doesn't mention what brand of radio, or whether the radios they attempted to airlift covered AM FM, and SW (Mike Brooker, hard-core-dx via DXLD) http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/23/international/asia/23KORE.html South Korea Foils Airlift of Radios to North -- By JAMES BROOKE HOLWON, South Korea, Aug. 22 - All in all, it was a perfect day for breaking North Korea's information monopoly, and Dr. Norbert Vollertsen and his band of volunteers were determined to take advantage of it. A brisk wind from the south was driving clouds and, Dr. Vollertsen hoped, large balloons carrying transistor radios north over the barbed wire of the demilitarized zone into North Korea, a country closed off from the rest of the world. But before the specially designed cargo balloons could be inflated with helium, South Korean police officers clambered aboard the truck and subdued Dr. Vollertsen, who is German, so roughly that he needed medical treatment. "The law requires that organizers of rallies or demonstrations notify the local police 48 hours in advance," said Kim Bu Wook, Kangwon Province's police chief.. This was before a two-hour standoff degenerated into a shoving match between riot policemen and members of a growing international movement to break the half-century information monopoly that North Korea's Communist government has maintained over its 22 million people. Until 2000, South Korea's military sent thousands of balloons north from border towns like this one, usually in the summer when the prevailing winds were favorable. But under the so-called sunshine policy of reconciliation, South Korea has tried to avoid irritating North Korea. By blocking the private efforts to distribute radios, however, South Korea has placed itself on a collision course with Washington. Over the summer, both chambers of the United States Congress voted overwhelmingly to expand the daily Korean-language broadcasting of Radio Free Asia to 24 hours from 4 hours. By law North Koreans are allowed to have only radios and televisions that are locked onto the state frequencies. Residents with illegal tuneable sets can listen to Korean-language government broadcasts from China, Russia and South Korea, a Christian group in South Korea, and two stations financed by the United States government, Radio Free Asia and Voice of America. But few North Koreans have access to normal radios and televisions, and North Korean defectors say that information controls in North Korea are far tighter than they were in Eastern Europe under the Communists. South Korean officials said earlier this week that they would allow the balloon launchings to go ahead. But the government apparently reversed that decision to avoid provoking North Korea in anticipation of six-country negotiations over North Korea's nuclear program, scheduled to start in Beijing on Wednesday. 73 (via Mike Brooker, Toronto, ON, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** KURDISTAN [and non]. Iraq/USA: KDP paper criticizes US Radio Sawa for ignoring Kurdish affairs | Text of report by Iraqi Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) newspaper Khabat on 24 August Following the war to liberate Iraq, [US-run] Radio Sawa became the most listened-to radio station. Many people listen to it in Arab countries as well. In our Kurdistan region, youths pay attention to it and listen to it eagerly. But, surprisingly, the radio station broadcasts only one Kurdish song in one hour or more, although the Kurds form a great part of the Iraqi people. It broadcasts other songs, like Arabic, English, French, etc, although there are no English or French people in the country. This is the radio's own policy: it does not pay attention to Kurdistan's politics and affairs. People listened to the Voice of Iraqi Kurdistan [which broadcasts in support of the Kurdistan Democratic Party, KDP], which carried a big message for the people, at home, in the markets, streets and roads, and it was getting a great deal of attention abroad too. With the beginning of the Iraq freedom war, the broadcasting of the nice Voice of Iraqi Kurdistan on FM stopped. The Kurdish songs and singers were stopped because Radio Sawa replaced it with its Arabic news and Arabic and foreign songs. This will have a great effect on the national feeling of our youths. It would be better if the Voice of Iraqi Kurdistan returned to the people immediately, as it was established because there was a historical need for it. We need it to educate our youths, to serve the cause of Kurdish culture and to deliver our political message. Restoring the service is a glorious historical task. Source: Khabat, Arbil, in Sorani Kurdish 24 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** KUWAIT [and non]. Yesterday evening no trace of Oman on 15355, which should be towards Europe. Furthermore Kuwait was noted with a strong signal on 9880, instead of 9855, parallel to 15495, after 22 UT. Kuwait on 9880 covered CRI-English co-channel, which is also to Europe via Taldom, Russia. Does anybody have some current information about Radio Kuwait, their schedule or if they, in their high-tech world, have managed to open a useful website? http://www.moinfo.gov.kw has apparently completely been shut down, http://www.radiokuwait.org only has news-on-demand, emails have always remained unanswered (as have normal letters, btw) 73, EiBi (Eike Bierwirth, Aug 21, hard-core- dx via DXLD) ** LIBERIA. LIBERIA'S SPLIT FAMILIES HEAL, CHILD BY LOST CHILD By TIM WEINER MONROVIA, Liberia, Aug. 22 --- "Good evening," said the voice of Radio Veritas, the Roman Catholic broadcast service in Liberia. "This is the Red Cross family tracing program. We bring you the names of children who are looking for their parents. . . The Red Cross managed to get the family retracing program fully running again on Tuesday, when Radio Veritas, knocked out last month by government shelling, came back on the air. .. http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/23/international/africa/23KIDS.html?ex=1062216000&en=8ed1d58857375f2e&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE (via Jill Dybka, DXLD) Nothing more about radio in story ** MEXICO. Finally remembered to check XERMX at one more time when English is supposedly scheduled: Aug 24, Sun 2200 on 11770: music fill instead (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) A Rádio México Internacional vai de mal a pior nas ondas curtas. A própria direção da emissora confirmou que passa por situação financeira caótica, em entrevista concedida a Jeff Whitte, divulgada no programa Rádio Enlace, da Rádio Nederland (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX Aug 24 via DXLD) It`s a brief interview with Ana Cristina del Razo, ex-directora of RMI: says serious financial problems caused departure of the translators and announcers for English, French and Portuguese programs; Spanish programs were cut to 15 minutes each. There remains a long-standing future plan to transmit via Internet. See CUBA for audio link (Radio Enlace, notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO. R. Mil, 6010, duplicates MW 1000 except for these times on weekends when Encuentro DX is aired: Fri 2200, Sat 1400, 2300, Sun 1330, 2300, Mon 0400 -- times converted from HCM UT -5 currently (Héctor García Bojorge, interviewed by Jeff White at Tizayuca, via Radio Enlace Aug 22-24, notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) Cf 3-154 ** MONGOLIA. 12085, 13.8 1005, Voice of Mongolia sände bl a en intressant intervju med två amerikaner som arbetat några år i Mongoliet. Bra ljud och hygglig signal. 3 CB (Christer Brunström, Sweden, SW Bulletin Aug 24 via DXLD) ** PERU. RADIO NYLAMP reactivated --- This short wave Peruvian station comes back to the waves after being off the air for a long time. In the past this station was reported on 4177 and 4299 kHz. Now it can be heard on 4335 with a good signal received here in Chimbote seaport. This station broadcasts from 0930 to 1300 UT and from 2200 to 0330 UT. Today I have telephoned to the General Manager Dr. J.J. Grandez and he told me that Radio Nylamp verifies correct Reception Reports with a QSL Letter. This Afternoon in the program regarding Social Greetings I was greeted by the DJ and to all Dxers all over the world. QTH: RADIO NYLAMP, Av. Andrés Avelino Cáceres # 800, Lambayeque, PERU. PHONE / FAX : 51-074 283353 73´s (CESAR PEREZ DIOSES, CHIMBOTE – PERU, Aug 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Stationen heter som bekant Radio Naylamp (Henrik Klemetz via mail, SW Bulletin Aug 24 via DXLD) 4335v, Radio Naylamp, Lambayeque, has been active the last week with fine signal and better audio than before. Female DJ and ID: "Radio Naylamp - la diferente". 5030.00, Radio Los Andes, Huamachuco: Info about Los Andes was sent out earlier via email and a "special preview". According to the DJ on duty this was a première transmission which I said in my comments. From a coup of our members, Henrik Klemetz/HK and Tore B. Vik/TBV, via email I received the info that this station is not new on shortwave even if it has been inactive for many years. Thanks Tore and Henrik! 5030.00, Radio Los Andes, Huamachuco, Provincia de Sánchez Carrión, departamento de La Libertad. Aug 13 2003 - 1030 UT. Was astonished when the station is listed in WRTH despite the DJ mentioned première transmission on shortwave. Maybe they earlier had performed some tests? I have never heard this station before. Very nice signal despite my temporary antenna. "Radio Los Andes - la radio total." Announced MW 1030 and SW 5030 kHz. Listen to the recording from this occasion at: http://homepage.sverige.net/~a-0901/ Info from "Ventanaperú": Provincia de Sánchez Carrión, cuya capital es Huamachuco. Sus distritos son: Cochorco, Curgos, Chungay, Huamachuco, Marcabal, Sanagoran, Sarin, Sartibamba; con una población total de 110,116 hab. Quito 13/08/2003 11:29:28 a.m. (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin Aug 24, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) {Correxion!! following item should be under BOLIVIA} ** PERU. 4780.96, 22.8 0010-0110, Radio Tacana, Q2, totally blocked by tone heterodyne until Mali closed down (I had to spend the time to log all the others). Seems to be heard better earlier, almost fade out at 0110. Also most of the time heavy utility-QRM for several minutes. When you could hear them they had disco pop music only interrupted by several IDs. Seemed to let a complete record run until changing to another one. HeP (Hermod Pedersen, Malmö, Sweden, SW Bulletin Aug 24, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) Q maybe means quality, i.e. Overall Merit, O of SINPO/SIO? (gh) ** UKRAINE. As of September 1, R. Ukraine International intends to move from 12040 to 9810 kHz. English to NAm at 0000 and 0300 UT (Erik Køie, Copenhagen, Aug. 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. In reference to the radio towers at Criggion, Wales (Date Set for Towers' Destruction, DXLD 3-152), the statement that they were "used to eavesdrop on Soviet radio signals" is erroneous. Criggion was a VLF transmitter site which sent CW and RTTY traffic to the Royal Navy, especially the submarine fleet, using callsign GBZ. I took pictures of the antenna during a visit to Wales, one of which appeared in Monitoring Times (March 1995, Below 500 KHZ). The six towers held up a kite-shaped array of cables which provided capacitive top loading for a vertical radiator. One of the station personnel, who came out to the fence and asked me to leave, volunteered the information that the three original self-supporting towers were on a ship bound for India when World War II broke out and were brought back to the U.K. An interesting feature of this antenna was that one corner of the array was anchored to the top of a 1200-foot hill (John Cobb, Roswell, GA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. BBCWS Preview: THE FUNNY SIDE OF FAITH A two-part series looking at the relationship between humour and religion. Is laughter compatible with worship? Can it ever be appropriate to tell jokes about God? The programmes examine how humour is used in a range of faiths, from the part played by the fool-saint Mullah Nasrudin, in mystical Sufism, to the satirical Christian website Ship Of Fools. Also featured are comedians performing Muslim, Hindu, Jewish and Sikh jokes. We find out how they are received by audiences in different worldparts and the dangers of treading the line between humour and blasphemy. From Aug 26: Ams: Wed 1545, 2145, Thu 0145 Eu : Wed 0945, 1445, 1945, Thu 0145 WAf: Wed 1045, 2245, Thu 0145 (via Ivan Grishin, BBC Programming, Aug ODXA Listening In via DXLD) [non] On a related subject: God help America --- US law insists on the separation of church and state. So why does religion now govern? Gary Younge, Monday August 25, 2003, Guardian http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,3604,1028758,00.html (via gh, DXLD) ** U K. BBC NEWS --- DYKE TO OPEN UP BBC ARCHIVE Greg Dyke, director general of the BBC, has announced plans to give the public full access to all the corporation's programme archives. Mr Dyke said on Sunday that everyone would in future be able to download BBC radio and TV programmes from the internet. The service, the BBC Creative Archive, would be free and available to everyone, as long as they were not intending to use the material for commercial purposes, Mr Dyke added. "The BBC probably has the best television library in the world," said Mr Dyke, who was speaking at the Edinburgh TV Festival. "Up until now this huge resource has remained locked up, inaccessible to the public because there hasn't been an effective mechanism for distribution. "But the digital revolution and broadband are changing all that. "For the first time there is an easy and affordable way of making this treasure trove of BBC content available to all." He predicted that everyone would benefit from the online archive, from people accessing the internet at home, children and adults using public libraries, to students at school and university. Future focus Mr Dyke appeared at the TV festival to give the Richard Dunn interview, one of the main events of the three-day industry event. He said the new online service was part of the corporation's future, or "second phase", strategy for the development of digital technology. Mr Dyke said he believed this second phase would see a shift of emphasis by broadcasters. Their focus would move away from commercial considerations to providing "public value", he said. "I believe that we are about to move into a second phase of the digital revolution, a phase which will be more about public than private value; about free, not pay services; about inclusivity, not exclusion. "In particular, it will be about how public money can be combined with new digital technologies to transform everyone's lives." Story from BBC NEWS: http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/entertainment/tv_and_radio/3177479.stm Published: 2003/08/24 11:47:38 GMT © BBC MMIII (via Dan Say, Tom Roche, DXLD) ** U K. BBC NEWS --- BBC ONLINE PROBE TO BEGIN The government is expected to name on Saturday the person who will lead an official review of the BBC's online services. Culture Secretary Tessa Jowell is due to get the review underway in earnest with the announcement at the Edinburgh International Television Festival. The review will weigh up whether the BBC has stuck to its original plans - approved by the government in 1998 - and what impact it has had on the commercial sector. The BBC's websites contain more than two million pages and reach up to 43% of the UK population each month, according to the corporation's latest annual report. 'Benefits' BBCi is "Europe's most widely visited content site" and costs £72m per year to run, the report said. A BBC spokesman said: "We will welcome the reviewer, whoever that may be, and will look forward to working with him or her. "We believe that we have worked within the terms of the original online consent and that we have brought benefits to the industry." The review will also form part of the charter renewal process that will reach its climax in 2006. BBC's role That is when the government will decide how the BBC has performed, what funding it should get and what its role should be. When Ms Jowell announced the timetable for the BBC online review in April, she said the detailed criteria would only be made public once the reviewer had been named. "These will, however, include a review of the service against the approval given and... an assessment of market impact together with an analysis of the role of BBC Online as part of the BBC's overall service." The results of a similar review of TV channel BBC News 24 - headed by former Financial Times editor Richard Lambert - were published last year. Story from BBC NEWS: http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/entertainment/3173909.stm Published: 2003/08/22 13:31:55 GMT © BBC MMIII (via Dan Say, BC, DXLD) ** U K. BSkyB chief rails at BBC licence fee [by?] PAUL GALLAGHER TELEVISION viewers are increasingly resentful of paying the BBC licence fee and the corporation should be overhauled for the multi- channel era, the chief executive of BSkyB told delegates at the Edinburgh television festival last night. In the festival`s keynote MacTaggart lecture, Tony Ball called on the government to rethink the terms of the licence fee as it prepares to renew the BBC's charter in 2006. Mr Ball said the BBC should be forced to sell off its most popular programmes, such as Fame Academy and The Weakest Link, to commercial channels and then use the funds to develop fresh ideas. . . http://www.news.scotsman.com/edinburgh.cfm?id=927642003 (Scotsman Aug 23 via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U K. BBC NEWS BOSS WAS READY TO MOVE GILLIGAN {Kelly affair} http://media.guardian.co.uk/huttoninquiry/story/0,13812,1028884,00.html (Guardian Aug 25 via Dan Say, DXLD) See also INTERNATIONAL WATERS non ** U S A. The current Ask WWCR admits that printed schedules from them can be more up to date than the website; and since there have been a number of changes, an unusual mid-month update has been made on the website http://www.wwcr.com Actually, the main page says August 14, but the schedules in txt themselves claim to be updated to August 1. (Why these dates seldom match is beyond me.) More importantly, the UT +5 difference from CDT has finally been taken into account for correct conversions of all the times, some 4 months after this year`s shift (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. BACH, BEETHOVEN AND BRAHMS TO RETURN PLANNED RADIO STATION TO HAVE ALL-CLASSICAL MUSIC FORMAT By ALLISON STEELE, Monitor staff Concord --- For the first time in almost three years, Concord's radio airwaves will again hum with the sounds of strings, horns and woodwinds. A small nonprofit group plans to bring a classical music station to town, filling a void left when New Hampshire Public Radio dropped the genre from its programming. The station hopes to be on the air by October. The project was developed by Harry Kozlowski, program director for the Concord radio stations WJYY and WNHI, along with local musician and composer Patrick Hebert and a handful of other music enthusiasts. New Hampshire Public Radio also gave the project a boost by offering the new station full use of its classical music library. In addition, the two stations have agreed they will promote each other on the air. "It was a generous offer, and much more than we expected," said Kozlowski. "We hadn't even gotten to asking about their library before they suggested it." "It's really hard not to be supportive of a project like this," said Mark Handley, president and general manager of NHPR. "There are a lot of people out there who are going to be really happy about this." The station, WCNH-LP at 94.7 FM, will broadcast 24 hours a day, seven days a week. To keep operating costs low, there will be no studio and few frills. Hebert will design the playlists. Kozlowski will act as station manager and the main voice and will read most station announcements. All music will be programmed a day in advance, and audio files will be transmitted to an unmanned network from a computer in Kozlowski's home studio. "It's going to be a very small project with a community group that does not have deep pockets," he said. "So we're trying to do this in a way that's sustainable." Highland Community Broadcasting must raise $25,000 to get the station set up. Soon, the group will begin a fundraising drive that may include a concert, and members will approach local groups and businesses that support the arts. Kozlowski estimates that WCNH will cost about $50,000 a year to run. The group will not be able to sell commercial time, but plans to keep it going through listener donations and corporate sponsorship. New Hampshire Public Radio stopped broadcasting classical music in February 2000, after research and surveys indicated that listeners were most interested in hearing continuous news and talk shows. "We did it with some reluctance," said Handley. "And we spent quite a few years trying to find a way to run two separate stations that addressed both of those audiences. But at the time, there were no more frequencies available. So we're really pleased about this." The project to create a classical station was born soon after NHPR dropped the classical programming. At the time, Kozlowski's daughter was taking piano lessons with Hebert, who lamented the loss. That same year, the Federal Communications Commission created a new class of low-power radio stations, a class specifically designed for community groups. Seeing an increase in the number of unlicensed stations popping up, the commission decided to make it simpler for people to create smaller stations. Kozlowski and Hebert decided to form Highland Community Broadcasting and applied for a license. Last month, the FCC granted the request. Currently, any radio listener in Concord with a yen for Bach or Beethoven has few options. Boston's classical station can't be heard past Manchester on most radios, and it's equally difficult to catch a clear signal from National Public Radio affiliates in Vermont and Maine, where classical music is still broadcast. Once operational, WCNH-LP should be heard clearly in Concord, Penacook, Bow and Hopkinton. Move north and, Kozlowski acknowledged, it might catch some interference from Mount Washington's transmission signal. Kozlowski's long-range plans for the station include broadcasting recordings of local concerts, and he's also hoping to start spotlighting young, local talent. "You can read about the star quarterback on a high school team, and go watch him play," he said. "But it's harder to hear about a young person who's a really talented musician. We'd like to be able to give people that chance." And Concord is a good market for a classical radio station, Kozlowski said. Many who live in Concord and its surrounding communities have an appreciation for the arts, and are hungry for more culture. "There certainly are a lot of people who've missed the music," he said. "And this won't only be classical, it'll be nonstop classical." Friday, August 22, 2003 (Concord Monitor via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. QUEER CHANNEL RADIO FCC keeps Grid Radio off the air and punishes its owner by JOHN GORMAN [Cleveland OH; illustrated:] http://www.freetimes.com/issues/1117/col-gorman.html It has been three years since the FCC shut down Jerry Szoka's Grid Radio. A non-licensed, low-power FM dance, music and community service station, Grid Radio's programming was targeted, but not limited, to the gay, lesbian and transgender community. Its 50-watt signal reached gay communities on the city's West Side, and Szoka chose the unused 96.9 frequency and outfitted Grid with technical equipment to prevent accidental signal bleed to other frequencies. Szoka's inimitable connections provided Grid Radio an inside track to play a continuous stream of unique dance mixes of current hit tunes, popular club tracks and techno. Grid Radio's limited broadcast day started weekday afternoons at 4 and weekends at 1 p.m. Sunday afternoons were reserved for a weekly upbeat and lengthy public affairs program. For the GLT community, this program was their lone radio connection for accurate news and information. Call it Cleveland's Queer Channel. Grid Radio's dance format attracted a sizeable straight following and became the weekend soundtrack for clubbers in the Warehouse District and Flats. Grid didn't run commercials, not even for the West 9th Street club of the same name, which Szoka managed and co-owned. In its third year, Grid Radio came in as the third most popular radio station with clubbers in a major beer company poll. Grid also showed up in a few Aribtron ratings diaries. That's impressive for a station which had limited on-air time, rarely identified itself, did no external promotion and had a signal reach limited to a minuscule slice of northwestern Cuyahoga County. Szoka, who is in his 40s and looks a youthful 30, still possesses the passion he had for radio when he was in his early 20s. His radio career started with a dance music show on Case Western Reserve University's WRUW-FM. A master electrician by trade, his desire to own his own club was sparked by Cleveland club entrepreneur Hank Berger, who hired him to wire and later DJ at his Trash and U4IA clubs in the late '70s. Szoka knows his clientele. Grid, now relocated to E. 13th and St. Clair, tops all local dance club polls and is nationally recognized as a trend-setting gay club. It also serves a refuge for straight and bisexual women who want to party and dance without being pawed by the drunken frat boys that congregate in the Flats. In 1995, Szoka finalized plans for a low-power FM station for the gay community. Compared to other cities of similar size, Cleveland was a pirate radio neophyte, well behind the national curve for renegades seizing the airwaves. There were less than a half-dozen low-power, regularly-scheduled pirate stations. Many other cities had dozens of low-power pirates, most programming to specific neighborhood, ethnic or lifestyle audiences. "I never applied for a license as there were no licenses available to apply for," says Szoka. "The FCC contends that I could have applied for a waiver, but that would have also been futile as they have only issued two waivers over 20 years ago for the hundreds of waivers applied for." Szoka's quandary started in the summer of 1996 when a WGAR engineer singled out Grid Radio and notified the local chapter of the Society of Broadcast Engineers (SBE). The group contacted Szorka and threatened to report his station to the FCC if he didn't cease broadcasting. He didn't and they did. Six months later, Szoka received the first of a series of warnings from the FCC to shut down the unlicensed station. When Szoka refused, the FCC took legal action. Notwithstanding FCC warnings and an impending court case, Grid stayed on the air and its popularity continued to grow. Szoka was even a guest on John Lanigan's WMJI-FM morning show, much to the chagrin of his co-hosts and WMJI's owner, Clear Channel. While Szoka battled the FCC, the agency's chairman, William Kennard -- noting the decline of local news and programming on commercial radio - - announced a proposal to create thousands of new low-power FM (LPFM) non-commercial stations to serve underrepresented community groups. The ruling called for an eight-year license, which couldn't be sold or transferred. Licenses would be awarded to community groups on a criteria system of residency -- the amount of local programming proposed and a 36-hour minimum broadcast week agreement. The proposal was sent to Congress, which quickly buckled under the lobbying strength of the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB). Congress trimmed the bill to 80 percent fewer stations than the original FCC proposal. Back in Cleveland, after years of court appearances and mountains of legal paperwork, Szoka was forced to pull the plug on Grid in 2000. Today, he is without legal support and is faced with an $11,000 fine and other costs from his battle with the FCC. "Just for goodwill, the FCC is fining me $11,000," says Szoka. "So I can never get one of the licenses I helped bring forth, and I have to pay $11,000 for having the nerve to prove to the FCC that they were wrong and that there is room for LPFM stations." There's no happy ending here. The FCC, now ruled with an iron fist by Michael Powell, has granted a very small number of LPFM licenses with the largest share going to Christian Right non-profit organizations. And Cleveland still hasn't gotten back its Queer Channel (Cleveland Free Times via Artie Bigley, OH, DXLD) ** U S A. The folks at Public Radio Weekend have posted a new pilot episode of their show. This time they're going for more substance and more of a "live" sound. http://www.publicradioweekend.org (Current, 10:21 AM EST Aug 25 via DXLD) We need another magazine show??? ** U S A. PROPOSED HISPANIC MEDIA MERGER IS UNDER FIRE By Frank Ahrens, Washington Post, Sunday, August 24, 2003; Page A08 The proposed merger between the nation's largest Hispanic television network and radio chain has drawn the usual antitrust scrutiny that accompanies every major media union. However, Univision Communication Inc.'s $3 billion bid to buy Hispanic Broadcasting Corp. is not just any merger, thanks to the participants -- it has spurred considerable political debate and hit ethnic hot buttons as well. The merger is seen as speeding toward approval at the Federal Communications Commission in the coming weeks; hence, backers and opponents have been lining up prominent lawmakers and Latinos on each side. Supporters say the merger will give the combined companies the marketplace clout required to compete for Anglo ad dollars against media giants such as AOL Time Warner Inc. and Viacom Inc. They say Hispanic media consumers watch English-language television as well, proving that the Latino and Anglo markets overlap. Opponents -- led by rival radio chain Spanish Broadcasting Systems, whose own bid for Hispanic Broadcasting was spurned last year -- say the English- and Spanish-language markets are separate. The combined Univision-Hispanic Broadcasting would create a monopoly that regulators would never allow in the Anglo market, they say. Further, they point out, Univision is not a Hispanic-owned company, but Spanish Broadcasting is. The struggle over the merger reflects Hispanics' growing political clout. They are the largest minority and one of the fastest-growing minorities; and despite the dominance of Hispanic Democratic lawmakers, some analysts believe Latinos have not pledged permanent allegiance to either political party. This is a point that Michael McCurry -- recently hired to lobby for Univision -- has been making to Democrats. "There is a rising importance of the Hispanic market in politics," said the former Clinton White House spokesman. They are a potential target of opportunity for Republicans, he said. McCurry was hired at the beginning of August to help educate the notoriously news media-shy and politically naive Univision on how to navigate Capitol Hill. Univision and Hispanic Broadcasting officials admitted they were blindsided by the opposition blitz of Raul Alarcon, president of Spanish Broadcasting. Univision Chairman A. Jerrold "Jerry" Perenchio is a major fundraiser for President Bush, and merger opponents -- and Hill Democrats -- fear he could use the combined reach of Univision and Hispanic Broadcasting to choke out liberal Hispanic voices. Recruiting Democrats in favor of the merger could help defuse concerns that the combined companies will be a Republican mouthpiece. Univision officials say the network's newsrooms operate independently from any corporate or individual ideology (via Matt Francis, DC, DXLD) ** U S A. In North Texas, major programming changes coming to the Dallas market. Common Es target KDTN-2 (which has been calling itself "KERA-2" on the air, leading to considerable confusion...) has been sold to the owners of KMPX-29. The channel 2 station will switch to the Daystar religious network. Their channel 29 will then be sold to Liberman Broadcasting, operators of KRCA-62 in the Los Angeles area, among other stations. KMPX will become an independent Spanish-language station. Note that KMPX has already filed for a substantial power increase. Another skip target will become more difficult to find (Doug Smith, TV News, Sept WTFDA VHF-UHF Digest via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED [non]. Re 4939.63: Amigo DXista Chris! You have heard Radio Amazonas, Venezuela! Quito 21/Ago/2003 9:12. 73 de (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, hard-core-dx? via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. Glenn: I reported to you a couple of weeks ago my repeated reception of a carrier at 5006, with no apparent mod, as early as 0900 but generally after 1000. This morning I tuned it at 1420 and it was present very distinctly, and I could now hear fading modulation: a male voice, conversational, either scrambled or in a language that was indistinct and unidentifiable. If scrambled then this might explain the anomalous frequency. I also heard a carrier at 5005.38 as closely as I could determine, without apparent mod. I have been trying to get either Nepal or RN Guinea Equatorial with some degree of certainty. Wonder if that was the carrier from either station? Tibet Peoples' BS was coming in very well a few minutes earlier, with separate programs, on both 4820 and 4905 (Steve Waldee, San José, CA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Certainly not Eq. Guinea at that hour; before he saw last issue; the old item from DXLD 1-108 over two years ago under JAPAN, which however, makes no reference to voice, at http://www.angelfire.com/ok/worldofradio/dxld1108.txt ``** JAPAN. I send you the information about the experimental SW station JG2XA. As I live in the neighboring city, the transmission is well received: University of Electronics & Communications, Chofu City, Tokyo started experimental SW transmission for research of HF-band Doppler-Shift (HFD). They had been using 5 and 8 MHz signals of former JJY, which ended transmission in March. They decided to set up their own SW station for this purpose. The new SW station, call sign JG2XA, started regular transmission on July 3. Frequencies: 5006 and 8006 (width 1.5 kHz) Power: 200 watt. Transmitter: Yaesu FT-860 + linear amp + lubidium generator (2 sets) Antenna: halfwave horizontal dipole. Schedule: 24 hours with continuous unmodulated carrier; ID in Morse Code is given at least every 30 minutes as "JG2XA JG2XA JG2XA UEC HFD STATION" in H3A mode. Addr: Tomizawa Laboratory, University of Electronics & Communications, Chofugaoka 1-5-1, Chofu City, Tokyo, 182-8585 Japan Tel: +81 42 443 5598 E-mail: tomizawa@ee.uec.ac.jp URL: http://ssro.ee.uec.ac.jp/lab_tomi/index.html (Takahito Akabayashi, Japan, Aug 5, BC DX via DXLD)`` UNIDENTIFIED. 6069.7: An unidentified station, which seems to be broadcasting religious programmes with a preacher similar to Peru 6020 and Brazil 6060, has been heard on air around 0615 very adjacent to Christian Voice, Chile, 6070. When heard Aug.22 the frequency was about 6069.9, and then thought in Portuguese. But heard again on Aug.24 on about 6069.7, and I couldn`t be sure if Portuguese or Spanish. The only other LA I can find listed for 6070 [besides Chile] is in the current WRTVH [pp 109/117] - Radio Capital from Rio de Janeiro - one I've never heard of. 73s, (Noel R. Green [Blackpool, NW- UK], Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) Dear Noel: On 6020 is Radio Victoria from Lima, Peru, and on 6060 is Radio Tupi from Brazil with the same religious program A Voz da Libertação. 73's (Nicolás Eramo, Argentina, ibid.) Hello Nicolás, Many thanks for the information. I have the ID of the two stations using 6020 & 6060 and have paralleled these frequencies with 6020 // 9720 and 6060 // with 9565 & 11765. All are often heard currently. But it's the one on about 6069+ that interests me. Hearing an ID will be difficult, to say the least, due to the amount of QRM present. What I hear is similar in content to 6020 & 6060, but does not appear to be in sync, so may not be the same programme. 73s (Noel Green, ibid.) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ POWERLINE COMMUNICATIONS ++++++++++++++++++++++++ NTIA EXPRESSES ``BROAD CONCERNS`` IN BPL COMMENTS NEWINGTON, CT, Aug 19, 2003 -- The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) has weighed in on the FCC`s Broadband over Power Line (BPL) initiative. While urging the FCC to ``move forward expeditiously`` with its inquiry into BPL, the NTIA expressed ``broad concerns`` about interference to government users. The NTIA also has launched an extensive modeling, analysis and measurement program for BPL. A Commerce Department branch, NTIA is the president`s principal advisor on domestic and international telecommunications policy. It also administers spectrum allocated to federal government users. ``Notwithstanding BPL`s potential benefits, the Commission must ensure that other communications services, especially government operations, are adequately protected from unacceptable interference,`` the NTIA said in late-filed comments in the BPL Notice of Inquiry (NOI) in ET 03-104. ``In tailoring its rules to promote BPL deployment, the Commission must be certain to provide all communications stakeholders with adequate protections against BPL emissions that may cause unacceptable radio frequency interference.`` A form of power line carrier (PLC) technology, BPL would use existing low and medium-voltage power lines to deliver broadband services to homes and businesses. Because it uses frequencies between 2 and 80 MHz, BPL could affect HF and low-VHF amateur allocations wherever it`s deployed. BPL proponents--primarily electric power utilities-- already are testing BPL systems in several markets, and one is said to be already offering the service. FCC rules already allow BPL, although industry proponents want the FCC to relax radiation limits. ARRL President Jim Haynie, W5JBP, has called BPL ``the most crucial issue facing Amateur Radio and the one that has the most devastating potential.`` ARRL Laboratory personnel already have visited several communities where BPL field testing is under way and documented the potential for extensive interference on HF frequencies in all field trial communities visited. In its comments, the NTIA indicated its apprehension regarding ``radiated emission limits and other measures`` that may be needed to protect the more than 18,000 HF and low-VHF federal government frequency assignments that BPL could affect. Until releasing its comments this month, the NTIA has been largely silent on the issue since last spring. In an April 24 letter, then- NTIA administrator Nancy J. Victory applauded the FCC`s decision to launch its inquiry into BPL, but called on the Commission to make sure that BPL does not cause harmful interference to other services. In early July, Frederick R. Wentland, NTIA`s associate administrator in the Office of Spectrum Management, told the FCC that the NTIA did not favor Current Technologies LLC`s request for a permanent waiver of the field strength limit specified for Class B emissions under FCC Part 15 rules. A Maryland BPL developer, Current Technologies already is field testing and marketing the technology. Wentland worried that the pole-mounted interfaces and outdoor power lines used for BPL could interfere with public safety communication in the 30 to 50 MHz range. He told FCC Office of Engineering and Technology Chief Edmond J. Thomas that the ``unobstructed and ubiquitous nature of this BPL application, and perhaps other aspects of BPL, differs considerably from the situations presently found in typical unintentional radiators`` operating under Part 15. Wentland also expressed concerns regarding compliance measurement techniques for BPL and the characterization of BPL emissions for use in compatibility studies. NTIA`s technical studies will include detailed measurements and analyses to ``help determine the least constraining BPL emission limits that would preclude unacceptable interference,`` Wentland told Thomas. Wentland, who has been named to succeed Victory as NTIA administrator on an interim basis, also invited the FCC to coordinate its own BPL measurement activities with those of the NTIA. In an attachment to its comments, NTIA summarized its measurement plan, which, among other things, will take ambient noise measurements and also ``quantify unknown aspects of BPL signals`` at several BPL test sites. The plan noted that as a result of nonlinear elements in the electrical power distribution system, ``BPL systems may radiate emissions at frequencies substantially higher than the frequencies actually used intentionally within the BPL system.`` The NTIA`s Institute of Telecommunication Science is carrying out the measurement program over a two-week period, coordinating its efforts with BPL network administrators. The data will be folded into the NTIA`s BPL modeling and analysis initiative. The NTIA said the results of its research will yield recommendations on radiated emission limits and other operational restrictions for BPL that are ``necessary to preclude unacceptable interference to federal government systems.`` The agency said it planned to conclude its research by year`s end. A copy of the NTIA`s comments--which had not been posted on the FCC Web site as of August 19--is available on the NTIA Web site http://www.ntia.doc.gov/ntiahome/fccfilings/2003/bplcomments_08132003.htm The FCC extended the reply comment deadline in the BPL proceeding to August 20, and the ARRL plans to file reply comments. The League`s initial 120-page package of comments and technical exhibits is available on the ARRL Web site [at] http://www2.arrl.org/announce/regulatory/et03-104/ There`s additional information and additional video clips on the ARRL ``Power Line Communications (PLC) and Amateur Radio`` page [at] http://www2.arrl.org/tis/info/HTML/plc/ To support the League`s efforts in this area, visit the ARRL`s secure BPL Web site [at] https://www.arrl.org/forms/development/donations/bpl/ Copyright © 2003, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved (ARRL via John Norfolk, DXLD) BPL ADVOCATES` COMMENTS LACK TECHNICAL SUBSTANCE, ARRL REPLY COMMENTS SAY http://www2.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/08/21/4/?nc=1 NEWINGTON, CT, Aug 21, 2003 -- The ARRL says Broadband over Power Line (BPL) proponents failed in their comments to the FCC to substantiate their claims that the technology will not cause widespread interference. In reply comments filed August 20 -- the FCC`s deadline to receive comments in the proceeding, ET Docket 03-104 -- the League said that if the FCC is going to rely on industry statements in making decisions on BPL deployment, the industry should back up its assertions with technical studies and hard data and make these public. ``Unfounded assurances that BPL will not cause interference are no substitute for real-world measurements,`` the League declared, ``and the FCC should rely on documented test results and an impact of interference potential based on scientific, not marketing, criteria.`` Generalized conclusions drawn about BPL`s interference potential in industry comments ``are premature and meaningless,`` the League said. A form of power line carrier -- or PLC -- technology, BPL would use existing low and medium-voltage power lines to deliver broadband services to homes and businesses using frequencies between 2 and 80 MHz. Some BPL proponents -- primarily electric power utilities – already are testing BPL systems in several markets and want the FCC to relax radiation limits. ``Power lines are ubiquitous, and attempts by the BPL industry to obtain relaxed emission classifications based on operating environment are obviously illogical and frivolous,`` the ARRL said, noting BPL would impact not only hams but public safety low-band VHF systems and other mobile systems. In contrast to the BPL advocates` ``blanket statements`` of no interference from BPL field trial sites, the ARRL said its own field tests ``lead inescapably to the conclusion that BPL will, if deployed, create widespread harmful interference.`` It predicted signal levels of up to 30 dB over S9 on a typical amateur transceiver, ``well beyond what would preclude amateur HF communications entirely.`` To dramatize its point, the League urged the Commission to view video shot during recent ARRL test-and-measurement forays to BPL field trial communities in four states. The ARRL said the type of degradation expected from BPL would transform 20 meters from a band with worldwide communication capabilities to one of limited regional communication capability. ``ARRL has, in fact, done what the BPL industry should have done-- brought an amateur station to the trial area,`` the League said. ``When it did so, the interference was manifest and widespread and would be so even to an untrained observer.`` Noting claims by Main.net http://www.mainnet-plc.com/ that it had received no reports of harmful interference in its worldwide trials, the ARRL countered that the tests had resulted in ``strong protests from Amateur Radio operators.`` Austrian amateurs documented ``massive interference`` on video, and, in an unusual move, the Austrian Experimental Transmitters Union (OeVSV) filed comments in the BPL proceeding. BPL proponents argue that the European power distribution system differs from that in the US. The League said measurements and testing should be done when the BPL systems are heavily loaded, treating the system`s entire emission as a single device. ``If all of the appropriate measurement factors are applied,`` ARRL said, ``no access BPL system would be found in compliance with FCC Part 15 regulations.`` The ARRL characterized some industry comments regarding the interference potential of BPL as ``wishful thinking`` and based on flawed premises. It said the League`s own technical exhibits-- attached to its initial and reply comments--show that BPL signals do propagate well and that overhead power lines make excellent radiators of HF signals. The League also noted that comments in the proceeding so far have been silent on the interference susceptibility of BPL to ham radio signal ingress. The League predicted that even as little as 250 mW of signal induced into overhead power lines some 100 feet from an amateur antenna could degrade a BPL system or render it inoperative. The ARRL called on the FCC to stop acting like a cheerleader for BPL. ``It is past time that the Commission acted in its proper role as a steward of the radio spectrum and recognized the interference potential of BPL to the sensitive incumbent licensed services in these bands,`` the League concluded. ``The Commission cannot stretch the Part 15 regulations as far as would be required to accommodate BPL.`` The League`s complete reply comments and technical exhibits are available on the ARRL Web site. See also the article ``BPL is a Pandora`s Box of Unprecedented Proportions, ARRL Tells FCC``. Additional information and video clips are on the ARRL ``Power Line Communications (PLC) and Amateur Radio`` page. To support the League`s efforts in the BPL fight, visit the ARRL`s secure BPL Web site [see url at the beginning of the article for links and diagrams]. Copyright © 2003, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved (ARRL via John Norfolk, DXLD) CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ EUROPEAN DX COUNCIL Last weekend more than 70 shortwave listeners, DXers and broadcasters (including yours truly) attended the annual conference of the European DX Council (EDXC) in Koenigstein, north of Frankfurt. The event had been organised by a local DX Club , the Rhein-Main Radio Club (RMRC). As usual, it was a great occasion to meet old friends and make new ones, which is not difficult, because we all share an interest in international radio. Some are only interested in the technical side of the hobby, others only care about programme content, not to forget those who collect radio items, in particular QSL cards, or pennants. At this year's meeting, the emphasis was on DRM - digital radio mondiale, with most amazing presentations about this new broadcasting technology and the latest from the DRM receiver's front. The Secretary-General of the EDXC, signor Luigi Cobisi of Italy (left on photo, with predecessor Risto Vähäkainu of Finland), was pleased with the conference: SOUND Luigi Cobisi (listen to the programme via audio link on this page --- below) Meanwhile, the EDXC is in a bit of a crisis, or has been for several years now. It seems that in this age of new technologies, not only the DX hobby is in decline, but also the need of people to join up in special clubs or the need to publish club magazines. Everybody is hooked up to the internet anyway, and information can be exchanged more rapidly than ever before. In a move to save the EDXC Luigi Cobisi launched the idea to make it an organisation for individual members, not only collective members grouped in DX clubs. SOUND Luigi Cobisi Signor Cobisi is stepping down as Sec.-Gen. at the end of this year, and the future is uncertain. Who will step forward and take over, who will organise a conference next year? Nobody knows, we'll have to wait for another couple of months to see whether the EDXC can be saved. And, as on previous occasions when I had the pleasure of meeting Luigi Cobisi, I also asked him this time to say something in Italian to his DX friends, and our listeners, in Italy. SOUND Luigi Cobisi in Italian I don't think you want to hear what my Italian sounds like. Anyway, we'll hear more from the EDXC conference in Koenigstein in future editions of Radio World. http://www.vrt.be/wm/rvi/rw_HI.asx http://www.vrt.be/wm/rvi/rw_LO.asx FRANS VOSSEN (RVi Radio World Aug 24 via DXLD) CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES / DRM +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ DIGITAL RADIO MONDIALE`S DEBUT SUMMER TO SIZZLE AT IFA 2003 AS MORE BROADCASTERS SEND DRM TRANSMISSIONS August 30th Press Conference to Include 2G Consumer Receiver, plus Special Announcement with World DAB Forum Berlin – The grand debut summer of digital radio system Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM) will sizzle next week during IFA 2003, the world`s largest consumer electronics show. Just six weeks ago in Geneva, 16 leading broadcasters made radio history by sending the world`s first DRM broadcasts across the globe. Since then, the number of stations transmitting live, daily DRM programs and periodic specials has risen to 25. DRM will showcase live broadcasts on a range of receivers -- including the first, second-generation DRM consumer radio, for distribution later this year -- at IFA`s Technical & Scientific Forum (TWF) in Hall 5.3, Stand 3, at the Messe Berlin, from August 29 to September 3. DRM Chairman and Deutsche Welle COO Peter Senger will outline DRM`s latest successes and future plans in a press conference on August 30. Experts representing German network operators, broadcasters, research institutions and manufacturing firms will also be available for reporters` questions. Additionally, Mr. Senger will be joined by World DAB Forum President Annika Nyberg, for a special, joint announcement. The press conference will start at 13:00 in the TWF. DRM is the world`s only non-proprietary, universally standardized, digital system for short-wave, medium-wave/AM and long-wave that can use existing frequencies and bandwidth across the globe. With clear, near-FM quality sound and excellent reception that offers a dramatic improvement over analogue, DRM will revitalize radio in markets worldwide. Various DRM receivers are expected to be available in shops in late 2004. The press conference will be followed by a DRM Symposium, from 14:00 to 17:00 in the same location, in which DRM`s experts will delve deeper into the system`s technical and commercial advantages. Scheduled to speak are: Mr. Senger; Michael Pilath of T-Systems MediaBroadcast (who leads DRM`s Koordinations – Komitee Deutschland), Michael Knietzsch of Thales Broadcast & Multimedia; Christian Hoerlle of TELEFUNKEN SenderSysteme Berlin; Stefan Meltzer of Coding Technologies; Gerd Kilian and Olaf Korte of Fraunhofer IIS; Wolfgang Schaefer of Robert Bosch GmbH; and Markus Zumkeller of Sony International Europe (DRM press release Aug 25 via DXLD) Continued: RECEIVER NEWS ++++++++++++ DRM`s technical highlights at IFA 2003 will include: Coding Technologies (CT) will present the first, 2G DRM consumer radio, the DRM Receiver 2010. A joint development by CT, Mayah and others, the DRM Receiver 2010 is smaller and less expensive than the first-generation models. As the first mass-produced DRM receiver, it will be ready for distribution in late 2003. Fraunhofer IIS will present the DRM FhG Prototype Receiver, the NewsBox DRM Radio. It is a novel DRM receiver prototype designed to fit in a 19`` hi-fi tuner rack, developed in the BMBF project, RadioMondo. It plays DRM audio and text, and permits navigation within the new data application NewsService Journaline, conveying categorised news in text form. Fraunhofer will also showcase the professional receiver, FhG Software Radio and the DRM Software Radio. The DRM Software Radio Project, managed by VT Merlin Communications, is at http://www.drmrx.org. Robert Bosch GmbH will showcase a modified car receiver that receives DRM signals on long-, medium- and short-wave (49m band only), using a conventional integrated RF front-end up to the 1st intermediate frequency. Digital decoding of the DRM signal is managed by a PC. Data services including Internet pages, slide shows and text will also be demonstrated. This was facilitated by Radiomondo (DRM press release Aug 25 via DXLD) IS THE SW-77 GOING UNDER TOO? Hi Glenn: Thanks for keeping us informed. Here`s a lip-smacking tidbit: The Sony Store in Plaza Las Americas in San Juan Puerto Rico is selling the SW-77 for $300!!!! That`s a bargain considering there is no sales tax in the island. Is this part of a nationwide closeout? The sales people couldn't tell me. They were surprised when I said that the receiver sold for close to $469 through mail order catalogues. What caught my eye was their ostentatious display of the receiver in their window – hanging from invisible threads (Marty Delfín, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Aug 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RCA RP-3710 DIGITAL AM/FM TUNER RADIO AND ALARM CLOCK Was at the local Wal Mart Supercenter this morning and stumbled across the RCA RP-3710 Digital AM/FM Tuner Radio And Alarm Clock For $18.49. I just pulled it out of the box and it feels stout and has pretty good sound. Can't say I've ever comes a cross a radio with a lighted LCD digital readout for so low a price. I will give it a good going over today and then post a review of this nice little radio. As promised I put the RCA RP-3710 digital AM/FM clock radio through the DX grinder last night. First of all sensitivity with the internal loop stick is surprisingly good, with very deep nulling possible off the ends of the loopstick. Selectivity is also very good. I tuned to the local 5 kw pest on 910 kc a few miles away and there was no splatter on 900 or 920 kc; I was amazed. With the internal loopstick antenna I was able to null out WBBR NYC and WWBR Bartow, FL on 1130 and hear KWKH in Shreveport, LA in the clear. I'm not interested in FM DX so only checked local stations and all is okay there and sound is very good on AM and FM from the tiny front mounted speaker. As it's meant to be an alarm clock first, there is no external antenna input or audio output for headphones. Also no provision for battery operation but it does have 9 volt battery back up for time and memories. The digital frequency readout is LCD and approximately 1" high, which is easy on my eyes as I'm half blind in one eye and deaf in the other????? It also has a backlit display that is adjustable for brightness and 11 memories for AM and 11 for FM. It makes one wonder why RCA could put digital readout in an under $19 clock radio but GE could not do the same on it's Super Radio's I, II and III. I also put the radio it on the 2 foot box loop and man did it ever come alive for stateside DX, when I tuned for resonance via inductive coupling. It heard everything that my FT-840 and 130 foot inverted L did, including KOA 850 kc at times through the fading and blanketing auroral conditions. By the dimensions are 5 1/2" wide, 4" tall and 3" deep. See included photo. http://www.kn4lf.com/rcaradio.jpg 73, (Thomas F. Giella, Space & Atmospheric Weather Forecaster C/S KN4LF, {Tampa FL,} hard-core-dx via DXLD) PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ LOOK AT TRANSMITTER SITES FROM ON HIGH I found out about something last night at a radio club meeting and have had a ball playing around with it today. Since I recall a thread on this reflector about how almost all of you seem to be map freaks like me, I thought you might get a kick out of this if you didn't already know about it. I had never noticed until I heard it last night that MapQuest at http://www.mapquest.com/maps/ gives you the option of obtaining an aerial view of locations you request maps for. Not all locations in the USA have aerial view options (I tried areas in WI, TN, OH, MI, NY, VA and MD and only two -- just Northeast of Baltimore and in Eastern VA SE of Fredericksburg did NOT have the option of aerial views). MapQuest also gives you the option of searching for a location using geographic coordinates instead of a street address (just click on the "Lat/Long" option on the left side of MapQuest's page). So that means you can go to a site like Bob Carpenter's at http://www.qsl.net/w3otc/ and get the FCC coordinates for transmitter sites of BC stations, and then, once you plug them into MapQuest and get the street map for them, if an option appears just above the resulting map which says "Aerial Photo", that means an aerial photo IS available for the site in question and you can click on it and get it to display. The photo that comes up initially is quite wide in area, but I find that if you zoom in to the third zoom level from max, you will see the antenna farm quite easily. Since the photo is taken from almost vertically above, it is not always so easy to see the tower, but you can certainly see the tower bases, buried cable lines, etc. You can also see where the transmitter building is located and how to get to it from the main road if you are thinking of dropping in for a visit. Some towers show up very nicely from above, however, the WCBS/WFAN island location being one that comes to mind. One note about plugging the FCC-provided coordinates into the MapQuest program. Since the FCC figures give a coodinate such as 35 59.833 N you will have to convert the .833 to a whole number indicating seconds to make MapQuest happy. To get the number MapQuest wants just use your calculator and get the value for X as in: 833 X ---- = --- 1000 60 Just round off "X" to the nearest whole number, that's plenty good enough. And remember to type in the longitude with an initial minus sign as in -86 47 32 in order to get the program to work correctly for Western Hemisphere locations. Hope you have as much fun with this as I have. Regards, (Fred Laun, Temple Hills, MD, K3ZO, Aug 20, WTFDA via DXLD) WILLIAM HEPBURN SITE CHANGES In anticipation of my move from the Toronto Metro Area to the Hamilton Metro Area, I have had to make the following URL changes: Canada TV List now at http://www.iprimus.ca/~hepburnw/dx/tv/tv-can.htm Canada TV E-Skip logos now at http://www.iprimus.ca/~hepburnw/dx/tv/can/logo-2.htm Caribbean TV List now at http://www.iprimus.ca/~hepburnw/dx/tv/tv-car.htm DX Web Site: http://www.iprimus.ca/~hepburnw/ Tropo Forecast Maps : http://www.iprimus.ca/~hepburnw/tropo.html (Hepburn, Aug 19, WTFDA via DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ K INDEX AND SPORADIC E The K index got up to 8 last night according to an e-mail from one DX colleague. Look at what you guys got today. THIS HAS BEEN CONSISTENT THIS WHOLE SEASON --- One to three day bursts of Es starting a day or two after these warnings, and often but not always launching with an overnight Es session. I think this is a KEY part of the overall question (Saul Chernos, Ont., Aug 19, WTFDA via DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-152, August 23, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3h.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1196: RFPI: Sat 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 on 7445 [nominal times subject to delay or pre-emption] WINB: Sun 0031 on 12160 WWCR: Sun 0230 on 5070, 0630 on 3210, Wed 0930 on 9475 WRMI: Sun 1800+ on 15725 WBCQ: Mon 0415 on 7415 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [NO LOW VERSION THIS WEEK; SORRY] [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1196h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1196h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1196.html WORLD OF RADIO ON SIUE WEB RADIO Here are the CONFIRMED times for WOR and COM on SIUE Web Radio: WORLD OF RADIO: Friday 10:30 p.m. (UT Saturday 0330) Tuesday 10:00 p.m. (UT Wednesday 0300) CONTINENT OF MEDIA: Friday 10:00 p.m. (UT Saturday 0300) U times will be one hour later when the United States returns to Standard Time on the last Sunday in October (E. B. Stevenson, SIUE Web Radio, Aug 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ALASKA. RADIO STATION BROUGHT WORLD TO INTERIOR By MARY BETH SMETZER, Staff Writer http://www.news-miner.com/Stories/0,1413,113~7244~1581596,00.html The inaugural broadcast of Fairbanks' first radio station -- KFAR, "From the Top of the World to You" -- had all the trappings of a Hollywood premiere -- hoopla interspersed with music, speakers and self-congratulatory recognition. Fifteen minutes before its scheduled startup, Oct. 1, 1939, radio listeners tuning in early heard an organ prelude over the airwaves provided by Don Adler playing a Kimball organ keyboard in the Empress Theater. The "prelude broadcast," according to a Fairbanks Daily News-Miner article, was to aid faraway listeners across the territory in locating the KFAR frequency "to a hair" before the broadcast proper began. The music also provided a warmup to the historic Sunday evening event for excited Fairbanksans. The same article reported: "Hundreds filed into the Empress Theater where the program was released over the theater's amplifying system, and groups were clustered around radios in hotels, shops, and private homes to hear Interior Alaska's first "homemade" broadcast. "Thousands, too, crowded to the station's transmitter site on the Farm Road (today known as Farmers Loop) where engineers Stanton Bennett and August Hiebert showed old-timers and youngsters alike the "innards" of a modern broadcasting unit." At 7 p.m. sharp, station manager Jack Winston intoned, "KFAR is on the air!" Not surprisingly, the first airwave address from KFAR's penthouse atop the Lathrop Building was from Capt. Austin E. Lathrop, president of the Midnight Sun Broadcasting Co., proclaiming, "I can only say this is the happiest day of my life." Among the speakers during the first sesquihour live broadcast were Fairbanks Mayor Leslie Nerland; Leslie Baker, general manager of the Alaska Steamship company; Sgt. Leon Harper, officer in charge, U.S. Signal Corps and Alaska Communications System Fairbanks station; Ralph J. Rivers, district attorney; and Dr. Charles E. Bunnell, University of Alaska president. Bunnell lauded Lathrop's many accomplishments, calling him the "drive- on spirit of the pioneer" in his address. The 1,000-watt station on the dial at 610 kilocycles [per second] initially was on the air 12 hours a day, Monday through Saturday. Broadcasts ran from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and again from 5 p.m. to midnight. Sunday air time was 2 to 10 p.m. Fairbanksans were hungry for timely news, which KFAR provided despite being unable to link up with teletype news services like The Associated Press or United Press International. The station subscribed to Trans Radio Press, which transmitted news in high speed code of 40 to 50 words per minute that was manually copied by the station's engineers, Stanton and Hiebert. The station also provided local news and special features. Irene Richards, head of the KFAR continuity department, initially carried the microphone moniker of "Story Lady." At 5 o'clock every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, Richards read children's favorites over the airwaves for 15 minutes. Her lead-in was: "If you like to hear a story, The kind that isn't borey, Sit back; listen to the lady tell Of the doggies, bears, and bunnies That you don't find in the funnies. For, it's these the Story Lady knows so well." Richards also aired a half-hour daily morning women's program with features on food, interior decorating, fashions, book reviews, music, club news and church socials. The KFAR offices and studios were housed on the fourth and uppermost floor of the Lathrop Building, which was completed in 1933. Lathrop had a four-room penthouse apartment gutted for the studio. The wall panels were knocked out and replaced with plate glass and soundproofed, and the room was "trimmed in decorative mahogany and finished in acoustic cork of a modernistic cut ... thickly carpeted and fitted with chromium and leather furniture." (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** ALGERIA. Re: [BDXC-UK] DXLD 3-150; WOR 1195 - Algeria on SW? I'm surprised this question is still being asked as all Algerian shortwave transmissions were dropped at least 2 years ago! Guido is right to note a large number of new FM transmitters in Algeria, many of which have been confirmed in the UK this summer during several Sporadic E openings. I believe these new FM outlets replace lower powered mediumwave transmitters which have presumably been decommissioned. The only AM outlets listed now on the RTA web site (I believe this list is correct) are the high powered transmitters: 153 kHz Bechar 2 x 1000 kW - Chaine 1 in Arabic 198 kHz Ouargal 2 x 1000 kW - Chaine 1 in Arabic 252 kHz Tipaza 2 x 750 kW - Chaine 2 in French 531 kHz Ain Beida 2 x 300 kW - Chaine 1 in Arabic 549 kHz S. Hamadouche 2 x 300 kW - Chaine 1 in Arabic 891 kHz O. Fayet 2 x 300 kW - Chaine 1 in Arabic 981 kHz O. Fayet 2 x 300 kW - Chaine 2 in Berber dialects. (Dave Kenny, BDXC-UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ANTARCTICA. Gabriel, Y ¿cuál de la emisión especial diexista proyectada para el 28 de agosto, que mencionó el 20 de julio? Si permitan los vientos, ¿se puede confirmar? Para quedarme antes del evento, lo menciono en la emisióm actual 1196 de World of Radio, como posibilidad... 73, (Glenn to Gabriel, Aug 22, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Sí, Glenn, la posibilidad sigue latente; el tema es que quiero la confirmación 100% desde Base Esperanza. Sólo espero comunicarme hoy con el operador para 'afinar' detalles. Todo está en manos de ellos, y..... del viento..... De todas maneras, puedes mencionarlo como altamente probable el 28/8/03 a 0100+ en 15476 khz. Ya he enviado todo el material realizado integramente en colaboración junto con Arnaldo Slaen. 73's GIB (Gabriel Iván Barrera, Argentina, Aug 22, ibid.) ** AUSTRALIA. Can't really imagine that I can find something of interest in the radio world that you may not have checked out, but: Western Australia Community Broadcasting Association is a vast website about the 200 + non- profit and largely nonprofessional stations in Australia. If you haven't looked, do peek and mourn for N America! http://wacba.com/ and the national site http://www.cbaa.org.au/ It also offered a chance to go to "our" alternativeradio.org – which I didn't know about, but which has some of my non- favorite liberals! And I'm a liberal. - HB (Howard Box, TN, Aug 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BAHAMAS. 1540: I heard them exactly twice, once very faintly during an aurora with little usable copy, and then again in Nov. 2001 during an extremely fortunate combination of circumstances. There was a really strong aurora which wiped out WPTR and KXEL and ZNS1 was on emergency facilities to give out hurricane information. They were alone on the channel and armchair copy. I haven't heard them since then (Dave Hochfelder, Highland Park, NJ, Sony ICF-2010 and Quantum QX Pro, Aug 22, IRCA via DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. Radio Tacana, Iturralde 4780.96 kHz Hola, Amigos DXistas en la lista! En esta dirección se puede leer sobre los diferentes pueblos indígenas en Bolivia, ``Tacana`` y otros: http://www.bolivia.com/empresas/cultura/Pueblos_Indigenas/Tacana.asp Nuestro amigo Rogildo de Bolivia nos ha informado que la provincia de ``Iturralde`` está ubicada en el departamento de ``La Paz``, no en el departamento de ``Pando`` como yo he dicho. A partir de Domingo se puede escuchr una grabación de Radio Tacana, Iturralde en esta dirección: http://homepage.sverige.net/~a-0901/ Es muy difícil captar el nombre del departamento pero seguramente Rogildo tiene razón. 73 de (Björn Malm. Quito, Ecuador, 22/Ago/2003 21:20, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. Bolivia, 4905.45, Radio San Miguel, 0905-1030 Aug 23. Noted the first hour being just news and a few promos. A woman did the presenting of the news generally, heard a few men there too. At 1010 the programming changed to music. Additionally at that time, the signal began to improve here. My DX edge suggested it was sunrise in Bolivia while about a half hour prior to sunrise here in Clewiston. At 1023 a man gave TC followed by a short ID "... Radio San Miguel" and back to music. So the signal started out as poor and improved to good by 1030 (Bolland, Chuck, Clewiston, Florida, DX LSITENING DIGEST) ** BOLIVIA. Hola Amigos DXistas ! Una nueva: ayer (21 de agosto) capté en 4905.3 kHz una emisora que al parecer era de Bolivia a eso de las 1040 UT, sin identificarse, y en efecto, HOY 22 de agosto les confirmo... 4905.2 (si, se movió...) 1040 UT, Radio San Miguel, Riberalta, Bolivia, Transmitiendo el programa "LOCRITO SAN MIGUEL", SINPO 44444. Estén atentos a la protesta de Radio La Oroya del Perú. 73 (Alfredo Cañote, Perú) Hi DXers ! A Bolivian station "moved" the frequency... I heard yesterday (August 21) but today i heard the name of the station. 4905.2 kHz, 1040 UT, Radio San Miguel, from Riberalta, Bolivia Program called "LOCRITO SAN MIGUEL", SINPO 44444. They use the same "channel" of Radio La Oroya (Perú). Greetings (SPACEMASTER, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. Caros amigos, Há pouco recebi um telefonema do diretor da Rádio Gaurujá, Orivaldo Rampazzo, informando que a QRG de 5045 kHz, onda tropical de 60 metros, cujo transmissor está em Presidente Prudente, começou a operar em fase experimental. Tentei captá-la aqui em Itajubá mas por enquanto nada... 73 (Caio Fernandes Lopes, Itajubá- MG, Aug 22, radioescutas via DXLD) Caio, Ontem a noite, 2350 hBr, escutei R. Guarujá Paulista em 5045 com bom sinal. Não ouvi em 3235 e 1550, talvez pela propagação. Esta manhã às 0720 hBr, estava presente com sinal fraco. Neste caso seria R. Guarujá Paulista, Guarujá, via Presidente Prudente? 73 (Rogildo Aragão, Bolivia, Aug 23, ibid.) Oi Rogildo, Sim, R. Gaurujá Pta via Presidente Prudente. Estou ouvindo-a neste momento. 73 (Caio, ibid.) ** CAMBODIA. [presumably] 11940.00 plus few +/- Hertz. National Radio from CBG is active again, maybe testing equipment, noted signing-on around *1200, and *2355 ... 0000 UT. But heard ONLY in local language, Khmer dialects? From first day observation on August 5th onwards (Roland Schulze, Mangaldan Pangasinan, Philippines, Aug 11, BC-DX via Wolfgang Bueschel, DXLD) ** CANADA. Canada. CHU. I checked at 1620 UT Friday August 22. All three CHU frequencies are operating. Everything seems back to normal (Bernie O'Shea, Ottawa, Ontario, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hearing all three outlets of CHU at 1930, 22 August. 3330, 7335 and 14670 (Steve Lare, Holland, MI, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. Glenn, I came across this article on the Native radio station in Fredericton. CKTP radio creates cultural bridge. CKTP is the first Maliseet radio station in the Maritimes. From: http://nb.cbc.ca/regional/servlet/View?filename=nb_maliseetradio20030822 The CKTP website is http://www.thebeat957.tk/ (Wade Smith, New Brunswick, Aug 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CHILE. 6010, Radio Parinacota, Putre Aug 22, 2224-2235 - followed this one for over 10 minutes; woman talked and mentioned "dia", "diez" and "Putre" followed by a man announcer who talked and mentioned "Parinacota". Very weak signal with some very minor RHC-6000 splatter too, but occasionally readable. New! (Bogdan Chiochiu, Île-Bizard, QC DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CHINA. 15245 and 17720 kHz: CRI German new morning service at 0500- 0700 UT. I took a listen to the two new CRI freqs this morning. 15245 had some splash from 15250 - AWR via AUT I think - but was otherwise a good signal. 17720 was also good but is co-channel RFA via ULA in Tibetan plus CNR-1 jammer[s!!]. These were not very strong today, so not causing much disturbance, but can be fairly good when propagation allows. Obviously, someone is monitoring CRI! (later) Re CRI - it looks like "left hand" and "right hand" not knowing what`s going on on 17720. But, they are partly responsible for causing the QRM. This morning, reception was very weak and unusable on 17720 at 0635 and not much better on 15245 - usable with a communications receiver, but would be difficult using a portable, I think (Noel R. Green, UK, BC-DX Aug 20) Dear Noel, I didn't check this CRI morning service due to other commitments. 17720 -- CHN jammers, that's a pity to select such a channel. This morning [22nd] I checked the CRI German morning outlet. 15245 0500-0514 only fragments of IBB HOL Tatar-Bashkirian co-channel heard. 0514-0517 fade-in of Urumchi signal. 0520-0657 only S=7 signal level, poor signal on telescopic antenna, only fair level, when the outdoor longwire connected inductive to SONY 2010 set. 17720 0500-0640 no propagation from URU into Europe. At same time the various ISR and IRN sces came in with fair, up to S=8- 9+ level. 0640-0657 poor CRI signal, of about S=5 level (Wolfgang Bueschel, Aug 22) I also monitored CRI today [Friday] like Wolfie. I found 15245 only peaking to about S3 here, with deep fades, and difficult to copy. I think I could trace something on 17720 but couldn`t tell what it was. I would guess that many stations have been surprised this summer by the difficult propagation conditions around 0500 to 0900. It's a very interesting period to study, propagationally, and you can never be sure what you are going to hear. Another problem is that the frequency "window" available, for International broadcasters, is a narrow one - far less than later in the day. And the recurrent CME's etc. have caused havoc this summer to long distance propagation at this time of day - but may have been responsible for the appearance of some other interesting signals! (Noel R. Green, UK, BC-DX Aug 22 via Wolfgang Bueschel, DXLD) ** CHINA. CNR Music Jammers: This rainy afternoon I managed to hear CNR Music Jammer on two frequencies: 13690- and 11945 kHz with sign on at 1458 UT. According to ILG, transmitter site is Xi`an. Scheduled 15- 20 UT. Are they trying to make reception of R Free Asia difficult as possible in mainland China? However, music was nice, Chinese Opera. Sri to see this kind of stupid action these days. 73´s (Jouko Huuskonen, Turku, FINLAND, Aug 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CONGO. [freq? 4765 or 5985, ed] R. Congo verified my RR after 100 days with a numbered blanco card and a letter. My card is Nr. 2! Address: Direction Générale de Télédiffusion du Congo, B.P. 2912, Brazzaville, Congo. v/s Jean Medard Bokatola, Tel. +242 81 06 08. (Klaus-Peter Hilger, Germany, BC-DX Aug 19 via Wolfgang Bueschel, DXLD) ** COSTA RICA. Glenn, I have a web page containing some of the hard to find recent developments at RFPI ... http://copyexchange.com/_wsn/page3.html The reason I know this information is through the weekly online chats with the people at RFPI and a small group of supporters, and, in addition, am in frequent contact with the station by phone. It should be made clear that I am not directly associated with RFPI, other than the fact that I am a listener and supporter (Franklin Seiberling {sigh' bur-ling} KC0ISV, Iowa City, Aug 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: RADIO FOR PEACE INTERNATIONAL MAY BE FORCED TO RELOCATE August 17, 2003 - Exclusive to The Copy Exchange - In a meeting held on the University for Peace (UPaz) campus on August 11th between UPaz and RFPI officials, an agreement was made to hold talks in the coming months regarding RFPI's fate. The deadline for reaching agreement was set at October 31, 2003, and no statements are to be made to the public by either side regarding these talks until after that deadline. In the past RFPI management has expressed a concern that a forced relocation could run into millions of dollars. It is unclear how much UPaz would offer in compensation for existing structures, lost air time, and other costs associated with the move. RFPI would be required to purchase land, construct studios, transmission facilities and towers, as well as deal with the red tape of Costa Rican licensing procedures. Station staff told The Copy Exchange that of late UPaz guards at the RFPI gate have been allowing some vehicles through the gate to park next to the studio, avoiding the staff humiliation of climbing through the locked gate. Guards, who no longer carry firearms and are generally business-like but cooperative, reportedly are not present at the gate at all times to allow vehicles in. The station gate was chained and locked by UPaz on July 21st when the action against the station was initiated. Station staff also reported that the lockdown has drastically reduced enrollment in the RFPI-run Institute for Progressive Communications (IPC) courses, causing a shortfall in an important income source. The station must now support itself almost entirely on listener and supporter contributions. The small RFPI staff speak of exhaustion from working overtime. Members must be at the studio 24 hours a day to insure proper station operation and prevent damage from occurring (from http://copyexchange.com/_wsn/page3.html via DXLD) WHAT IS MAURICE STRONG'S AGENDA FOR SHUTTING DOWN RADIO FOR PEACE INTERNATIONAL (RFPI)? http://www.saverfpi.org/article.php?story=20030822142447673 (Save RFPI posting via DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. RADIO, TV MARTÍ TO BE BROADCAST VIA SATELLITE, OFFICIALS SAY http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/miami/sfl-dmarti22aug22,1,1163747.story?coll=sfla-news-miami (via Mike Terry, DXLD) REFUERZAN LAS TRANSMISIONES DE RADIO Y TV MARTÍ RUI FERREIRA, El Nuevo Herald http://www.miami.com/mld/elnuevo/news/world/cuba/6588738.htm El Nuevo Herald | 08/22/2003 | Posted on Fri, Aug. 22, 2003 TOMADO DE LA SECCION [CUBA] (via Óscar de Céspedes, FL, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** CZECHOSLOVAKIA. CZECH RADIO MARKS 35TH ANNIVERSARY OF BATTLE FOR RADIO STATION A military band played outside the Czech Radio building on Thursday morning, as politicians lined up to lay wreaths at the plaque to those who lost their lives defending the station in August 1968. It's thirty-five years to the day since the Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia, a day of reflection and remembrance for the Czech people. Czechoslovak Radio played a particularly important role in the hours that followed the invasion, as besieged reporters broadcast desperate appeals for help to the outside world. Representing the Senate at Thursday's ceremony was Jaroslava Moserova, then a doctor working at a hospital a few minutes from the radio station. She shared her memories of that time with Rob Cameron. "I was in Prague, and we live on a hill, on the sixth floor, with a good view of the whole city. I remember the planes coming in, just over our roof. I remember what somehow felt was very frightening, that suddenly the hum of the city - which one doesn't normally register - stopped. Suddenly it was silent. One heard only the shots, and saw the shots, but the silence was frightening. Then of course the next day I went to work because it was obvious that there would be wounded here, by the broadcasting station, and our hospital is just around the corner. So we were getting the wounded, being the nearest hospital to the radio building. I remember how impressed I was how everyone ignored the Soviet tanks. The soldiers were shooting and people simply walked along, they didn't take shelter, they ignored them. It was marvellous. Of course what came after was the worst." Is the memory of those days still as strong in your mind as it was ten or twenty years ago? Is it something which is slowly fading from your mind? "No. This will never fade. Never. Never - mainly the way our people behaved, how marvellous they were. How - without any instructions - they took down the street signs, changed the road signs. They were marvellous, and they didn't fire a single shot. It was only the Soviets who were shooting." Many young people today have little or no idea what happened outside this building 35 years ago. That's rather sad isn't it. "Well, they have no idea what the whole regime was like. What happened afterwards, how people were forced to lie, forced into hypocrisy, how they taught their children to be two-faced. The mediocrity of all the people in top positions who had no professional merit, only political. They just don't know. That's why I started this project 'the Absurdities of Totalitarianism', where I collect personal experiences and documents of what it was like. The extent of the lies, of the falsehood, of the suppression of facts. It was amazing." (source? via ASWLC yahoogroup via Mike Terry, DXLD) {see 3-153} ** DENMARK. Thanks for your interest in WMR - World Music Radio. Finally we`ve got some news to report: After several months of waiting, we have today received the license to commence broadcasting on two different short wave frequencies from the authorities here in Denmark - and so low power test-transmissions can be expected soon on 5815 and 15810 kHz. News will follow shortly. The power is 400 Watt and the transmitter site is near Karup in Central Jutland, Denmark. WMR is planning to commence regular transmissions within a few months – probably late November. We will be on the air 24 hours a day --- 7 days a week --- with our own very special, unique blend of current chart music, oldies from the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s as well as popular tunes from countries all over the world. The power on short wave will be 10 kW on each frequency. Our programmes will be available not only on short wave but also via the Internet and hopefully also FM, medium wave as well as satellite. At a later stage --- when digital receivers become available --- we are planning on broadcasting in the DRM mode on a third short wave outlet. Reception reports for our programmes are welcomed and will be acknowledged by a new QSL-card. The address of WMR remains: WMR, PO Box 112, DK-8900 Randers, Denmark. Best regards, (Stig Hartvig Nielsen, http://www.wmr.dk Aug 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. DW changes to CIRAF 42, 49, 50, 54 from August 1st: German 1000-1355 cancelled 21790 NAU 500 kW 90 degr Chinese 1030-1055 cancelled 17835 WER 500 kW 60 degr 1300-1350 Cancelled 15535 TRI 250 kW 45 degr 1300-1350 Cancelled 17845 WER 500 kW 60 degr 2300-2350 Cancelled 9560 NAU 250 kW 70 degr (x9470) (Roland Schulze, Mangaldan Pangasinan, Philippines, BC-DX Aug 11 via DXLD) ** GUATEMALA. One of the reports on this week`s Common Ground (see USA) is about this: ProPetén through its resident agronomist sponsors a daily radio show called "Mi Amigo, El Agrónomo" (My Friend, the Agronomist). On the air since 2000, this variety program gives advice on organic alternatives to farmers across Petén interspersed with country music, jokes, and stories. Within the year, the program gained an audience of 100,000 listeners, making it the #2 radio show in the region. ProPetén also sponsors a weekly environmental radio show called "Connection with Nature" in conjunction with the local university. More at http://www.propeten.org --- Unfortunately, I have found nothing about the stations carrying such a popular show (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GUYANA. Voice of Guyana, 3290, 0348-0402, August 21, English, Announcer with schedule, "..returning at (0900?) GMT.." and positive ID, "This is the Voice of Guyana". Instrumental music until 0355, news bulletin mentioning Israel, Palestine and Islamic Jihad, pips at 0400 into BBCWS relay with a big drop in already poor aduio quality. Poor under static crashes (Scott R. Barbour Jr., NH, August 21, DXLD) ** HUNGARY. HUNGARIAN RADIO, TV BROADCAST ON THE INTERNET COULD END FOR LACK OF FUNDS | Excerpt from report by Hungarian TV on 22 August [Presenter] The VilagRadio and VilagTV [WorldRadio, WorldTV], available on the Internet, could cease within a month. So far 8-10,000 people were listening and watching regularly the free Hungarian language broadcasts, but because of the company's serious financial problems, those beyond the borders can soon only listen to Hungarian news or music for eight dollars per month. [Reporter] Farewell to the Vilag Radio, mainly this kind of emails are arriving to the company which, through a special programme, made Hungarian radio and TV programmes available for anyone, free of charge. [passage omitted] The company, which was founded more than two years ago, is struggling with financial problems. According to their calculations, unless they will get at least 600 subscribers, the computers of the Hungarians abroad will go silent. [Representative of MAVIP Kft] We are asking eight dollars per month for listening to the radio, the television will remain free of charge. We need to cover the costs of operating the system from these subscription fees. [Reporter] Up till now only 114 people paid the subscription fee. According to statistics, the number of those listening to the radio via the Internet from the so far regular 8,000 has dropped to 600. Source: Hungarian TV2 satellite service, Budapest, in Hungarian 1810 gmt 22 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** INDIA. NEW DELHI: India's pubcaster Doordarshan director-general S.Y. Quraishi may be staying put for the moment. His new posting orders have not come but the official hunt for a DG for DD's sister organization, All India Radio, has been set in motion. . . http://www.indiantelevision.com/headlines/y2k3/aug/aug173.htm (via Jill Dybka, DXLD) ** INDONESIA. 4896.96, RRI Wamena (presumed) 1152 Aug 18. English songs "Angel of the Morning" (strange version) and "Proud Mary". VG signal but tuned out before ID time (John Wilkins, Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Drake R-8, 100-foot RW, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL INTERNET. From: Charles H. Riggs, III Subject: OperaCast Weather Report For Weekend Of 8/23-5 Newsgroups: rec.music.opera Date: 2003-08-22 19:14:25 PST Dear fellow opera lovers, Here is our weekend Weather Report, intended as a guide for those planning to listen to some opera on the Web this weekend, but who would prefer not to experience the nasty and unsettling surprise of coming across an audio stream which is in less than tip-top technical condition. In the following discussion we use GMT time as a reference. For those of you in the United States remember that early in the morning GMT time means, in general, the previous evening in the States, that the evening GMT time is, in general, afternoon in the US, etc. etc. The following paragraphs will make most sense to those of you who have already taken a look at the schedule for this week, which has now been posted on the Opera On The Internet section of http://operacast.com Saturday Morning: Some of you probably plan to listen to Haydn's Seasons on Hector this afternoon. If you do, be aware that this station intermittently suffers both from clicking and very low-level beeping in the background. We have contacted the managers of this stream repeatedly on these matters. However, while always polite, they have failed completely to correct the problem in any way. If you should notice it, and if the problem should bother you a lot, let us know and we will furnish to you the appropriate email addresses. . . (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) He then goes into great detail about the audible deficiencies of many webcasters, which info ought to be equally applicable to non-operatic broadcasts. I didn`t spot a link to this rec.music group on the operacast site itself, which also has a great deal of info. With these magna opera, one never need be deprived of opera, especially on weekends (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. SOUTH KOREA/USA: HYUNDAI MOBIS DEVELOPS NEW INBOARD SATELLITE RADIO | Text of report in English by South Korean news agency Yonhap on 20 August SEOUL, 20 Aug: (Yonhap) - Hyundai Mobis said Wednesday [20 Aug] that it has developed a new inboard digital satellite radio that is more affordable and easier to install in a car than existing products. Mobis, which is one of the largest auto-tech and parts manufacturers in Korea, said the new product can provide clear digital sound quality music, news and sports from over 100 satellite stations in the United States, as well as pick up regular radio broadcasts. The company added that the radio took two years to develop and held a distinct advantage over rival products in the United States, Japan and Europe because there was no need for an outboard set-top box. Mobis said Hyundai Motor Co. plans to install the new satellite radio in its Santa Fe and Grandeur XG models next year, as well as aims to target car owners who do not have this option. The auto-part company said it is aiming to sell 100,000 units worth 100bn won (85m dollars) in the US market by 2005. Source: Yonhap news agency, Seoul, in English 0510 gmt 20 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** IRELAND. Following the reports about RTE Radio 1 on 252 kHz in the weblog, reproduced in DXLD3151, there was a report on the UKK-radio- listeners email list that when RTE Radio 1 split its service on Wednesday night to allow for soccer coverage on medium-wave and normal programmes on FM, LW carried the FM service. A later report from the same contributor indicated that RTE left LW on Thursday afternoon (time not given). Checking here in Wembley Park at 21:45 UTC 22 August suggests that RTE is still off the air on LW (PAUL DAVID, Chairman, Brent Visually-Handicapped Group, Registered Charity No.: 272955, Aug 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ISRAEL. PIRATE BLAMED FOR BLOCKING AIR TO GROUND COMMUNICATIONS 22/08/2003 22:40 By Jonathan Lis, Haaretz Correspondent An El Al aircraft with 420 passengers on board was delayed two-and-a- half hours from landing Friday afternoon at Ben Gurion Airport due to disturbances in the plane's communication with the control tower. The plane, which took off from New York, landed safely at 5:30 P.M. after it was discovered that a pirate radio station operated by settlers was the source of the interference. The station was broadcasting from the roof of a synagogue at the Bat Ayin settlement, north of Ramallah. Security forces, including police and Israel Defense Forces troops, pinpointed the location of the transmission and shut down the station. Only then was the plane able to reestablish communication with the control tower at the airport and land. . . http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=332401&contrassID=1&subContrassID=7&sbSubContrassID=0&listSrc=Y (via Mike Terry, DXLD) WTFK? Something doesn`t ring true about this; a set-up? Geez, don`t they have any emergency back-up channels??? Ought to have those regardless of any `pirate threat` (gh, DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH. MINISTER PLANS TO DROP RADIOS ON NORTH KOREA By Jeremy Kirk, Stars and Stripes Pacific edition, Saturday, August 23, 2003 SEOUL --- If the wind is just right this weekend, Douglas Shin's hopes for a unified Korea will go lofting over barbed wire and land mines and into North Korean airspace. . . http://www.estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=17165 (via Jilly Dybka, KF4ZEO, DXLD) RADIO AIR-DROP INTO N KOREA THWARTED --- From BBC News http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/3173541.stm South Korea police have blocked a group of human rights activists from sending balloons attached with radios into North Korea. The activists said they wanted to help the people of the secretive communist state find out what was happening in the outside world. Veteran German activist Norbert Vollertsen was reportedly injured in the ensuing scuffle. Douglas Shin, a Korean-American rights campaigner who took part in the attempted launch, told the BBC that the activists were not aware they were acting against the South Korean authorities. They "cheated us into believing this was OK to do", Mr Shin told the East Asia Today programme. "But when we got there it was a different story," he said. Asked if he thought the alleged about-face was related to upcoming six-nation talks on North Korea's nuclear arsenal, Mr Shin said: "It's all politically connected". It is hoped that the talks, which start in Beijing next week, will help break the political deadlock on the Korean peninsula. The activists were aiming to launch more than 20 helium-filled balloons across the Korean border. Each balloon was carrying about 20-25 small transistor radios. Officers stopped the activists' truck as they approached the border town of Cholwon, saying the air-drop was not authorised by the South Korean Government. "Norbert tried to fill up just one balloon as a token, and they pre-empted it by... swarming over him," Mr Shin said. Mr Vollertsen was later taken to a nearby hospital, complaining of a leg injury. The campaign was aimed at overcoming North Korea's strict ban on outside broadcasts. North Korean radios and televisions can only tuned in to government channels, which feature mostly army music or gushing praise for leader Kim Jong-il. "We are doing this because North Korean media is awful. There is no news at all - only propaganda," Norbert Vollertsen told the BBC's World Today programme on Thursday, before the attempted launch took place. "The ordinary people are thirsty for information because... silence is killing North Korea," he said. Mr Vollertsen is a 45-year-old German doctor, who was once honoured in North Korea for his humanitarian work there, but was expelled in 2000 after condemning the country's human rights record (Aug 22 via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** LESOTHO, Radio Lesotho, 4800, August 21, 0419-0433, announcer speaking with several different persons, presumed phone-in program with several mentions of "Botswana". Poor, battling with "sweeper" and data bursts (Scott R. Barbour, Jr., NH, August 21, DXLD) ** LIBERIA. IMPROVING SITUATION IN LIBERIA RENEWS HOPE AS AID SUPPLIES ARRIVE --- Posted by: newsdesk on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 01:19 PM The situation in the Liberian capital city of Monrovia is finally improving, said Rick Sacra, associated director for SIM Liberia, in an e-mail report that arrived today. ``Monrovia is at last a basically peaceful city and people are beginning to move around freely,`` he said. ``The peace process and the deployment of the ECOMIL (peacekeeping) troops are reported to be moving on slowly but surely. Displaced people on the eastern side of Monrovia at the Sports Complex and the Kendeja Culture Center (both sites close to the ELWA radio campus of SIM/HCJB World Radio) have not yet received any food distribution,`` but these are expected to begin next week. Fuel continues to be a concern in the city with gasoline selling at ``anywhere from $5 to $10 a Gallon,`` Sacra said. However, ELWA was able to obtain 1,000 gallons of diesel fuel for its generators and vehicles at the price of US$2.80 earlier this week. . . [from a much longer story about the situation there:] http://www.hcjb.org/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=741&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0 . . .ELWA is broadcasting a message of hope on a limited schedule as diesel fuel is available to operate its generators (HCJB World Radio/SIM/Reuters/AP/Mission Network News, via HCJB press via DXLD) ** MEXICO. As he is working with the HFCC, Jeff White has been trying to add some Latin American stations to the listings, which should result in less interference to them from the major broadcasters --- at least their existence becomes officially recognized (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Subject: Radio Mil record HFCC Estimados Julián y Héctor: Aquí, como prometido, está el record que acaba de aparecer hoy en la base de datos del HFCC para Radio Mil por la temporada B03. Muestra Radio Mil las 24 horas diarias, 7 días por semana, hacia Zona 10 (CIRAF), desde Ciudad de México, con 1 kilovatio y antena omnidireccional. Muchos 73. Jeff [spreadsheet wrapping] ; B03 NEW 19-aug-2003 NEW ; upload time: 19-aug-2003 16:07:55 ; Version:00 Total reqs:1 ; Subversion:00 ; Radio Mil Mexico ;----+----+----+------------------------------+---+----+-------+---+-- ;FREQ STRT STOP CIRAF ZONES LOC POWR AZIMUTH SLW ANT DAYS FDATE TDATE MOD AFRQ LANGUAGE ADM BRC FMO REQ# OLD ALT1 ALT2 ALT3 NOTES ;----+----+----+------------------------------+---+----+-------+---+-- 6010 0000 2400 10 MEX 1 0 0 926 1234567 261003 280304 D MEX NEW NEW 10028 R. Mil (via Jeff White, Aug 19, cc to DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO. 6045, XEXQ, *1200-1210 Aug 18. XE anthem, a few bars of march music, then YL with opening announcement at 1203:40. Mentioned freqs 1460 AM and "Seis punto cero cuatro cinco MegaHertz (sic) de la onda corta". More chat, including program lineup, to 1209, when the first classical piece was presented. Occasional good peak, but frequent signal dropouts, as noted by others. Very disturbed band condx today - A=65 and K=7 ! (John Wilkins, Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Drake R-8, 100-foot RW, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** PAPUA NEW GUINEA. 3290. Radio Central. 0845 Aug 22. Excellent strength with news in English at 0900 (Ian Cattermole, New Zealand, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** PERU. 5029.97, R. Los Andes, 1003. Listened again to the tape of Aug 17 log and came up with this for opening anouncement at 1003: "Desde Huamachuco, capital(?) de los Andes, en la cumbre de la libertad(?), para el oriente, norte y centro del Perú, Radio Los Andes presenta 'Cantaré(?) de Mi Pueblo'..." (John Wilkins, Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Drake R-8, 100-foot RW, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** PORTUGAL. Re: [BDXC-UK] RDP spurious signals on 19 mb. Also heard on 22/8/2003 on 13554.1 kHz at 1950-2005 UT with a very FM- y AM signal. ID on the hour (Mark Hattam, London, England, Aug 22 via Wolfgang Bueschel, DXLD) Hi Mark, same transmitter I guess, spur signals 166 kHz away from both sides of fundamental 13720: at 2020 UT football transmission in progress, also disturbed signal on 13554 and 13886 kHz. 73 wb df5sx (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, Aug 22, DX LISTENING DGIEST) ** SLOVENIA. Last night 8/21 was great! I`ve never known a night like it for MW harmonics! Although later the aurora hit and it did blow out. E.g.: 1854 kHz, Slovensko R, (2 x 927), 2017 UT (Tim Bucknall, UK, harmonics yahoogroup via DXLD) ** SPAIN. Pals radio station Hi! It's Antoni Bernabe, the "owner" of the web about the closed radio station in Spain. I found your page, http://www.worldofradio.com/dxld3042.txt and it's very interesting; have not read all, but I was surprised of seeing my name :) From your txt I copied what follows: ------------------------------------- You can also view another interesting story about Pals, compiled by Antoni Bernabe, Spain, who tells us that it's at http://www.arbe-inc.com/ralib/radio-liberty.html (Bob Padula, Australia, EDXP March 13 via DXLD) Beware: MIDI launches automatically (gh, DXLD) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- I'd like if you could make some corrections (if you are in Alcatraz, may be I'll join you too when IBB's team see my site :D:D :) ). First I modified the problem with the midis; I'm very sorry for the inconveniences, but this www world is new for me, and some visitors (one) asked me to correct it, as not all the people have ADSL (256K internet). Last June I did a lot of improvements in the page, and currently I'm doing more, as well as new pics, and the most important, now it's necessary to download the files, they are not automatic, audio and the videos I uploaded (videos have not good quality, but it was too big the size for the best quality). The page is being improved, not as quick as I'd like, but I have to work too to eat, you understand, are'nt you? :). I'd appreciate very much your criticizes, the bad and the worses, just remember that some improvements are being done. In update 13, at end of September (I hope) will be on the net. The other news is the domain, now I have a paid server, not the best (the best is too expensive for me), but much better which I had before (free server), and new domain, the other redirects to the new, which is http://www.radioliberty.org The server you have the link to is from my "entrerprise", but the space was finally not enough (14 Mb), currently I have uploaded about 30 Mb between pics (23 Mb) and video and audio files (6). (I know, 30-6=24, but +/- one Mb it's for the html files) The last news is that the land will be kept green, is what people here want, but my black future sees houses and more houses there, very sad :( I do not steal more time to you, Only wanted you to know this. Thanks, (Antoni Bernabe, Spain, Aug 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SRI LANKA. 7302.5 [new crystal, ex-7300 even]. SLBC Ekala. Roland in the PHL noted this station at 1320-1420 in Hindi and 24332, best in usb mode. Strong splatter from 7295 RTM Kajang, Malaysia (Roland Schulze, Mangaldan Pangasinan, Philippines, BC-DX Aug 3 via Wolfgang Bueschel, DXLD) ** THAILAND. Reuters.com - BANNING SAUCY SONGS FROM THE AIRWAVES http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=oddlyEnoughNews&storyID=3322119&fromEmail=true Another case of censoring playlists, this time in Thailand. 73- (Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** UGANDA. LEGISLATORS SAID OPPOSED TO 200M-SHILLING ARMY RADIO PROJECT | Text of report by Ugandan newspaper The New Vision web site on 23 August Members of the Defence and Internal Affairs Committee have opposed the army's plan of setting up a 200m-shilling radio when the ordinary soldiers' welfare remains inadequate. They said although the radio was necessary to inform, educate and entertain the officers, it was not a priority as one cannot entertain hungry and demoralized people. "When you look at that suggestion of the 200m-shilling army radio, considering the relationship between the army and the people in the north, who will listen to the radio? Why isn't this money put on soldiers' welfare instead," asked Nyombi Tembo (Kassanda south). The MPs were on Tuesday [19 August] meeting over the Ministry of Defence policy statement. They proposed that since the radio project can be deferred, the money should instead be re-allocated to improving ordinary soldiers' welfare, buying descent uniforms and on food. "The army is at liberty to use Radio Uganda and other existing radios. The way I understand it is that the radio was going to target the ordinary soldier. If it is an army radio, what additional values is it going to contribute? The money should go to welfare," said chairman Simon Mayende. The MPs also questioned the army's request for 21bn shillings under classified expenditure. Source: The New Vision web site, Kampala, in English 23 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** U K. BBC IS BIGGEST BULLY, SAYS NUJ SURVEY Ciar Byrne Friday August 22, 2003 Broadcast journalists suffer more bullying than any other sector of the media and the BBC is the worst culprit by far, according to research by the National Union of Journalists. . . http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,1027658,00.html (via Jilly Dybka, KF4ZEO, DXLD) ** U K. DATE SET FOR TOWERS' DEMOLITION Two radio towers left over from the Cold War are due to be felled once and for all next week when a second attempt is made to blow them up. The 600-ft tall masts and towers of the former British Intelligence radio station at Criggion, ten miles from Welshpool, were due to be demolished last weekend. But the explosive action was only partially successful because people coming to watch the blast stood too close to the site. Contractors Alan Campbell Group had considered toppling the remaining two towers over the Bank Holiday weekend but have now decided to carry out the demolition on Wednesday. Spy station's heyday British Telecom decided to demolish all the masts - used to eavesdrop on Soviet radio signals during the Cold War - after a contract by the government to use the station ended in March. Criggion was built during World War II and its heyday was in the 1960s but after the fall of Communism in the 1990s the station became surplus to requirements. Three masts have already been demolished and another tower toppled over on Tuesday. Story from BBC NEWS: http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/wales/mid/3176253.stm Published: 2003/08/23 14:17:11 GMT (c) BBC MMIII (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) {See 3-153 for correxions!} ** UNITED NATIONS. AHEAD OF INFORMATION SUMMIT, U.N. SHOULD EXAMINE ITSELF by Barbara Crossette, U.N. Notebook | July 21, 2003 from UN Wire UNITED NATIONS --- In December, a grandly titled World Summit on the Information Society will confront the technical (and, hopefully, political) gaps that keep so many of the world's people in perpetual darkness, deprived of the basic knowledge they need to change the course of nations, or just their own lives. A good place for member countries to start fixing things might be in the United Nations itself. … Now, about those radio programs. The enormous U.N. system in all its diversity and activity has the resources to offer only one 15-minute news-and-features program from Monday to Friday, at about midday (5:30 p.m. GMT), which stations around the world may air then or later, free of charge. Other special programs in a range of languages are produced when possible, though the radio section has no travel budget or money to do field reporting, unless it can piggyback on someone else's trip. Yet radio remains the main source of information for several billion people in the developing world, and the use of radio in peacekeeping missions (paid for by other budgets) has proved to be very popular as a calming, credible source of information in disturbed areas. The daily U.N. radio program, in the six official U.N. languages, can cover some but not all of the day's news, given its early release time. Who hears it? Well, because shift work is not allowed at U.N. radio, Asians generally don't, because the news is too late the first day and stale the next. African stations cannot always use the news broadcasts because their slow Internet systems make downloading too time-consuming, if there is any Internet access at all. In some cases, radio engineers must telephone African stations to deliver programs manually over phone lines. On the other hand, Spanish-language programs are apparently more successful in reaching their target audiences, and are reported to have a wide following in Latin America. U.N. radio has had problems with its software, which it cannot afford to replace. Its staff has to commute between eighth floor offices and basement studios to create and record programs. It has been estimated that it would cost about $1 million to upgrade to an effective contemporary radio service. That much money will never materialize at current budget levels and no large international corporation has stepped up to donate new equipment. The entire public information division -- including the radio operation, a talented video team reduced mostly to making archival footage and the very busy office of the secretary general's spokesman, which also monitors the Security Council and all other aspects of U.N. work for daily briefings and press statements -- operates on a current budget of $146 million spread over two years. Most of that, about $110 million, goes to pay a staff of 754 people, a large number of whom are in jobs protected against layoffs, officials say. That leaves $18 million a year for everything else, from buying new equipment and to meeting crisis needs, like promoting the voice of the United Nations in the wake of the 9/11 attacks on the United States... http://www.theatlantic.com/foreign/unwire/crossette2003-07-28.htm (via Jilly Dybka, KF4ZEO, DXLD) ** U S A. Re: 9495, jamming WHRI: It`s a whine like sound. Might be digital. But it`s unusual that it closed shortly after WHRI (LOU Johnson, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [and non]. This week`s Common Ground (heard Fri 22nd at 1706 UT on KWGS) starts off with two reports, first on Radio/TV Martí and second on VOA`s Zimbabwe service. Later on, Guatemala Eco Radio (a program --- did they ever mention the station, let alone the frequency? See GUATEMALA), Beijing Talk Radio (a farang does a personal-advice call-in), and China Internet. Segments may be listened to in mp3 or real, and transcripts available later. Here`s the Public Radio Fan page about the show: http://www.publicradiofan.com/cgi-bin/program.pl?programid=487 And the shows`s own site: http://www.commongroundradio.org/ (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. As we drove through St Louis, enjoyed WEW-770; they have a very impressive live-local format of nostalgia, honoring requests, warm and person to person. They even called me on the air to say they were having trouble finding my request. Per web it`s daytime only, but heard at 9 pm, and on air 24 hours? (George S. Thurman, MO, Aug 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) NRC AM log 2002y says they stay on until sunset in New York, and also have pre-sunrise authority (gh) ** U S A. A MESSAGE LOUD AND CLEAR --- Today`s editorial . . .The Radio Broadcasting Preservation Act of 2000 contains provisions that would prevent the FCC from considering applications from organizations who had previously been unlicensed broadcasters. Radio free brattleboro, therefore, has little choice but to either allow itself to be muzzled, or take its mandate from the people who own the airwaves. It has made the right choice, and its 10-watt signal today sends the message loud and clear. . . http://www.reformer.com/Stories/0,1413,102~8854~1585118,00.html (Aug 22 via Artie Bigley, DXLD) rfb --- they`re baaack By Daniel Barlow, Reformer Staff BRATTLEBORO -- With the flick of a few switches, the Ramones' "We Want the Airwaves" blasted out across the 107.9 FM frequency Friday evening and radio free brattleboro returned to the local airwaves. . . http://www.reformer.com/Stories/0,1413,102~8860~1587124,00.html (Aug 23 via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. FCC TO EXAMINE LOCAL BROADCAST PRESENCE Commissioner says study should have come before changes JONATHAN D. SALANT, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON -- The Federal Communications Commission will begin looking at how television and radio stations can best serve their communities, the agency's chairman said Wednesday. Michael Powell's announcement follows intense criticism by lawmakers and others of the FCC's decision to loosen broadcast ownership rules. Powell, the driving force behind the new rules that take effect next month, sought to play down concerns the changes would promote mergers and leave a few big companies controlling the vast majority of stations. "We heard the voice of public concern loud and clear, that localism remains a core concern of our public," Powell said. "And thus, I think it's time the commission address it head on." He plans to appoint a task force to study the issue, hold public hearings and report back within a year. In addition, the commission will ask for comments on rules designed to promote local programming, including looking at the practice of making a newscast sound local despite being aired from another city. Powell said the FCC would speed the licensing of noncommercial, low- power FM radio stations, which are designed to feature local programming. Commissioner Michael Copps, one of two Democrats on the five-member FCC, said the study should have been done before the FCC approved the rules. "You cannot use a blanket of study to quell the fire of public outrage about increasing control of the public's airwaves by fewer and fewer conglomerates," Copps said. "What if we complete these studies and find out that localism is not served by consolidation? It will be too late." The FCC voted 3-2 along party lines in June to overhaul ownership rules for newspapers and television and radio stations. The changes would allow a single company to own television stations reaching 45 percent of the nation's viewers -- compared with 35 percent before -- and to own newspapers and broadcast outlets in the same city. Smaller broadcasters, network affiliates, consumer groups and others are concerned the new limit will allow the networks to gobble up more stations and limit local control of programming. Lawmakers from both parties are pushing to roll back some or all the changes. Over Bush administration objections, the House voted 400-21 last month to roll back the rules. Powell said the question of how to best serve communities is best addressed separately rather than in the ownership rules. "Ownership rules are actually a very clumsy way to get at some of the things that consumers are actually concerned about," Powell said. Critics said Powell's proposal was disingenuous. "This is absurd on the face of it," said Jeff Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy, an advocacy group. "This is a man who spent 18 months looking at the issue. Only now, after there's a unanimous uproar, does he decide to re-examine the issue. He is trying to shore up his support in Congress." But Powell said he was not responding to criticism of the new ownership rules. "It is not a political strategy," he said. "It is an effort to be responsive to consumers." But a spokesman for the National Association of Broadcasters said the trade group welcomes "a review of the public service performed day in and day out by free, over-the-air broadcasters." Over the years the FCC has rolled back requirements that broadcast owners said handcuffed them. In the 1980s, the FCC said radio and television stations no longer had to air a certain amount of nonentertainment shows, such as news, public affairs or educational programming. The commission also abolished the Fairness Doctrine, which required broadcasters to air both sides of controversial issues. Powell pledged to speed up licensing of low-power FM stations, which broadcast with 100 watts of power and measure their listening audience by blocks rather than regions. While consumer advocacy groups praised the effort, they said the low- power stations serve neighborhoods, schools, and local groups, and can't compete with 50,000 watt commercial broadcasters. "Powell is giving away the store and offering the public some crumbs," Chester said. ©2003 The Olympian, Olympia WA (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** U S A. FCC LAUNCHES INITIATIVE TO PROMOTE LOCAL BROADCASTING By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Federal Communications Commission Chairman Michael Powell announced Wednesday a series of initiatives aimed at ensuring broadcasters serve the communities in which they operate. The move comes amid intense criticism of the FCC's decision in June to revamp media ownership rules, which opponents said would promote more mergers and limit local programming. "We've heard the voice of public concern loud and clear," Powell said in a statement. "Many fear the effect that large, out-of-state media conglomerates have on the media landscape." Powell said the FCC will form a task force that will make recommendations to the commission within a year on promoting localism in broadcasting. The FCC also will speed up the licensing of hundreds of low-powered radio stations, often run by churches, community groups and schools. And Powell directed his agency's staff to begin an inquiry seeking comment on FCC rules aimed at promoting localism. Powell, a champion of deregulation who critics say is too pro-big business, led the Republican dominated FCC's effort to ease decades- old rules governing ownership of newspapers and television and radio stations. The 3-2 party-line vote on June 2 approved changes that allow individual companies to own TV stations reaching nearly half the nation's viewers and combinations of newspapers and broadcast outlets in the same area. The vote prompted criticism from a wide range of groups and legal challenges. Opponents say the relaxed rules could lead to a handful of big companies controlling the majority of what people see, hear and read. Lawmakers from both parties are pushing to roll back some or all of the changes, a fight that's expected to heat up when Congress returns from its August recess. Powell said the new initiative is "an honest attempt to address the concerns raised by the public about localism during the media ownership proceeding. It is neither hollow nor political." The FCC review leading up to the ownership rules vote divided the commission, with Powell rejecting repeated requests from Democratic commissioners Michael Copps and Jonathan Adelstein to delay the vote to allow for more public comment on the impact of media concentration. Reaching out to his fellow commissioners, Powell said his colleagues "have consistently shown a deep and unwavering commitment" to advancing local views in broadcasting. He said, "I am optimistic that we will reach consensus on how the FCC can promote localism." Powell said the localism task force will hold its first meeting in September and the public may attend. Powell first discussed his new initiative Monday in Aspen, Colo. with a surprise announcement at a summit for technology and telecommunications leaders from industry and government. Mel Karmazin, president of media giant Viacom Inc., said at the summit's final event on Tuesday that broadcasters already do a good job of presenting viewpoints and that "to be successful you have to serve the local community." Major media companies said changes to the ownership rules were needed because the old regulations hindered their ability to grow and compete in a market altered by cable television, satellite broadcasts and the Internet. The government adopted the ownership rules between 1941 and 1975 to encourage competition and prevent monopoly control of the media. In 1996, Congress required the FCC to review the rules every two years and repeal or modify any regulation determined no longer in the public interest. John Rethorst (New York Times, August 20, 2003 via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. LATE NIGHT SHOWS FORCED TO FACE FACTS By Lisa de Moraes. Saturday, August 23, 2003; Page C01 "The Late Late Show With Craig Kilborn" did a very funny bit this week in which they closed-captioned Arnold Schwarzenegger's first campaign ad for those of us who have trouble understanding the Austrian native: "Dis hysterical erection his come bout becuz deres a tree men dos dis connect between da peep hole of Cauliflower and da readers of Cauliflower. . . ." http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A34642-2003Aug22?language=printer (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. CLASSICAL MUSIC INTEREST IS LOSING STEAM BUT NOT AT SEATTLE'S KING-FM Radio Beat: By BILL VIRGIN, SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER If you were trying to pick a radio format with which to snare a piece of the market, you might choose some flavor of contemporary pop or rock, perhaps country, or you might opt for talk. Classical would seem to be the ticket to distant also-ran. Classical record sales, never a big portion of the overall market to start with, have slipped further. Fewer orchestras syndicate their concerts for broadcast. The industry publication M Street Database counts 32 commercial classical stations, down from 45 10 years ago. Non-commercial stations have dropped from 267 a decade ago to 126. But then there's Seattle's KING-FM (98.1), never the top-rated station in this market but certainly no straggler either; in the spring Arbitron book it ranked 12th out of 31 stations (it was eighth in the winter book). Peter Newman, who is retiring at the end of this month after 26 years at the station, including the job of program director since 1985, says those classical stations that remain "are around for very specific reasons, because they make sense financially or they fulfill the goals of the ownership." In KING's case that means distributing profits to its owners, the Seattle Symphony, Seattle Opera and Artsfund (the former Corporate Council for the Arts), nearly $4.8 million since the station was spun off by the Bullitt family in 1994. Of course, that role wouldn't be of much value if KING's audience was dwindling. Newman says that doesn't appear to be happening. The average age of listenership, at 50, hasn't increased during the last decade, Newman says. "People don't come to classical music generally until they get into their 30s." KING-FM has been trying to make sure it attracts and retains classical music fans. One is through balancing the playlist between the standard repertoire and less familiar composers and pieces. "Our station and others are programmed more deliberately," he says. "In the past, everyone came in, did their shift, and if the same piece of music played twice in a day, no one cared. We're more careful in controlling the rotation." KING's other trademark is its heavy promotion of local classical music organizations. "Partly it's strategic; those groups form a lot of the support in our community," Newman says. In addition, "We get a lot of good programming." KING also has been aggressive in developing Internet broadcasting and often shows up on national surveys of top Webcasting stations. "I think the station is in pretty stable shape," Newman says (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. DANA M. RAYMOND, PATENT LAWYER, DIES AT 89 By DOUGLAS MARTIN, The New York Times, August 20, 2003 Dana Merriam Raymond, a patent lawyer who won or achieved settlements in 21 lawsuits filed by the inventor of FM radio against companies that had denied him credit and compensation, died on Aug. 3 at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan. He was 89. Mr. Raymond represented Edwin Howard Armstrong, an electrical engineer who invented the basic electronic circuits underlying modern radio, television and radar, including wideband frequency modulation, known as FM radio. Though Mr. Armstrong's breakthroughs are sometimes said to have exceeded Edison's, the Radio Corporation of America and its broadcasting subsidiary, the National Broadcasting Company, challenged his claim to having invented FM in a court case filed in 1948. The case was one factor that drove Mr. Armstrong to commit suicide in January 1954. The next January, Mr. Armstrong's estate, under the control of his wife, Marion, settled with RCA and NBC for a payment of $1 million. Mr. Raymond worked on that case as a young assistant to Alfred McCormack at the law firm of Cravath, Swaine & Moore. Mr. Raymond left to join what was then Brumbaugh, Graves, Free & Donahue, which later became Brumbaugh, Graves, Donahue & Raymond. It merged into the firm of Baker Botts in 1997. Though they were then in different firms, Mr. Raymond and Mr. McCormack together prepared and filed suits on behalf of the Armstrong estate against 21 other companies that they contended had refused to give Mr. Armstrong proper credit for FM radio. Two years later, Mr. McCormack died. Mrs. Armstrong wanted Mr. Raymond to continue the battle. Cravath remained as co-counsel. According to a biography of Mr. Armstrong by Lawrence Lessing, "Man of High Fidelity: Edwin Howard Armstrong," Mr. Raymond brought a strong background in scientific issues, particularly physics, to the case. Mr. Lessing described him as "soft spoken and studious" and "a shrewd counselor." Mr. Raymond's first priority, according to the book, was not to reveal how close to insolvency Mr. Armstrong had left his estate, knowing that this knowledge would weaken his position in any settlement talks. Second, he wanted to make a show of strength to bolster negotiations. He knew that the RCA settlement could be seen as "a paternalistic gesture, designed to paper over a messy situation." Though they could legally have asked for triple royalties on all FM apparatus manufactured and sold from 1940 to 1950, Mr. Raymond and Mrs. Armstrong decided that the smarter course of action was to pursue only reasonable claims based on the standard royalty paid by other companies that had acknowledged Mr. Armstrong's claims and paid him for licensing the technology. They settled with some smaller companies. The Emerson Radio and Phonograph Corporation decided to fight in court rather than settle. Mr. Raymond made a risky decision: he asked for a trial before a judge. The conventional legal wisdom was that an individual suing a large corporation should seek a jury trial. Catherine Flickinger, Mr. Raymond's daughter and a lawyer, said there were two reasons for asking for a judge. First, the science was difficult to understand. More important, the legal reasoning of a judge would set a precedent for the cases to come, while a jury verdict is considered a unique occurrence with scant future relevance. In September 1959, Judge Edmund L. Palmieri of Federal District Dourt in Manhattan found for Mr. Armstrong on all counts. An important factor was Mr. Raymond's argument that for all the years at issue, many other radio companies, including General Electric and Westinghouse, had settled and paid the same uniform royalties that Emerson was ultimately forced to pay. All but one of the remaining companies then settled, but Motorola demanded a separate trial. Mr. Raymond won in Federal District Court in Chicago in 1963 and on appeal to the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in 1967. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case. Dana Merriam Raymond was born in Manhattan on July 28, 1914, and grew up in Berkeley, Calif. He graduated from the University of California at Berkeley and from Columbia Law School. He went to work for what is now Cravath, Swaine & Moore, and was drafted into the United States Army in 1940. He was commissioned as a lieutenant and assigned to the Royal Air Force in Scotland, where he worked on the top-secret development of radar. Mr. Raymond, a chess enthusiast, specialized in the law of patents and intellectual property. He represented Dr. Charles H. Townes, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist whose work helped lead to development of the laser. He was secretary of the Armstrong Memorial Research Foundation at Columbia, which is dedicated to continuing Mr. Armstrong's work, and was a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers. Mr. Raymond's wife, the former Josephine Sheehan, died in 2000. His survivors, in addition to his daughter Ms. Flickinger, who lives in Manhattan, include two sons, Peter, of Bronxville, and John, of San Francisco, also lawyers, and seven grandchildren. Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company (via Dan Say, DXLD) ** U S A. A FINAL 73 TO K6DUE At the beginning of our newscast, we told you about the passing of a member of the Amateur Radio Newsline family. Roy Neal, K6DUE, died August 15th following heart surgery. One of the people who knew Roy best is Alan Kaul, W6RCL. Roy and Alan worked together at NBC News, and on projects benefiting amateur radio. Alan looks at the life of a man who was an institution in American broadcast journalism, as well as a driving force in amateur radio`s conquest of space: When Roy Neal, K6DUE, died last week, he was possibly the best-known ham in America. He left an indelible imprint on Amateur Radio. Roy, more than anyone else, was responsible for getting ham radio aboard manned space craft and each new mission is testament to his legacy. His efforts earned Roy awards from the Dayton Hamvention, they designated him Ham of the Year and from CQ-Magazine, which this year named Roy to the Amateur Radio Hall of Fame. He also received honors from The American Radio Relay League, and other groups and served as chairman of two key AMSAT committees. Roy was a good guy. He was my friend and colleague at NBC News. I met Roy in the 1960`s when I was working in Seattle and he came to town to report on aerospace giant Boeing. After I moved to Los Angeles and joined NBC News in the 70`s, Roy and I collaborated on a lot of news reports. As a correspondent Roy was best known for his coverage of the US Space program (he was a friend of the original astronauts) and often reported from both the launch site at Cape Canaveral and NASA Mission Control in Houston. Not many people know this but Roy was also the author of a book about America`s missile system, called The Ace In The Hole. It was written at the height of the Cold War. In the 1970`s, Roy teamed with television producer Dave Bell, W6AQ, to launch the first of several documentaries about amateur radio. Number One was a 16-minute film, Moving Up to Amateur Radio, followed a few years later by The World of Amateur Radio. Dave Bell remembers Roy as the ultimate professional: Dave Bell W6AQ: ``Of all the on-camera talent that I have known, Roy was the most assured and had the smallest ego of all of them. He was a true professional when it came to the news. Everything was always true. Everything was straight from the shoulder and there was no compromise. Roy was one of the old-school news guy. He grew up in the television business and he understood it better than anybody who is working in it today. `` In the 1980`s Roy helped convince NASA to put ham radio in Space aboard a manned flight of the Shuttle. That first ham-astronaut was Owen Garriott, W5LFL, on board STS-9. Garriott`s story of the first DXpedition in Orbit was told by Roy in the television documentary Amateur Radio`s Newest Frontier. Audio from ARNF: ``This is the story of an expedition. The story of STS-9. The Columbia. And these are the explorers: John Young - the commander. Brewster Shaw the shuttle pilot. And the scientists Dr. Ulf Merbold, Byron Lichtenberg, Robert Parker and Dr. Owen Garriott -- an Astronaut who is also Amateur Radio operator W5LFL. This is an expedition to probe the outer limits of science and Amateur Radio`s newest frontier. Roy`s next project was called SAREX - Shuttle Amateur Radio EX- periment, followed by the New World of Amateur Radio which profiled a new ham, teen-ager Kelly Howard, N6PNY. She`s now all grown up, married and has kids of her own. She fondly remembers working with Roy Neal. Kelly Lenhert (née Howard) N6PNY: It was all so exciting, but it was also overwhelming. But working with Roy made me feel so comfortable. He made me feel competent in what I could do. He took me under his wing and he was really supportive and he got me to do what I needed to do to make the film and bring out the best in me. `` Roy`s last documentary was called Ham Radio in Space. Roy`s interest was a natural fit with AMSAT. Roy`s close friend AMSAT Vice President Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, thinks of K6DUE as his mentor. Frank Bauer KA3HDO: ``One of the things that Roy taught me was how to distill information into basically sound bites, if you will. I remember one time where we had to give a presentation - at Dayton - and we had 20 minutes. I told him that I did no know how he could so that, and he said: `Frank, if I can do the whole world on the news in 30 seconds, you can do this in 20 minutes.` So Roy taught me a whole lot from an executive perspective because he was a true executive. `` Another AMSAT officer who worked closely with Roy is Robin Haighton, VE3FRH, the President of AMSAT North America. Robin Haighton VE3FRH: ``The space program itself is in good hands, but there is no doubt about it that we will miss that leveling confidence that Roy always brought to the meetings and the discussions. He made friends with everybody. The moment you met him you felt that here was a man you could trust. `` Other comments have come in from all over the world From New Zealand, the past president of NZART, Jim Meechen ZL2BHF sent his condolences. As have numerous other Newsline listeners. Another of Roy`s friends, Bob Heil, K9EID, had this to say. Bob Heil K9EID: ``I`m going to miss his spirit. He had a spirit about him that when you heard him on the air, you stopped tuning. This was something special you were listening to. And it wasn`t always the tone of his great broadcast voice. It was his spirit. He was always in an up-mode about this hobby. `` Roy was in the first generation of television newsmen who began their craft after World War Two. He started in Philadelphia and then moved to the West Coast where he helped found the NBC News bureau in Los Angeles. That was during the days of the old John Cameron Swayzee Camel News Caravan. Roy was at ease in front of a microphone, and could talk to millions of television viewers as easily as he could talk to the ham across town. On camera, he had the uncanny ability to read to time, precisely to time. When I produced updates for NBC Nightly News and Roy was the on-camera talent, I would time the newscast and tell Roy how long he would have to report the story. I`d say something like this: ``Roy, can you do it in 19 seconds?`` And Roy would always reply, ``You know I can old buddy.`` Roy liked that phrase ``old buddy. ``He used the phrase to address friends and co-workers for some time. As for the updates, Roy always got them right. He would stop talking just an instant before we`d have to switch back to the network. By the time he retired in 1986, Roy had worked out of the Los Angeles news bureau for almost 35-years. He`d probably written millions of words, and brought his audience uncountable hours of news and information. But even in retirement, Roy Neal didn`t stop doing what he did best. He was no stranger to listeners of Amateur Radio Newsline who knew him as a tireless volunteer giving freely of his own time to report the latest information, always signing off in his own stylized way. ``This is Roy Neal, K6DUE. Thanks for listening and 73.`` 73, Old Buddy _ I really hate to see you go. I`m Alan Kaul, W6RCL, reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline. Roy leaves his wife Pat, and sons Mark and David. Services were held August 19th at the Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church in High Point, North Carolina. In lieu of flowers the family requests that donations in Roy`s name be made to the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation at the Astronaut Hall of Fame. The mailing address is 6225 Vectorspace Blvd, Titusville, Florida, 32780. Please mark your envelope to the attention of Linn Le Blanc. And this final thought. Yes, we at Newsline have lost a very dear friend. More important, so has all of Amateur Radio. 73, Roy. None of us will ever forget you. (ARNewsline, W6RCL) Additional on-line reading: The Roy Neal Story: http://www.angelfire.com/tv2/broadcastpioneers/neal/neal.html ARRL: http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/08/18/101/?nc=1 ARISS: http://www.rac.ca/ariss/ CNN: http://edition.cnn.com/2003/TECH/space/08/19/neal.obit JSC Amateur Radio Club: http://www.w5rrr.org/sta-pix.html NEWSCAST CLOSE For now, with Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, at the editor`s desk, I`m Don Wilbanks, AE5DW. Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2003. All rights reserved (via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. RADIO LAW: FCC DECLINES TO RECONSIDER ITS HUMAN EXPOSURE TO RF RULES The FCC has declined to open an Inquiry into updating its human exposure to RF signals rules. In particular, the petitioner in this case wanted the Commission to consider possible health hazards not covered by the current rules, including non-thermal effects and the effects of long-term low-level RF exposure. According to the CGC Communicator the FCC dismissed the petition, arguing that any such evidence should be presented to other, more appropriate expert agencies. The Commission also noted that its current human exposure rules have recently been upheld by the Second Circuit Court of Appeals. This, in the face of similar arguments by other petitioners. The complete story is in cyberspace at http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-03-191A1.doc (CGC) (ARRL Letter Aug 22 via John Norfolk, DXLD) see also RECEIVER NEWS ** U S A. AMERICA TRIES TO CUT TOLL OF 50M MIGRATING BIRDS KILLED BY PHONE MASTS --- Paul Brown, environment correspondent Friday August 22, 2003 The Guardian A federal investigation has been launched into the plight of up to 50 million migratory birds killed each year by mobile phone and broadcast masts strung across the US. . . http://www.guardian.co.uk/usa/story/0,12271,1027336,00.html (via Jilly Dybka, KF4ZEO, DXLD) ** URUGUAY. INFO Y RELACION SOBRE ONDAS CORTAS EN URUGUAY Amigos y colegas, Con cierta tardanza, seguramente debido a razones burocráticas, he recibido contestación por (correo certificado y aviso de retorno) de parte de URSEC, autoridad de las radiocomunicaciones en el Uruguay a mis preguntas sobre la situación oficial de algunas emisoras operando en Onda Corta en mi país, (Expediente. Nº 2003/1/1059.-Inf. RDF 167/2003.) Montevideo, 24 de julio de 2003.- La primera nota reza de la siguiente manera: "U R S E C Unidad Reguladora de Servicios de Comunicaciones DIVISIÓN TÉCNICA.- DEPARTAMENTO RADIODIFUSIÓN.- Exp. Nº 2003/1/1059.-Inf. RDF 167/2003. Montevideo, 24 de julio de 2003.- Con referencia a emisora CXA61, 6,045 MHz. R. Sarandí Sport corresponde informar que se encuentra coordinada con 2,5 kw y operando con menor potencia por el momento.– La emisora Ciudad de Montevideo, coordinado con 10 kw y operando con menor potencia.– Con referencia a 31 metros para operar desde Artigas, La Voz de Artigas, hasta el momento no se han adjudicado frecuencias en esa banda.– Se adjunta listados de emisoras y potencias.– Notifíquese a interesado.–" FIRMAS Y SELLO, Sr. Alain Núñez González, Director División Técnica y otra persona de apellido Iglesias, demás ilegible. Se recuerda que LV de Artigas menciona en su sitio web, el canal de 31m. Y R. Sarandí Sport dijo tener algo menos de 8 KW. Voy a hablar de nuevo con el técnico en los próximos días. -- Adjunto otra hoja con la lista de frecuencias, potencias y azimuth de antena, son los canales registrados a emisoras de onda corta en Uruguay. Téngase presente que sólo algunas operan/operaron efectivamente. Algunas nunca salieron al aire. Y que las potencias son las coordinadas. URUGUAY POTENCIAS DE EMISORAS ONDA CORTA FRECUENCIA ESTACION POTENCIA AZIMUTH 6000.0 MONTEVIDEO 5.0 40 6010.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 ND 6035.0 MONTEVIDEO 1.0 ND 6045.0 MONTEVIDEO 2.5 ND 6055.0 MONTEVIDEO 5.0 40 6075.0 ARTIGAS 2.5 ND 6115.0 MONTEVIDEO 5.0 10 6125.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 320 6125.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 320 6140.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 ND 6155.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 10 6170.0 MONTEVIDEO 1.0 ND 9515.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 ND 9515.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 38 9595.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 349 9620.0 MONTEVIDEO 20.0 320 9620.0 MONTEVIDEO 20.0 38 9620.0 MONTEVIDEO 20.0 38 9640.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 330 9650.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 ND 9670.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 210 9670.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 50 9680.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 280 9770.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 38 11735.0 MONTEVIDEO 5.0 ND 11835.0 MONTEVIDEO 5.0 348 11835.0 MONTEVIDEO 5.0 ND 11835.0 MONTEVIDEO 5.0 348 11845.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 330 11860.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 50 11885.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 320 11885.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 38 11900.0 MONTEVIDEO 20.0 320 11900.0 MONTEVIDEO 20.0 20 11900.0 MONTEVIDEO 20.0 38 11955.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 325 15230.0 MONTEVIDEO 5.0 348 15275.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 340 15275.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 38 15275.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 340 15355.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 340 15355.0 MONTEVIDEO 10.0 50 17870.0 MONTEVIDEO 25.0 ND La última nota es una RELACIÓN DE ONDAS CORTAS DE URUGUAY (vale la misma observación que en el caso anterior, muchas de ellas están inactivas; otras nunca salieron al aire.) Repito: esta **NO ES UNA LISTA de TODAS LAS EMISORAS EN EL AIRE, SON LAS QUE ALGUNA VEZ SOLICITARON PERMISO, O SON ASIGNADAS PARA EL SODRE**. FREC. kHz. NOMBRE 49 Mts 1. 6000.00 CXA2 RADIOMUNDO 2. 6010.00 CXA142 EM. CIUDAD DE MONTEVIDEO 3. 6035.00 CXA30 RADIO NACIONAL 4. 6045.00 CXA61 RADIO SARANDÍ SPORT 5. 6055.00 CWA148 UNIVERSO 6. 6075.00 CXA3 LA VOZ DE ARTIGAS 7. 6115.00 CXA73 CLARÍN 8. 6125.00 CXA4 SODRE 9. 6140.00 CXA20 MONTECARLO 10. 6155.00 CWA155 BANDA ORIENTAL 11. 6170.00 CXA21 RADIO FÉNIX 31 Metros 12. 9515.00 CXA71 SODRE l3. 9595.00 CXA72 MONTECARLO 14. 9620.00 CXA6 SODRE 15. 9640.00 CXA8 SODRE 16. 9650.00 CXA42 EM. CIUDAD DE MONTEVIDEO 17. 9670.00 CXA24 SODRE 18. 9680.00 CXA18 SODRE 19. 9770.00 CXA9 SODRE 25 Metros 20. ll735.00 CXA7 RADIO ORIENTAL 21. ll835.00 CXA19 RADIO EL ESPECTADOR 22. 11845.00 CXA11 SODRE 23. l1860.00 CXA16 SOBRE 24. 11885.00 CXA68 SODRE 25. 11900.00 CXA10 SODRE 26. l1955.00 CXA22 SODRE 19 Metros 27. 15230.00 CXA- SODRE 28. 15275.00 CXA14 SODRE 29. 15355.00 CXA10 (23) SODRE 16 Metros 30. 17870.00 CXA54 SODRE 73 de (Horacio A. Nigro, Montevideo - URUGUAY, Aug 18, Conexión Digital via DXLD) NOTE: Most of these are NOT on the air, but it`s nice to know that if they were, all frequencies would be correct to one or to decimal places! (gh) ** VENEZUELA. Hola Glenn, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA. En días recientes me he enterado de que la popular estación juvenil Cosmos 94 (94.1 San Juan, 94.7 Isla), ha cambiado de nombre y de formato. El grupo estadounidense de medios SBC adquirió un lote de emisoras en Puerto Rico y Cosmos fue una de ellas. Ahora la estación se llama Onda 94 y transmite sólo hits del trillado TOP 40, o lo que llamamos algunos locutores independientes, "Radio Payola". Es lamentable, debido a que Cosmos 94 estaba dedicada al rock en español y a las bandas locales, las cuales carecen de algún apoyo por parte de las radiodifusoras de la Isla del Encanto. 73's y buen DX... (Adán González, Aug 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ZAMBIA. ZNBC, 4910, 0405-0417, August 21, Afropops at tune-in, presumed PSA/announcement mentioning "Commission", "Zambia", "20 August" and a tentative web address, crc.(zm?).com. Announcer with local time (6:14 AM) and back to music. Strong, clear signal. I tried the "tentative" web address listed above, but I must have heard incorrectly, as it leads nowhere. A quick check at allafrica.com under "Zambia" shows a news article, posted August 20, regarding the CRC, Constitution Review Commission. No web address though (Scott R. Barbour Jr, NH, August 21, DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. 5006: I think that unID carrier on 5006.0 kHz which appeared on DXLD 3-139 might be JG2XA. It was reported by Mr. Akabayashi in DXLD 1-108. JG2XA is still on the air and I have noticed steady carrier on 5006.0 kHz (Takeshi Sejimo, Overseas Charge Secretary, Radio Nuevo Mundo, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ A friend gave me an unsolicited subscription to Maxim, and I`ve been racking my brain trying to figure out what it has to do with DX, as I feverishly leaf through it every month vainly searching for interesting and relevant articles, among all the skinny nippleless nymphs and perfume pages, but now I finally know: --- HOW TO BUILD A RADIO 1. Get Loopy --- In addition to carcinogens and B.O., the air in your house is full of radio waves. ``All you need is an antenna to capture them, a coil to resonate them, and a rectifier to translate them,`` promises Rebecca the Crystal Queen ruler of the 1,000 member Xtal Set Society. Polish off some delicious Quaker Oats, then punch four holes in the cylinder: one in the lid, one in the base, one on the side an inch from the top, and one on the opposite side an inch from the bottom. String plastic-coated 24-gauge wire through the lid and out the top hole (fig. 1), then loop the wire around the container (fig. 2). Every five turns, strip an inch of insulation and twist it into an eyelet (fig. 3). Feed the last 25 feet into the can and out the base (fig. 4). The sound waves [sic!] are energy enough, so unlike your girlfriend`s orgasm, it requires no batteries! 2. Get Wired --- For the rectifier, get your hands on some high- impedance crystal earplugs. (This and other parts are available at http://midnightscience.com or any geek-friendly electronics store.) Cut off the metal plug, separate the two wires, and strip off an inch of insulation. Solder a 47,000-ohm resistor between the wires to regular energy flow. Clip a 1N34a germanium diode to one end to insulate the audible part of the sound wave from the useless inaudible parts. Strip off a section of the wire where it exists the container - -- that`s your ground wire --- and attach one end of the resistor to that section with another alligator clip. Warn the neighbors --- you`re about to rock the hizzouse! [?] 3. Get Down --- String your antenna --- about 50 feet of wire coming from the top of the cylinder --- out a window and tie it up high, far away from power lines. Connect the 25 feet of ground wire to a cold- water pipe --- your bong won`t do the trick, Cheech. If you didn`t screw things up, you should be jamming to the works of Bach and Limbaugh in no time. Tune your unit by attaching the tip of the diode to the eyelets with a clip (fig. 7) and repositioning the antenna. Reception will vary according to the position of the radio and the time of day, and there`s no way to guarantee which waves you`ll catch. ``You can usually get one to three stations,`` Her Royal Majesty says. ``The longer your antenna, the more you`ll pick up.`` Ain`t that just always the way! Very Technical Specifications: Total Cost: $10-$15 Tools: Utility knife, wire cutters, soldeirng iron, solder, wire strippers, strippers Difficulty: easy listening out of hard rock (Maxim, Sept 2003, page 62, q.v. for the missing figures 5 and 6, via gh DXLD) NEW SANGEAN WOODEN RADIO For everyone`s information, just found this new review. It`s only two days old! It looks like Sangean is coming out with a new radio. It looks pretty good too. Something unique is that there is a user feedback form so you can send a message to the CEO of Sangean. This is a must read for everyone intersted [sic] in radio. The radio won`t even be released for another 2 months. http://www.radiolabs.com/Articles/woodradio.html Just thought I would let everyone know! Ciao! Lee (Lee Marcus, rec.radio.shortwave August 22 via John Norfolk, DXLD) It appears to be a small analog AM/FM radio, although one photograph shows it with longwave! (John Norfolk, DXLD) BLACKOUT RUN ON GRUNDIGS Eton Corporation, the leading developer and distributor of shortwave radios under the Grundig brand name, today announced an immediate surge in demand for its products due to yesterday's blackout in parts of the Northeast region, the largest power outage in North American history. A rush on retailers for disaster preparedness supplies has prompted the company to arrange immediate shipments of its self- powered shortwave radio to retailers in the affected states. . . http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/030815/sff044_1.html (via Jilly Dybka, KF4ZEO, DXLD) BLOOD FLOW TO BRAIN CHANGES WITH RADIO-WAVE EXPOSURE TOKYO, Aug. 19 (Kyodo) -- Japanese researchers said Tuesday they have found that blood flow in the brains of people who complain of irritation from electromagnetic waves changes when they are exposed to such waves from appliances such as cell phones and power lines. The research group measured the changes in the amount of blood flow in 10 people, five of whom have symptoms of hypersensitivity to electromagnetic waves. They found that the brain's blood flow in those with the hypersensitivity fluctuated with exposure to the waves. The findings are expected to contribute to understanding the symptoms, such as headaches and fatigue, for which the causal relationship with electromagnetic waves remains unknown. The researchers believe the symptoms were caused either because the electromagnetic waves disrupted the nerve system and thus caused changes in the blood flow, or that the ability to maintain the brain's blood flow at a certain level was reduced. The research involved Ko Sakabe of the Kitasato Institute Hospital and the nongovernmental environment organization Japan Offspring Fund. Many people with irritations linked to electromagnetic waves also have problems moving their eyeballs and abnormality in their pupils' reaction to light. "We want to conduct further research with more cases and higher precision," Sakabe said. There has so far been no method to test for hypersensitivity to electromagnetic waves. One indicator is that symptoms disappear or improve as patients distance themselves from the environment affected by the waves. In some cases, factors other than electromagnetic waves were said to be the cause of the illnesses (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) See also USA DRM +++ DIGITAL RADIO MONDIALE Christian Vision will be conducting special DRM transmissions to HFCC in Tromso, Norway on 25th, 26th, 27th August. The transmission parameters are as follows: Time 1300-1400 UT Freq 11675 kHz Site Rampisham Azimuth 33 deg Antenna 4/4/.8 ? Power 33kW Target northern Norway Language English ("The Voice"). The regular Monday transmission to Europe 1000-1100 will be suspended next week. Don't forget that the latest DRM schedule is always available at http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/html/drm_schedule.html DRM AND WORLD DAB FORUM TO MAKE JOINT ANNOUNCEMENT AT IFA 2003 The leaders of digital radio organisations Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM) and the World DAB Forum will make a joint announcement at IFA 2003, the world's largest consumer electronics event. World DAB Forum President Annika Nyberg will join DRM Chairman Peter Senger during a portion of DRM's August 30th press conference in the Technisch- Wissenschaftliches-Forum (TWF) for a special announcement. The press conference begins at 1300 local time in the TWF at IFA 2003 in the Messe Berlin. [I have no idea what the announcement is about, but we will publish details as soon as possible after the event.] (Andy Sennitt, Media Network newsletter Aug 22, Radio Netherlands via DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ [CUMBRE DX] PROPAGATION REPORT One M class flare to note this week on Aug 19 causing a fadeout over Central Africa. Otherwise the sun has been fairly quiet. Solar wind speed declined on Aug 16 before a shock in the solar wind at 1342 Aug 17 due to a Coronal Mass Ejection. This caused brief active/storm levels in the geomagnetic field followed by a predominantly southward bias to the solar wind which kept levels active through until Aug 19. This led to significant depressions in the MUF at mid-high latitudes. Another coronal hole windstream started to impact the earth yesterday leading to further increased geomagnetic activity. IPS Geomagnetic Warning 39 was issued on 21 August and is current for interval 21-23 August. A rise in geomagnetic activity to minor storm, with some stations recording isolated major storm periods, today was due to a slightly earlier than expected start of the predicted coronal hole effect. The geomagnetic activity is expected to remain enhanced to 'active to minor storm' levels during the next two days. Conditions are expected to remain disturbed through until Aug 30. Prepared using data from http://www.ips.gov.au (Richard Jary, SA, Aug 22, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) QST de W1AW To all radio amateurs PROPAGATION FORECAST BULLETIN 34 ARLP034 From Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, WA August 22, 2003 Sunspot numbers down 19%, solar flux down 7%, and the planetary A index up 42%; Could it be any worse for HF operators? Well yes, it could, but those percentages reflect the change in average daily indices from last week to this week. What could be worse of course are zero sunspots with solar flux around 70 or lower, which is what we were seeing about seven years ago at the bottom of the solar cycle. For an example of this, look back to Propagation Forecast Bulletin ARLP042 dated October 11, 1996 at http://www.arrl.org/w1aw/prop/1996-arlp042.html The sunspot number was a flat 0 for every day of that week, and average solar flux was 68.6. What does that mean for HF propagation? Run the free W6ELprop software available from http://www.qsl.net/w6elprop/ Run one copy for August 22 with a solar flux of 68.6, and another copy with a flux value of 121.7. In my comparison, in each instance I ran a path from Dallas to Germany. The signal strength on the path with the lower values showed about the same signal levels for 40 meters, but the path reliability rating was much lower. Looking at 20 meters, the path seems to close about 90 minutes earlier on the one using the lower flux value. It is fun to run these comparisons over different paths and seasons. Without any doubt the day most disturbed by geomagnetic storms this week was Monday, August 18, when the planetary A index was 86 and the planetary K index was 8 during one three-hour period, 7 during another, and 6 during three other periods. This indicates a severe geomagnetic storm. This kind of thing gets worse as one goes toward either pole, and in Fairbanks, Alaska the College A index was 132. The College K index was 8 during two periods, 7 during three periods, and 4, 5 and 6 in the other three. This is why many Alaskan amateur radio operators complain of long periods when they can`t seem to hear or work anyone or anything. The Monday storm began around 0100z when the interplanetary magnetic field tipped to the south near earth. This makes the earth vulnerable to the effects of any solar wind or flare activity. A solar flare erupted on the sun on August 19 at 2005z, and this pushed a strong coronal mass ejection toward earth. The forecast from the U.S. Air Force for planetary A index was adjusted upward on Thursday, August 21 after the initial one at 2104z. That earlier one predicted a planetary A index of 30 for Friday, which is quite high. Six hours and twenty minutes later a new forecast was released which predicts Friday`s planetary A index at 50. Saturday is predicted at 30, and Sunday, Monday and Tuesday all show the same planetary A index of 25. Predicted solar flux for Friday, August 22 is 115, and 110 is the value for Saturday through Tuesday, after which the number is expected to head higher. I received several emails last week asking about any correlation between the widespread power blackout and space weather. This seems unlikely because conditions were actually rather mild during that time. But a solar flare is a natural thing to consider during a massive power outage, since a big flare on March 6, 1989 brought down an electric power grid in Canada. One who wrote to ask about this was Tim Anderson, AG4XM of Covington, Kentucky. He sent this article about space weather and the effects upon power grids: http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/eiskappenman.html David Moore of Morro Bay, California sent an article about an 11-year cycle in which the sun`s magnetic poles reverse. Read all about it at http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=12383 For more information on propagation and an explanation of the numbers used in this bulletin see the Propagation page on the ARRL Web site at http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/propagation.html Sunspot numbers for August 14 through 20 were 108, 86, 92, 113, 104, 77, and 62, with a mean of 91.7. 10.7 cm flux was 129.7, 131.4, 126.9, 119.3, 115.9, 116.7, and 111.8, with a mean of 121.7. Estimated planetary A indices were 18, 14, 11, 15, 86, 21, and 15, with a mean of 25.7. Copyright © 2003, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved. (ARRL via John Norfolk, DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-151, August 21, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3h.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1196: RFPI: Sat 0130, 0800, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 on 7445 [nominal times subject to delay or pre- emption] WWCR: Sat 1030, Sun 0230 on 5070, 0630 on 3210, Wed 0930 on 9475 WRMI: Sat & Sun 1800+ on 15725 WINB: Sun 0031 on 12160 WBCQ: Mon 0415 on 7415 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [NO LOW VERSION THIS WEEK; SORRY] [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1196h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1196h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1196.html I AM NOT REPONSIBLE for any viruses you may be getting, spoofing one of my hotmail accounts as sender!!! Judging from all the bounces I am getting, further filling up my accounts with spam, making them almost unusable, a lot of these are going out, presumably the latest virus sobig. The entire message typically runs around 100K, whatever the subject may be, which won`t have any relevance to what you might really get from me. I do not believe my own computer is infected. One story about this: http://www.msnbc.com/news/955498.asp Preferably contact me via one of my yahoo accounts, such as the one announced on World of Radio. You are not likely to get an original message from me at hotmail, tho a reply might come from there if that`s where you sent yours (gh) UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIALS Got you, via the High Version but with a lot of interruptions, sorry to hear of your Recording Troubles, but as I believe you would say over there, 'I sure hope you will be back on Low Stream Next week'. (Ken Fletcher 2130UTC=2230UTC+1 August 21st 2003) Siempre trato de leerlo completo. Es sin duda un EXCELENTE MATERIAL para todo diexista que se respete. Saludos, (Adán González, Catia La Mar, Venezuela) ** ANTARCTICA. 15476 kHz - LRA36, Radio Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel En relación al comentario de que el pasado lunes 18 del presente, LRA36 no fue escuchada, les puedo confirmar que efectivamente la emisora estuvo fuera del aire ese día. Esto fue debido a que se estuvo trabajando en la reparación de la antena; no se efectuaron emisiones durante ese día. Las transmisiones de LRA36 están sujetas en ciertos momentos a las crudas condiciones climáticas del Territorio Antártico, en donde soplan rafagas de hasta 360 kms/hora; lo que hace en esos momentos, se retire la antena y se cambie su posición para que no sea destruída, razón por la que queda fuera del aire temporalmente. Inclusive, en esos momentos de fuertes vientos, el personal no puede salir siquiera de sus viviendas por razones obvias (Gabriel Iván Barrera, Conexión Digital via WORLD OF RADIO 1196, DXLD) What about Aug 27/28 special you foresaw back on July 20? Went ahead and mentioned it on WOR 1196, in case it is still in the offing (gh) ** AUSTRALIA. The ARDS studios are at Nhulunbuy (Gove) and the program is sent via satellite to the transmitter site near Darwin, for which they pay a rental of A$700 a week. The project has a budget of $A1m to become fully operational. Just under 50% of this has been raised to date. Programs include local indigenous music and pre-recorded programs funded by government, NGO and philanthropic groups. The idea of `radio browsing`' allows listeners to call the station with information and education requests. The staff then web search for answers and put a program together. ARDS was founded in 1973. It's the community development arm of the Northern Regional Council of Congress (NRCC) which is the Aboriginal & Islander Presbytery of the Northern Synod of the Uniting Church of Australia Australia {sic}. Contact details: 19 Pera Circuit, Nhulunbuy NT 0880 (studios) studios); PO Box 1671 Nhulunbuy NT 0881 (mailing) mailing); T: +61 8 8987 3910. F: +61 8 8987 3912. Email: nhulun@ards.com.au Website: http://www.ards.com.au Radio Service Manager: Dale Chesson Background: Australian domestic SW broadcasts using up to 1 kW power are permitted under recent law changes and must use a selected group of frequencies which do not require further notification outside Australia. Holders of other types of broadcasting licences are now allowed to add these SW broadcasts, but only for a domestic audience. Northern Territory obtained self-government in 1978 and now seeks full statehood by 2008. The population of the entire territory is just 200,000. Darwin has people from 130 countries speaking 60 languages. Many parts of SE Asia (such as Singapore, Malaysia, Philippines, Indonesia) are closer to Darwin than Australia`s federal capital in Canberra. The NT is embarking on a series of major economic infrastructure projects. A 1000 km gas pipeline is planned across Arnhem Land, linking the Timor Sea gas field Blackrip with the Alcan alumina plant at Nhulunbuy. The pipeline is likely to run through traditional Yolgnu land. Sources: ARDS, Australian X-Band Guide (under preparation), Australian Financial Review Magazine August 2003 (NEW ZEALAND DX TIMES PAGE 38 AUGUST 2003 via DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. NOVA / NUEVA / NEW RADIO 4781.5 RADIO TACANA, Tumupasa, Departamento de La Paz, 0202, August 20, 45444; música latina, OM: "Sintoniza Tacana la radio... la programación contigo hasta 11 con 30 minutos (0330 UT)", "Transmite desde Tumupasa, norte de La Paz, Radio Tacana" "estaremos mañana a las 6 (1000 UT)..." 0305 música brasileira (música brega de la Amazônia brasilera) hasta 0328, s-off 0331. OM anuncia que ésta es la segunda prueba; pienso que salió al aire por la mañana. Radio Tacana pertenece al Consejo Indígena del Pueblo Tacana --- CIPTA y está localizada en la Población de Tumupasa, Provincia Iturralde, Departamento de La Paz. Al norte del departamento de La Paz, región de Ixiamas y San Buenaventura, al noroeste de Reyes y Rurrenabaque (Depto. Beni). http://amazonas.rds.org.co/Libros2/Bolivia/Bol00025.htm http://www.bolivia.com/empresas/cultura/Pueblos_Indigenas/Tacana.asp 73 (Rogildo Fontenelle Aragão, Quillacollo, Bolivia, Aug 20, WORLD OF RADIO 1196, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Also heard in other parts of South America and as far off as Europe: Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador: 19 August 2003, 0245, on 4780.96 kHz, Radio Tacana, provincia Iturralde, departamento Pando. [Rogildo Fontelle is stating depto La Paz]. Hermod Pedersen, Huaröd, Sweden: 22 August 2003, 0010-0110, on 4780.96, Radio Tacana, playing non-stop music occasionally interrupted by Radio Tacana-IDs. Before 0000 frequency blocked by het-tone from Mali on 4782. (hard-core-dx via DXLD) 4780.96 Radio Tacána, provincia Iturralde, departamento Pando. El 19 de Agosto 2003 - 0245 UT. Radio Tacána estuve en el aire la primera vez (probablemente) El primer de julio 2003 en la frecuencia de 4780.89 kHz. No he notado nada entre 1 de Julio y 18 de Agosto. En 19 de Agosto en la noche de nuevo estuvo en el aire en 4780.96 kHz con buena señal y calidad de sonido. "Radio Tacána está transmitiendo en 4780 M(!)Hz, banda de 60 metros onda corta". "Desde la provincia de __Iturralde, el departamento de Pando en 4780 M(!)Hz banda de 60 metros onda corta transmite Radio Tacána". 73 de (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** CANADA. For those interested in why CHU has been off the air, I talked to them via e-mail and they said that their backup generator failed during the power outage. They will return to the air when either the power grid is stabilized or the backup generator is repaired (Patrick Griffith, on the road in Alamogordo, Aug 19, NRC-AM via WORLD OF RADIO 1196, DXLD) CHU time/frequency station in Ottawa: I made contact by phone today August 20. CHU has been off since the blackout. They are having problems with the backup equipment and in particular the cooling system which requires a lot of energy, apparently. They are working on it and hope to be back on soon, whenever that is (Bernie O'Shea, Ottawa, Ontario, WORLD OF RADIO 1196, DX LISTENING DIGEST) CHU Ottawa. As of this time 1800 UT Thursday August 21 CHU is back on 7335 kHz only. Nothing on 3330 and 14670 as yet (Bernie O'Shea, Ottawa, Ontario, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA [and non]. WELL WORTH A LISTEN By PAUL GILSTER, Correspondent I enjoy being read to, and I used to tune in radio stations in Montreal or Toronto so I could hear the Canadian Broadcasting Co.'s regular book reading sessions. These weren't available over the CBC's shortwave service, so I had to cope with static-filled AM radio frequencies, but hearing a good book was worth the effort. I can now abandon the CBC, because Audible offers a wide variety of books... http://newsobserver.com/business/story/2797062p-2585870c.html (via Kim Elliott, DXLD) For a price. CBC Radio One readings still scheduled at 10:40 pm local, and also sometime during Richardson`s Roundup in the afternoon (gh) ** CANADA. GARDINER IN NEW SLOT (CKLW-AM's 50,000 watt signal reaches much of Southwestern Ontario, northern Ohio and a large part of Michigan.) Cam Gardiner comes back to life on AM-800 CKLW radio Sept. 2, flying solo in a new program. The veteran radio man has taken control of the diabetes that nearly killed him nine months ago. Now he will be working in the bright light of day, as host of a show created around him from noon to 3 p.m. called Live Today. His partner for more than 15 years, Lisa Williams, is returning, too, from family leave, but she will resume the station's morning shift, 5 a.m. to 9 a.m. [EDT = UT -4] She will have a new co-host, Mike Kakuk, who has been keeping the morning mike warm during Cam-and-Lisa's absence. "I'm going to miss working with Lisa more than anything," Gardiner said. He acknowledged, however, that getting up in the middle of the night had taken a toll on his health. Live Today will begin with an hour of information from the parent CHUM network, local news, sports and other items with Gardiner doing the intros. From 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. he will conduct telephone interviews, locally and across the continent, both on breaking news and human- interest issues. "It's local live programming in the middle of the day, something we haven't had in years. The station wanted to open up the slot anyhow," Gardiner said. Melanie Deveau's Windsor Now show shifts to 3-6 p.m. followed Dr. Joy Browne in a new slot, 6-9 p.m. She'll be followed by Dr. Gabe Mirkin and then the Deborah Ray Show, both continuing in their current time slots. Coast To Coast with George Noory continues 1-5 a.m. On weekends, Money Talks with Jerry White is moving to 8 p.m. on Saturday. Sunday schedule changes will put Motor Trend on at 9 a.m., Herbal Pharmacist at 10 a.m., Satellite Sisters from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Halo Radio after 2 p.m., Halt Trading at 6 p.m., the Local Line on Sports at 7 p.m. and Raceline Radio at 8 p.m. Wayne Stevens At Large has been dropped after 10 years but he continues his afternoon show on the sister station, CKWW-AM. Leah Hansen leaves the temporary morning job and returns to swing- shift replacement assignments (Windsor Star Via Harry van Vugt, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, DXLD) Satellite Sisters? Is that the same program which used to be on public radio in the US, cancelled? (gh) ** COSTA RICA. Radio For Peace International met on 18th August with University for Peace representatives in the first of the meetings to be held between the two organizations during the agreed time period for `conversations` ending October 31st. The next scheduled meeting between RFPI and the University will take place on 4th September. RFPI wishes to thank all listeners and supporters for their crucial dedication and commitment to an ongoing campaign of letter writing, petition sending and raising awareness in countless ways about this issue with their local media. Continuing international attention on events here at RFPI is vital for the survival of the only progressive voice on short wave, YOUR global community radio station!!!! Thank you!!! (RFPI Update Aug 19 via WORLD OF RADIO 1196, DXLD) For almost two decades, United Nations Radio has maintained a close working partnership with Radio for Peace International --- a short- wave broadcasting station that transmits its programming from the campus of the University for Peace in Costa Rica. Radio for Peace International retransmitted taped and news programmes of United Nations Radio in English, French and Spanish to audiences in the Caribbean and Central America. Starting in September 2000, when United Nations Radio launched its daily live news and current affairs programme in the six official languages, Radio for Peace International began broadcasting the programme in English and Spanish to same target regions (from http://www.un.org/ga/coi/6e.htm via Franklin Seiberling, IA, DXLD) ** COSTA RICA. 6175, 0950 20/7, Faro del Caribe good with music and ID (Andrew Sunde, Ohai, ICF 2001, 5 MHz dipole, 40m wire, Aug NZ DX Times via DXLD) Haven`t seen this frequency reported in a long time (gh) ** CUBA. GOOD NEWS, AMIGO BOB !!! Three new 100 kW transmitters now on the air replacing the more than 40 year old Brown Boveris. Try listening to 11760 kiloHertz in Spanish. It is beaming to NY, but should deliver a good signal at your QTH. We also use the same transmitter earlier in the day on 11875 kiloHertz. 73 and DX (Arnie Coro, Dxers Unlimited, Aug 19 with his script to Bob Chandler, ODXA via DXLD) Viz.: Item one: Big thank you from our engineering staff. They simply loved the reports provided by listeners in North America, South America, the Caribbean, Europe and even Australia and New Zealand of the new 100 kW transmitter during its first on the air test on 9600 kiloHertz; now they have two more of the new ones on the air. One is on 11760 kiloHertz with our East Coast of North America beam in Spanish, and the other one is on 9550 kiloHertz with our Caribbean and Southern region of North America phased dipoles array. So, once again, your kindfull coöperation is requested. Monitor both 11760 kiloHertz and 9550 kiloHertz from 00 to 05 UT and send your signal reports directly to me via e'mail to arnie@r... [truncated by yahoogouprs]. By the way, for the technically minded our new transmitting equipment is using pulse step modulation, a system that is much more energy efficient than the conventional AM plate modulated system. [Later:] You are listening to Radio Havana Cuba, and yes amigos, we are really happy here after almost completing the start up procedures of three new short wave 100 kiloWatt transmitters. They are now used for our Spanish language evening local time in Havana broadcasts, from 00 to 05 hours UT. The frequencies are 9550 kiloHertz to the Caribbean and Southeastern North America, 9600 kiloHertz beaming to South America's Atlantic coast and 11760 kiloHertz beaming to Eastern North America. We are also using the three new transmitters during our Spanish language morning broadcasts that start at 11 hours UT and last until 15. The morning frequencies are at this moment 11705 kiloHertz to South America, 9550 kiloHertz to the Caribbean and 11760 kiloHertz to Eastern North America, but we may be changing the 11705 kiloHertz frequency soon. On 9550 kiloHertz we are also broadcasting in English, Creole and French to the Caribbean during our local afternoon .... Send your signal reports and comments to arnie@r... [truncated] (Prof. Arnaldo Coro A., CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited Aug 19 via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via WORLD OF RADIO 1196, DXLD) ** CUBA. El gobierno cubano "censa" todos los ordenadores de la isla y "decomisará" los de origen dudosa En toda la isla se inició la semana pasada la "Operación Windows", que tiene como objetivo la realización de un inventario de computadoras en centros de trabajo y residencias particulares y el decomiso de las que se consideren de "origen dudoso", según publica el diario online "Cubanet" La operación es controlada por la Seguridad del Estado e incluye a la Policía Nacional Revolucionaria y el Departamento Técnico de Investigaciones. Participan también presidentes de los Comités de Defensa de la Revolución (CDR), jóvenes comunistas y estudiantes universitarios. En las viviendas privadas se recogen en formularios el nombre del dueño del equipo, la marca del mismo, documentos que legitimen la propiedad del mismo, año de adquisición del ordenador, uso y cómo lo adquirió. En las empresas se solicitan facturas de su compra, documentos de su existencia, roturas, pérdidas por robo y uso de los equipos, así como los autorizados a permanecer en viviendas. De acuerdo a informaciones ofrecidas por fuentes dignas de crédito, la "Operación Windows" no podrá obtener todos los datos que se estiman, ya que tanto los centros de trabajo como cualquier particular podrían no declarar la existencia de computadoras, pudiendo esto burlar el levantamiento de las mismas. cnet/20 (via José Elías, Venezuela, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. "We Will Succeed" -- BBG Chairman Tomlinson Announces Initiative to Improve Radio and TV Martí Delivery to Cuba [naughty, naughty, ``venceremos`` is reserved for the Commies! -- gh] Miami, FL, August 21, 2003-- At a press briefing this morning in Miami, Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) Chairman Kenneth Y. Tomlinson, joined by Office of Cuba Broadcasting Director Pedro Roig and fellow BBG Governor Joaquin Blaya, issued the following statement concerning Radio and Television Martí: "We have been working diligently to strengthen the signals of Radio and TV Martí, to allow the people of Cuba access to uncensored news and information. As part of this effort, I am pleased to announce that we will soon undertake testing to see if TV Martí can be sent to the Cuban people by satellite. This would allow viewers in Cuba to receive the TV Martí signal via state of the art satellite technology through free-to-air reception. Free-to-air means that the satellite signal is not encrypted and can be viewed by anyone with a dish and an ordinary digital receiver. Radio Martí's signal would also be included in the transmission. "Hispasat will provide a powerful signal with a footprint that fully covers all of Cuba and nearly all of Latin America. Satellite receivers now on the island that are able to receive direct-to-home, free-to-air can be easily tuned to receive the signal. According to various commercial sources, satellite dishes are being used by more and more Cubans, and the numbers continue to rise. Moreover, we expect that as a powerful television signal with reliable, objective news and information becomes available to the Cuban people, it will inevitably find viewers. If we build it, they will come. "VHS tapes with the best of the week's programming on TV Martí will also be made available to the Cuban audience. We are confident that with the extraordinary resourcefulness of the Cuban people, and with the assistance of those outside Cuba who wish them well, these VHS tapes will quickly find an eager and growing audience of Cubans who thirst for unbiased, fair, and professional reporting that is otherwise unavailable to them. We are confident that broadcasting the truth is not only right, and our duty. It is also comfort and an encouragement to the dissidents living in Cuba who -- as did their predecessors in Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and the Soviet Union -- brave the dictator's anger to speak the truth. "But the Castro regime is not content only to misinform the Cuban people. The Cuban government also spends huge sums to block Radio Martí and its television services. We hope that the measures we are announcing today will make it easier for the Cuban people to hear and see our signal through the electronic curtain that Fidel Castro has caused to descend upon the unfortunate Cuban people. But if our efforts to penetrate this obstacle do not succeed, we will not stop trying. We will succeed. "We are also making improvements in our programming to Cuba. TV Martí is now implementing a new format with a heavy emphasis on news and information programs. As a result, news programming will nearly double. On the entertainment side, we have arranged for Major League baseball games to be broadcast on TV and Radio Martí, including the playoffs and World Series. The Voice of America's half-hour radio program, Ventana a Cuba, that is now aired on Saturday and Sunday will be increased so that listeners can hear it every day. Cubans with access to the Internet will be able to receive the entire increased output of U.S. international broadcasting online. "All of these efforts are part of the Administration's commitment both to strengthen and modernize TV and Radio Martí, and to improve the content and usefulness of our broadcasts. The freedom of Cuba's long- suffering people remains a high priority for this Administration as it does for the American people. So long as the Cuban people remain in chains, the liberty of all people is threatened. Our efforts to provide a reliable, accurate, and accessible source of news and information to the people of Cuba will advance the day when they can breathe free." (BBG Press release Aug 21 via DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. THROWING A BONE TO MIAMI'S CUBANS [do they mean to imply that Miami`s Cubans are (mad) dogs ??] By NBC 6 Reporter Hank Tester --- POSTED: 12:15 p.m. EDT August 19, 2003 UPDATED: 9:05 p.m. EDT August 19, 2003 MIAMI -- NBC-6 has learned that early in September the Bush administration will announce that the signal for TV-Martí will be beamed into Cuba via satellite. The satellite delivery system announcement is an attempt to answer harsh criticism by Cuban exile power brokers and politicos that TV- Marti is a failure. They charge the U.S. Government has been unable to figure out how to penetrate the Castro government's electronic jamming of TV-Marti's over-the-air signal. . . http://www.nbc6.net/hanktester/2415506/detail.html (via Jilly Dybka, WORLD OF RADIO 1196, DXLD) U.S.-FUNDED TV MARTÍ TO REACH CUBA VIA SATELLITE --- BY MADELINE BARO DIAZ, South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Posted on Thu, Aug. 21, 2003 MIAMI - (KRT) - Officials with U.S.-funded TV Martí, the television station that broadcasts an alternative to Cuba's state-run media, announced Thursday that they will start using a satellite to reach the island. The Office of Cuba Broadcasting, based in Miami, said the effort was aimed at thwarting the Cuban government's repeated jamming of TV Martí`s signal. Within a few days, its employees will begin using the Histasat satellite, located over the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Africa and near the equator, to strengthen the signals of both TV Martí and Radio Martí. "We have great confidence that this platform, this satellite, is the answer we have been waiting for," said Pedro Roig, director of the Office of Cuba Broadcasting. "It is the most modern communications technology available." Cuba analysts, however, described the Bush Administration's attempt to strengthen the ability of the stations as not just an attempt to evade the blocking technology of Fidel Castro's government. Experts said the plan also helps address a wave of criticism from prominent Cuban- Americans that the administration has not had a tough enough policy towards Cuba - much as the indictment Thursday of a Cuban general and two pilots for the 1996 deaths of four Cuban-American fliers did. Jaime Suchlicki, director of the University of Miami's Institute for Cuban and Cuban-American Studies, said those moves were only a start. "The Cuban community would like to see more," Suchlicki said. "They had big expectations." TV Martí, which went on the air in 1990, broadcasts its signal from a balloon that is tethered to Cudjoe Key. Because of Cuba's efforts to block its signal, the U.S. government has had better luck with Radio Martí, which Cubans have been able to pick up on shortwave radios or on AM radio outside of Havana. Using satellite technology will cost close to $1 million, money that will come from TV Martí's $10 million annual budget. Although the satellite might get around the jamming, only Cubans with satellite dishes will be able to pick up the signal. Roig said he did not know how many Cubans have satellite dishes, but some estimates put the number at close to 20,000. Officials also said Cubans might be able to fashion a device that would allow them to get the signal. In Cuba, the plan was met with some skepticism. Elsa Morejón, whose husband Oscar Elias Biscet was convicted in April along with 74 other dissidents in Cuba, is a weekly contributor to Radio Martí, where she speaks about Cuba's penal system. She called the plan to send Radio and TV Martí signals to Cuba via satellite "unviewable" because only a few privileged Cubans have satellite dishes at home. "What are they going to do, broadcast for foreigners?" she asked. "Those (dishes) are concentrated in the capital because this is where the foreigners and the money are, but in the interior provinces they don't exist." Satellite dishes cost about $700 for 200 channels on the black market - almost 100 times more than an average Cuban's salary. Some Cubans tape new release movies and sporting events and make a brisk side business renting the videos for a few cents. Though the satellite dishes are generally tolerated, last year the government swept several Havana neighborhoods and seized some. Cubans generally hide the dishes in water tanks or other receptacles on their roofs and sometimes share programming by splitting cables into various apartments in a building. Morejón also said beaming Radio and TV Martí programming via satellite might cause the Cuban government to clamp down on those who have dishes. "Maybe there is tolerance now because most people only watch entertainment," she said. "They (the government) will see who has satellites and taken them away." Radio Martí officials said even if the latest signal is jammed they are committed to getting TV Martí into Cuba. The station hopes to nearly double its programming, with a heavy emphasis on news and sports. Otto Reich, Bush's chief adviser on Latin America, touted the satellite broadcast as "one more step the Bush administration is taking to break through the information blockade." In Miami, however, the announcement failed to satisfy some of the Bush administration's staunchest critics, who have alleged that a lack of political will - not a lack of adequate technology - has kept TV Martí off the air. "This is a mockery," said Cuban exile activist José Basulto, who earlier this year broadcast a video message to Cuba from a plane to show how easily the U.S. bypass the Cuban government's jamming. "This will only reach the hotels and Cuban government officials." --- (South Florida Sun-Sentinel correspondent Vanessa Bauza contributed to this report.)--- (c) 2003 South Florida Sun-Sentinel (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) TV MARTÍ WILL TRY TO REACH CUBANS WITH SATELLITE TRANSMISSIONS --- BY NANCY SAN MARTIN, Knight Ridder Newspapers, Posted on Thu, Aug. 21 MIAMI - (KRT) - TV Martí will begin satellite transmissions to Cuba as early as next month in an effort to break through the government jamming that has left the $11 million-a-year station largely unable to get its pro-democracy message to its intended audience, U.S. officials announced Thursday. ``The freedom of Cuba's long-suffering people remains a high priority for this administration,'' Kenneth Tómlinson, chairman of the federal agency that oversees the broadcasts, said at the Miami office for TV Martí. ``Our efforts to provide a reliable, accurate and accessible source of news and information to the people of Cuba will advance the day when they can breathe free.'' The decision was viewed by some Cuban-Americans as part of an effort by the Bush Administration to quell rising frustrations among South Florida's exile community, which has openly criticized Washington in recent weeks for doing little to step up U.S. pressures on Cuba. Thursday's announcement came as federal authorities unsealed a Miami grand jury indictment against two Cuban MiG pilots and the head of the island's air force for the 1996 shoot-down of two Brothers to the Rescue planes that killed four people. At a monthly cost of about $80,000, the satellite TV broadcasts will begin with a three-month trial period and, if deemed successful, will be extended on an annual basis for up to seven years, Tomlinson said. The signal for Radio Martí, now broadcast on short-wave and AM frequencies, will also be broadcast on satellite now, he added. TV Martí also will nearly double its airtime to eight hours, from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. daily, to include more news programs as well as Major League baseball games - Cuba's national sport. Its top programs will be copied on VHS tapes and given to travelers to the island for distribution to friends and relatives. ``We hope that the measures will make it easier for the Cuban people to hear and see our signal through the electronic curtain that Fidel Castro has caused to descend upon the unfortunate Cuban people,'' Tomlinson said. ``But if our efforts to penetrate this obstacle do not succeed, we will not stop trying. We will succeed.'' One State Department official dismissed the assertions that the TV Martí decision was politically inspired, saying that ``This is part of a long-standing and continuing effort by the administration to provide more and better information to the Cuban people.'' Pedro Roig, director of the Office of Cuba Broadcasting, operators of TV Martí, characterized the satellite transmissions as ``historic,'' adding that ``this will break the monopoly of information that Castro has over Cuba.'' TV Martí currently relies primarily on a regular TV signal, broadcast from a balloon tethered 10,000 feet above Cudjoe Key in the Florida Keys. Those transmissions have been easily blocked by the Cuban government, and few Cubans have ever seen its programs. Cuba may be able to block the TV Martí signal, however, since jamming out of Cuba briefly disrupted U.S. government and private Los Ángeles station broadcasts this summer to Iran of programs critical of the Shiïte Muslim government there. The signal will be broadcast from the Hispasat satellite, operated by a private Spanish company, which orbits above the Atlantic and close to the Brazilian coast. It will allow Cubans with any satellite dish and receiver, such as those used by Direct TV subscribers, to obtain the free-of-charge transmissions. Hispasat provides a powerful signal with a ``footprint'' that covers all of Cuba and a large portion of Latin America, making it more difficult to jam, Tomlinson said. It is also widely used by broadcasters in Latin America and Europe. U.S. broadcasters hope to tap into a flourishing but illegal satellite receiver market in Cuba that has become apparent over the past five years. U.S. authorities estimate that as many as 15,000 satellite dishes are now in operation at Cuban households. Cuba's jamming of the regular TV Martí broadcasts has been so effective that a survey done in September in Havana, commissioned by Tómlinson's Board of Broadcasting Governors, sampled 1,000 adults and found that only 0.1 percent reported they had watched TV Martí within a one-week time period. ``This indicates, at least numerically, that at least 1,700 people tuned in that week. What it doesn't tell you is how well they were able to see the broadcasts,'' said BBG spokesman Joe O'Connell. (c) 2003, The Miami Herald.(via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** CUBA. LA HABANA INFORMA A E.U. QUE DIPLOMATICOS IRANIES EN LA ISLA INTERFERIAN SEÑALES DE SATELITE DE COMUNICACIONES ESTADOUNIDENSE El gobierno de Cuba ha informado al de los Estados Unidos que la fuente de interferencia que afectaba las transmisiones estadounidenses en lengua farsi hacia Iran, via satélite, procedía de unas instalaciones diplomáticas iranias en o en los alrededores de La Habana, según ha dicho el Departamento de Estado. Y en lo que parece ser una insólita muestra de cooperación desplegada entre los dos antiguos enemigos de la Guerra Fría, La Habana parece haber actuado para satisfacer una reciente protesta formal de Washingon. "La interferencia ha cesado," dijo Jo-Anne Prokopowicz, una vocera del Departamento de Estado. A mediados del pasado mes de julio, tras negar que su régimen fuera responsable por la interferencia, Cuba prometió investigar la denuncia estadounidense y finalmente ha informado a Estados Unidos que ha encontrado la fuente de la interferencia y le ha puesto fin. "Cuba nos informó el 3 de agosto que había localizado la fuente de la interferencia y que había tomado acción para detenerla," dijo Prokopowicz. "El gobierno cubano nos has comunicado que la interferencia provenía de una facilidad diplomática iraní", y agregó: "Ahora le daremos a este asunto seguimiento con el gobierno de Iran." El 15 de julio pasado, la Junta de Gobernadores de los Servicios de Transmisiones de Estados Unidos acusó a Cuba de interferir su programación dirigida hacia Irán al igual que la de una emisora privada de la oposición iraní que opera desde territorio estadounidense y transmite hacia Irán. La interferencia afectaba todas las transmisiones en lengua Farsi que utilizaban el satélite Loral Skynet, en un momento en que tenían lugar en Irán protestas públicas crecientes contra el régimen de Teherán. Terranet --- AFP --- Lebanon --- USA --- La Nueva Cuba --- Agosto 21, 2003 (TOMADO DE LA EDICION ELECTRONICA DE "LA NUEVA CUBA" FECHA 21 DE AGOSTO, 2001. http://www.lanuevacuba.com/master.htm via Oscar de Céspedes, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Satellite-jamming case: see also IRAN ** CZECHOSLOVAKIA. RADIO PRAGUE'S FINEST HOUR In the early hours of the morning on 21 August 1968, troops of the Warsaw Pact countries crossed the border into Czechoslovakia, and within hours they had brought an end to the bold experiment called "Socialism with a human face" that was being pursued by the government of Alexander Dubcek. This tragedy for Czechoslovakia was played out on the airwaves of Radio Prague. To commemorate the 35th anniversary of these dramatic events, Radio Netherlands publishes a special feature, including another chance to hear extended highlights from the Media Network documentary Truth Will Prevail. http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/features/html/prague010830.html (Media Network blog Aug 21 via DXLD) I think MN won a NY Festivals award for this one (Lou Josephs -- 8/21/03; 5:20:07 PM, ibid.) ** GERMANY. Re: ADDX / RMRC European DX Conference 2003 report on Juelich 3965 today Some just posted comments reveals that the DRM transmission was a no- show and could not be decoded, the cause is described as a software fault at Jülich. The incident kicked off an argument about the skills of the T-Systems staff. Well, they did the AM transmission fine as always, so I have no reason for any criticism (Kai Ludwig, Germany, Aug 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HAWAII. Long time DXer, Chuck Boehnke of Keaau Hawaii is seriously ill in the hospital in Hilo. He would appreciate get well cards that are cheerful. At Post Office Box 488, Keauu HI 96749-0488. His e mail address: CCB@flex.com (Patrick Martin, Seaside OR, Aug 21, IRCA via DXLD) ** INDONESIA. Radio Republik Indonesia has moved its website to a new provider and slightly changed the address: http://www.rri-online.com instead of http://www.rrionline.com It is mainly a news portal, but includes also some information about the radio services. New email address for the External Service "Voice of Indonesia" is voi@rri-online.com (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, Aug 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) As previously reported here, for a while both were in use, but only they new one led to English (gh) ** IRAN. OPPOSITION CONDEMNS REGIME'S ALLEGED "JAMMING" OF SATELLITE BROADCASTS | Text of report in English by Iranian Mojahedin-e Khalq (MKO) web site on 20 August Mullahs' regime uses its espionage and terror nests (under cover of embassy) for "satellite terrorism": The Cuban government has declared that the religious fascism ruling Iran has in recent months been using its diplomatic centre and installations in the suburbs of Havana to jam and disrupt Persian- language satellite television programmes. The Iranian resistance calls on the UN Security Council and competent international authorities to condemn this blatant breach of international law and conventions by the mullahs' regime. It underscores the need to adopt binding decisions against the medieval regime ruling Iran. The mullahs' Supreme National Security Council, chaired by Mohammad Khatami, assigned the Intelligence Ministry in summer 1999 to jam and disrupt Persian-language satellite television broadcasts with the help of the state television, the Ministry of Post and Telecommunications, the Revolutionary Guards' Directorate of Electronic Warfare (known as JANGAL) and the Army's Directorate of Communications and Electronics (known as ARAL). On the basis of an independent investigation by Britain's DERA Defford (Defence Evaluation and Research Agency) satellite communications company, the Iranian resistance announced in 2000 that jamming signals were beamed from a location inside Iran near the Caspian Sea in northern Iran. Subsequently, the mullahs used more sophisticated technology to continue jamming satellite programmes from several locations. The use of diplomatic installations by the religious, terrorist dictatorship ruling Iran to jam and disrupt satellite broadcasts shows a new stage in the extension of terrorism to satellite communications. It also displays the mullahs' fear of any cracks appearing in the wall of censorship and repression in Iran. The Iranian resistance calls on the UN Secretary-General, the Security Council and the International Telecommunications Union to adopt effective measures and impose binding sanctions on the religious tyranny ruling Iran. Inaction and silence by international agencies only emboldens Tehran's rulers to continue their blatant violation of international law and conventions. Secretariat of the National Council of Resistance of Iran, 20 August 2003 [The US State Department on 20 August said it had received information from the authorities in Cuba that an Iranian diplomatic facility was responsible for jamming American satellite television broadcasts aimed at Iran in July 2003. A State Department spokeswoman said the Cuban government had informed the United States that it had taken action to stop the interference. The US had previously accused Cuba itself of jamming the television broadcasts, a charge the Cuban authorities denied. The jamming affected Persian-language broadcasts carried by the Loral Skynet satellite, and reportedly became more pronounced during anti-government protests in Iran.] Source: Mojahedin-e Khalq (MKO) web site in English 20 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) See also CUBA ** IRAQ. U.S. TAPS MEDIA CHIEF FOR IRAQ --- Regulation Attempted Without Appearing Heavy-Handed --- By Daniel Williams, Washington Post Foreign Service, Tuesday, August 19, 2003; Page A14 BAGHDAD, Aug. 18 -- U.S. authorities have appointed a media commissioner to govern broadcasters and the press, establish training programs for journalists and plan for the establishment of a state-run radio and television network -- part of an effort to regulate Iraq's burgeoning news media while dodging allegations of heavy-handed control. The standards and enforcement mechanisms are being "fleshed out," said a senior official of the governing Coalition Provisional Authority. A board to take complaints about media excesses was envisaged, but the official declined to specify the limits on news coverage. In June, L. Paul Bremer, the civil administrator in Iraq, issued guidelines for all media outlets here, forbidding them from inciting violence, promoting "ethnic and religious hatred" or circulating false information "calculated to promote opposition" to the occupation authority. Occasionally, U.S. soldiers have raided newspaper offices deemed to be in breach of the regulations, and they have closed at least two newspapers and one radio station. But the delicacy of sending heavily armed troops to enforce media rules has prompted the occupation officials to look for other ways to exercise their power to censor. The new media commissioner will be Simon Haselock, a spokesman and media supervisor for U.N. authorities overseeing Kosovo. In June, he drafted a proposal to regulate journalists' activities through a panel that officials here have dubbed a "complaints commission." The commission, which would include journalists, would levy fines. Alleged transgressors could appeal. The system is similar to one functioning in Kosovo. . . http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A11484-2003Aug18.html (via Kraig Krist, DXLD) ** IRELAND. RTE is testing on longwave 252 kHz again today. Observed from tune in at 1445 UT with a relay of RTE Radio 1 parallel with 567 kHz MW. At 1449 they switched to a continuous 1 kHz audio tone. 73s (Dave Kenny, BDXC-UK, Aug 20, via DXLD) Thanks to a tip from Ron Candy of Canning Town, East London, I noted RTE Radio 1 being carried on 252 kHz LW at 22:00 BST on 20 August (21:00 UTC). However, the programming was several seconds behind the signal on 567 kHz MW, which was by this time clear as it was almost 2 hours after London sunset. In addition, the LW channel was dominated by Algeria, with Ireland quite difficult to hear, suggesting that quite low power was being used. If I remember rightly, in previous existences, the power of the Irish transmitter had to be reduced to 100 kW once the sun dipped below the horizon. I would suggest that the power on this occasion was well *below* 100 kW. If I remember, I will check the frequency again tomorrow before leaving for work around 7:00 BST (0600 UT) by which time the sun will be well and truly up over NW London (PAUL DAVID, Chairman, Brent Visually-Handicapped Group, Registered Charity No.: 272955, Aug 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RTE FIRES UP 252 KHZ AGAIN Thanks to Gerald Gray and Mike Guy for drawing my attention to the fact that Irish public broadcaster RTE is again testing the longwave transmitter on 252 kHz. Gerald writes: "RTE Radio 1 is currently using the 252kHz LW in Trim Co. Meath as at 0030 GMT on 20/8/03. Seems rather weaker than Atlantic 252 used to be, so maybe it's not running the full 100 kW night time power. Haven't had a chance to hear it in the daytime, so I'm not sure whether it's still testing and whether it's using 500 kW." Well, at 1005 UT this morning they were carrying a test tone, so obviously this is not (yet) a regular service. Mike notes that when relaying Radio 1 the audio is delayed by several seconds. I initially wrote here that I doubted the delay was so long, but several people have confirmed that it is. I therefore assume they're feeding the audio from Dublin via ISDN, and the delay is caused by the encoding process. So far, RTE hasn't mentioned the longwave tests on its Web site or in a press release (Andy Sennitt, Holland) 252 is one satellite hop behind both releases of RTE Radio 1 at 28 east (about half a second), and roughly four satellite hops (about 2 seconds) behind the 13 east release of RTE Radio 1. Perhaps they've introduced a delay to allow them time to switch 252 to carry different adverts to 567? Or maybe they're sourcing it from the web? (Ray Woodward • 8/20/03; 4:18:40 AM. . .) Thanks, Ray. I don't think they're sourcing it "from the Web" but they might well be using a dedicated ISDN feed, as we did for Radio 10 FM and Radio Nationaal before it. There are inherent delays in the encoding process. In fact, the more I think of it, the more that would make sense. If they've gone to the trouble of installing that, it suggests to me they're serious about longwave (Andy Sennitt • 8/20/03; 5:46:50 AM) Just to add to the confusion - RTÉ have now synchronised 252 with 567 kHz. Perhaps they couldn't afford the ISDN line! (Del (North Wales) • 8/20/03; 6:51:59 AM. . .) The audio quality is vastly better than I've ever heard previously from RTE on 252, I guess they've tagged it on to the same feed as Tullamore. The ISDN presumably being a back up (like virgin in the UK)? (Ray Woodward • 8/20/03; 7:22:42 AM) In fact I'd go so far as to say the audio quality of RTE 252 is now better than that of the BBC on 198! (Ray Woodward • 8/20/03; 7:51:23 AM) The signal is coming in here in NW London quite well on my kitchen radio - but the car radio doesn't have as good a signal. Right now they're alternating between tone, RTÉ Radio 1 and silence (Richard Logue • 8/20/03; 7:56:31 AM) Well, from all the reports, obviously they're still in the testing phase. As Ray says, they're probably doing comparative tests between different ways of feeding the audio. Maybe they're also at times taking the audio off air from the nearest FM transmitter. I have to say that I find it very hard to get excited about all this. Maybe it's because I'm getting old :-) (Andy Sennitt • 8/20/03; 8:18:27 AM) Well I guess when you (like me) can tune into the stereo satellite version of RTE Radio 1 via Astra 2D Long Wave does seem to be a little insignificant. BTW 252 has dropped behind 567 again (Ray Woodward • 8/20/03; 8:52:32 AM) That, plus the fact that it's neither a new transmitter nor a new network (apologies for the excessive alliteration). It would be interesting were it to start carrying different programming from the existing networks. But that's unlikely. The RTE annual report (available as a PDF file on their Web site) specifically says they plan to relay Radio 1 for the Irish in the UK (Andy Sennitt • 8/20/03; 9:26:12 AM) We heard the transmissions in Basildon Essex at 7 pm today coming in quite well and clear audio. Reception of Atlantic 252 in this location was virtually non-existent (Paul • 8/20/03; 11:42:42 AM) RTE was still transmitting on LW just before 8pm local time. Reception is still acceptable. Chatting about RTE with my partner, we are both looking forward to having an alternative source of news to the BBC. The audio on 198 has been poor for some time, and there have been a string of transmitter failures from that unit. It has led to complaints from older listeners using LW about the poor quality of the transmissions. Were your listeners/readers aware that the mast and the site at Droitwich were condemned some years ago and when parts of the aerial system fall off they are not replaced. Source: Radiophile Magazine (Paul • 8/20/03; 12:17:17 PM) Judging from reports, some people saying it's weaker than before and others stronger, I suspect they may have done something to the antenna pattern. South East England was outside the marketing area of Atlantic 252, and RTE is anxious to get into London to reach the large Irish community who have been unable to hear Radio 1 clearly on 567 since 558 was allocated to commercial radio. When I'm back at work next week I'll try to contact RTE, unless someone else beats me to it :-) (Andy Sennitt • 8/20/03; 2:33:04 PM) I suspect it may be simpler than that, I'd be amazed if CLT spent much on it with regards to maintenance in its latter years of ownership and you can be certain TeamTalk won't have done anything. I reckon RTÉ might well have given the site the sort of preventative maintenance it probably hasn`t seen since it was built - cleaning insulators, checking earth mat etc. etc. It could just be that the site is now back to performing as it did when it was first built? (Ray Woodward • 8/21/03; 2:17:52 AM) Yes Ray, you could well be right. Last night I was just about able to null out Algiers and listen to RTE without much co-channel interference, but then it went into a slow fade and became unreadable for several minutes. I also noticed some other unidentified audio faintly in the background, which I think may have been caused by the "Luxembourg effect", unless I'd left another radio switched on somewhere in the house :-) (Andy Sennitt • 8/21/03; 4:52:12 AM) (all: from Media Network blog Aug 20-21 via DXLD) RTE was on 252 kHz most of last night with a relay of Radio 1 parallel to 567 kHz. However the transmitter power must have been very low as the frequency was completely dominated by Algiers here during the hours of darkness. When Atlantic 252 was on air, they used to reduce power at night to 100 kW, but I suspect that RTE was running much less than this last night. This morning RTE is still on 252 kHz but now in the clear with good reception here in Berkshire. 73 (Dave Kenny, Aug 21, BDXC-UK via DXLD) ** ISRAEL. For those of you tracking local (Israel) stuff. GalGalatz, which is Army Radio's secondary network (more music), has changed their FM frequency in the north. It has changed from 106.4 to 107 FM. This according to the news on the hour - and their website http://www.glz.msn.co.il (Doni Rosenzweig, Aug 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ISRAEL. Kol Israël a indiqué qu'à compter du 17 août 2003, l`émission de 1645 TU sera temporairement supprimée et celle de 1000 TU sera réduite de 5 minutes (Christian Ghibaudo - 14 août 2003 et Mohamed Khallel - 15 août 2003) (informations issues de http://perso.wanadoo.fr/jm.aubier via DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH. I notice that the Korean Central Broadcasting Station has now popped up on 6250.3 // 6398.9 naturally in Korean. From Memory this station is a relay of the Domestic service and is relayed to the substantial Korean diaspora in Japan. I wonder if the senders were redirected away from the former northern based clandestines that were closed at the end of July (Robin L. Harwood, Norwood Tasmania, Aug 18, EDXP via DXLD) ** LIBERIA. On Tuesday, Monrovia's Catholic-run Radio Veritas played gospel songs celebrating peace. The station recently resumed broadcasting after fuel shortages during 10 weeks of rebel sieges shut down transmitters in the city. . . http://www.guardian.co.uk/worldlatest/story/0,1280,-3045313,00.html (via Jill Dybka, MSIS, Aug 20, WORLD OF RADIO 1196, DXLD) WTFK? Used to be on SW 5470. Rest of story about other things (gh, DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS [non]. BREAKING NEWS: RADIO 10 FM TO TEST TOMORROW IN DRM!! Talpa Radio International has announced that Radio 10 FM will become the first Dutch domestic radio station to broadcast in DRM. They will make a test transmission tomorrow, Friday 22 August, between 1100 and 1300 UT via the UK mediumwave transmitter at Orfordness on 1296 kHz. Although Talpa Radio is continuing with efforts to secure terrestrial FM coverage for Radio 10, it is seriously considering DRM as a possible long-term solution. Regular mediumwave broadcasts in AM continue on 1395 at 0400-1800 UT (Media Network blog Aug 21 via DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. Will be interesting to see what frequency list will be provided for the new 24 hr broadcast and if reception will be reasonable here in the Northeastern part of the US. I have to guess it will not beamed to the US but only to the Pacific region. I do not see an advanced look at the frequency schedule on the website and only a couple of weeks to go (Bob Montgomery, Levittown, PA USA, Aug 21, swprograms via DXLD) ** OKLAHOMA [non]. HAM-CONCERT PIANIST-JOGGER COMPLETES 880-MILE CHARITY RUN --- http://www2.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/08/21/2/?nc=1 NEWINGTON, CT, Aug 21, 2003 -- Concert pianist and cancer survivor Martin Berkofsky, KC3RE, has completed his 880-mile Celebrate Life Run from Tulsa to the Chicago area. An ARRL member, Berkofsky set out jogging on April 9, his 60th birthday, to celebrate his recovery from cancer and to raise money for research into the disease. He concluded his marathon around midday August 20 in Zion, Illinois. There he`ll perform a special concert today for cancer patients, their families and staff members at Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) Midwestern Regional Medical Center. ``How grateful I am for all of the support and help from so many radio amateurs,`` Berkofsky told ARRL. He singled out for special mention the Tulsa Amateur Radio Club and its president, Gregg Wonderly, W5GGW, as well as the Washington (Missouri) Zero Beaters, the Chicago FM Club, and his QSL manager Murray Green, K3BEQ. He also acknowledged ``the countless radio amateurs who kept me company with on the road QSOs, many even driving out to meet me personally and to help me with road directions when my maps weren`t clear.`` Along the way, Berkofsky carried a quad-band ham radio handheld transceiver to chat with locals as he passed through their communities. He marked his daily position using APRS gear loaned to him by John Chamberlain, AC5CV, of Waco, Texas, and he also made some QSOs via EchoLink. Berkofsky says he set a daily record of 23.1 miles on July 16. ``Went through the wall, as runners would say,`` he told ARRL. ``Could have continued even longer had it not gotten dark!`` CTCA and the Cancer Treatment Research Foundation (CTRF) sponsored Berkofsky`s run and are benefactors of the donations pledged on its behalf. CTCA says his run raised more than $80,000 for cancer research. ``How proud I am to say that Amateur Radio played such a large part in this,`` Berkofsky added. It also garnered extensive media coverage along the way, with nearly every local newspaper running a feature story on the pianist as he passed through their towns. In St Louis, Martin`s Celebrate Life Run made the front page of the St Louis Post- Dispatch. He also received TV and radio coverage. Following his Zion encore concert, Berkofsky will fly back to Tulsa for a Saturday night benefit for cancer patients at the CTCA hospital there. He`ll return home to Northern Virginia next week, where he hopes to resume his hamming activity on 20 meters. ``I think it will take months to really understand everything that has happened,`` Berkofsky said. ``What an incredible experience, what incredible lessons. I hope I come out of this as a better person.`` Copyright © 2003, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved (ARRL via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** PERU. Fascinating discussion of the Incas and the quipus in particular on hour 2 of The Connection, Thu Aug 21 --- We have the alphabet. The Egyptians used hieroglyphics. The ancient Mesopotamians had cuneiform marks that they pressed into bricks. Most civilizations develop a language and find a way of writing it down. Which is why anthropologists have wondered for years about the Incas. The great South American seemed to have everything but writing. They formed a complex government, conquered lands from what is now Colombia to Chile, but left no known record of their achievements. They did have strange things called khipus, made out of string, sort of like a grass skirt with knots. Now one anthropologist is taking a new look at khipus, arguing that these twisted knots and different colors of string might actually be the first known three-dimensional form of writing. Listen: http://realserver.bu.edu:8080/ramgen/w/b/wbur/connection/audio/2003/08/con_0821b.rm (via Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU [and non]. Hola Glenn, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA. El programa "La Voz de la Liberación", de la secta "Dios es amor" --- capítulo Perú --- fue captado el 19-08, a las 0532 UT, SINPO 4-3, en la frecuencia de 6020.34 kHz. La misma programación se repetía en 6060.19 kHz. Pensaba --- al principio --- que era Alcaraván Radio, pero el 20-08 escuché a Alcaraván en 6009.8 kHz, mientras la otra estación estaba en 6020.34 kHz. Primera vez que oigo esta emisora. Acá en Venezuela la misma secta se ha apoderado de un gran número de emisoras de OM. 73's y buen DX... (Adán González, Aug 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Radio Victoria uit Peru komt de laatste tijd 's-morgen goed door met id's en al op 6020 (6020.313). Tijd zo vanaf 04.30 utc tot wel 8.26 utc. Ik hoor hem op dit moment (0820 UT) heel zachtjes door de ruis. Ik heb er opnames van gemaakt! groeten, (Hans, SDZ. http://www.hansdezeeuw.nl Aug 21, BDXC via DXLD) ** PITCAIRN. UK HANGS ON TO PITCAIRN http://www.nbr.co.nz/home/column_article.asp?id=6861&cid=5&cname=Asia printer-friendly version: http://www.nbr.co.nz/print/print.asp?id=6861&cid=5&cname=Asia (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** ROMANIA. Sur les 12 émetteurs ondes courtes de la radio roumaine, 6 seulement sont en activité, d'où un manque de signal sur certaines fréquences. Il n'est pas possible de modifier les fréquences attribuées jusqu'à fin octobre (Radio Roumanie Internationale - 15 août 2003) (informations issues de http://perso.wanadoo.fr/jm.aubier via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. Getting very weak (classical?) music on 1935 kHz at 1959 UT 20/8/03; from the math I see it can't be a real harmonic --- must be some kind of intermod. Later: it's in again tonight, even stronger: it's from St Petersburg, a mix of Radio Maria 1053 & VOR 1494! (carrying audio from both) 2001 UT; also something on 1926 kHz at 2125 utc 20/8/03 verv weak; couldn't get enough audio to make any ID Best regards (Tim Bucknall, Congleton, Cheshire, UK, Icom R75, Wellbrooke ALA1530 outdoor Loop, harmonics yahoogroup via DXLD) ** SUDAN [non]. Thank you for your e-mail. I am surprised to hear from someone in New Zealand about our SW service for Sudan. Are you Sudanese, have you worked there, or are you just interested? Regardless, I am happy to hear that we have people wanting to listen to us from all over the world. We are targeting our broadcasts to Eastern Africa, so you may not be able to hear us, but our programs run at these times at these frequencies: 6 PM to 7 PM (GMT+2) at 17,630 khz. 7 PM to 8 PM (GMT+2) at 17,660 khz We will be on air Monday through Friday. So if you are listening during the week, you should hear us at 8 AM to 10 AM, assuming you are at GMT+12. Unfortunately, after the sun comes up, SW reception starts to diminish. With luck you may be able to pick us up faintly. Right now we are running a test signal that consists of 30 minutes of Sudanese music that repeats for the 2 hours. Starting Thursday (August 7) we will add other content, including some news about Sudan. We are starting humbly and it will be some weeks before we will be able to offer a completely original 2-hour program every day. Still, in the coming days there is much we hope to do. It may be difficult for you to tune us in with only music playing. Starting Thursday it should be easier to identify us when you hear us. If you have questions, please let me know. You may send a reception report to me or to the radio e- mail, which is srs@edc.org. SRS is Sudan Radio Service. We have dropped the word ``independent`` from our working title. We think S-R- S has a nicer ring to it. I look forward to hearing from you. Best regards, Jeremy Groce, Radio Programming Advisor. EDC (Education Development Center, Inc.) Sudan Radio Service Project. In Washington, DC: (igroce@edc.org) (via NEW ZEALAND DX TIMES AUGUST 2003 via DXLD) UNITED KINGDOM, 17630, Sudan R. Service, 1608+ 21 August. Oddly enough, found on this frequency with Afro Hi-life music at tune-in, and quickly into multi-lingual IDs, including English by W announcer as "You are listening to Sudan R. Service on 17630 kHz", then long canned English ID/mission announcement by W as: "Good evening, you are listening to Sudan R. Service ? shortwave radio service dedicated to peace and development in the Sudan. We will be bringing you a variety of BBC(?) programs, including programs on health ?. We also will be bringing you independent and balanced news. The Sudan R. Service is operated by a ? Sudan... one of the most important objectives of this radio station is to provide you with accurate... we will also ? cultural programs including music, stories, and ?. We will ? development of ? programs ? on how to prepare your livestock, information of local markets... we need your help... SRS ? Sudan R. Service (address, but couldn't copy)...". As you can tell, there was quite a bit a fading. Pretty weak signal. I left and returned later, around 1630, only to find them gone, possibly back on 17660. At 1658, they suddenly came back on 17630 with M and W alternating and mixed with instrumental music. So they must've erroneously punched up the wrong frequency for the first part of the 1600 hour (Dave Valko, Dunlo PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** SWEDEN. RADIO SWEDEN -- Coming up on Radio Sweden: Thursday: In "HeartBeat", child-proofing the home and imaginary friends Friday: Our weekly review Saturday: "Studio 49" Sunday: In "Sounds Nordic" Aeysha and the new room at Music Museum for people with learning disabilities (SCDX/MediaScan Aug 20 via DXLD) ** TAJIKISTAN. Tajik Radio has added an English program for the domestic audience on its 2nd National Channel (1143 & 7245 kHz) at 0800-0830 (Mon-Sat). The program includes news, English lessons and pop music. (Monitored by Alexander Polyakov, Uzbekistan). (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, Aug 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K [and non]. Does the BBC's sexed-up reporting on the blackout count as a glitch? :-) From listening to CBC North Quebec in the first hour after the power went out, and then later listening to WABC radio it was fairly obvious that the Canadians were handling the outage the same way New York City (and I presume the other major cities hit) were: there was some confusion at first, which is understandable, but the people handled it with aplomb for the most part. The BBCWS didn't give this impression at all. In listening to the 0200 UTC edition of "The World Today", the folks in Bush House (to a much greater extent than their correspondents here in North America) kept using the word "chaos" to describe the situation in NYC. I laughed particularly hard when the correspondent said that many people were "taking the chaos in stride" -- if they're taking things in stride, it's not chaos! After the Bush House folks talked to their New York correspondent, they went to their Toronto correspondent, and tried to paint a completely different picture of what was going on, as though they thought Toronto (and by extension the rest of Canada) was a model of how to do things, while New York (and by extension the rest of the US) was a model of how *not* to do things. Ironically, the broadcaster that I thought gave the most objective, just-the-facts report on the blackout was China Radio International (Ted Schuerzinger, Aug 20, swprograms via DXLD) ** U K. News of GB2RS on 5 MHz. The experimental GB2RS news reading on 5405 kHz upper sideband each Sunday at 12.30pm local time is still attracting a large number of NoV-holders to the after-news net. Today Peter, GM4WCE, is reading the news from Ellon near Aberdeen. During the peak of summer, the D-region of the ionosphere has been causing considerable attenuation to across-the-UK signals, but last Sunday - when Gordon, G3LEQ, read the news - he found that propagation conditions were much better than during the last month. So far his experiments with various 5 MHz antennas have shown the basic 88-foot reference dipole at 0.15-wavelength above ground to be the best performer. He issued a challenge over the air to other experimenters to find and demonstrate a more efficient and practical antenna that outperforms the basic dipole for NVIS (Near Vertical Incidence Skywave) propagation. So far no-one has said that they are experimenting with the Jamaica or Shirley aerial arrays which favour Near Zenithal Radiation, but this may be due to space limitations. Anyone able to try them out is asked to contact the GB2RS News Manager, Gordon, G3LEQ, on 01 565 652 652 or by e-mail to gb2rs@ntlworld.com (Radio Society of Great Britain GB2RS News script for August 24, 2003 posted August 20 on uk.radio.amateur by G4RGA via John Norfolk, DXLD) I am somewhat bemused by the hams` fascination with propagation on this `new` band. We all-band DX listeners have been familiar with it forever (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. AMSAT`s Roy Neal, K6DUE, Silent Key. Roy Neal, K6DUE, of AMSAT has become a Silent Key. He was recovering after heart surgery but died from complications on the 15th of August. Roy Neal was for many years the NBC-news Science Correspondent, covering the American space missions for US television audiences. Through his extensive contacts at NASA, he was instrumental in convincing NASA management to fly amateur radio on-board the Space Shuttle. Later, he worked on the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station - or `ARISS` - program and provided much support to AMSAT and the ARRL on amateur radio space matters (Radio Society of Great Britain GB2RS News script for August 24, 2003 posted August 20 on uk.radio.amateur by G4RGA via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. HAM RADIOS CAME TO RESCUE IN BLACKOUT http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/blackout_ham_radio (via Jill Dybka, DXLD) When everything else failed, ham radio operators stepped into the breach as backup. . . http://wizzer.advance.net/cgi-free/getstory_ssf.cgi?a0460_BC_Blackout-HamRadio&&news&newsflash-national (AP via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. Re: WVIP Item in DXLD 3-150 Hi Glenn --- I was born in Mt. Kisco and lived in Bedford Hills (4 mi away) for more than 25 years before marriage and totally agree with Karl on the waste of a station. I grew up listening to WVIP-AM mostly hoping for a snow day from school, when it played mostly what was known as elevator music. I recall visiting the station in 1994 (they were next to the cardiac rehab facility I went to, located on Radio Circle) for information to give to the National Radio Club for a station profile. By the time I mailed in the info a month or two later, Tony Fitzherbert of the NRC said the station had switched to automated format and no longer followed the info I sent him. I recall a trailer to the left of the main studio building. Maybe it's the same trailer used after the fire. At 2230 UT on 19 August, the signal from WVIP appears to be at full power as I'm hearing them at S9 +10 level as indicated on the NRD-515 S-Meter. Recheck at 0000 20 August has them at S7+. The 20th ed. 9 of the NRC Logbook shows 33 watts. Not sure if that is now the current low power Karl means or a later Logbook shows something different, but it certainly sounds too strong even for only 15 miles from the station (Mahopac to Mt. Kisco distance). Maybe Karl can indicate the correct time for the power reduction? At 0045 when I bailed out, WVIP still appeared to be at full power as I had not heard a discernible change in level with a signal of S7 to S8. By the way, 1330 is being received at an S5-6 and is being QRMed a lot even using a K9AY loop. I wonder what Radio Visión Cristiana is gaining with two 5 kW (day power) stations 40 miles apart. One final recheck at 0415 had them at a very "fadey" S4 to S7 in addition to a longer fade cycle with an ESPN station. I would guess the way they sound now, they are on lower power (John Sgrulletta, Mahopac, NY, JRC NRD-515 /K9AY Loop, Aug 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) If it leads to one additional convert, it`s worth it??? (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. BLACK DAYS FOR US MEDIA --- WHILE MILLIONS OF NORTH AMERICANS STRUGGLED TO MAKE DO WITHOUT ELECTRICITY, ADVERTISERS WERE ALSO LEFT POWERLESS Stefano Hatfield, Wednesday August 20 2003, The Guardian As politicians, television and newspaper pundits flail around looking for someone to blame for the Great Blackout of 2003, media owners can get down to counting the cost. All told it was, understandably, a miserable and difficult couple of days for much of the east coast media, struggling to get their programmes [sic --- we have programs over here --- gh] and papers out to an audience hungry for information. Many found their back-up systems were simply not prepared for how sudden and total the blackout proved to be. If anyone "won" the media battle, then it was an old stalwart: radio. Some of the sights of the day were crowds of bewildered pedestrians huddled around car or old transistor radios, chattering nervously as the scale of the debacle became apparent. It was through radio that the few advertisers that were able to take advantage of the situation made themselves heard: most notably Duracell, which had a great blackout. The other marketer who was quick to capitalise was actually a Brit. David Morison bid for the keywords "blackout," "black out" and "power outage" on the Google search engine. When people who had power for their computers then entered these words or phrases on Google's web search, they saw Morison's ads, headlined "power outage" which read, "how do you keep your employees informed in an emergency situation?" with a link to his website. There was also blackout-related news and advice on handling power outages. Visits to his one-man site, http://www.emergencyintranet.com increased by 40 times. Television stations in the north-east were soon able to regain their signals, but nobody was watching. The real challenge now is to pin down just how many consumer eyeballs advertisers lost. It's not easy, given that there is still dispute over the 50 million figure ascribed to the number of people who were affected by the outage. The north-east is estimated to contain some 15% of the national viewership, with New York metropolitan area accounting for perhaps half of that. "Make goods" (free ads) will be expected from advertisers to compensate for their ads not being seen. It will certainly affect the crucial Nielsen TV ratings. Meanwhile, early estimates are that anything up to $20m in ad revenues will have been lost by networks that had to switch to blanket news coverage - for anyone with a battery-operated television. To be honest, we were dreading the moment the television news returned. Without power, we were blessedly spared NY1's tales of commuters "bravely" going home ("Normally we take the subway, but today we walked over the bridge! No-one mugged us for our Nikes. That would never have happened before September 11th"). We were also spared the New York Post's uplifting tales of courage: "the day I took the stairs and lived!" and similar. Having been killed by the New York Daily News on the first editions, the Post's journos worked in the dark all night to produce a special second edition on Friday morning - only for terrible distribution problems to prevent many copies ever hitting the streets. Forget the commuters - the executive who fesses up responsibility for that to Rupert Murdoch really is "brave". The New York Times's coverage was excellent, and so extensive it could almost have been prepared in advance without anyone leaving the office. But that could never happen at the grey lady, could it? Accurate reporting was at the heart of what was, for me, one of the jarring moments: on the excellent PBS radio [sic --- maybe he means NPR? Incredibly, many Americans also mix up PBS (TV) and NPR (radio), two entirely separate oganizations --- gh], no less. The anchor said "Now, we shouldn't let this affect our relationship with Canada, should we?". This was early on in the blame game - once it was clear that the culprit wasn't Iraq, North Korea or France, Canada was fingered as the foul perpetrator of a monumental cock-up that couldn't possibly be America's fault. I guess I should vouch for the bravery of some advertising Brits who had to "endure" the blackout terror in the unfamiliar surroundings of the rooftop pool at SoHo House. I counted them all out flat on sun loungers on Friday morning, and I counted them back in the pool that same afternoon. Assorted key Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R, WPP executives and commercials production freelancers waved their Blackberries around meaningfully, and swapped stories of the German model who thought her hairdryer might have triggered the entire blackout. Somehow, they all endured the mini fire and evacuation, the "trauma" of having to open their own windows for air, and then their Ben and Jerry's ice cream bars melting. Our indefatigable host Podge, who actually had worked short-handed night and day, was not the first service sector employer to question Mayor Bloomberg's bizarre exhortation to New Yorkers to stay at home and take a "snow day". By Friday night I was sick of the city authorities and the electricity people using the media - as they had all day - to tell us that power had returned to the city "pretty much" everywhere. At 9.02 pm however, after 29 hours, we were still "pretty much" in the dark in SoHo. At 9.03 pm, though, the fan started twirling. It was over. But I will forever cherish my "I survived the blackout" T-shirt as proof of my "bravery". So, that was the blackout. Now, of course, we are being told how wonderful we were for not panicking. Well, of course we didn't - we still had some leftover duct tape from a previous orange security alert, so we were bound to be safe. Unlike during the 1977 blackout, we didn't even go out looting for television sets. What would be the point? We couldn't watch them. Stefano Hatfield is contributing editor of Advertising Age and Creativity Copyright Guardian Newspapers Limited (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** U S A [non?]. Getting some jamming on WHRI 9495 between 1200 and 1300 during the Power Hour Show here in Atlanta. After WHRI closed at 1300 the jammer closed one minute later. So much for freedom of speech (LOU KF4EON Johnson, Aug 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Other than the timing, what evidence do you have that this is deliberate interference against WHRI? Please describe the `jamming` in as great detail as possible (gh) ** U S A. KXOK --- THE ST. LOUIS LEGEND: http://www.630kxok.com/ (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) historical site; the KXOK calls have taken a sidetrip since to --- Enid OK! At least on TV (gh) ** U S A. HIGH AND MIGHTY --- IN A CORPORATE-CENTERED NATION, LEGENDARY TEXAN JIM HIGHTOWER SPREADS HIS MESSAGE OF PROGRESSIVE POPULISM --- BY TAMARA WIEDER YOU CAN CALL Jim Hightower all kinds of things: former Texas agriculture commissioner; national radio commentator; columnist; public speaker; modern-day Johnny Appleseed; founder of the nationwide "Rolling Thunder Down-Home Democracy Tour"; author of books such as If the Gods Had Meant Us To Vote They Would Have Given Us Candidates (HarperCollins, 2000) and the recently published Thieves in High Places: They`ve Stolen Our Country and It's Time To Take It Back (Viking); America`s most popular populist. But when it comes to the hell-raising Hightower, it`s best simply to let him do the talking... http://www.bostonphoenix.com/boston/news_features/qa/documents/03106270.asp (Boston Phoenix, via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** U S A. RADIO STATION TO RESUME BROADCASTING FRIDAY By Daniel Barlow, Reformer Staff BRATTLEBORO -- An unlicensed community radio station shut down by the Federal Communications Commission in late June intends to return to the airwaves on a new frequency on Friday {Aug 22]. Members of radio free brattleboro said the more than 2,000 signatures collected from area residents justifies the station's return to the public airwaves, although the FCC still considers the station to be operating illegally. When rfb was shut down on June 24, station co-founder Larry Bloch said the FCC agents asked him to produce either the station's license or its authority to broadcast. The signatures from area residents supporting rfb's return to the airwaves constitute that authority, Bloch said. "We are a community radio station and the community has given us the authority to broadcast," he said. "We've done some research, spoken with an attorney familiar with the FCC, and this seems to be the most sensible way to return to the airwaves." The station will resume broadcasting on Friday at 5 p.m., at its new frequency of 107.9 FM, Bloch said, and will feature a number of the station's DJs passing the microphone around until 8 p.m. A spokesman for the FCC in Washington declined to comment on the move. "The Federal Communications Commission has no comment on the subject matter you called us about," the spokesman said. Founded five years ago, rfb has broadcast at less than 10 watts from an apartment building in downtown Brattleboro and could only be heard within the town limits. Between 60 and 70 DJs are part of the station and pay dues to keep it running. Station DJs said rfb performed a valuable community service in training residents in the art of radio broadcasting and was a local news source and outlet for opinion. According to the station's promotional information, rfb was "part of the national movement to resist homogeneous corporate influence and return the airwaves to the hands and voices of the citizens, as it was intended." The FCC was acting in response to two complaints that rfb, which used to broadcast at 88.1 megahertz, interfered with the frequency for WFCR, the Amhert, Mass., National Public Radio affiliate that broadcasts at 88.5 megahertz. One of the complaints came from WFCR and one from a Guilford resident. At the time of the shutdown, one of the FCC agents warned a DJ that if the station went back on the air, U.S. marshals would seize the equipment as evidence and "put it in jail." The lawyers with whom rfb consulted advised the station that with the frequency switch and the community support, the FCC is likely to leave the station alone, Bloch said. "We think nothing will happen," Bloch said. "They've got bigger fish to fry than going after a true community radio station." Michael Mello, a professor at Vermont Law School, said rfb's move appears to fall within the realm of civil disobedience. He said while the federal government has legal authority to shut down the station, rfb members may also have a legal case if they challenge the shutdown. More troubling, said Mello, is that the federal government would choose to use its resources fighting a tiny station like rfb when terrorism continues to loom as a larger threat. "The federal government is stretched so thin after Sept. 11, that it is just insane to devote the time and manpower and energy to go after a group of harmless people," he said. "This seems to me to be a misuse of federal resources. It's really quite obscene." The new frequency is the third for rfb, which switched from 88.1 FM to 88.9 FM a few weeks before the shutdown to make room for a planned National Public Radio classical music station. [sic --- NPR owns no stations --- gh] Bloch said no station currently broadcasts at 107.9 FM -- one of the frequencies left open for the 100-watt community radio stations for which the FCC accepted applications in 2001. A license was never granted for that frequency, Bloch said, and the station never applied for one as it would have required it to cease broadcasting. "We're in safe territory," Bloch said. Brattleboro Selectboard member Pat DeAngelo, a vocal supporter of rfb, said she was delighted to hear the station would return, but added that she knew nothing of the legal ramifications that could result when the station resumes broadcasts this week. "I don't know much about the procedure of what they are doing, but I certainly support them," she said. "I like getting my information from local organizations, whether it's rfb or ibrattleboro.com . I don't want to get my news from just one or two large corporations." Bloch said he and many other members of rfb were surprised by the large and diverse outpouring of community support the station received after it was shut down. Along with the more than 2,000 signatures the station collected, numerous "free rfb" T-shirts were sold, he said. "It seems the station's appeal crosses all boundaries," he said. "We've trained over 500 people at the station and it seems that everyone knows somebody who has worked or does work with us." A new program schedule for the station is being developed, Bloch said, and he expects a majority of the station's shows to resume normal broadcast soon (Brattleboro Reformer Aug 20 via Artie Bigley, WORLD OF RADIO 1196, DXLD) ** U S A. FCC CHIEF TO PROD TV STATIONS ON LOCALISM POWELL TO RESPOND TO CRITICS WITH CALLS TO SERVE VIEWERS By Frank Ahrens, Washington Post Staff Writer, Wednesday, August 20, 2003; Page E01 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A17211-2003Aug19.html (via Kraig Krist, DXLD) FCC PANEL TO STUDY LOCAL MEDIA http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A23027-2003Aug20.html (via Kraig Krist, Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** VENEZUELA [and non]. LOS 15 AÑOS DE LA FM COMERCIAL EN VENEZUELA Era 1ero. de julio de 1988. 2 de la tarde. Regresaba del liceo como cualquier otro día y encendí el radio para hacer mi habitual "escaneo" de bandas. Para mi sorpresa, al final del cuadrante me topé con una potente estación con música continua y excelente modulación; era la frecuencia de 107.3 MHz. Sin saberlo, era testigo presencial de un momento histórico en la radiodifusión venezolana: el comienzo de la "Generación de la FM". Ya dos años antes nos habían bautizado como la "Generación Halley" --- en clara alusión al famoso cometa --- y ahora asistíamos al descubrimiento de la "banda misteriosa", "la banda del ruido". El comienzo de la explotación del "HI-FI" estéreo vernacular estaba a la vuelta de la esquina. Venezuela, para el momento, era uno de los pocos países del mundo donde prácticamente no había radiodifusión en modulación de frecuencia. Durante años sólo conocí una estación en dicha banda, la legendaria Emisora Cultural de Caracas, 97.7 MHz. Lo único que podía oírse en Caracas y en casi toda Venezuela. Después capté, varias veces, la señal de La Voz de Maravén (una de las desaparecidas filiales de Petróleos de Venezuela), localizada en Punto Fijo. Del resto, no había emisoras de FM en Venezuela. Hasta mediados de la década de los 60, la FM fue una banda para enlaces entre estudio y planta. Nada más. En los 70 hubo promesas de concesión de licencias para explotadores privados, sin embargo transcurrieron muchos años sin una respuesta definitiva por parte de los organismos reguladores estatales. Para 1985, yo ya hacía diexismo en FM. Lo veía tan apasionante como el de las ondas cortas. Conectaba la antena del televisor a mi radio y podía atrapar casi cualquiera cosa presente en el éter. Como siempre he vivido en el Litoral Central de Venezuela, mi ubicación ha sido estratégica para captar las frecuencias muy altas. Mis primeros DX's fueron Curazao (Radio Korsou 93.9, Radio Hoyer 2 105.1, Z-FM 95.5- Radio Curom), Puerto Rico (Cosmos 94, Cadena Salsoul 98.5, Criolla 103, Sonorama 107) y las Islas Vírgenes (WVIS, 106.1). Y todo ello gracias a lo "desértico" del espectro radioeléctrico venezolano. Incluso, una vez sintonicé Radio Rosario 99.5 ¡fue fantástico, no lo podía creer! y Radio Cidade de Brasil ¡menos lo creía! Como comprenderán, aquel 1ero. de julio de 1988 significó dos cosas para mí: una, que al fin se iba a hacer radio de una manera más amplia en Venezuela. Dos, que ya no iba a poder hacer más diexismo en FM porque el cuadrante se iba a inundar de emisoras locales, como efectivamente ocurrió. Eran dos sentimientos encontrados. Dulces y amargos a la vez. A partir de la salida al aire de "Éxitos 107", primera estación de radiodifusión sonora comercial en FM de Venezuela, la radio dio un vuelco total en este país de Suramérica. Podría llamarse como el renacer de ese medio que a tantos nos ha embrujado. Luego de 1988, años fructíferos vinieron y la radio inclusive llegó a competir con la televisión en popularidad, sobre todo entre los más jóvenes. Lamentablemente, esa llama que se encendió a finales de los 80 se fue apagando lentamente y propuestas "quemadas" hasta el cansancio como el formato de la "radio participativa", pusieron en la guillotina la creatividad de productores, locutores y musicalizadores. Y ni hablar que eso de la "radio participativa" sólo se limitó a poner a los oyentes al aire cuando telefoneaban a la emisora. ¡Desperdicio total! La Generación Halley-FM se evaporaba. En la actualidad, la tecnología ha sido usada por ciertos dueños de circuitos y estaciones de radio para deshumanizar el medio y circunscribirlo a "dar la hora y pinchar un CD". Las computadoras, que podrían ser un gran aliado, se han convertido en un gran enemigo de la radio y de su audiencia. Ya ni siquiera se puede dedicar o pedir una canción. Ya no se puede disfrutar de otro tipo de música que no sean los mentados "éxitos" del TOP 40. La mercantilización en su máxima expresión es el actual virus que corroe la radio en FM y en general, la radio comercial. La única salvación a la vista podría ser el naciente fenómeno de las radios comunitarias, las cuales rescatan buena parte el sentimiento de "hacer radio" de las primeras décadas: la radio como un servicio público y no como maquinita para producir monedas (Adán González, Certificado de Locutor 26.950, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Aug 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. Hi Last night on the 20th, I was hearing a station on 4939.63 using LSB mode around 0900 to past 1000 GMT. The announcers spoke Spanish and had one female at times and one male at times. They played an awful lot of Spanish language songs. The audio had a bit of echo to it, not too loud or distorted. At no time did I hear anything remotely sounding like an ID from either announcer. I figured at first if it was Radio Nacional from Quito [sic] I would at least hear Quito somewhere in there around the hour, but nothing was heard at all. Any ideas on who this is? I have two listings that have the stations running on this frequency of sorts at variable frequencies. One from Venezuela, one from Bolivia. Tonight at 0809 on this same frequency I can just tell something is there. I hear the het but not much of anything else. Every so often a bit of audio pops in, mostly music. I am using the RX320 and the 50 ft south wire to hear this (Chris Dx'ing in Kentucky, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Has he read the discussion of 4960v in DXLD 3-150? (gh) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ PRIME TIME SHORTWAVE After a hiatus of a month and a half the Prime Time Shortwave website is up and running again. I had to take some time off from working on my database due to a torn retina. I can't see too well yet but it shouldn't be too much longer. At Prime Time Shortwave you will find schedules for shortwave stations sorted by time, country and even by frequency. Daniel Lyddy provides the schedules in palm pilot format and I provide the schedules in html, ascii, dBase and Excel formats. Fellow Canadian International DX Club editor provides an up-to-date listing of DX media programs. Prime Time Shortwave can be found at http://www.primetimeshortwave.com Users of screen reader programs can find the ascii text files at http://www.primetimeshortwave.com/time.txt and http://www.primetimeshortwave.com/country.txt Enjoy, (Dan Sampson, Aug 21, swprograms via DXLD) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ COMPANY CREATES VCR FOR RADIO http://www.nbc5.com/irresistible/2421299/detail.html?z=dp&dpswid=1260382&dpp (WMAQ via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) BLOOD FLOW TO BRAIN CHANGES WITH RADIO-WAVE EXPOSURE Tuesday, August 19, 2003 at 17:31 JST TOKYO - Japanese researchers said Tuesday they have found that blood flow in the brains of people who complain of irritation from electromagnetic waves changes when they are exposed to such waves from appliances such as cell phones and power lines. . . http://www.japantoday.com/e/?content=news&cat=1&id=270016 (via Jill Dybka, DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ POWERFUL GEOMAGNETIC STORM SENT OUT BY THE SUN A strong geomagnetic storm that rated a G4, the second highest rating on the NOAA space weather scales, was reported today at 5 a.m. EDT by the NOAA Space Environment Center in Boulder, Colo. These storms are disturbances in the geomagnetic field caused by gusts in the solar wind that blows by Earth. . . http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=12359 (via Jill Dybka, DXLD) ARNIE CORO'S DXERS UNLIMITED HF PLUS LOW BAND VHF PROPAGATION UPDATE AND FORECAST According to scientists, this latest geomagnetic storm caught them all by surprise; it came out of nowhere and did send the A index shooting to sky high figures above the 60 mark, while the K index at times went even up to 7. From a very authorized research organization in Belgium, I received the following comment about what happened on the 18th of August that left the HF bands dead for several hours at many locations around the world. Here is what the Belgian solar astronomers said, and I quote: ``Since 0000 UT Aug. 19, the N-S component of the interplanetary magnetic field turned positive again (now near +20nano Teslas), and around 0400 UT, the geomagnetic storm, which has reached major to severe storm levels yesterday, ended rather abruptly. The geomagnetic field is expected to remain unsettled to active until late Aug. 20 or Aug. 21, when the Earth will be submitted to the influence of a low latitude coronal hole now crossing the central meridian of the Sun. Although it started to decay, active region Catania#96 (NOAA0431) produced two M flares this morning (M2.2 at 0759 UT, M2.9 at 1004 UT). This region is thus still capable of producing M flares over the next 2-3 days, before it passes the West limb.`` As you may realize, current solar terrestrial conditions are far from ideal for the enjoyment of the short wave region of the radio spectrum!!! After a significant geomagnetic storm that struck Earth on Monday, conditions are now going back to near normal, but only for a few hours, as scientists are forecasting the impact of yet another stream of particles from the Sun that will further disrupt HF propagation. Solar flux is now around 115 units, and the A index was moving down at the time I was writing the script of the show at around 18 hours UT Tuesday. The optical sunspot count was very near 100, and the effective sunspot number, the figure used for a nowcast [sic] of HF propagation conditions was around 65. Be ready to pick up some interesting AM broadcast band DX if the increase in solar wind speed and particle content causes another geomagnetic storm within the next 24 to 36 hours. Chances for 6 meter sporadic E openings are very low at this moment. We still must wait at least two more weeks to see some improvement in HF propagation (Prof. Arnaldo Coro A., CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited Aug 19 via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via WORLD OF RADIO 1196, DXLD) PROPAGATION NEWS Solar data for the period from the 11th to the 17th of August, compiled by Neil Clarke, G0CAS. http://www.g0cas.demon.co.uk/main.htm Despite a moderately sized and magnetically complex sunspot group, solar activity was `very low` on the 11th, and `low` for the remainder of the period. The largest solar flare that the group could muster was a C8, early on the 15th. Solar flux declined from 131 on the 13th to 119 by the 17th. The average was 127. The 90-day solar flux average on the 17th was 127, that`s two units up on last week. X-ray flux levels increased to peak at C1 units on the 14th but by the 17th levels were down to B3.7 units. The average was B5.3 units. Geomagnetic activity was unsettled; the most disturbed day was the 12th with an Ap index of 25 units. Around midday on the 17th a sudden storm was recorded at the ACE spacecraft. Just prior to that the three-hourly K index was zero. The daily Ap average was 16 units. Solar wind speeds at the ACE spacecraft declined from 750 kilometres per second to 420 by the 17th. Particle densities were low except on the 17th, when they increased to 23 particles per cubic centimetre. Bz fluctuated between minus and plus 8 nanoTeslas but on the 17th varied between minus 10 and plus 20 nanoTeslas. HF band conditions were once again rather poor due to seasonal effects. Hopefully, HF conditions should start to improve during the coming weeks as we head towards the autumn equinox. The daytime MUFs will increase, although unfortunately not to last year`s levels because of the continuing decline in the sunspot cycle. The minimum is still expected around the end of 2006 or early 2007. VHF Sporadic E is now less prolific than last month, but openings were reported on most days, including a number of double-hop 50 MHz contacts to the Middle East. A short 70 MHz opening to Slovenia occurred on the morning of the 15th. The continuing heat-wave across the UK and much of continental Europe again brought good extended tropospheric propagation at VHF and UHF. And finally the solar forecast. This week solar activity is expected to be mostly low with only a small chance that activity could increase to moderate. Solar flux should be around the 100 mark for the next couple of days but then increase as we head towards next weekend. Geomagnetic activity is expected to be disturbed for most of the coming week due to a recurring coronal hole. This hole has survived several solar rotations and it`s interesting watching it change shape with each rotation. This can be viewed at the SOHO website - look for the EIT 284 Angstroms image. The image is gold in colour and the coronal hole shows up as a large black area. MUFs during daylight hours at equal latitudes should be around 20 MHz for the south and 17 MHz for the north. The darkness hour lows should be around 11 MHz. Paths this week to the Middle East should have a maximum usable frequency, with a 50 per cent success rate, of about 24 MHz. The optimum working frequency, with a 90 per cent success rate, should be around 17 MHz. The best time to try this path should be between 0800 and 1700 UTC. Sporadic E may take place on the occasional day. The RSGB propagation news is also available in a Saturday update, posted every Saturday evening and for more on propagation generally, see http://www.rsgb.org/society/psc.htm (Radio Society of Great Britain GB2RS News script for August 24, 2003 posted August 20 on uk.radio.amateur by G4RGA via John Norfolk, DXLD) FORECAST OF SOLAR AND GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY 20 AUGUST - 15 SEPTEMBER Solar activity is expected to range from very low to moderate levels during the period. Activity for most of the period is expected to be at very low to low levels. Region 431 may produce an isolated M-class event before it rotates off the disk on 21 August. No greater than 10 MeV proton events at geosynchronous orbit are expected during the period. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux is expected to reach high levels on 25 August – 01 September, 05 – 07 September, and again on 10 – 13 September. The geomagnetic field is expected to range from quiet to major storm levels during the period. A large coronal hole high speed flow is due to return to a geoeffective position on 22 August with minor to major storm levels possible on 22 – 29 August. Another coronal hole high speed flow is due on 02 – 05 September with minor to major storm levels possible. Towards the end of the period a couple smaller coronal holes may produce isolated minor storm levels. :Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt :Issued: 2003 Aug 19 2211 UTC # Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Environment Center # Product description and SEC contact on the Web # http://www.sec.noaa.gov/wwire.html # # 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table # Issued 2003 Aug 19 # # UTC Radio Flux Planetary Largest # Date 10.7 cm A Index Kp Index 2003 Aug 20 120 15 3 2003 Aug 21 115 15 3 2003 Aug 22 105 25 5 2003 Aug 23 100 25 5 2003 Aug 24 100 20 4 2003 Aug 25 100 30 5 2003 Aug 26 100 25 5 2003 Aug 27 105 30 5 2003 Aug 28 105 30 5 2003 Aug 29 110 20 4 2003 Aug 30 120 15 3 2003 Aug 31 125 10 3 2003 Sep 01 130 15 3 2003 Sep 02 130 25 5 2003 Sep 03 135 35 6 2003 Sep 04 135 25 5 2003 Sep 05 130 15 3 2003 Sep 06 130 15 3 2003 Sep 07 130 15 3 2003 Sep 08 130 25 5 2003 Sep 09 130 35 6 2003 Sep 10 130 20 4 2003 Sep 11 130 12 3 2003 Sep 12 130 20 4 2003 Sep 13 130 15 3 2003 Sep 14 130 10 3 2003 Sep 15 125 12 3 (http://www.sec.noaa.gov/radio via WORLD OF RADIO 1196, DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-150, August 19, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3h.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1195: RFPI: Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 on 7445 [nominal times subject to delay or pre-emption] WWCR: Wed 0930 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1195.html SOLICITED TESTIMONIALS Traditionally, I've listened to WoR on WPKN-FM in Bridgeport, CT. I'm moving to Westchester County, NY. I'll have to find a local station or just keep listening to WPKN over the 'net... Thanks for keeping on the excellent work. Cheers, (Joshua S. Freeman) UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIALS Glenn, I've been burning your WOR shows to cd and listening on long car rides. They're a real pleasure to listen to. I've sort of re- kindled my childhood DX'ing hobby (hmmm... a typical, yet harmless mid-life crisis?:)). I just wanted to send along kudos. My only wish is that they were in *.mp3 format, as the conversion from Real to MP3 can be a long, tricky task. Any chance they would be posted in another audio format in the future? Again, the shows are really enjoyable. Keep up the good work (Todd Van Gelder, Maryland, Aug 18) They are converted to mp3 at http://www.yahoogroups.com/group/NetworkRadioInternational/files (gh) Thanks Glenn! Note: Always a pleasure to hear your weekly show. I hope this small amount helps in some way to support your outstanding program. Best to ya! (Larry NX2V Guerrera, Jericho, NY, Aug 18, with a contribution via PayPal) ** AFGHANISTAN. NEW AFGHAN RADIO STARTS BROADCASTING | Text of report by Afghan television on 18 August Radio Kelid officially started broadcasting programmes today. According to a report by the Bakhtar news agency correspondent, Radio Kelid broadcasts news shows, educational, sports, entertainment, cultural and social programmes round the clock on 88.00 FM. According to a relevant source, Radio Kelid covers an area of 30 km. Radio Kelid has been established with the technical cooperation of the Internews organization. It is also supported by the Orfan cultural organization and the Kelid, (?Morsal) and (?Sapida) weeklies. Source: Afghanistan Television, Kabul, in Dari 1500 gmt 18 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** AFGHANISTAN [non]. R. Amani, 15615 is via Armavir-Krasnodar, Russia (Wolfgang Bueschel, BC-DX Aug 17 via DXLD) ** ALGERIA. Has anybody heard RTA Algiers lately? A week ago there was some discussion on #swl if they are still on short wave, or not. Their web page at http://www.algerian-radio.dz isn't showing any short wave frequency anymore, but their FM transmitter park has been growing enormously. I've sent them an e-mail to ask for definite answer but haven't got a reply until now. 73, (Guido Schotmans - Antwerp, BELGIUM, Aug 19, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** ANTARCTICA. Ayer lunes 18 estuvo fuera del aire LRA36 en los 15476 khz. Alguien sabe si está operando normalmente??? (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentina, Aug 18?, Conexión Digital via DXLD) No puedo determinar a qué hora actual escribes, pero me parece que ayer era el domingo 17 cuando no opera la emisora. O puede deberse a la tormenta geomagnética, anulando señales polares. 73, (Glenn Hauser, ibid.) Hola Glenn! fue ayer lunes 18 cuando no encontré la emisora y me sorprendio. Generalmente la señal es muy fuerte por aquí. De todas maneras, bien vale la sugerencia. Muchas gracias (Arnaldo Slaen, ibid.) ** AUSTRALIA. Now I have monitored RA`s Feedback of Aug 16 from the WRN archive, Roger Broadbent interviewing Richard Trudgeon(sp?), community educator and business manager of ARDS. Some of the points which may not have been covered previously: People in Arnhem Land get some TV services, but not much on radio, especially in their own language. They get very good reception of R. Australia, but that`s in a foreign language, English. Richard is the main program producer, but he`s trying to recruit people in the various communities to participate. Some of the subjects mentioned were diabetes, renal failure, and other medical problems; Australian law, e.g. the people do not understand how courts work and what pleading guilty or not guilty means. Has material recorded over the past 4-5 decades, including religious (apparently the missionaries were active here previously), song cycles, and also some contemporary Y. music. This is a A$5 million project, done for only $280 thousand. No one wanted to fund it, and it took three years to get on the air, since it`s a ``non-sexy`` medium, antiquated shortwave, but it`s ideal for this service to start up. Still trying to correct the aerial to be sure the signal isn`t going off to Fiji instead, hitting ionosphere at wrong angle. Has had report from NZ and Melbourne, but only on `professional ham radios`, not ordinary receivers. Plans to move to digital radio and ``satellites straight down`` at some point in the future. Will create online dictionaries in medical, economic and technical fields. This is all aimed at adults, and elders to turn them into teachers. Richard is getting excited now that ARDS is on the air, but is taking a couple of weeks rest before concentrating on producing more programming. There is an ID clip at about 45 minutes into the WRN 0800 UT file for last Sunday which I plan to insert on WORLD OF RADIO 1196 (notes by Glenn Hauser for DX LISTENING DIGEST) I reckon I had Humpty Doo last night very poor, off frequency 5048.7 or thereabouts. USB. Cheers (Lew Chapman, somewhere in Australia, Aug 18, ARDXC via DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. 4905.16, Radio San Miguel, Riberalta, Beni, 0944-1000, August 18. Spanish. Interview with medicine doctor who talked about different health themes. At 1000, "Cu-Cu" sound and TC and ID as: "Radio San Miguel" by female, 34222 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentina, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Ao que tudo indica, a Rádio San Miguel, da cidade de Riberalta, não mantém freqüência fixa em 60 metros. Em Cochabamba, o dexista brasileiro Rogildo Aragão ouviu a emissora, em 16 de agosto, às 0215, pela freqüência de 4905 kHz. Na oportunidade, apresentava o programa Show de los Sábados. Anteriormente, era captada em 4930 kHz (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX Aug 17 via DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. 5927.1, R Minería, Oruro, August 18th, 2340-2350, Spanish, advertisement, ID, music of the Andes; SINPO 22222 (Michael Schnitzer, Homepage: http://home.arcor.de/mschnitzer/ Location: Hassfurt, Germany, Receiver: NRD-525, Antennas: 25m long wire, DX-One Professional, EWE to South America, dxing.info via DXLD) ** BOTSWANA. Yesterday morning, August 15, I had been listening for about an hour on 1350 kHz without results. Then at 0302 came the surprise: I heard a hymn and a male voice talking, with no doubt, in an African language. A rapid research on WRTH gave me the hint that it might have been RB1 Tsabong opening. Later on I checked my recording and found that the hymn corresponded to a midi version of it found on the web. QRK 2/3 for a few minutes. TEN TEC RX 340, T2FD 29.4 meters long (Valter Comuzzi, Pasian di Prato (Udine), Italy, dxing.info via DXLD) Nice catch! This summer I have also heard Botswana several times on this frequency. Especially fine the station came just on the same day, 15th of August. Somehow I 've heard them mostly on Fridays or Saturdays - extended programme?. Here they've been audible starting approximately 2200 (Jyrki HYtönen, Kannus, Finland, ibid.) ** BRAZIL. 3235.05, 0058-0145, R. Clube, Aug 19. Male announcer mentioned Marília in Portuguese. Lots of station promos at TOH. Then on to music program. S6 signal level. Recheck at 0130 and signal level the same but quality has diminished. Playing various Latin tunes. A few static crashes (Bob Montgomery Levittown, PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) So the Guarujá acquisition is partial? Nos próximos dias, a Rádio Guarujá Paulista, de Guarujá (SP), passará a emitir pela freqüência de 5045 kHz. A informação é de Orivaldo Rampazzo, diretor da emissora. Ele conversou com Caio Lopes, de Itajubá (MG). A Guarujá Paulista já ocupa a freqüência de 3235 kHz, que era da Rádio Clube, de Marília (SP). A freqüência de 5045 kHz é da Rádio Difusora, de Presidente Prudente (SP). De acordo com Rampazzo, "a onda curta engrandece a emissora". A Guarujá também está projetando transmitir em 31 metros. O endereço da emissora é o seguinte: Rádio Guarujá Paulista, A/C Orivaldo Rampazzo, Rua Montenegro, 196, CEP: 11410-040, Guarujá (SP). A Rádio Nacional do Brasil transmite, desde 1º de agosto, duas emissões, em português, para o continente africano. A Gerente da Radiobrás, Taís Ladeira, informou ao dexista Sarmento Campos, do Rio de Janeiro (RJ), que as emissões ocorrem entre 0500 e 0800 e entre 1900 e 2100. As freqüências utilizadas são as duas que a Radiobrás dispõe, no momento, ou seja : 6180 e 11780 kHz. De acordo com informações de Tobias Jung, publicadas no sítio Rádio Agência, a programação é constituída de espaços que a Radiobrás já produz para o público interno do Brasil. A única exceção seria o programa Giro Afro, este sim, um boletim diário com notícias dos países de língua portuguesa. No entender de Sarmento Campos, "o executivo brasileiro dá sinais de reconhecer a importância do rádio", com o anúncio. Não há previsão do retorno do sinal da Rádio Liberal, de Belém (PA), na freqüência de 4775 kHz, em ondas tropicais. A informação é de Paulo Roberto e Souza, de Tefé (AM), que conversou com a direção da emissora. Algumas peças já foram adquiridas. Falta apenas o conserto do transmissor. Por enquanto, a Rádio Liberal pode ser ouvida em ondas médias, em 1330 kHz. Na Internet, possui o seguinte sítio: http://www.radioliberal.com.br (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX Aug 17 via DXLD) ** BULGARIA. 11600, R. Bulgaria 0135-0154 07/Ago SINPO=34442 Español. Con algunas noticias DX y luego el programa "Para los Oyentes Jóvenes", entrevistando jóvenes sobre sus preferencias musicales y tocando algunas canciones de un grupo búlgaro de música "rock". Me parece que el audio es muy bajo en relación a la fuerza de la señal, por eso en el SINPO la O=2 (Elmer Escoto, Honduras SONY ICF-SW7600GR y antena "random" de 10 metros, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. Canada. CHU time/frequency station in Ottawa has not been heard here on Monday August 18 so assume that they are off the air. I tried phoning but no answer, Federal public servants working in Ottawa have been told to stay home today unless their work is essential. This is to keep down the use of electricity. Those government workers who work across the river in Gatineau, Quebec were to report for work as usual today (Bernie O'Shea, Ottawa, Ontario, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Isn`t accurate time an `essential service` for many scientific and civilian applications??? One graf says they have generator backup, so why aren`t they on? Here`s the official CHU page: http://inms-ienm.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/time_services/shortwave_broadcasts_e.html ``The CHU station is located 15 km southwest of Ottawa at 45º 17' 47" N, 75º 45' 22" W. Main transmitter powers are 3 kW at 3330 and 14 670 kHz, and 10 kW at 7335 kHz. Individual vertical antennas are used for each frequency. The electronics systems feeding the transmitters are duplicated for reliability, and have both battery and generator protection. The generator can also supply the transmitters. The announcements are made by a talking clock using digitally recorded voices`` (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. My blackout observations (long post). Well, where was I when the lights went out? I was with my wife in a supermarket in Port Dover, a resort town on the north shore of Lake Erie. When the power went out we kind of joked that it was "all our fault" because the week previous, we'd been in a supermarket in Fenelon Falls, Ontario when the power went off (although the emergency generator kicked in within two minutes). In Port Dover though --- the backup generator didn't come on and all that was working was the cash register. We got back in the car to head down to our campsite at Turkey Point Provincial Park and of course I did what any radio junkie would do --- I turned the radio on. Before entering the supermarket we'd been listening to WQLN 91.3, the NPR station out of Erie, PA. When I got back in the car, the station wasn't there. I thought at first --- okay maybe some weird tropo happening. However I tuned around the FM band and noticed alot of stations weren't there or there were a lot of weak signals. I managed to tune in CBC Radio One on 99.1 out of Toronto --- with a rather fuzzy signal and heard the news of the big blackout. I usually carry a ham radio HT with me but this time I didn't have one with me --- just the hustle of getting the car all packed up. I thought --- rats. biggest emergency in years and I don't have any ham equipment with me. I did however have my trusty Radio Shack DX-392 along with a 30 ft. piece of wire and a Kaito KA007 multi-band emergency windup radio (courtesy of Durham Radio. I have a review I've written that will appear in an upcoming issue of LI). I also had plenty of spare batteries! So, while setting up the tent and getting dinner ready, tuned into CBC Radio One and listened to all the news reports coming in from around the city. I could pick up CBC-1 out of Paris, Ontario on 89.1, London on 93.5 and occasionally on some other frequencies. CBC-1 went into special programming mode pretty much till Friday night. My French is limited but from what I could tell Radio Canada was also running special programming. My compliments to the folks at the CBC, I thought they did an excellent job under difficult conditions. There were a few technical "glitches" along the way but given the circumstances they were quite understandable. In many cases it was caller's cellphones that went out of commission. Cellphones are wonderful things --- but all too often don't work in a disaster area. Also noticed that on quite a few FM frequencies there was a carrier, but no audio --- so the transmitters were working but the studio/transmitter links were down. After dinner, I switched to listening to some of the ham nets. The Trans Provincial Net ran an extended session on 7.055 MHz with Jeanne VA3FW out of Kingston, Ontario operating as net control. As the propagation shifted they switched to an extended session of the Ontario Phone Net on 3.742 The various local ham radio emergency coordinators had obviously swung into action on local VHF/UHF repeaters that had emergency power. The nets were quite busy and nice to see lots of hams were able to get themselves on the air with emergency power. I heard a lot of familiar voices, including ODXA member James VE3TPZ popping in from Stratford both from home...and from the Red Cross emergency station VA3PRC. (You were louder from home James!) I did notice that quite a number of AM/FM "combo" stations began simulcasting news and taking phone calls from listeners --- running the "AM" programming on the FM "side". Heard this kind of activity from Hamilton, Guelph and Kitchener. The NPR stations were also running special news reports. Other FM stations just kept playing music as if nothing was going on - -- and the evangelical stations kept playing their canned religious programming. Couldn't they at least say a prayer for those in the affected areas, I thought??? I tuned into CBC Radio One out of Windsor on 1550. They had moved their studios to the transmitting site during the emergency and weren't running the "Toronto" feed. They were taking calls and mentioned that people were honking their horns as they drove past the CBE transmitter site! The AM band I found much more useful, especially after dark. I could easily tune in to WABC 770 and WCBS 880 from New York, WTAM 1100 from Cleveland and WJR 760 Detroit were quite loud at my "campfire" location. CFRB 1010 was a little tough to listen to with the co-channel interference from WINS New York. CFTR "680 News" was generally in the clear as was "Mojo 640". AM740 obviously had trouble with their studio-transmitter link. There was a carrier on the frequency but with no audio. The little Kaito KA007 was very handy for listening to TV audio. I could pick up quite a number of the local Cleveland TV stations along with CHCH out of Hamilton and the Global TV Channel 6 transmitter out of Paris, Ontario. There were lots of "eye in the sky" reports --- only I can imagine that very few people were watching! I tuned into the BBC World Service and of course the blackout was the first item of news --- with reports from correspondents in both New York and Toronto. The little Kaito also tunes in the VHF band from 145 to 170 MHz. Just with the little whip antenna I had some faint signals from one of the two meter band repeaters on the U.S. side of Lake Erie. It appeared to be linked to either the I-Link or IRLP systems and there were folks coming in from all over the U.S. Also tuned into one of the marine weather channels where in their notice to shipping they were warning boaters about navigation hazards due to all the normal lighting being out. I listened to WGY 810 out of Schenectady, NY after midnight. They were carrying the "Coast to Coast AM" programme and were very quick at coming up with conspiracy theories on the reason for the blackout. Talk of electromagnetic pulse weapons in the hands of terrorists etc. Spent Friday at the beach...and later went to Port Dover for their "Summer Fest" (the power was back on) the solar panel on the Kaito works great on a bright sunny beach! Also listened to the ONTARS ham net on 3.755 for a little while Friday night. ONTARS remained in "special session" till around 11 PM with Percy VA3BBD in Owen Sound as net controller and VE3EMO the ham station at Ontario's Emergency Measures Organization taking reports from hams across the province as to who was back up and who was still "off". I suppose I could have spent time "chasing DX" during the power outage --- but instead found myself doing more listening just to get a picture of what was going on --- and what would await us when we got back home to Toronto. From talking to a few folks in the building where I work today, all kinds of folks were looking for batteries for their portable radios and finding stores sold out. I'm sure that after this experience, wind-up "emergency" radios like the Baygens, Grundig FR-200 and the Kaito KA007 will be selling like hotcakes! Had a look at the Kaito website and I see that Kaito has a new Dynamo/Solar radio for sale with digital readout. It covers AM/FM and shortwave but lacks the TV audio and the VHF band. You can look at the new radio at: http://www.kaitousa.com/KA007D.htm 73 (Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, Ham Radio Editor, "Listening In" Magazine, ODXA http://www.qsl.net/ve3sre Aug 18, ODXA via DXLD) ** CANADA. BITOVE TUNES IN TO SATELLITE RADIO FIRM PLANS TO FILE APPLICATION WITH CRTC By KEITH DAMSELL TECHNOLOGY REPORTER UPDATED AT 3:48 AM EDT Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2003 The future of digital radio in Canada grew more clouded this month following news that food service tycoon John Bitove wants to launch a high-tech satellite radio service. Canadian Satellite Radio Inc. plans to file an application to the federal broadcasting regulator within the next few days. The company is a partnership between a Toronto group led by Mr. Bitove and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc., a Washington, D.C., broadcaster with about 700,000 subscribers across the United States. The company wants to begin broadcasting its CD-quality sound next year but declined to discuss the specifics of its proposal. Mr. Bitove's plans are being watched closely by broadcasters. Some of the country's largest radio station owners are backing a rival technology, digital audio broadcasting. Currently, about 70 AM and FM stations across the country are simulcasting their signals in digital formats. The potential launch of satellite radio has created "a bit of a conundrum. There's no question it doesn't help what we're trying to do with DAB. It's another distraction," said Steve Edwards, vice- president of corporate engineering and technology at Rogers Broadcasting, a unit of Toronto holding company Rogers Communications Inc. Seven Rogers stations currently simulcast in the DAB format and three additional stations are scheduled to go digital over the next few months. Gary Slaight, president and chief executive officer of Toronto-based Standard Broadcasting Corp. Ltd., argues that satellite radio may have little or no impact on DAB. Nevertheless, Mr. Slaight, one of digital radio's most outspoken critics, thinks the technology's future may be "under review." "I have a feeling even Rogers and CHUM Ltd., who have been waving the DAB flag, may now be saying this may not necessarily be the best way to proceed," he said. First developed in the late 1980s, DAB has had a brief and troubled history. Via a digital radio technology called Eureka 147, broadcasters can transmit a complex signal with many potential applications, not the least of which is a crystal-clear sound. As CD-quality music plays, a radio display will show the song title and artist. Press a button and you can order the CD. Press another and you can order concert tickets. Stations can be personalized according to a listener's needs with the latest weather, traffic or stock market quotes available on request. In 1995, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission released a policy for the introduction of digital radio, foreseeing "digital radio services as coming to replace existing AM and FM services over time." The policy set a rough framework for incumbent players to access the L-band, a valuable chunk of digital spectrum set aside by Industry Canada. Launching services with a single digital transmitter costs about $40,000 per radio station. Blanketing an entire city with eight digital transmitters costs about $300,000 per station. At this stage, there are no data available on DAB's actual listening audience in this country. While Europe's major broadcasters embraced Eureka 147, it was a very different story in the United States. Concern that a new dedicated digital band would undermine the value of FM stations prompted the United States to support a made-in-America compromise called IBOC (in band/on channel). The IBOC plan requires no new spectrum and squeezes new digital signals within the existing FM and AM radio bands. Canadian supporters of Eureka 147 claim the U.S. plan will mean an inferior digital radio signal for the world's largest commercial audience. The two formats are not compatible and require separate digital receivers. To date, the Canadian industry's hopes have largely rested on a single retailer, InterTan Inc., the Barrie, Ont., parent of Radio Shack. In November last year, Radio Shack stores across the country began selling two DAB receivers priced at $299 and $399. Unfortunately, consumer demand has failed to materialize and InterTan has sold only "hundreds" of units, reports David Easden, associate vice-president of merchandising. "We ended up with a very cool radio that a number of early acquirers bought in to, but kind of a radio that's out of the average individual's reach," Mr. Easden said. "It's great technology but it hasn't maybe taken off quite the way I think the industry had hoped it would." Radio Shack has discontinued the sale of the two DAB receivers and later this month will begin selling a cheaper $99 unit. Digital Radio Rollout Inc., an industry lobby group, is confident the more affordable DAB unit will lead to a "significant breakthrough" in consumer interest, said spokesman David Bray. Satellite radio has complicated matters further. In the United States, XM Satellite and competitor Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. have each quickly built a base of subscribers willing to pay a monthly fee of $10 (U.S.) to $12 to listen to commercial-free radio. Combined, XM and Sirius have invested more than $2.5-billion in operations and continue to lose money. Auto makers are unperturbed and after an initial commitment to support DAB, are now offering satellite radio as an option in a handful of 2004 U.S. models. General Motors Corp. and Honda Motor Co. Ltd. are supporting the XM platform while Ford Motor Co. and DaimlerChrysler AG are offering Sirius to customers. The car market is essential for success, industry sources report, noting that the rush-hour commute to and from work is the key radio-listening period. Meanwhile, some retailers report increasing interest in satellite radio systems, especially in rural Canada. Satellite radio has yet to be licensed in this country and getting access to signals mirrors the trade in grey-market satellite TV. Retailers interviewed buy satellite receivers in the United States and then resell them here. The consumer must then set up a U.S.-based account with Sirius or XM to receive signal access each month. Audio Video Unlimited in Williams Lake, B.C., has sold a handful of car stereo satellite units manufactured by Tokyo-based Alpine Electronics Inc. for $1,000 (Canadian) each. "They've been fairly popular," said store owner Brian Sawyer. "Once you get 40 kilometres out of town, you've got no radio period. And we have so many people working in the logging industry. So for all these operators, logging truck drivers, haulers that have been out of the office for 10 to 12 days, satellite radio is fantastic." While satellite radio may appear to have some momentum, there is some optimism digital radio may find an audience among new Canadians. In April, the CRTC granted a DAB licence to Sur Sagar Radio Inc. of Toronto. Some time next year, the Asian language station will begin operating Canada's first stand-alone digital radio service. "It's a new technology . . . and we're sure it's going to be picking up. We wanted to be in something current," said station manager Amar Prett. Wayne Stacey, an Ottawa-based broadcasting engineering consultant, said the fate of DAB is akin to the "chicken and egg" puzzle: innovative broadcasting may drive consumer demand for receivers but at the same time, broadcasters are waiting for greater consumer acceptance before launching further DAB services. © 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved (via Dan Say, DXLD) ** CHILE [non]. A 30 AÑOS DEL GOLPE MILITAR EN CHILE Nos dirigimos, en primer lugar al auditorio chileno, y no sólo a ellos. El 11 de septiembre de este año conmemoramos con ustedes una luctuosa fecha en la historia contemporánea de Chile. Aquel día, hace tres décadas, una junta castrense se levantó en armas contra la democracia y, pisoteando el juramento militar perpetró en el país un golpe de Estado. El presidente Salvador Allende, legalmente elegido pereció en el palacio de La Moneda. Quienes sintonizan desde hace tiempo las ondas de Radio Moscú deben recordar que después de implantada la dictadura, por primera vez salieron al aire los programas con el título de `Escucha Chile`. Aquella fue una de las primeras manifestaciones de la solidaridad de los pueblos de Rusia y de las otras repúblicas soviéticas con los chilenos que eran víctimas de la opresión de los militares. Este programa conquistó popularidad desde los primeros días de su existencia. En las ciudades y aldeas chilenas era escuchado en secreto por gentes de distintas convicciones. Ello se debía a que contábamos solo y nada más que la verdad, denunciábamos los crímenes de la Junta y dábamos los nombres de los patriotas asesinados y de sus verdugos. La voz desde Moscú llegaba incluso hasta los prisioneros de los centros de reclusión pinochetistas. No es casual que la Junta declarase entonces a Radio Moscú como a un enemigo jurado suyo. Un poco más tarde salió al aire además, el programa ``Radio Magallanes`` Semana tras semana y año tras año esos programas fueron creados por un pequeño equipo integrado por periodistas chilenos y soviéticos. Ellos trabajaban activamente con la correspondencia que llegaba a Moscú desde distintos rincones del mundo, sobre todo de América Latina. A través de terceros países, y a veces incluso directamente, nos llegaban también mensajes de Chile. Les invitamos a recordar y a que nos escriban de cómo supieron ustedes de la existencia de los programas Escucha Chile y Radio Magallanes y qué significado tenían para los chilenos en aquellos años. Además, nos gustaría recibir vuestras respuestas a las siguientes preguntas: 1.-¿Qué piensa de la llegada al poder del gobierno de la Unidad Popular y cuales fueron a su juicio las causas de su derrota? 2.-¿Por qué la cúpula castrense resultó entonces más fuerte que la democracia? 3.-¿Qué opinión le merece la figura de Salvador Allende 30 años mas tarde? Les anunciamos que, a partir de mediados de agosto, La Voz de Rusia comienza Las Jornadas Chilenas, a las que desde ya les invitamos a participar con su testimonio. Quedamos a la espera de vuestras cartas por correo postal y por Internet. Las mejores respuestas serán premiadas con recuerdos de la alcaldía de Moscú, de la Fundación Nuevo Mundo 500 y de nuestra emisora, La Voz de Rusia. La fecha para el envío de las respuestas es, a más tardar, el 20 de agosto. De antemano, muchas gracias. Por supuesto que se puede participar por correo electronico: letters@v... [truncated] REDACCION LATINOAMERICANA, LA VOZ DE RUSIA (via Arnaldo Slaen, Aug 18, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** CONGO. 5985, 2243-2300, R. Congo, Aug 18. Male announcer in French at tune in with mentions of Congo several times. Signal level between 10 and 20/ S9 level. Fairly clear with little to no interference. Must have been commentary on the news as George Bush mentioned a few times. Two male announcers back and forth with comments. Very nice copy with SF at 116 and A index at 62. 2247 to some very nice African tunes. Sudden off at 2300 in the middle of a tune (Bob Montgomery, Levittown, PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** CUBA. Las frecuencias de Radio Habana Cuba han mejorado una barbaridad. Este 18/08 la monitoré en 9550, 9600 (fortísima, +40dB), 11760 y 15230 kHz. Muy débil en 11930 kHz. Todas a las 0230. 11875 entra al aire luego de las 0400. 73's y buen DX (Adán González, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) The geomag storm got new 9600 here; quite weak around 0130 Aug 19. I meant to mention with the Arnie Coro stuff in previous issue, that the http://www.radiohc.cu/ingles/dxers1.htm website, nor via Bob Chandler, ODXA, lacks DXUL scripts between Aug 2 and 16 --- was the show on vacation, or in repeats? In fact as of Aug 19, radiohc still has doesn`t have the Aug 16 script (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. A Rádio Havana Cuba tem novo concurso, conforme dica de Valdirei Carneiro, de Curiúva (PR). O tema é a trova cubana. Para participar, o ouvinte deve responder, até 31 de dezembro, as seguintes questões: 1) Mencione 3 temáticas que coincidam entre os trovadores tradicionais e os atuais e suas respectivas canções; 2) Nomeie 3 representantes da trova velha e 3 da nova trova cubana; 3) Que é, para você, um trovador? Respostas para: Rádio Havana Cuba, Apartado 6240, La Havana, Cuba (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX Aug 17 via DXLD) ** CUBA. Hoy Lunes 18 de Agosto hube de sintonizar desde mi QTH: Sur de Miami la emisora de Ciudad de la Habana, Cuba "CMCA RADIO CIUDAD DE LA HABANA" en la frecuencia de los 910 AM con una señal aceptable, moderada pertubación de propagación entre las 1300-1400 UT. La emisora emitía el programa "BUENOS DIAS CIUDAD". En ese tiempo de una hora se abordaron distintos temas: noticiosos, infantiles, informaciones sobre la salida y llegada de trenes y ómnibus a las respectivas terminales, así como otros temas a los residentes de Ciudad de la Habana. Lo interesante resultó que en la identicación de la emisora se anunció: "CMCA Radio Ciudad de la Habana la emisora joven de la Capital 94.9 FM, 820 AM desde el quinto piso del edificio # 1, Radio Ciudad de la Habana". Teléfono: 55-46-44`` Nuevamente sucede, se anuncia una frecuencia y se emite por otra. Revisando el WRTH encuentro CMCA 820 AM 10 kW desde Santa Catalina, Municipio de 10 de Octubre. En dias pasados también sucedió con Radio 26 la emisora provincial de Matanzas en los 1060 AM, por donde se continúa escuchando. Cordiales 73's (Oscar de Céspedes, FL, Aug 18, Conexión Digital via DXLD). ** DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. Hola Glenn, HIJQ, primera vez que la encuentro tan temprano, 2028 UT, en los 4959.86 kHz, con SINPO 2/2. Tocaba el tema "Not gonna get us", de la banda Tatoo. Luego escuchada a la 0120, con el espacio "El Guerrero de Super Q", con una alta dosis de rap estilo "The Noise". (17/08). (Adán González, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GUATEMALA. Radio Buenas Nuevas, en 4799.79 kHz, en lengua indígena a la 0153 UT. SINPO 3/3. (17/08). (Adán González, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GUATEMALA. 3325, R. Maya de Barillas 2349-0000/ 29/Jul SINPO=34332 En español. No escuché los acostumbrados "saludos" en lengua indígena, sino el programa "La Biblia dice". Apaga el transmisor a las 0000 (Elmer Escoto, Honduras SONY ICF-SW7600GR y antena "random" de 10 metros, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HAWAII. 15000 khz - WWVH - Hawai/USA --- Cartão QSL Full data sob o nº de série 22048, Carta agradecendo a recepção e confirmando também os dados do informe, pedindo novos informes. Foto aérea da estação e NIST Brochure. V/S - Dean T. Okayama - Engineer-in-Charge, 37 dias. NIST Radio Station WWVH, P.O. Box 417, Kekaha HI 96752 - USA, site: http://www.boulder.nist.gov/timefreq e-mail: wwvh@boulder.nist.gov (Alexandre Deves Sailer / Viamão – RS, @tividade DX Aug 17 via DXLD) ** HONDURAS. 3249, R. Luz y Vida, 0029-0032 28/Jul, SINPO=22222, señal débil. Locutor en español con mensajes cristianos "Que Dios te bendiga en ésta hora... mantengámonos en el Camino del Señor". Anuncian un número telefónico (ininteligible). Hora "Las 6 con 30 minutos. Radio Luz y Vida, San Luis, Santa Bárbara". La frecuencia varía (Elmer Escoto, Honduras SONY ICF-SW7600GR y antena "random" de 10 metros, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDIA. 9690, 11620, 13710. All India Radio 1430 check, Good signals on the eve of their independence day. 11620 runs behind the other frequencies by some seconds (David Norcross, SLO Cen Cal Coast CA, Aug 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Ergo heard on Aug 14. That would be the AIRGOS to SEAs at 1330-1500 (gh) ** INDIA. PRIVATE RADIO NOT ALLOWED IN NEWS PTI[ MONDAY, AUGUST 18, 2003 01:38:02 PM ] NEW DELHI: The government on Monday said private radio is not permitted to broadcast news and current affairs. Following a complaint received through the CEO of Prasar Bharati on June 11, 2002 regarding broadcasting of news and current affairs on private FM Channel in Mumbai, the matter was taken up with the company, Information and Broadcasting Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad said in a written reply. In its response, the company said it had happened inadvertantly and they had taken measures to ensure this is not repeated. Central Monitoring Services of the Ministry had also been asked to monitor Radio Mirchy, 93.5 RED FM and Radio City Private FM channels on July 19 and July 20, 2003, the Minister said. He said monitoring is being done by the Information and Broadcasting Ministry to ensure that the terms and conditions of licence agreement are adhered to (Times Of India, Aug 18, 2003 via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, dx_india via DXLD) What is the so-called democratic government of India afraid of? (gh) ** INDONESIA. 15150, Voice of Indonesia, 2028-2106* Aug 10, tuned in to hear English program with ID ("From Jakarta, you are listening to the Voice of Indonesia.") and e-mail address, program preview, Indo vocals followed by travelogue feature. Mix of music and talks rounded out the programming until news at 2055. ID, schedule and close down announcements at 2103 ("Now we are saying goodbye to our listeners from the Voice of Indonesia, Jakarta."). After brief pause there was another vocal until 2106. Fair and steady signal making for enjoyable listening (Rich D`Angelo, PA, NASWA Flashsheet via DXLD) ** INDONESIA. 4869.96, RRI Wamena, 1029-1110 Aug 18. I thought this was a local station at first, it being so strong. Stayed with this during the period and noted steady music. On the hour a quick ID by a man and then back to music. No news or other pertinent details noted. Signal was good even after 1110 (I left the recorder on while I walked the dogs) (Bolland, Chuck, Clewiston, Florida, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDONESIA. 4870.9, RRI Sorong, 0924 Aug 15, azan magrib call to prayer started followed by 0929 lagu padang pasir (desert songs, i.e. Arabic style) then tedious information but with many mentions of Sorong from around 0935 until unceremonious 1005*. Crazy freq choice as RRI Wamena not far away on 4870 at similar strength. However, Sorong may have no choice but to use their very old 10 kW transmitter. The usual but extremely irregular 4875 xmtr (actually 4874.6) was first mentioned in WRTH in 1978 and before that 4871v was used. From 1986-88 both transmitters were used, 4871 in local a.m.'s and 4875 in evenings but since then only 4875. 9743.6, RRI Sorong, 0759* Aug 15, close down just after HCJB 9745 had s/on. Before that was weak but clear. 15125, RRI Jakarta, 0807 Aug 15, reactivated after many moons \\ 9680 11860. Observed past 1030 but fading as band propagation collapsed. Again at tardy *2223 on the same date (David Foster, Australia, DXplorer Aug 16 via BC DX via DXLD) ** IRAN. For how long has Iran been jamming Israel? Kol Israel`s Farsi service has been unjammed for a long time, but powerful jammers are heard on 15640 - and spreading down to 15650 some days - and weaker jamming on 17545. I haven`t heard jammers on new 17525 [x13860] yet (Noel R. Green, UK, BC-DX Aug 11/15 via BC-DX via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. 7460, Radio Sedoye Payeme Doost, *0227-0315* Aug 11, musical opening, woman with ID and announcements in Farsi. Some vocals but mainly long talks. At 0310 a man with ID and sign off announcements with music played until carrier cut. Good signal (Rich D'Angelo, PA, NASWA Flashsheet via DXLD) ** ISRAEL. KOL ISRAEL ENGLISH CHANGES Comments in Brackets [] are mine [Doni`s]. As of this past Thursday, they were totally removing the evening (Israel time) English broadcast. Instead, they removed the 15 minute broadcast, and added a 5 minute one. They also shortened the afternoon broadcast from 15 minutes to five minutes. http://bet.iba.org.il/?lang=23 English-language broadcast changes begin [began] Sunday This is an important announcement to local and overseas listeners of Kol Yisrael English-language news broadcasts. English news broadcasts can now be heard at the following local [Israel] times on Reshet Aleph, in the AM and FM bands: 7:00 to 7:15 a.m 1:10 to 1:20 p.m. [Instead of 1:15-1:30 p.m.] 8:00 to 8:05 p.m. [Instead of 7:30-7:45 p.m.] There is also a 10 p.m. broadcast in Reshet Hey on the FM band that can be heard in the Jerusalem area. [88.2 FM - difficult to receive without a decent PLL digital tuner, as there is another IBA radio station on 88 FM.] Overseas listeners can hear these broadcasts [on shortwave] at 4, 1010[-1020 instead of 1015-1030], 17 [a 5 minute broadcast - instead of the 15 minute broadcast at 1630 UT] and 19 hours UT. [I have not heard about the frequencies being used at the 1630 broadcast.] [That's Midnight-12:15 AM, 6:10-6:20 AM, 1-1:05 PM, 3-3:25 PM Eastern {daylight -- gh} Time. All of them are relays of the domestic English service, besides the 3 PM.] Daily Kol Yisrael news reports in English can also be heard on the Internet at websites http://www.iba.org.il and http://israelradio.org.il 17.08.2003 15:10 (Doni Rosenzweig, Aug 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ENGLISH RADIO NEWS CUTS DRAW PROTESTS By TOVAH LAZAROFF, From the Jerusalem Post http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/A/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1061110452195 Despite protests from listeners here and abroad, Israel Radio's English and French news on Sunday lost the bulk of their evening broadcasts to make way for Channel 1's 7:30 Hebrew news program. Past and current English News radio staff said the move to a five- minute news bulletin has destroyed what was once a vibrant news program that drew listeners from Washington, New York, London, and the Arab world, including the late King Hussein. Staff members already struggling to present a comprehensive news program in 15-minute segments instead of the half-hour they once had, said the 10-minute loss makes their programs irrelevant. According to Zvi Pantanowitz, a former head of English news, "Given what is happening in Israel today, to expect the whole thing to be summed up at the end of the day in five minutes is a bit ridiculous." Oren Helman, a spokesman for Israel Radio, disputed the claim that the new schedule will destroy the foreign-language evening news broadcasts. He said they have not been canceled, but rather replaced by a new schedule of five-minute news bulletins in English, French, and Spanish from 8:00-8:15 p.m. The bulletins are a tribute to the importance of foreign language news to listeners here and abroad, he said. Helman said Israel Radio shortened the broadcasts after receiving many requests from listeners to air Channel 1 television's Hebrew news program. Israel Radio feared it was losing listeners because it was not broadcasting the Channel 1 program, Helman said. But according to Marvin Silverman, national president of the Association of Americans and Canadians in Israel, the cutbacks are simply the latest in a series of moves by the Israel Broadcasting Authority directed against English radio and television broadcasts. "There appears to be an attitude on the part of the powers that be at the IBA that the English-speaking audience are second-class citizens," he said, adding that the televised English news program on Channel 1 has also been cut back. Silverman said without comprehensive English news programs, it is hard for new immigrants and tourists to get accurate news about Israel. "The president and the prime minister talk about aliya from North American and then do all kinds of things to give a contrary message," he said. "The world speaks English, and to cut off the English news is to prevent others from hearing Israel's side of the story," Silverman said, adding that for lack of an alternative listeners abroad will be forced to rely on CNN and BBC. Industry, Trade, and Labor Minister Ehud Olmert, who was also appointed communications minister on Sunday, and is responsible for the IBA, was out of the country and could not be reached for comment. English and French news retain their 15-minute morning slots at 7 a.m. and 7:15 a.m. on Radio 1, but lost five minutes of their 15-minute lunchtime broadcasts, which can now be heard from 1 p.m. in French and 1:10 p.m. in English. The 15-minute Spanish evening news was split, with 10 minutes moved to 1:20 p.m. and another five minutes in the evening after the English and French news (via Doni Rosenzweig, DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH. According to Mr. Tohru Yamashita of Asian Broadcasting Institute, North Korea lost patience to the fact that South Korea did not stop their propaganda broadcasts to North in return for the close of "Voice of National Salvation" on August 1. "Korean National Democratic Front", the parent organization of "Voice of National Salvation", announced in P`yongyang on August 12 that they will relay Korean Central Broadcasting Service for 12 hours a day from August 15. On August 15 they broadcast at 0700-1300 and 1700-2300 KST (2200-0400 and 0800-1400 UTC on August 14-15) on 1053 (Haeju), 3480 (Wonsan), 4557 (Haeju), 4450 (Pyongyang) with the name of "Pyongyang branch of Korean National Democratic Front". The station is not a clandestine, but a formal one from North Korea now (Takahito Akabayashi, Tokyo, Japan, BC-DX Aug 15 via DXLD) I notice that the Korean Central Broadcasting Station has now popped up on 6250.3 // 6398.9 naturally in Korean. From memory this station is a relay of the Domestic service and is relayed to the substantial Korean diaspora in Japan. I wonder if the senders were redirected away from the former northern based clandestines that were closed at the end of July (Robin L. Harwood, Norwood Tasmania, Aug 18, EDXP via DXLD) ** KOREA SOUTH. Os ouvintes mais assíduos da programação em espanhol da Rádio Coréia recebem a publicação Anual Report. Possui ótima encadernação e interessantes informações, conforme dica de Osmar Rodrigues, de Atibaia (SP). A publicação pode ser solicitada ao endereço eletrônico: intl@kbs.co.kr (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX Aug 17 via DXLD) ** KURDISTAN [non?]. V. of People of Kurdistan, 8170, July(?) 11, 1705 in Arabic, 4085 x 2? SINPO 25522 (Luca Botto Fiora, Italy, August World DX Club Contact via DXLD) ** MEXICO. XEBI, 790 kHz, Aguascalientes. Friendly VL and two stickers from Ing. Alfredo Rivas Godoy, Dir Gen who also said that XEBI is one of the oldest stations in Mexico, having been established in Sept 1936. Thanks to Henrik Klemetz for originally providing the ID on this one. (My 17th Mexican State QSL'd). (Paul Ormandy, ZL4TFX, Aug 19, EchoLink Node 87378, Host of The South Pacific DX Report http://radiodx.com DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PAKISTAN. Harold Hausenfluck of Richmond, Virginia alerted me to a station that turned out to be Radio Pakistan in Urdu heard Saturday Aug 16 on 15065 before 1800 and signing off around 1906 GMT with South Asian music, brief Kor`an, IDs. Good signal strength. Modulation could have been clearer, but not as bad as some. 73 (Charlie Gambill, Aug 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PAKISTAN. 15728, R. Pakistan 8/05 0220-0233 Farsi. Said programa en Farsi. ID, news, mentioning Iran (Sheryl Paszkiewicz, WI, NASWA Flashsheet via DXLD) ** PAKISTAN: MINISTER SETS TARGET OF 25 TV CHANNELS, 100 RADIO STATIONS IN A YEAR | Excerpt from report by Associated Press of Pakistan (APP) news agency Islamabad, 18 August: Minister for Information and Broadcasting Shaykh Rashid Ahmad said on Monday [18 August] that target of 25 television channels and 100 radio stations would be achieved within a year in the country. Addressing PTV General Managers Conference here, he said four channels of PTV and seven in private sector are presently functioning in the country. Some new channels are also being allowed to start working, thus the number of television channels would reach to 25 within a year, he added. Similarly, the minister said, new radio stations are being opened in private and public sector and there would be 100 radio stations in the country within a year. Shaykh Rashid asked Pakistan Television to prepare itself to meet this new challenge. Only those television channels which have better performance would survive in future. He said PTV has best talent and infrastructure to face the challenge of private channels. The minister said there is a big margin to improve news and current affairs programmes and directed to separate the news and current affairs. He said PTV News, Sports and Home channel will be started in a bid to provide latest information to the viewers. Appreciating the performance of PTV National, he said the viewers have appreciated this new channel which has recently been launched to telecast regional language programmes. [Passage omitted] The minister expressed the need to start a channel for children to educate them. He congratulated Chairman PTV Syed Anwar Mahmood and Managing Director PTV Akhtar Waqar Azeem for earning a profit of 70m rupees. Source: Associated Press of Pakistan news agency, Islamabad, in English 1417 gmt 18 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** PAPUA NEW GUINEA. This week`s RVi Radio World is made up of vintage recordings from here and NZ, Samoa, including R. Wewak, 3325, full ID in Pidgin and English, GSTQ. As usual the audio is only available for one week until the next show http://www.vrt.be/wm/rvi/rw/rw_HI.asx http://www.vrt.be/wm/rvi/rw/rw_LO.asx (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. 4995, R. Andina, Huancayo 0300-0307 31/Jul SINPO=35222/35221 Leyendo carta de un "hermanito' a quien supuestamente le hicieron brujerías por medio de un muñeco y lo invita "a venir a mi consultorio en la ciudad de Huancayo... Usted me está escuchando a través de Radio Andina" y luego algo ridículo: "Les voy a adivinar de qué color es su radio. Hay un hermanito que nos escucha con un radio color negro. Otro hermanito nos escucha con un radio color gris, otro hermanito con un radio color plata...." (hi hi hi). El ruido atmosférico y el "fading" hacen muy difícil la escucha (Elmer Escoto, San Pedro Sula, Honduras, SONY ICF-SW7600GR y antena "random" de 10 metros, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. La peruana de 5030 kHz puede oírse a las 0005 UT, con SINPO 2/1. Desconozco el nombre esta estación. (18/08). (Adán González, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) R. Los Andes, Huamachuco, reactivated, as in 3-146 and 3-147, which I guess you don`t have time to read?? (gh) ** POLAND. R. Polonia English schedule: NEWS FROM POLAND – reports and correspondents` dispatches on events in Poland as they happen, including Press Review: M-F 1200, 1700 EUROPE EAST --- Reports from a network of correspondents all over the region: how are Poles, Czechs and Hungarians getting ready for EU membership, when will the Baltic states join NATO and why tourists should avoid Belarus`: Sat 1700 MULTIMEDIA SHOW --- News, chat and interview for shortwave and satellite enthusiasts: Tue 1730, Thu 1230 PANORAMA --- investigates a topical issue, from horse racing to child abuse to Polish millionaires: Sat 1205, Sun 1705 BUSINESS WEEK --- what`s happening in Europe`s fastest growing economy: Fri 1220, 1720 DAY IN THE LIFE --- anyone from government minister to polar explorer to Miss Poland: Wed 1720, Tue 1220 FOCUS: the arts in Poland: Thu 1720, Mon 1220 THE WEEKLIES: Sat 1730, Sun 1200 [press review?] COOKERY CORNER: Mon 1720, Wed 1220 DISCOVERING CHOPIN: Wed 1730, Fri 1220 POSTBAG: Fri 1730, Sun 1235 REQUEST CONCERT: Sun 1730, Tue 1230 SOUNDCHECK: Thu 730, Sat 1230 LETTER FROM POLAND: Tue 1720, Thu 1220 CHART SHOW: Sat 1730, Mon 1230 (Website via Mike Barraclough, Radio World, Aug World DX Club Contact via DXLD) ** PORTUGAL. Re Portugal and the spurs - this is a regular occurence, Wolfie. Whatever the cause, the effect can produce massive signals. 15525 is used by one of the older 100 kW units. I will try some of the signals you quote between 1600 and 1800 (Noel R. Green, UK, BC-DX Aug 15 via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. Frecuencia RM sale al aire en la programación de La Voz de Rusia los días martes: España: 2030-2100 UT por 11630, 9480, 7440 kHz America Latina: 0000-0100 (UT del miércoles) por 12010, 11750, 11510, 9965, 9830, 9665, 7330 kHz 0100-0200 (UTC del miércoles) por 12010, 11510, 9965, 9945, 9830, 7330 kHz (info enviada por gentileza de Pancho Rodriguez) (via Arnaldo Slaen, Aug 18, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ¿A qué horas exactas? (gh) See also CHILE [non] ** SAUDI ARABIA [non]. 15705, Sawt al-Islah (Voice of Reform), 1915- 2001* Aug 10, presumed the one with long Arabic talks by various men with a couple of musical selections as bridges. Fair signal but heavy jamming reduced reception to poor level. Although transmission ended, jamming continued past 2025 tune out (Rich D`Angelo, PA, Cumbre DX Aug 19 via DXLD) ** SOUTH AFRICA. 3320, 0016-0044, R. SonderGrense, Aug 19. Very clear reception. 0015 Enya tune, Sail Away. S9 signal level with some fades. But very good reception. Then to more US pop tunes after male announcer with intros in Afrikaans language. Then to long talks at 0020. Some static crashes but fairly nice (Bob Montgomery, Levittown, PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** TOGO. 5046.68, Rdiff. Togolaise 1911 Aug 12. Audible and talk program in French. 1950 Changed to English News program. Radio Togo and Radio Lomé ID confirmed. Fair (Nobuo TAKENO, YAMAGATA, JAPAN, NRD- 535D with 10 meters wire, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) 5046.66, 2331-2400, R. Togo, Aug 18. French tune at check in. A bit of a surprise as audio has been a problem. S9 signal level with some fades. Fairly clear however. Popular US pop tune at 2336; the name escapes me. Signoff with NA at 0006. Nice copy (Bob Montgomery Levittown, PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** TURKEY. VOT in the first week of July started a new series of programmes titled ``Religious Traditions in Turkish Music`` which was heard in the Sunday transmission at 1230 on 17830 to Eu, 17595 to Au/As (Edwin Southwell, UK, Radio World, Aug World DX Club Contact via DXLD) ** UGANDA. Re Idi Amin`s UBC: North American service when you could hear the damn thing was at 0100 UT on 15.320, I think. At least that's what was on the QSL I got 3 years later (Lou Josephs, USA, 8/18/03; 8:50:52 PM, Media Network blog via DXLD) I thought it was 15325; 9515 is mentioned in the vintage clip at http://www.intervalsignals.net I plan to include in WOR 1196 --- BTW, prepare to cover your eyes if you mistakenly go to .com instead (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. For the benefit of those of you outside the BST time zone, this note relates to Tuesday 19 August. Sir Henry Wood, the man who single-handedly invented the BBC Promenade Concerts, died on this date in 1944. I think he was aged 70 (PAUL DAVID, Chairman, Brent Visually- Handicapped Group, Registered Charity No.: 272955, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Three cheers ** U S A. WBCQ`s main site http://www.wbcq.us has been down for several weeks, but lately we have been seeing this: ``We've been delayed... New Website Opens On Monday, August 18, 2003`` NOT: still not open on Aug 19 (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [non]. 11785 - SITE? Radio Sawa 8/05 0230-0300* AR pop music, American pop music, ad, website. IDs. News mentioning Colin Powell, FM and kHz. Clever that they are on Baghdad's frequency (Sheryl Paszkiewicz, WI, NASWA Flashsheet via DXLD) Morocco per SW Guide (gh) ** U S A. NEW STATION, 93.7, SCANS FOR IDENTITY By Robert Philpot, Star-Telegram Staff Writer If you've hit the "scan" button on your car radio lately, you might have been surprised to see it stop at 93.7, where a Fort Worth-Dallas radio station didn't previously exist. And perhaps more surprised to hear a smooth-jazz CD on the dial halfway between classic-rock land and regional Mexico. This is KNOR, which somehow found a home on Fort Worth-Dallas' overpopulated radio dial. What's KNOR gonna be? Don't know yet. When is it gonna play music full time? Don't know that, either. . . http://www.dfw.com/mld/startelegram/living/6559104.htm (via Artie Bigley, Aug 18, DXLD) ** U S A. When I came through Albuquerque this morning I noted that KDEF/1150 was having problems. They obviously lost their satellite feed. The automation was still playing the commercials and IDs at the proper time. But when it would switch back to the programming all it got was dead air. This went on for at least an hour until I risked the roaming fees on my cell phone and called the station. Surprisingly I got a live person after only 2 rings on a Sunday morning. He said he was working on the problem with the satellite feed. Everything was back to normal within 10 minutes of my call. Made for an interesting format - dead air, commercials, IDs, more dead air. I can see the promos - "When you're tired of all the talk, all the music, and all the noise - relax with us. Dead air 11-50, KDEF, Albuquerque." (Patrick Griffith on the road in Alamogordo, Aug 17, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. Local station WVIP, 1310, Mt. Kisco, New York has had an open carrier since the blackout ended here around 10 pm on Thursday. It is a relay station for Radio Visión Cristiana (1330 in New York City and a transmitter in the Caribbean.) It is a Spanish-speaking Christian station group. This station is 5000 watts directional during the day; low power at night. Two short towers in a meadow. It's hard for me to believe that no one has had the time to drive up here and reset the satellite receivers. They have recently dramatically cleaned up the transmitter hut by rebuilding the exterior walls and adding a new modern door in the last few months. WVIP`s studio facilities burned to the ground a few years ago. Since then, they have been on the air from (briefly) a mobile trailer next to the transmitter house, and then from another station's facilities nearby (WGCH Greenwich, CT 1590). They were sold to RVC a sesquiyear ago approximately. I have not noticed if their power change from high to low power is occurring at the correct time. It's a shame that a full-powered station in the New York City metropolitan area is now this disposable. So sad (Karl Zuk, N2KZ, Aug 17, amfmtvdx at qth.net via DXLD) ** U S A. Back from the Blackout --- As we go to press (so to speak) Sunday night, the Blackout of 2003 is well on the way to the history books: power is back on across the region, and the radio and TV dials are back to normal. But it's worth a moment to update our Friday recap of how broadcasters from Long Island to Cleveland handled the power failure - and to offer some lessons to broadcasters looking to make sure they don't go dark the next time the power goes off. We'll start with the market-by-market look at who stayed on and who didn't: http://www.fybush.com/nerw.html (Scott Fybush, NE Radio Watch Aug 18 via DXLD) When next week`s edition is published, the above issue (illustrated} should be found at: http://www.fybush.com/nerw-030818.html (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) see also CANADA ** U S A. Could Louisville broadcasters handle blackout? http://www.courier-journal.com/features/columns/dorsey/2003/dorsey20030818.html (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. WIRELESS GROWTH HINDERS RESCUERS FCC VOWS TO FIX RADIO INTERFERENCE By Christian Davenport, Washington Post Staff Writer, Monday, August 18, 2003; Page A01 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A7270-2003Aug17.html The explosive growth of the mobile phone industry has crowded and tangled the nation's airwaves to such an extent that wireless company signals are increasingly interfering with emergency radio frequencies used by police and firefighters, public safety agencies said. Emergency departments across the country -- including some in the District, Maryland and Virginia -- report unsettling stories of officers who can't call for backup, dispatchers who can't relay suspect descriptions and firefighters who can't request ambulances because of radio "dead spots" believed to be caused by wireless phone interference. "Just by the grace of God or good luck, we've been able to avoid a major problem," said Gary Manougian, a police officer in Portland, Ore. "But I don't think we can go on like this indefinitely." The Federal Communications Commission has vowed to find a solution, even if it has to reorganize a large swath of the radio spectrum -- a massive and controversial task, potentially costing hundreds of millions of dollars and taking years to complete, industry officials said. FCC Chairman Michael K. Powell said in a speech last week that "it is one of my top priorities . . . to ensure that public safety has the reliable spectrum resources it needs to do its lifesaving work." He warned that solving the problem "may be one of the most challenging spectrum policy proceedings" to come before the agency. No death or catastrophe has been attributed to such communication problems, said Robert Gurss, director of legal and government relations for the Association of Public Safety Communications Officials International, a nonprofit organization representing emergency communication officials. But dozens of agencies large and small -- from New York City to Androscoggin County, Maine -- have registered complaints, and one public safety coalition estimates that interference is a problem in at least 27 states. The issue has its roots in the 1970s, well before the popularity of mobile phones, when the FCC assigned channels in the 800 megahertz band to public safety departments. In the 1980s, wireless companies began to acquire, with federal approval, space adjacent to the emergency radio frequencies. Soon, the wireless phone industry started to grow. Last year, there were an estimated 140 million wireless phone subscribers, the Cellular Telecommunications and Internet Association said. An increasing number of public safety agencies moved into the 800 megahertz band as well, and as the agencies and wireless companies occupied more spectrum space, airwave conflicts intensified. Communication officials said many factors cause interference. A common problem arises when a police officer, for example, is close to a wireless phone company transmitter but far from a tower that carries the signals for emergency radios. In that situation, the wireless phone tower overpowers the officer's radio, rendering it useless, the officials said. To solve the problem, the FCC is considering reshuffling channels in the 800 megahertz band. The idea is to separate the wireless companies from the public safety departments, so they inhabit different ends of the band. None of the companies is doing anything wrong, FCC officials said. As organized, the spectrum, which is a limited resource, simply can't accommodate everyone. There are several wireless companies operating in the 800 megahertz band, including Verizon, AT&T Wireless and Cingular, the FCC said. Most of the complaints that the agency has received have been caused by Reston-based Nextel Communications Inc. because many of its band frequencies abut those of emergency radios. Mindful of the mounting pressure, Nextel has teamed with a broad coalition of partners -- including the Association of Public Safety Communications Officials International and the International Association of Chiefs of Police -- to develop a proposal to reorganize the spectrum, which, if approved, would give Nextel some prime real estate in the airwaves. Nextel also has offered to pay $850 million for the cost associated with reshuffling the channels if its plan is adopted. The company's proposal is just one of many the FCC is reviewing. Many communication experts said that a complete reorganization of the spectrum is unnecessary, too expensive and too time-consuming. Meanwhile, public safety officials said the situation is urgent. "If we don't fix this now, it's only going to get worse," Gurss said. Anne Arundel County police officer Patrick A. Fisher said he ran into the problem one day this spring. The call from his partner that came over the radio was crackled and fuzzy, and Fisher could make out only two words: "start . . . fire." Fisher sensed a tone of urgency in the other officer's voice and rushed to the street he knew his colleague was patrolling. When he arrived, he saw the other officer futilely fighting a house fire with a garden hose. Fisher reached for his radio, but its reception was too weak until he drove a few blocks away. Finally, firefighters arrived. "If it was another couple of minutes," Fisher said, "the whole side of the house would have been gone." About two years ago, police officers in Portland were chasing a man after a carjacking attempt when their radios went dead. The man ran through a suburban area, then hid in the woods. About a dozen officers dropped into formation around him. "We were trying to set up a perimeter, but our radios wouldn't work," Manougian said. Some officers had to run into nearby homes to call in information to the dispatcher. Denver has identified at least 24 dead spots in its communications system, and the police officers know where they are, said Dana Hansen, superintendent of communications for the city's police department. It's particularly troubling, she said, that many of the dead spots happen to be at major intersections where many traffic accidents occur. When Fairfax County first purchased an 800 megahertz radio system, it had interference problems, said Mernie Fitzgerald, a county spokeswoman. Nextel and Cingular agreed to reconfigure their systems in the county, and they were able to solve the problem, she said. "We haven't had any problems in the last two years," she said. Montgomery County recently spent $175 million on a communications system that includes an 800 megahertz radio network. The county took care to ensure there wouldn't be any interference problems, said Lt. Dallas Lipp of the county fire and rescue department. The county's system is on a different part of the spectrum than local wireless phone networks, he said, so its system is less susceptible to problems. "But we're always monitoring how our system is performing," Lipp said. The District filed an interference complaint last spring with the Association of Public Safety Communications Officials International. Now, having been awarded a $40 million grant from the federal government, the city plans to build seven transmitters and receivers to strengthen its radio system's signal. Anne Arundel County plans to spend $15 million over five years to build more towers and to update its equipment. And last year, county officials passed a zoning law that required wireless companies to certify that their signals would not interfere with the county's radio system. Cingular asked the FCC to strike down the ordinance. Last month, the commission did so, saying that the county was trying to regulate the airwaves through its zoning code. The county, which has appealed the FCC's decision, has worked with the companies to reduce the interference. The effort appears to be working: The number of known dead spots has dropped from more than 60 to about 20, county officials said. Still, they said, 20 is too many. Meantime, Fisher said many colleagues on the Anne Arundel County police force have found their own solution: They carry cell phones in case their radios go dead. © 2003 The Washington Post Company (via Kraig Krist, DXLD) ** U S A. GETTING LOST WILL GET HARDER WITH NEW PERSONAL BEACONS BY PAUL ROGERS Knight Ridder Newspapers Posted on Sun, Aug. 17, 2003 SAN JOSE, Calif. - (KRT) - Forget about leaving a trail of bread crumbs. Getting lost in the woods may become a thing of the past, thanks to a new high-tech panic button for outdoors lovers. In a move that could change society's relationship with wilderness, the federal government last week rolled out a new electronic homing system that uses satellites to track "personal beacons" carried by outdoors enthusiasts. The devices will allow rescuers to immediately locate people stranded miles from civilization and facing life-threatening injuries. The beacons weigh about one pound and are slightly larger than a Palm Pilot. Each carries a transmitter that sends a satellite distress signal, when activated, to a national rescue center in Maryland. Used by sailors and pilots for 20 years, the devices were approved for land use for the first time on July 1 by the Federal Communications Commission at the request of NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (www.noaa.gov). They cost $600 to $750, but prices are expected to fall as their use becomes more common. NOAA, which also runs the National Weather Service, predicts that as the beacons are offered for sale in outdoors stores such as REI in the coming months, they will prevent the deaths of hundreds of hikers, hunters, skiers and mountain bikers by providing an emergency lifeline to civilization. "We're extremely excited," said Marilu Trainor, a NOAA spokeswoman. "People buy good trekking shoes, clothing and tents. They should consider adding these beacons to their checklist. It's an investment in your own safety." Some outdoors lovers, however, are wary. While supporting the safety potential, they note that many people head to remote wild areas, such as California's Sierra Nevada, the Mojave Desert or Alaska's vast wildernesses, to sever ties with civilization. By carrying an electronic beacon, people heading into any American wilderness - no matter how remote - will always have the ability to be found, or to contact civilization, at a moment's notice. "People have profound experiences in wilderness," said Steven Shewach, the Sierra Club's national outdoor activities training manager. "They are spiritual. They are emotional. It is inspiring to see the beauty. But there's also a sense of adventure that comes from risk and pushing personal limits, both physically and emotionally. A lot of folks might say I don't want this technology there. I want to handle it on my own." Several companies manufacture the beacons. The more expensive models can pinpoint a person lost in the wilderness to within a few dozen yards. The less expensive models can pinpoint people to within about a mile. The way they work is similar to a tiny radio transmitter. [actually, exactly like a tiny radio transmitter --- gh] Operating on a 406-megahertz frequency, the beacons emit a signal that is picked up by 24 NOAA satellites in orbit after the user presses a button. That signal, which contains unique information about each user, is relayed to the U.S. Mission Control Center at the NOAA Satellite and Information Center in Suitland, Md., for processing, and the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Langley Air Force Base in Virginia. Air Force officials then contact local police or search-and-rescue teams to go find the person in trouble. An early test program using the devices in Alaska has saved more than 200 lives since 1994, from stranded snowmobilers to lost hunters. "The desire is to use resources effectively," said Lt. Col. Scott Morgan, the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center commanding officer. Personal beacons "do that by pinpointing the location of the person in distress. The bottom line is we'll be able to better locate individuals and save lives." False alarms are a concern. After the beacons are activated, the user has 50 seconds to cancel the signal. People convicted of malicious use of the beacon can face up to six years in prison, $250,000 in fines and a bill from rescue agencies. For several years, hikers have debated whether to carry cell phones or GPS devices. Some do for safety, but others forsake them because of weight concerns and the feeling they compromise the wilderness experience. "Hikers are pretty much out there to get away from it all," said Liz Bergeron, executive director of the Pacific Crest Trail Association, in Sacramento. "I want to be out there with no connection. But these might bring some peace of mind to people's family and friends." In the end, the best route to back-country safety remains the tried-and-true rules, many experts say: Always tell others where you are going and when you'll return. Don't venture too far alone. Carry plenty of food and water. "I normally wouldn't carry one of these beacons," said Vern Gersh, an outdoor guide with Yosemite Guides, in El Portal. "But if I was going to do something more hard-core, alone, off the trail, it might be a good safety net." (c) 2003, San Jose Mercury News (San Jose, Calif.). (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. I've made a few updates to our http://www.dkosmedia.com website that I would like to call your attention to. We have joined the over 100,000 sites that now carry the Code Amber ticker, the internet's version of the AMBER alert. To add this vital service to your website, click on the banner or the running ticker on my homepage to connect to codeamber.org. We've added obituaries for Roy Neil and Ed Townsend to our "Latest News" section. There is also a link to Roy's bio page; Plans for this week's show and the live365.com re-run schedule are in the "Program/Website" section. The sections are opened by clicking the item on the menu over on the left side. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ "Big Steve" Coletti, A Different Kind Of Oldies Show on WBCQ, 7415 kHz Shortwave, Saturday Evenings at 8:00 ET, 0000 UT-Sunday, E-mail: bigstevecole@email.com - Web: http://www.dkosmedia.com US Mail: P.O. Box 396, New York, NY 10002 (via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ** U S A. SK - ROY NEIL HINKEL, K6DUE - SK We mourn the passing of someone we never met but worked with for many years. Roy Neil, formerly of NBC News and a co-founding member of, and regular reporter on the Amateur Radio Newsline passed away Friday August 15th from complications following heart surgery in High Point, NC. He was 82. For many years we helped distribute the ARNewsline by way of the old BBS network systems and in the early days of AOL, Prodigy, Compuserve and the long defunct GEnie network. Back in the 90's we used excerpts from ARNewsline on our old Crossband program on Radio Newyork International and later on the Let's Talk Radio satellite network. Through these reports and with comments we occasionally relayed back and forth by way of ARNewsline Founder/Editor, Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, we felt like we got to know Roy just a little. We had an affinity for Roy Neil's work from the NBC days. He explained the space program and various scientific discoveries in layman's language, but always had that little extra in his reporting that made techknowledgy hungry minds like mine wanting more. His easy going style made it reassuring that we could also understand a little more of our ever changing science, turning our apprehension of the unfamiliar into comfort with our future. The AR Newsline was not published last week. Roy Neil Biography: http://www.angelfire.com/fl/engservice/K6DUE.html Warning: it plays a very boring MIDI version of the NBC News theme, John Williams' "The Mission" (Big Steve Cole, DKOS News via DXLD) SERVICE SET FOR ROY NEAL, K6DUE; FAMILY INVITES MEMORIAL DONATIONS NEWINGTON, CT, Aug 18, 2003 -- A service has been set for Tuesday, August 19, in High Point, North Carolina, for Roy Neal, K6DUE, who died August 15 following major heart surgery earlier in the week. He was 82. A retired NBC News science correspondent, producer and executive, Neal -- born Roy N. Hinkel -- chaired the Space Amateur Radio EXperiment (SAREX)/Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Working Group. ARISS Chairman Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, said Neal played a pivotal role in getting NASA to permit Amateur Radio aboard human spaceflight vehicles. ``Through his extensive contacts in NASA, he was instrumental in convincing NASA management to fly Amateur Radio onboard the space shuttle,`` said Bauer, who expressed condolences to Neal`s family on behalf of ARISS and AMSAT. ``Roy`s successful negotiations with NASA management led to the first on-orbit Amateur Radio operations by astronaut Owen Garriott, W5LFL, on the STS-9 space shuttle Columbia flight in November 1983.`` Bauer, who`s also AMSAT-NA`s vice president for human spaceflight programs, also credited Neal with being instrumental in forming the ARISS international team and for moderating its gatherings. ``K6DUE`s extensive experience as a newsman was put into practice as he utilized these talents to keep the ARISS team on-track and focused during these critical, consensus-gathering meetings,`` Bauer added. Neal also often emceed ARISS school group ham radio contact teleconferences. ARISS, a joint project of ARRL, AMSAT and NASA, developed the first permanent ham station in space aboard the ISS. Bauer called Neal ``an encyclopedia of knowledge`` about the US space program and said he was honored to have him as a friend. ``I will miss him dearly,`` Bauer said. ``K6DUE worked tirelessly to expand Amateur Radio operations beyond the surface of the earth. He personally challenged me and the entire ARISS team to develop, operate and maintain a permanent Amateur Radio station on the ISS. The ham radio station onboard the ISS serves as a living legacy to Roy Neal.`` Neal covered all of the Mercury missions for NBC -- becoming a personal friend of the Mercury 7 astronauts in the process -- and later reported the Gemini and Apollo missions and many early space shuttle flights. In the process, he got to know many of the country`s space pioneers. Earlier this year, he was inducted into the CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame for his role in persuading NASA to allow the first Amateur Radio operation from space. Neal also was a regular visitor and sometime presenter at Hamvention and a correspondent and reporter for Amateur Radio Newsline. He hosted the 1987 ARRL video production New World Of Amateur Radio, an overview of ham radio in space. A Pennsylvania native, Neal began his broadcasting career at a Philadelphia radio station. Subsequently, he served as an infantry officer during World War II and served as a program manager for the Armed Forces Radio Network in Europe. Following the war, he resumed his broadcasting career in Philadelphia, this time in television. He went on to set up NBC`s West Coast news bureau. Later, the former NBC correspondent and producer anchored the New Year`s Day Tournament of Roses Parade telecast for many years. An ARRL member, Neal had been licensed for much of his adult life and was active on the air until the last few weeks of his life. He enjoyed DXing, HF and VHF. Survivors include his wife Pat and sons David and Mark. Neal`s services will be 11 AM August 19 at Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church, 1225 Chestnut Drive, High Point. The family invites donations in lieu of flowers to the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation, Astronaut Hall of Fame, ATTN Linn LeBlanc, 6225 Vectorspace Blvd, Titusville, FL 32780. Copyright © 2003, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved (ARRL via John Norfolk, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. For those who didn't already receive this: Busta moves... the "Radio Citadelle" on my page, no doubt. http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-03-2661A1.doc (Terry L Krueger Clearwater, Florida USA, Aug 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: Before the Federal Communications Commission Washington, D.C. 20554 In the Matter of Odino Joseph c/o Noah`s Ark Baptist Church 576 11th Street North Naples, Florida 34102 File No. EB-02-TP-300 NAL/Acct. No. 200232700020 FRN 0007-3087-3 FORFEITURE ORDER Adopted: August 14, 2003 Released: August 18, 2003 By the Chief, Enforcement Bureau: I. INTRODUCTION In this Forfeiture Order (``Order``) we issue a monetary forfeiture in the amount of one thousand dollars ($1,000) to Mr. Odino Joseph (``Mr. Joseph``) for willful violation of Section 301 of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended (``Act``). The noted violation involves Mr. Joseph`s operation of a radio station without Commission authorization. On August 5, 2002, the Commission`s Tampa, Florida Field Office (``Tampa Office``) issued a Notice of Apparent Liability for Forfeiture (``NAL``) to Mr. Joseph for a forfeiture in the amount of ten thousand dollars ($10,000). Mr. Joseph filed a response to the NAL on September 24, 2002. II. BACKGROUND On April 22, 2002, the Tampa Office received a complaint from a Naples, Florida broadcaster regarding an unlicensed FM radio station operating on 104.3 MHz in the Naples area. On May 14, 2002, two agents from the Tampa Office drove to the Naples, Florida area to investigate the complaint of unlicensed operation on 104.3 MHz. As the agents approached the Naples area they detected an FM radio station on 104.3 MHz. Using electronic direction finding techniques, the agents positively identified the source of the transmissions to be an antenna mounted on a tower attached to the back of Suite #530 in a strip mall located at 11th Street North, Naples, Florida. The agents determined that the station exceeded the permissible level for a non-licensed low-power radio transmitter by 31,953 times. Accordingly, a license was required for operation of this station. FCC records show no license has been issued for the operation of an FM broadcast station at this location. Thus, the station operated in violation of 47 U.S.C. § 301. The agents approached Suite #530 and interviewed a man near the suite. This man stated that he subleased Suite #530 along with a ``Pastor Odino`` but that it was ``Pastor Odino`` who operated the radio station. This man identified to the agents the location of the radio station behind locked doors inside Suite #530. Inside Suite #530, the agents found a handwritten note with the words ``Pasteur Odino`` and a telephone number. The agents observed a van parked in front of the strip mall. On the van were signs with the words ``Noah`s Ark Baptist Church`` along with an address that identified the location of the church as another suite in the same strip mall. The signs also listed a telephone number and the name ``Pastor Odino Joseph`` as the church`s pastor. The agents contacted Pastor Odino Joseph at the phone number found during the investigation. During this call, Mr. Joseph admitted to the operation of the unlicensed radio station on 104.3 MHz and promised to cease operation until a license could be obtained. On August 5, 2002, the Tampa Office issued an NAL for a $10,000 forfeiture to Mr. Joseph for operating a radio station without Commission authorization in willful violation of Section 301 of the Act. Mr. Joseph filed a response to the NAL on September 24, 2002. In his response, Mr. Joseph admits that he operated radio transmitting equipment, but requests cancellation or reduction of the forfeiture amount. Mr. Joseph asserts that although the violation was willful, it was not intentional. Mr. Joseph argues that the facts of this case do not warrant an upward adjustment of the forfeiture amount. Further, Mr. Joseph contends that all of the downward adjustment criteria are applicable. In support of his argument regarding the downward adjustment criteria, Mr. Joseph indicates that his violation is minor. Mr. Joseph states that the second criterion, good faith or voluntary disclosure, is also applicable because he did not attempt to conceal the origin of his broadcast or evade detection. Mr. Joseph also maintains that the signal strength of his transmissions was greater than he intended, which was only to reach within a couple of miles from his church. Mr. Joseph adds that he cooperated with the Commission`s agents and terminated all transmissions upon request. In addition, Mr. Joseph argues that he has a history of overall compliance. Finally, Mr. Joseph asserts that payment of the proposed $10,000 forfeiture would impose a financial hardship on him and submits financial information for 1999, 2000, and 2001 in support of this assertion. DISCUSSION The proposed forfeiture amount in this case was assessed in accordance with Section 503(b) of the Act, Section 1.80 of the Commission`s Rules (``Rules``), and The Commission`s Forfeiture Policy Statement and Amendment of Section 1.80 of the Rules to Incorporate the Forfeiture Guidelines, 12 FCC Rcd 17087 (1997), recon. denied, 15 FCC Rcd 303 (1999) (``Policy Statement``). In examining Mr. Joseph`s response, Section 503(b) of the Act requires that the Commission take into account the nature, circumstances, extent and gravity of the violation and, with respect to the violator, the degree of culpability, any history of prior offenses, ability to pay, and other such matters as justice may require. Mr. Joseph acknowledges in his response to the NAL that he operated radio transmitting equipment without a license. Accordingly, we conclude that Mr. Joseph willfully violated Section 301 of the Act and a forfeiture amount of $10,000 was properly assessed. The term ``willful,`` as used in Section 503(b) of the Act, does not require a finding that the rule violation was intentional or that the violator was aware that it was committing a rule violation. Rather, the term ``willful`` simply requires that the violator knew it was taking the action in question, irrespective of any intent to violate the Commission`s rules. Moreover, the NAL in this case proposed the base forfeiture amount of $10,000 for the violation and did not apply any of the upward adjustment criteria. Thus, Mr. Joseph`s arguments that the upward adjustment criteria are inapplicable are irrelevant. Mr. Joseph`s claim that the violation was minor is not supported by the facts. Specifically, we do not believe that a non-licensed FM operation that exceeds the level for permissible non-licensed low power operation by more than 31,953 times is a minor violation. Moreover, we are not persuaded that a reduction on the basis of good faith or voluntary disclosure is warranted in this case. There is no evidence that Mr. Joseph made any efforts to correct or voluntarily disclose the violation prior to our investigation of this matter. Also, Mr. Joseph purports to have a history of overall compliance with the Commission`s Rules to support his claim for reduction of the forfeiture. However, in light of the fact that Mr. Joseph is not a Commission licensee, we do not believe he has any history with the Commission upon which a history of overall compliance reduction can be based. Furthermore, although Mr. Joseph has terminated all transmissions, remedial action taken to correct a violation is not a mitigating factor. Finally, based on the financial documentation provided by Mr. Joseph, we conclude that payment of the proposed $10,000 would impose a financial hardship on Mr. Joseph. Therefore, we will reduce the forfeiture from $10,000 to $1,000. ORDERING CLAUSES Accordingly, IT IS ORDERED that, pursuant to Section 503 of the Act, and Sections 0.111, 0.311 and 1.80(f)(4) of the Rules, Mr. Odino Joseph IS LIABLE FOR A MONETARY FORFEITURE in the amount of one thousand dollars ($1,000) for willful violation of Section 301 of the Act. Payment of the forfeiture shall be made in the manner provided for in Section 1.80 of the Rules within 30 days of the release of this Order. If the forfeiture is not paid within the period specified, the case may be referred to the Department of Justice for collection pursuant to Section 504(a) of the Act. Payment may be made by mailing a check or similar instrument, payable to the order of the Federal Communications Commission, to the Federal Communications Commission, P.O. Box 73482, Chicago, Illinois 60673-7482. The payment should reference NAL/Acct. No. 200232700020 and FRN 0007-3087-3. Requests for full payment under an installment plan should be sent to: Chief, Revenue and Receivables Operations Group, 445 12th Street, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20554. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of this Order shall be sent by first class mail and certified mail return receipt requested to Mr. Odino Joseph, 576 11th Street North, Naples, Florida 34102, and to his counsel, Marc L. Shapiro, Esq., 720 Goodlette Road North, Suite 304, Naples, Florida 34102. FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION David H. Solomon Chief, Enforcement Bureau [Footnotes the referents of which did not survive conversion, deleted here] Federal Communications Commission DA 03-2661 (via Terry Krueger, DXLD) ** U S A. NPR and the International Association of Audio Information Services have asked the FCC for more time to reply to a study of low- power FM interference. They requested a 90-day extension of the deadline, originally set for Sept. 12. posted at 11:09 AM EST http://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/ecfs/retrieve.cgi?native_or_pdf=pdf&id_document=6514383297 (Current via DXLD) ** U S A. Infineon: Glenn, To check the status of the Supreme Court of the United States case of Infineon vs Rambus (SCUS 03-37) go to http://www.supremecourtus.gov/docket/03-37.htm 73, (Kraig Krist, VA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hmm, I see among the Attorneys for Petitioner is: Kenneth W. Starr (gh, DXLD) ** URUGUAY. Desde Montevidéu, Manrique Beceiro envia panorama atual das emissoras daquele país nas ondas curtas: em 6045 kHz, emite a Rádio Sport, com programação esportiva 24 horas, em paralelo com 890 kHz. Já em 11735 kHz, aparece a Rádio Oriental, em paralelo com 770 kHz. Na faixa de 31 metros, a SODRE pode ser ouvida em 9620 kHz, paralelamente com 650 kHz. Também a Emisora Ciudad de Montevideo, em 9650 kHz, em paralelo com 1330 kHz (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX Aug 17 via DXLD) ** VENEZUELA. La estación YVTO, 5000 kHz, ha estado más de una semana fuera del aire. No quiero pensar que tan errática actividad sea el preludio a una salida definitiva del aire. 73's y buen DX (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Aug 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VIETNAM [non]. Re Degar Voice, 7115: The website http://www.radioradicale.it has material related to the Degar people. (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, DXplorer Aug 16 via BC-DX via DXLD) Interesting. Unfortunately, won't propagate to ECNA at that hour. Do they have a website? http://www.montagnard-foundation.org does not appear to be connected to the station itself (Jerry Berg, MA, DXplorer Aug, via BC-DX Aug 17 via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. 4960, 0015-0036 30/Jul SINPO=xxxxx Idioma indígena, probablemente miskito con algunas frases en español. Anuncian un número telefónico que no corresponde al formato usado en Honduras: 895-015. Además los controles de la hora que emiten no concuerdan con la hora en que se realizó la escucha, por lo que debe tratarse de un programa pre-grabado: "10 de la mañana con 30 minutos...". No capté ninguna identificación (Elmer Escoto, Honduras SONY ICF-SW7600GR y antena "random" de 10 metros, DX LISTENING DIGEST) En la frecuencia de 4959.98 kHz está transmitiendo Radio Federación Shuar, Sucia (Ecuador). Probablemente sea la emisora Elmer Escoto ha captado. Estoy de acuerdo con Arnaldo. Otra posibilidad es Cima100, Sto. Domingo (República Dominicana); no recuerdo la frecuencia exacta pero está más bajo que Federación. Se reconoce la emisora por su sonido ``débil`` y claro también por su música ``caliente``. Durante bastante tiempo he tenido una estación no identificada en 4960.46 kHz pero solamente en la mañana aproximadamente entre 10-1100 UT con español y algún idioma indígena. Bolivia? (Björn Malm, Ecuador, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ DE RADIOS Estimados Amigos, Por medio de la presente los invito a participar de http://www.deRadios.com - Un Sitio de Radios, donde accederá a toda la información de lo que ocurre con las Radios de Argentina y Latinoamérica. Para ello suscribase a nuestro Newsletter Semanal Sin Cargo haciendo click en este link SUSCRIPCIÓN y disfrute los beneficios de compartir la Magia de la Radio en la Web. A la espera de vuestro contacto, los saludo muy cordialmente (Darío Durán, Director General, http://www.deRadios.com +54 223 495-8871 Aug 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ THE PROPAGATION OUTLOOK FROM OTTAWA http://www.spaceweather.gc.ca/myservlet/geomag_CLF/main_e.jsp Here`s the 27-day outlook in graphical form, which we used to get in the P-mail and quote on WOR along with Boulder info. 27 - Day Magnetic Activity Forecast http://www.spaceweather.gc.ca/forecast27days_e.shtml Unfortunately, it is only issued every 27 days, apparently with no daily or even weekly updates, and the current one covers thru Aug 26; further, it is awfully slow-loading (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) MAJOR GEOMAGNETIC STORM We have ALL been caught out, by the behaviour of the Sun in the last 30 Hours or so (This includes the observatories!!!). Jan Alvestead has just returned from holidays; you might like to look at his latest report on http://www.trsc.com A surprise Coronal Mass Ejection arrived at Earth at about 1340 UT on Sunday 17th August 2003; this was followed by the commencement of a Severe Geomagnetic Storm at 0100 UT on Monday 18th August 2003. The 'K' Index got as high as '8' at some observatories. It now looks as though the next forecast Coronal Hole, may get into Geoeffective Position on the Sun, somewhat earlier than originally expected. I am afraid it looks as though the 'promised window' for quiet conditions for the next couple of days, is not, now, in the main, going to happen. The Solar Wind IS dropping quite quickly, at the moment, I am NOT confident that this will continue for more than a further 6 to 18 Hours. VERY sorry, folks!! There are also currently, several interesting comments on Auroras, which are very much connected with Solar and Radio Conditions. on the Main Page of http://www.spaceweather.com Can I especially commend you to read the Daily Report and Forecast on this Site after 2210 UT this evening. Because of changes on the Site, I find the best way to access this, now, is to put 'NOAA Forecast' into http://www.google.co.uk and select the second item that comes up on the resultant list (Ken Fletcher, 1811UTC=1911UTC+1, 18th August 2003, BDXC-UK via DXLD) Severe attenuation of Radio Signals observed here on Short Wave, this evening (Hardly surprising!!) This is the best time to look for Transmissions from SOUTH of us, where Northern Signals are Attenuated by Geomagnetic Storm Effects. I bet 5.850 Radio Canada via Sweden won`t be up too much to-night. I would be interested in any observations posted on this one, relating to this evening`s transmission (2000-2130 UT) from various parts of the country, or any other transmissions thought relevant, for example can the 60M experts tell us about transmissions this evening, compared to normal? Many Thanks (Ken Fletcher, 1842UTC=1942UTC+1, 18th August 2003, BDXC-UK via DXLD) DAILY SOLAR SPACE WEATHER AND GEOMAGNETIC INDICES Here are some general guidelines concerning correlation of propagation indices to actual expected propagation conditions. You can find more information at http://www.kn4lf.com/kn4lf8.htm 1.) Dropping indices numbers are better, except for solar flux on HF. 2.) For medium frequencies a solar flux under 150, under 100 better, 70 is best for E layer multi hop. Keep in mind though that the 10.7 cm (2800 MHz) solar flux index is not a "reliable" gauge of ionization in our atmosphere, as the energy of photons at this frequency is to low on the order of one million times. 2a.) For high frequencies a solar flux of 100 is okay, 150 better, above 200 best for F layer multi hop. 3.) Solar flux of at least 100 for E valley-F layer ducting mechanism. 4.) Previous 24 hour Ap index under 10, under 7 for several days consecutively is best. 5.) Previous 3 hour Kp index under 3 for mid latitude paths, under 2 for high latitude paths, 0-1 for several days consecutively is best. 6.) Energetic protons no greater than 10 MeV (10+0) for 160/120 meters and no greater than (10-1) on MF broadcast band. 7.) Background x-ray flux levels less than C1 for several days consecutively for 160/120 meters and less then B9 for MF broadcast band. 8.) No current STRATWARM alert. 9.) IMF Bz with a negative sign, indicates a better chance of high latitude path auroral absorption/unpredictable refraction or scattering of MF RF signals, when the Kp is above 3. 73, Thomas F. Giella, Space & Atmospheric Weather Forecaster, C/S KN4LF, Plant City, FL, USA 33566, EL87WX SWFWMD Rainfall Observer #574 NWS Tampa Bay, FL Skywarn Spotter #HIL-249 Florida Space & Atmospheric Weather Institute: http://www.kn4lf.com/fsawi.htm (via hard-core-dx via DXLD) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-149, August 17, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3h.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1195: RFPI: Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 on 7445 [nominal times subject to delay or pre-emption] WBCQ: Mon 0415 on 7415 WWCR: Wed 0930 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1195.html WORLD OF RADIO on WJIE: We missed checking Sunday 1630 the last few weeks to confirm whether WJIE has still been running #1179 from April, but on Aug 16 we found that the schedule had been updated at http://www.wjiesw.com/schedule.htm to show only one time for WOR, Sat 0930 UT. However, occasional checks at various times of both frequencies, 7490 and 13595, the past week have failed to confirm WJIE is even on the air, or modulating if there is a carrier. We have told them there is no point in continuing until WJIE can become serious about SW (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) WORLD OF RADIO WATCH: On WRMI: 1195 confirmed Sat Aug 16 at 1804 on 15725; on WINB: confirmed 0031+ UT Sun Aug 17 on 12160; CONTINENT OF MEDIA on RFPI was about half an hour early at 0300 UT Sun instead of 0330 (gh) SOLICITED TESTIMONIALS Re: DXLD 3-146 comments by Steve Cross: ``The best reception by far is the Sunday UT show on WWCR 5070 at 0230 UT.`` I agree with that assessment, but the UT Saturday 1030 airing, also on 5070, matches it occasionally. For the past several weeks, I have been waking up around that time and tune the program in on the Satellit 800. For the past two or three weeks reception was marginal but it could have been impaired by some nearby interference. I didn`t wake up in time this morning (August 16) but I did tape it on the VCR from my DX-398, and today it was very clear, and it was complete, while during recent weeks it would usually be cut off before the propagation outlook as the program occasionally starts 1-2 minutes late. I must make a habit of checking the tape afterwards, even if I do wake up early and listen to it then on the 800, as I have noticed that occasionally reception will be better on one radio than on the other. Perhaps this is due to the fact that I use two separate antennas, both the wind-up type (the one for the 800 is attached to the whip antenna while the 398`s is plugged into the antenna input) which I am limited to but fortunately they are both satisfactory. ``The Thu afternoon local show on WWCR 15825 at 2030 fades in and out but is usually readable, again if no weather or solar problems.`` I usually find this to be completely inaudible, but I believe that is due to local interference burying the signal. ``The first show of the week on WBCQ is not readable until wintertime on 7415 and is occasionally readable on 17495, both at 2200 UT Wed.`` I agree with the comment for 7415 but 17495 is usually buried under local interference. But as the slide into winter continues the interference should abate. So, at the moment, my first chance to hear WORLD OF RADIO clearly is the Saturday 1030 airing on WWCR. As the nights get longer, however, the first airing on WBCQ should start coming in stronger, although even at its best it never matches the reception I usually get on WWCR Saturday mornings and evenings. I have, on a couple of occasions (both in July late in the evenings while I was home on vacation), downloaded it from the net and listened to it on the computer. The first time it played complete with no interruptions but the second time it cut out so many times I was forced to stop after five minutes or so. I consider WORLD OF RADIO to be the only DX program worth listening to. I never listen to DXING WITH CUMBRE, although, as I have said once before somewhere in the gh universe, they really ``don`t speak my language, so to speak.`` (I have no interest in DXing as such). DXERS UNLIMITED definitely doesn`t speak my language and I never listen to that, although I have in the past checked their posted scripts (but not for many months now). I have been intending to start listening to DX PARTYLINE again, but I usually find that I`m busy with something else when their broadcast times comes around so I don`t bother. However, if I didn`t get good reception Saturday morning, I always make sure I finish with or stop whatever I`m doing by the time the Saturday evening WORLD OF RADIO broadcast rolls around. 73, (John Norfolk, OKCOK) Dear Mr Hauser, Hello! My name is Ian and in answer to your question, ``What is my favourite station for listening to World of Radio?`` I would say WWCR. I listen to you at 0230 UT Sundays on 5070. Actually I usually set the tape recorder because it`s 0330 local time here. I use a Sangean 818, the one with the built-in cassette recorder, with an 11 meter `open` end fed ceiling loop clipped to the set top whip. The loop is a single strand of 12 volt doorbell wire (insulated). The wire is held in place by 5 plastic `map pins`, two or three turns around each pin. I actually have 23 or these lops about 2.5 inches apart. The other one feeds my 1972 Eddystone EB37 transistor `cabin` set which I bought at the National Vintage Communications Fair for 20 pounds in May this year. . . (Ian Evans, Gwent, UK, 10 Aug, by P-mail, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AFGHANISTAN [non]. 15615, CIS(?) to AFGHANISTAN, R. Amani, 1624- 1637, 15/08, Arabic?, CIS test tones at tune-in until 1628, silence until 1631 sign-on, very poor/weak under propagational QRN, with presumed ID and Arabic-like music fanfare followed by music and talks. Not able to get any readable copy, just enough to know something is there! (Scott R Barbour Jr., Intervale, NH, Sangean ATS 818, RF Systems MLB-1, RS longwire w/ RBA balun, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Surely they would not use Arabic except for Qur`an recitations (gh, DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. RA will be able to broadcast a few more hours out of Darwin in the near future to Asia; to improve signal in Vietnamese, which is presently from offshore [Taiwan?]; also looking at mounting a transmission to S and SE As in English, probably around 1300-1530 UT for a presence in the evening as well as afternoon. Due to budget cuts, RA will make some changes, cancelling some programs to be replaced by others, details not yet decided, to take effect at the beginning of September (Jean-Gabriel Manguy, RA network manager on Feedback Aug 8 [presumably] from WRN archive Aug 17, looking for current show about ARDS, notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. 5050, ARDS, another "vague" QSL but a QSL all the same, especially when Radio Manager Dale Chesson dale@ards.com.au said the male announcer I heard on Aug 8 was him. Other info from Dale: "We are a community education/community development organisation and our media release went out on Thursday (Aug 7)." He added: "We're collecting S readings from hams across the Top End (i.e. the Northern Territory) to identify if our antennae are aimed correctly. We'll use MF transmitters in the major communities once time and finances allow. We are on 5050, as that was the frequency assigned by the ACA when we applied for our HF Domestic Broadcasting Licence. 5060 is the upper limit of the licence and we wanted something as close to that as possible to cope with the tropical climate, etc., as we would only be issued with one frequency due to congestion of the spectrum. Over 5060 you need an International Broadcasting Licence and that was really out of the scope of our operations." I recommended shifting to 5045 or 5055 to lessen interference. Dale's response was: "Given frequency allocation by ACA, and also that 5040 is the Defence frequency in Townsville, there is little hope of us being issued something inside their 9 kHz spacing requirements." I made reference to the ABC SW transmitters at Katherine, Tennant Creek and Alice Springs. Dale said that the ABC's transmitters are "50 kW vertical incidence with shower antenna. We were quoted A$5 million to replicate this service!" The station`s name isn't finalised yet: "We have a name in mind at this stage, but are waiting for our listening audience to come up with something that they will identify with. As we talk to people, we refer to it as the Community Development Radio Service." (David Foster, Australia, DXplorer via DXLD) ** BAHAMAS. 1540, ZNS1, Nassau - 0535+ 8/17. Weird, a couple of years ago I recall hearing them track Billy Joel's "River Of Dreams" album in its' entirety. So whadda ya know, tonight I stumbled upon them tracking Joel's "The Stranger" and across the top-of-the-hour. Is there some hidden meaning here, or could there be a closet Billy fan working graveyard in central New Providence? (Terry L. Krueger, Clearwater, Florida, USA, 27.55.83 N, 82.46.08 W, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BANGLADESH?? 9550, Bangladesh Betar, 1228 17 Aug, Instrumental music and announcement by W in what sounded like English, then into long talk by W after 1230 although it didn't sound like English then. No IS noted. Definitely Asian. If them, maybe they started the English program a little early. Weak and fading. Nothing but Hams on 7185. Could they be using the same transmitter and switching frequencies?? 73's (Dave Valko, Dunlo PA, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) Well, GVG said 7185 was the only active SW frequency here (gh, DXLD) 7185, Bangladesh Betar 1234-1259* 8/16. English transmission; last minute of news, then commentary with mentions of India and Bangladesh; subcontinental vocal music at 1240. Fair signal with ARO QRM (John Wilkins, Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Drake R-8, 100-foot RW, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. 4905, RADIO SAN MIGUEL, Riberalta, 0215, August 16. Spanish, program "Show de los Sábados" "...la multitud de Radio San Miguel", "...mes aniversario, 35 años de Radio San Miguel..." sign-off 0300 45444; also 1035, August 16 Spanish, Mass 55555 (Rogildo F. Aragão, Quillacollo - Bolivia, Sony ICF-2001D - Lowe HF-225E, LW 20m + LW 50m, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Nominal 4930; this is the one that jumped to 4735v recently (gh, DXLD) e.g.: 4930.01, R. San Miguel, 15 Aug 2353, M talk in Spanish with mention of Sierra, and ending with R. San Miguel ID at 2355, into nice Tango vocal song. Fair (Dave Valko, PA, 15 August, micro dxpediton, Used a 26 meter dipole oriented 120-300 degrees and 4 meters off the ground, and a 300' Beverage on the ground running to 190 degrees, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. Hi Glenn, Re the item NACIONAL DO BRASIL PARA A ÁFRICA in DXLD 3-146: So you think the Af service is actually on 9665? I haven`t heard anything yet to indicate this is for Africa, but I am by no means fluent in Portuguese. Today, Aug. 17, I heard the usual sambas and what sounds a recorded ID which includes station name, frequency[ies?] and a schedule, and also mentions RadioBrás, but no mention of a target. Audio is overmodulated which doesn`t improve audibility. Signal strength here is very good, which doesn`t suggest it`s beaming towards the main Portuguese speaking countries in southern Africa. 73s, (Noel Green, England, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. 12 AMAZON CATHOLIC STATIONS FORM NEWS SERVICE Tefé, Amazonas, Aug 9 (Conexión Digital) --- Twelve Catholic radio stations located in the Amazon Basin are working together to produce a regional newscast, reports Paul Roberto e Souza. With the goal of creating an informative program over the Amazon Basin, originating from Tefé, Amazonians will produce it. According to Padre Edilberto Sena, director of ZYI354 Rádio Rural of Santarém 710 AM and ZYG363 on 4765 kHz shortwave in the Brasilian state of Pará, ``It is not xenophobic, but is dedicated to highlight the values of our region and to alert our people about international greed, especially that of the Gringo North Americans.`` Forming the network are stations in ZYH204 Cruzeiro do Sul 940 AM and ZYF203 on 4865 kHz shortwave in the state of Acre, ZYI535 Bragança 1390 AM and ZYG364 on 4825 kHz in the state of Pará, Rádio Rural de Santarém, among others. ZYH282 Rádio Educação Rural 1270 AM and ZYF271 on 3385 kHz shortwave, of Tefé, in the state of Amazonas, a city where Paulo Roberto e Souza works, is not currently a member of the network, but it will be entering shortly (Catholic Radio Update Aug 18 via DXLD) ** CANADA. RCI is expecting a new design of QSL card within the next month or two. That card will picture the flags of the Canadian provinces and territories. 73s (Swopan Chakroborty, Kolkata, India, Aug 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. I received the following inquiry from a DXer in New Zealand. I didn't do any SW listening at all during Thursday's blackout. Does anyone know if CHU went off? And if they did go off, how long did they stay off? Or did they switch to emergency power and stay on during the outage? As I type, just after 1 PM eastern (1700 UTC), I can't hear CHU at all. But that's likely due to propagation, as I can't hear WWV on 5000 or 10000, and reception is poor on 15000. 73 (Mike Brooker, Toronto, ON, Aug 17, NRC-AM via DXLD) Nope, CHU is definitely off the air (as of 1345 EDT). I live just a few km away from the transmitter site, and there is not even a weak carrier on 3330 or 7335. I can't say whether they've been on at all since the blackout, since I didn't check until now (Barry McLarnon, Ottawa, ibid.) CHU has indeed been off since the blackout. I thought it was bad band conditions at first, but I guess not. I wonder if they are dropping the service? I ask because some time ago, they removed the web pages on CHU's data format and such. I'd think WWV would reach well into Canada, so I never understood why they have CHU. Are there some areas where WWV just doesn't get into in Canada? (Adam Myrow, Memphis TN, ibid.) I live near Boston. We have heard them occasionally since the blackout, sometimes very weak, sometimes normal level for very short periods, and then totally gone. Did not know if it was propagation or blackout related. Suspected the latter, and you are confirming this. But I can say they have been on although very sporadically (Allan Dunn, K1UCY, ibid.) ** CANADA. We're told - but have not yet confirmed - that the CN Tower transmitting facility lost power, sending most of the signals there either into darkness (CTV's CFTO, CHIN-FM, CJRT, CBL-FM) or to low- power auxiliary facilities. On the AM dial, CHWO (740) was off the air most of the night, though the problem appeared to be at the studio and not the transmitter, since CJBC (860) stayed on from the same transmitter. Scattered off-air stations were reported elsewhere in Ontario, and we caught the CJBC relay network picking up Syracuse's WTKW and relaying it in the absence of the Kingston 99.5 signal early in the blackout. On Friday morning, the transmitters of the TVOntario network that weren't off the air were carrying a slate apologizing for the lack of programming because of the power outage (Scott Fybush, NE Radio Watch Aug 15 via DXLD) more under USA ** CANADA. CIAO-530, CHKT-1430 and CHIN-1540 were k.o.'ed completely. CJBC-860 stayed on, but CHWO-740 was off sporadically. They didn't seem to have any special programs when they were on, just the usual nostalgia music. CFTR-680 was off for about an hour after the power went out, with only a growlly carrier, but came back on around 1800 EDT. Of course MOJO-640 stayed on - power outages are a test of macho and separate the men from the boys. No sign of JOY-1250, presumably they were knocked off - God works in wonderful ways :) CFYZ-1280 stayed on, with emergency programming (well, duh, virtually every flight at YYZ was cancelled) (Mike Brooker, Toronto, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** CANADA [and non]. RADIO TO THE RESCUE WHEN POWER OUT People spent hours in their cars flipping from station to station Julie Smyth, National Post, Saturday, August 16, 2003 http://www.nationalpost.com/home/story.html?id=1C6A930E-72D0-46F6-A871-901FACC0BD38 It was the renaissance of radio. As the power went out, leaving television screens black, people huddled around battery-powered radios to get their news. Neighbours gathered on lawn chairs, lit lanterns and candles, watched the stars and turned on the old-fashioned pocket radio someone had dusted off and dug out of the basement closet. Through out the night, the scratchy sounds of beat-up hand-helds and more modern ghetto blasters filled the air with music and newscasts. Many people spent hours in their car, flipping from station to station, or fell asleep, clutching their radio and listening to bulletins about when their power might be restored. "I laid all night listening to the radio. People were phoning in asking where they could get a Tim Hortons," said one woman. It was a throw-back to the fifties when only months ago every family across the modern world was glued to the television watching live footage of combat in Iraq on CNN through the camera of an embedded camera crew. For one of the most important stories in years -- the biggest blackout in North American history -- television, for once, could not reach viewers in major cities such as Toronto, Ottawa, New York. With limited news access -- even the Internet proved useless except on portable computers -- people relied on the only source of information that was still available. The good old radio made a temporary come- back, brought upon simply by the fact that all the technology available to the giants of broadcast could do nothing about the fact 50 million people could not turn on their television sets. "Radios were flying off the shelves," said Peter Collins, who works at a Waterloo, Ont., Radio Shack. "Some people were picking up shortwave radios, others were going for the old-style pocket radios." The CBC spent most of yesterday airing footage from the night before, with Ontario viewers seeing the first images of the blackout as late as 24 hours after the outage began just after 4 p.m. on Thursday. CBC, with its head office in the middle of downtown Toronto, relied initially on radio coverage, then had to broadcast out of Calgary and Vancouver on what was an exclusively eastern story. By 6 p.m., Peter Mansbridge, on holidays and driving home to his home in Stratford, Ont., had arrived and reported from the CBC's rooftop in his shorts and, somewhat controversially, his annual summer holiday beard. (He was expected to keep his facial hair, which one CBC official described as his "casual look" for last night's coverage.) Even radio had to bounce from signal to signal on occasion, said Tony Burnman, editor-in-chief of CBC News. It was not until 9 p.m. that CBC had enough back-up power to move coverage to Toronto. "We had to struggle with the technology but I think we were able to get our message out." But it did not get to the people who cared about the story most. As one Ottawa woman put it: "As soon as we got home, we kept thinking we'd put on the news so we could find out what was happening. Then we realized, we can't turn on the TV." CBC relied on limited emergency power that allowed it to broadcast on radio and to feed television news reports, including footage of Mr. Mansbridge, to Vancouver, then it moved to the full-scale program out of the Toronto building. The network had full power back by 11 p.m, which was early compared to most homes in the city. Other national networks across North America had similar problems and had to hope people would once again return to the round-the-clock television coverage yesterday. "I expect the audience for the National tonight will be phenomenal," Mr. Burnman said yesterday. Or maybe they'll just stick with their radios (© Copyright 2003 National Post via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** CANADA. Radio Shalom application DENIED --- It's a very lengthy decision. Excerpts presented below. See http://www.crtc.gc.ca/archive/ENG/Decisions/2003/db2003-399.htm [...] 6. The Commission received 23 letters of support and two petitions with 182 and 533 signatures, respectively, in support of Radio Chalom's application. On the other hand, the Association des radiodiffuseurs communautaires du Québec (ARCQ), Radio Centre-Ville Saint-Louis inc. (Radio Centre-Ville) and Radio Communautaire Francophone de Montréal inc., licensee of CIBL-FM Montréal, opposed any new radio licence in the Montréal market because of their concerns for the survival of community radio stations CINQ-FM and CIBL-FM Montréal and CHAA-FM Longueuil. Fred Leclaire and Hyman Glustein filed a joint intervention opposing the application based on their concern that the new station would have negative impacts on radio stations currently offering ethnic programming in the Montréal market. 7. The Union des artistes (UDA) and the Société professionnelle des auteurs et des compositeurs du Québec (SPACQ) also submitted comments on the application. UDA stressed the importance it placed on promoting French-language stations in the Montréal market, while SPACQ stated, among other things, that priority should be given to broadcasting outlets that would give airplay to French-language musical selections. [...] 9. Radio Chalom's proposed frequency and technical parameters made it non-competitive on technical grounds with the other applications to serve the Montréal region, and could in the Commission's view, have represented an appropriate technical use of the proposed AM frequency. The Commission also considers that the applicant's experience in operating an SCMO service has provided Radio Chalom with the appropriate practical knowledge and sufficient resources to operate the proposed radio station. Given the relatively modest nature of the proposal from a commercial vantage point, the Commission is further satisfied that the proposed Montréal station would not have had an undue negative impact on existing radio stations. 10. Radio Chalom, however, failed to convince the Commission that its application to operate a broadcasting undertaking that is both ethnic and religious, responded to the requirements of the existing Ethnic and Religious Policies, or that it would be able to comply with those Policies and its obligations as a broadcasting licensee. Given the lack of details and clarity of the information provided by Radio Chalom, both in its application and at the public hearing, the Commission considers it important to clarify in this decision certain provisions of its Ethnic and Religious Policies as they pertain to Radio Chalom's proposals. [...] 19. The Commission finds that the measures proposed by Radio Chalom for soliciting points of view from other religious groups were not sufficiently concrete to ensure that its programming would be balanced. The Commission notes that the applicant proposed to achieve balance through on-air exchanges of opinion between members of the Jewish community. In the Commission's view, Radio Chalom's proposal to fulfil the balance requirements through an exchange of ideas within its own group would not have allowed it to meet the requirements of the Religious Policy. [...] 21. (...) It is not sufficient, however, merely to make air time available to other groups. A broadcaster must actively solicit such programming to ensure that different views are presented. An applicant should demonstrate to the Commission that it has contacted other religious groups, and present evidence that a willingness exists on the part of other faith groups to participate. Moreover, it should indicate to the Commission how it will ensure that programming from the various faith groups in the community will continue to be available on an on-going basis. (...) [...] 22. On the basis of the information provided by Radio Chalom in its application and at the public hearing, the Commission does not consider that the applicant fully appreciates, or that it would be willing or able to meet the requirements of, the Ethnic and Religious Policies. 23. The Commission notes further that Radio Chalom did not provide, either in its application or at the public hearing, reliable quantitative information with respect to several matters, including the proposed weekly hours of local programming, news in general, local news and music. [...] (via Ricky Leong, QC, DXLD) ** CANADA. CKUT now has a 2-month experimental audio archive derived from their logging recordings. If you can get it to work, says Sheldon Harvey on this week`s IRR. You have to specify the date, start and stop time you want to hear, mp3 either in 32 kbps mono or 64 stereo. International Radio Report is Sundays at 10:30-11:00 local. I could not get it to work either: again seeing `this may not be an MPEG file` error message. IRR`s own audio archive, which only contains the latest show, is still OK at http://www.vif.com/users/rleong/stream.html (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CHILE. 6089.9 Radio Esperanza, Temuco, 1401+, August 02, Spanish, local ads: "si busca muebles... Quincalleria Cohue, pionero en el sur", gospel music, 43522 (Arnaldo Slaen, Chascomus, Argentina, hard- core-dx via DXLD) ** CHINA. Due to heavy co-channel interference [and bad frequency selection, wb] CRI Beijing's new introduced morning service in German at 0500-0700 UT will replace both 15215 17690 kHz, by new 15245 and 17720 kHz from August 18th at 0500 (Marcel Goerke, Germany, A-DX Aug 17 via Wolfgang Büschel, DXLD) ** CHINA [non]. World Falun Dafa Radio Dear Lim Kwet Hian, Our broadcast schedule and frequency are: Asian: Everyday: Beijing time 6:00am-7:00am, 9.625 MHZ [2200-2300 UT] Sunday - Friday: Beijing time 11:00 PM - 12:00 AM, 9.930 MHZ [1500- 1600 UT] Tuesday - Saturday: Beijing time 12:00 AM - 12:30 AM, 9.930MHZ [1600- 1630 UT] Europe: Everyday: GMT 21:00-22:00, 5.925 MHZ The 9.625 MHZ one will be stopped in after this September. Dafa Hao means "Falun Dafa is good". It's just another name for World Falun Dafa Radio. Thanks for you interest. Best regards, Editor editor@falundafaradio.org (Falun Dafa R to L. Kwet Hian, Indonesia, Aug 7, 2003 for CRW via DXLD) 9930 being KWHR, of course ** CUBA. Attention Radio Havana Cuba listeners around the world... your attention please... our engineering department needs your help... We are now testing our 9600 kiloHertz frequency with a new transmitter. It is on the air starting at 00 UT, that is 8 pm Eastern, 7 pm Central, 6 PM mountain and 5 pm Pacific time. Again the frequency is 9600 kiloHertz and the new transmitter under test will be on the air from 00 to 05 UT. The program we are broadcasting on that frequency is in Spanish, but you can easily identify the station because we do ID quite often, and use the same interval signal that is used on our regular English language programs. Send your reports to arnie@r... [truncated by yahoogroups] amigos, and we will be sending back to you a special transmitter test QSL card that I will autograph for you. Friday evening, when we first tested the new transmitter it was sounding really good, with excellent modulation quality, as heard via ground wave here in Havana. We are also now using on a regular basis from 05 to 07 UTC our 250 kiloWatt transmitter on 9820 kiloHertz with the Pacific Coast of North America Curtain Array. By the way the new transmitter is a 100 kilowatt rig, but we are running it at 70 kiloWatts during the test period. The antenna used on 9600 kiloHertz is beaming to Venezuela, but many of you in North America can pick up the back of the beam quite easily according to my calculations. You can also send your reports via AIR MAIL to Arnie Coro, Radio Havana Cuba, Havana, Cuba, and don't forget to include your postal mailing address in all of your correspondence to the station, so that we can send you our nice QSL cards that verify your reception reports (Dr. Arnie Coro Antich, CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited Aug 16 via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. Glenn, heard Radio Martí on 19610, 2 x 9805 at 0805 UT on the 17th. Signal was fair with fading; heard female with talk and slow Spanish ballads. 9805 was an excellent signal, presumed from Delano (Ron Trotto WDX4KWI, Waggoner, Illinois, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. Special ADDX / RMRC European DX Conference 2003 report on DTK T-systems Juelich 3965 kHz today at 1900-1930 in AM mode, 1930- 2000 UT in DRM mode, noted here in southern Germany with S=9 +60 dB. Interviews with various DX personages and DRM developing staff could be heard. This is not a 'malicious criticism', but in reality the DRM Juelich outlet used three adjacent channels. Measured a bandwith of 12.70 kHz with the small 2.2. kHz filter of the AOR 7030 set. Signal covered 3958.68 to 3971.38 kHz portion of the 75 mb. 73 wb (Wolfgang Büschel, Stuttgart, Aug 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDIA. AIR MAITHILI NEWS, DD METRO TO START IN DARBHANGA Indiantelevision.com Team (16 August 2003 5:00 pm) NEW DELHI: India's radio pubcaster All India Radio (AIR) is starting a daily news bulletin in Maithili language from Darbhanga station of AIR from today. Deputy prime minister LK Advani would formally inaugurate the bulletin at Darbhanga and would also lay the foundation stone of DD Metro channel. The minister of information and broadcasting Ravi Shankar Prasad would preside and several union ministers, including CP Thakur, Hukam Narain, Dev Yadav, Sanjay Paswan, Shahnawaz Hussain and Rajiv Pratap Ruddy, MPs (members of parliament) from Bihar and some state leaders would be present on the occasion. Maithili bulletin would raise the number of languages/dialects to 66 in which AIR broadcasts bulletins. The Maithili bulletin would benefit a total Maithili speaking population of 2.41 crores (24.1 million) in India and Nepal. Maithili speaking population in India accounts for 2.2 crores (22 million) in northern Bihar. Madhubani and Darbhanga are the major towns and cultural centres in the region (via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, DXLD) WTFK?? ** IRAQ. CRW AND RNW ANALYSIS ON IRAQ PROVEN CORRECT Note: Long-time readers of CRW, Radio Netherlands Media Network and ClandestineRadio.com will recall our analyses of the campaign against Baghdad, which the following piece published by the New York Times proves were indeed on target. We were first to report in 1998 that Wifaq Iraqi National Accord's radio stations broadcast from the 50kW Harris transmitter administered by the CIA in Kuwait. In 2000 we revealed the Wifaq's ties to Jordanian intelligence. As early as October 2002 we reported "(T)he Bush administration is clearly pinning its hopes on the Iraqi National Accord (INA), which seeks to eliminate Saddam by recruiting support from within his inner circle." We stated in December 2002, "The pro-coup stations, meanwhile, continue to broadcast as... the Pentagon proceeds with its build-up in the region - leading to suspicion that hope lingers within the Washington Beltway that America's show of force will act as a force multiplier to the broadcasts and lead to a so-called "zipless coup" that lies at the core of the Iraqi National Accord's platform." RNW's Andy Sennitt was first to note that astrological forecasts on Radio Tikrit were probable surreptitious messages to intelligence assets in Baghdad. Hours before Operation Iraqi Freedom began, on March 17, 2003, we detailed how the Bush administration and the radio stations it covertly supported were trying to neutralize the Iraqi military and political elite. Clandestine broadcasting, we have long believed, can serve as a window into the murky realm of espionage and covert operations. Clearly, this is the case (N. Grace-USA for CRW and RNW Media Network, CRW via DXLD) Viz.: U.S. MOVED TO UNDERMINE IRAQI MILITARY BEFORE WAR By Douglas Jehl with Dexter Filkins, New York Times, A1 August 10, 2003 http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/10/international/worldspecial/10IRAQ.html (via CRW via DXLD) ** ISRAEL. At the end of today's 1630-1645 UT English broadcast (heard on usual 15640 and 17545 kHz) Israel Radio carried an announcement confirming the end of the this English broadcast from tomorrow. The full announcement said: "And now this announcement: Local and overseas listeners of Kol Israel English language news broadcasts. As of Sunday 17th August Kol Israel will stop broadcasting the 7.30 pm, that's 1730 hours UT [wrong, its at 1630 UT in summer] English news bulletin. In addition the 1.10 broadcast is being reduced to 10 minutes and will be heard from 1.10- 1.20 local Israel time. Starting Sunday 17 August Kol Israel local English broadcasts will be heard at 7 am and 1.10 pm in the AM and FM bands and at 10 pm in the FM band. Overseas listeners can hear these broadcasts at 0500, 1110 and 2000 UTC." It appears they got the time conversion to UTC completely wrong as surely Israel is on UT +3 hours in Summer, in which case English will be on SW at 0400, 1010 and 1900 UT from tomorrow. 73s (Dave Kenny, UK, Aug 16, BDXC-UK via DXLD0 ISRAEL RADIO TO CEASE EVENING NEWS BROADCAST IN ENGLISH By Anat Balint, Haaretz Correspondent and Haaretz Service http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml? Israel Radio will cease its daily 7:30 P.M. [1630 UT] news broadcast in English as of Sunday, the Israel Broadcasting Authority has decided. In addition, the daily lunchtime news in English will be cut from 15 to 10 minutes [1015 UT?]. The radio announced the changes Friday on air, but no explanation was given. The 7:00 A.M. [0400 UT] morning news broadcast is not affected by the decision. The IBA will continue to broadcast its English news program abroad on shortwave at 10 P.M. Israel time [1900 UT]. This broadcast, however, cannot be picked up anywhere in Israel, except for Jerusalem. A staffer at Israel Radio's English News division said there had been a flood of telephone calls, email messages and faxes from listeners protesting the move. The staffer said that the English department had only been informed of the decision on Thursday evening and that management had not offered any explanation. The upshot of this decision, he said, was that there would be no news broadcast in English from 1:20 in the afternoon, when the lunchtime program ends, until the next morning at 7 A.M. Last month, Israel Broadcasting Authority (IBA) Director General Yosef Barel announced that he had reached an agreement with Industry and Trade Minister Ehud Olmert to freeze all planned changes in the broadcasting hours of Voice of Israel radio stations and IBA television stations until a committee headed by Ra'anan Dinur, the director general of Olmert's ministry, finishes formulating a reform program for public broadcasting. Barel's plan to consolidate broadcasts on Reshet Alef, the Voice of Music and Reka (which airs programs focusing on new immigrants) into one culture channel will not happen in the near future, following the announcement, and the same is true of his plan to cancel the Mediterranean channel's Arabic-language satellite broadcasts and merge them with Channel 33's programs (via Mike Terry, DXLD) [apparently same story:] http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=330044&contrassID=1&subContrassID=7&sbSubContrassID=0&listSrc=Y (via Daniel Rosenzweig, DXLD) ** KOREAS. Re: KOREA NORTH. SOUTH KOREA TO HEAR NORTH'S RADIO "WITHOUT FILTRATION" FOR ANNIVERSARY | --- I guess this statement refers to KCBS put on former Voice of National Salvation frequencies as observed by Hans Johnson? I wonder whether or not 1053 is on, too. There is already a KCBS outlet with 1500 kW from Haeju on 1080, I bet that two 1500 kW rigs are installed there side by side, one for 1080 and the other one for 1053. Re. jamming: The main mediumwave frequencies (at least 657 and 1080) and also some shortwave outlets of KCBS and Pyongyang Pangsong are jammed in Seoul. I think we had a detailed report a couple of months ago? (Kai Ludwig, Germany, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MALI. ORTM Bamako: on 16 Aug at around 1906 on 4835 heard with English news and pop tunes between the items. A weak parallel was heard on appr. 4782.4 (heavy ute-qrm). At 1920 music and at 1925 local language program. I recall these English news are aired only during weekends (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO. XERMX seems to be in a real state of flux. I understand the Portuguese program was cancelled, and now the producers of the English and French programs are gone, but they may be replaying some old programs still. I assume their frequency/time schedule is the same, with the appropriate adjustment for daylight/standard time (Jeff White, FL, Aug 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** OKLAHOMA. Enid`s community access cable TV service, Pegasys, is in danger of a drastic budget cut, as the city manager thinks it is getting too much, based on a percentage of Cox Cable`s franchise fee, which has been steadily growing over the years. Pegasys is a rarity in Oklahoma, with only one other equivalent service in the state, in Norman. Unfortunately, Pegasys` schedule is topheavy with gospel huxters since ``that`s what the community wants``. See the week`s schedule (still last week`s as of Aug 17, a big help): http://www.pegasys.org/this_week_schedule.htm Read about the current crisis and links to Enid Eagle coverage about it: http://www.pegasys.org (Glenn Hauser, ibid., DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: PEGASYS IS IN JEOPARDY! YOUR HELP IS NEEDED...... On Tuesday, August 19, 5:00 pm, the Enid mayor and city commissioners will be discussing PEGASYS funding and the July 2003 - June 2004 contract, which has not been signed by the City of Enid. They will be discussing cutting funding this year, instead of in 2004! This is a public study session. If you would like to attend, please come to the Enid Municipal Building (Martin Luther King, Jr. building) upstairs in the city manager's conference room at 5:00 pm. The regular city commission meeting will follow downstairs [cablecast on Pegasys ch 11] The Enid City Commission is considering a proposal to cut PEGASYS funding by 50% or more over a period of time. Your input is critical to help keep YOUR community access station alive! Please write, email, or call your City Commissioner TODAY!! (via gh, DXLD) ** OKLAHOMA. Selected AM Happenings: Anadarko KJON 850 was silent; not ethnic [and moved toward Dallas!] Chickasha KOCY 1560 silent; now Radio Disney. FMakings --- Applications: Blanchard (from Weatherford) KWEY-FM [97.3 --- gh]. The country station serves the Clinton area; but would move to southwest of Norman, with a signal to reach the southern parts of the OKC market. Comments by Sept. 22; replies by Oct. 7 (Aug FMedia! via DXLD) Unnecessary; leave one FM to serve Weatherford (gh, DXLD) ** SCOTLAND. RAIDED PIRATE RADIO HIJACKED CHARITY STATION'S FREQUENCY A PIRATE radio station broadcasting in the Glasgow area has been raided by industry watchdogs for operating without a licence. Inspectors from the Radio Communications Agency seized broadcasting equipment in a swoop on the operator of Perfecto FM. The station had been broadcasting on 106.9FM, the same wavelength as community radio station Sunny Govan FM, which has been given a licence allowing it to broadcast on the frequency until the end of this month. . . http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5018121.html (via Artie Bigley, OH, Aug 9, DXLD) ** UGANDA. IDI AMIN AND INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING The death in exile of former Ugandan dictator Idi Amin brought back memories of how it was 30 years ago. A young Ugandan journalist who was recently on a course at the Radio Netherlands training centre told me he didn't know that Uganda had ever had an external service. In 1972, President Idi Amin changed the name to Uganda Broadcasting Corporation (UBC) to compare with the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). He purchased some high power shortwave transmitters and started a foreign service, which was inaugurated in time for a conference of the Organisation of African Unity which he hosted in Kampala. He boasted at the time that Radio Uganda was stronger than the BBC - hardly surprising, as the transmitter site was just down the road from the conference centre. It wasn't long before the expensive transmitters fell into disrepair due to lack of proper maintenance. By the time Amin was deposed in 1979, the only similarity with the BBC was the name, and that was duly changed back to Radio Uganda (Andy Sennitt, Media Network blog Aug 16 via DXLD) WTFK? 15325 (gh) ** U K. SPECIAL EVENT. Glyn, GW0ANA, reports: ``Many Amateur Radio operators may be aware of the significance of ``Flatholm Island `` located in the Bristol Channel in the UK. The island has a very historic link in connection with our hobby as it was used by Marconi when he demonstrated to the British Post Office that his theory that radio waves would travel across water. He made the link via radio from Lavernock Point in south Wales to the island on Thursday, May 13th 1897. To pay homage to Marconi, the Barry Amateur Radio Society (South Wales) erected a monument on the island and each year make an annual visit to operate a special event station using the callsign ``GB5FI`` (Flatholm Island). This years` visit will take place between Friday, August 22nd and Wednesday, August 27th.`` The society will activate this very rare WAB square ST26 and operate mainly on the amateur HF bands to follow in the footsteps of the historic event. This year they also plan to operate via satellite using AO-40 and also Oscar 14 (subject to access in the short pass time). Their priority will be mainly SSB operation, but they may operate on the digital or SSTV modes. This is a very rare opportunity to add to your QSL card collection a ``MARCONI Experiment`` location, Flatholm Island, via satellite! Lighthouse ref. number: 0007. QSL via GW0ANA direct CBA or via the Bureau is no problem (KB8NW/OPDX August 18 [posted August 15]/BARF-80 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. A follow-up to the item on Roy Neal, K6DUE, in DXLD 3-148: Neal was a contributor to the Amateur Radio Newsline service, and no doubt a tribute will appear from that source shortly. K6DUE also conducted a net on 7153 LSB Saturday mornings at 1315 UT. On August 16 there were a couple of hams talking about K6DUE shortly after 1315, but their comments were brief and they left the frequency shortly afterwards. I am assuming that if a net continues, it will probably be done as a memorial to K6DUE. But until such comes about (if it does), the K6DUE net will be deleted from future editions of Nets To You! Speaking of Nets To You! I found that the Treasure Coast Net, which meets on 7153 earlier, begins at 1200 during summer, not 1300. The QCWA net list on their web site simply gives the time as 1300 UT, and I assumed that it was for all year, which of course turns out to be wrong (John Norfolk, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. EWTN CELEBRATES ITS 22ND ANNIVERSARY; NETWORK`S FOUNDRESS, MOTHER ANGELICA, DOING WELL Irondale, Ala, Aug 13 (EWTN) --- EWTN Global Catholic Network celebrates its 22nd Anniversary on August 15th and will air a 30-minute special that day profiling the network`s historical achievements. The program titled, ``EWTN Yesterday and Today,`` airs at 2:30 PM EDT. As Mother Angelica, EWTN`s Foundress often said, ``The history of EWTN isn`t about what we`ve done, it`s about how we`ve done it.`` Giving all the credit to God and His Providence, she says she didn`t have a business plan when she powered up the network in 1981. As Mother pointed out, ``What could a handful of nuns know about starting something that would become a global Catholic television and multimedia network?`` According to Sister Mary Catherine, Vicar of Our Lady of the Angels Monastery in Hanceville, Alabama, Mother Angelica continues her recuperation after suffering a debilitating stroke nearly two years ago. ``Mother is doing well and is taking part in all of the Community`s activities,`` she said. ``She sings at daily Mass, joins the Sisters for the Divine Office and spends time each day in adoration before the Blessed Sacrament.`` Sister Mary Catherine said in the evenings, ``Mother enjoys lending a helping hand snapping beans from our garden. She keeps us all entertained with her funny little remarks and one-of-a-kind facial expressions! Even with few words, she is able to get her point across. She is in very good spirits, enjoying every moment that she spends with the Sisters.`` As it celebrates its anniversary, EWTN Global Catholic Network is planning several new series and specials for television, radio and the Internet http://www.ewtn.com According to Doug Keck, Vice President of Programming and Production, ``Headlining our special events calendar are two major programs in October, first, the much anticipated Beatification of Mother Teresa on October 19th and later that month, the 25th anniversary of Pope John Paul II`s pontificate. EWTN will take you to the heart of these celebrations, live from Rome,`` he said. Keck also mentioned the launch of a new live Monday-Friday 60-minute radio call in program in September called ``EWTN Open Line,`` which will feature a different host and Church related topic each day. EWTN Global Catholic Network is available in more than 84 million television households in 110 countries. And with its worldwide short- wave radio station, satellite delivered AM & FM radio network, Internet website http://www.ewtn.com and publishing arm, EWTN is the largest religious media network in the world (Catholic Radio Update Aug 18 via DXLD) ** U S A. WCPE *89.7 Raleigh NC is among five finalists for ``Classical Station of the Year`` in the 2003 Marconi Radio Awards from the National Association of Broadcasters. The nomination comes as WCPE celebrates its 25th year of broadcasting classical music. An independent task force selected finalists in 19 awards categories. Ballots will be sent to members of the NAB Marconi Radio Awards Selection Academy in August. The ballots will be tabulated by the accounting firm of KPMG. The winners in each category will be announced on October 2 at the NAB Marconi Radio Awards Dinner & Show at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia. The annual dinner and show, radio`s premier awards program, will also feature comedian Steve Harvey as the emcee. In addition to WCPE, finalists for NAB`s ``Classical Station of the Year`` are KDFC 102.1 San Francisco; KFUO-FM 99.1 Clayton MO; WFMR 106.9 Brookfield WI; and WRR 101.1 Dallas --- all commercial stations (Bruce Elving, Aug FMedia! via DXLD) LAST CHANCE FOR TRANSMITTER --- By Michael Futch, Staff writer Do you own a slice of the Fayetteville skyline where a classical music radio station can install a station transmitter? If so, officials with WCPE would like to talk with you. WCPE (89.1 FM) is a 100,000-watt station that operates out of Wake Forest in Wake County. Fayetteville is part of WCPE's secondary broadcast area, which is anywhere from 50 to 100 miles from the station. Those are areas where the signal is not good, but the station still has a crop of faithful listeners. . . http://www.fayettevillenc.com/story.php?Template=local&Story=5803835 (Fayetteville NC Observer, via Artie Bigley, Aug 11, DXLD) ** U S A. Bob Edwards tells The Tennessean that union-management relations at NPR have been "a little testy" lately: "A nonprofit thinks it's doing God's work, whether it's NPR, the Red Cross or NATO. They're doing God's work and how can you argue with God? -- that's their attitude. So sometimes you need a union to just cut through that." http://www.tennessean.com/business/archives/03/08/37641758.shtml?Element_ID=37641758 (posted at 4:07 PM EST Aug 14, Current via DXLD) ** U S A. NPR BOARD WANTS NO PART OF TV'S PROPOSED PAC Originally published in Current, Aug. 4, 2003 By Dan Odenwald The NPR Board has firmly refused to join public TV execs in establishing a political action committee to aid congressional allies of public broadcasting. In a unanimous vote at its meeting last month, the board said "the act of soliciting and collecting funds to influence the outcomes of elections is not appropriate to the mission of NPR or public radio." "A person's ability to contribute to a PAC in support of a cause he or she believes in is an important First Amendment right," commented John Lawson, president of the Association of Public Television Stations (APTS). "We were surprised the NPR Board would be so quick to say that those rights should not be available to public radio supporters." ... http://www.current.org/funding/funding0314pac.html (Current via gh, DXLD) ** U S A. PIRATE GETS OFFICIAL SUPPORT! By Jean Choung Of The Examiner Staff, Published Friday, August 15 In a 2-to-1 vote, the Board of Supervisors City Services Committee on Thursday passed a resolution supporting an unlicensed, low-power FM station, San Francisco Liberation Radio 93.7 FM, which the Federal Communications Commission is investigating and threatening to close or heavily fine. The station offers shows on alternative social and political views, such as those on gay issues and the Green Party. The resolution also urges Congress to hold meetings and develop laws to help such diverse forms of local media, which are not run by large corporations. Independent, low-power stations have a tougher time obtaining a license to operate due to stringent laws that favor large media companies. Additionally, the resolution urges Congress and the FCC to reverse a decision made in early June allowing large media companies nationwide to own more television stations, radio stations and/or newspapers than previously allowed. The full board must still weigh in on the issue. Supervisor Fiona Ma voted against the resolution, saying she was uncomfortable weighing in on a federal issue. Supervisor Matt González, a Green Party member, developed the resolution. About 60 volunteers run SFLR. The FCC visited the station, operated out of the dank and musty basement of a three-story Victorian home, last month. At the time, SFLR volunteers refused FCC's request to be able to inspect the radio equipment. The FCC threatened the station with a $17,000 fine for refusing to comply and being unlicensed. The station continued to refuse inspectors, launching an FCC investigation. Peter Franck, a lawyer representing SFLR, said the FCC has also threatened to close the station if it did not provide proof of a license to operate. An FCC official would not comment on the investigation. The station has applied for FCC licenses on two occasions, once in 1998 and most recently in mid-2000. Both requests were denied. The most recent rejection was based on two laws, one that prohibits providing a license to a station that has operated previously without a license, and another that requires a channel separation from other radio stations that SFLR does not meet. The first law is being challenged in Supreme Court and the second law is under review by Congress. Based on the uncertainty of the future of those laws, the FCC should hold off on making any decisions about the station, Franck said. Supporters of SFLR who spoke during the committee meeting said preserving the station would mean preserving democracy and a diversity of voices on the airwaves. "It's about giving the public the widest breadth of information possible," said Steven Schubert, an SFLR supporter. The microstation broadcasts in some city neighborhoods and parts of the East Bay (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. A long-inactive Manatee County pirate is back, though suspect not the original operator (probably a friend, though): "Hot 102.1" was noted with a killer signal (audible up through south- central St. Petersburg). Format is (while I listened, 4:50 p.m.+ Friday, 8/15) urban and current rap (Ashanti, Papa Doc, R Kelly, B2K...). Announced 744-2786 followed by many 'shout outs' by girls-in- da-hood, mostly in the Port Manatee area (station was previously DF'ed by myself in the Palmetto area). The host was "Boy DJ" but he mentioned "Big Dog" is on Wednesdays (so apparently this is a seven- day operation). Often uses the slogan "All New Hot 102.1" as well as "Ghetto Radio" (the latter especially when the phone line is activated). Stereo, clean though very compressed audio with heavy bottom-end. Noted one 'commercial' for a nightclub (Terry L. Krueger, Clearwater, Florida Aug 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. 87.9 MHz FLORIDA (PIRATE): "Mélodie FM" Tampa. "Mélodie" appears to be the correct slogan for this one, not "Unité FM" as I originally thought. Quite a few ID's noted 0330+ 8/17 while driving home from St. Petersburg. Usual Kreyol format (Terry L Krueger, Clearwater, Florida, USA, 27.55.83 N, 82.46.08 W, Visit my "Florida Low Power Radio Stations" at: http://home.earthlink.net/~tocobagadx/flortis.html DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. The bands seemed "quieter" last night when I was tuning around. I suspect it was because many of the lower power stations in smaller communities were off the air for want of an emergency generator. I kept the dial on 740 for some time hoping that the CBC affiliate in Winnipeg [Edmonton --- both west of the Hudson -- gh] might punch through, but no luck. Had this happened in the winter, I think we might have had better DX --- but then again, we would have all been shivering too! :-) Locally, here in the Albany area, it was hit or miss. The local NPR powerhouse -- WAMC, whose main transmitter is located on Mt. Greylock in the Berkshires of western MA but whose studios and control room facilities are in Albany -- suffered "brownouts" all evening. The transmitter would be on, but at times programming was interrupted. WGY 810 was down for a very short while, but then kicked in its emergency generator which had it on at reduced power from its normal 50kW. The Clear Channel (the co., not the frequencies) stations in the area all tacked to WGY whether they were on AM or FM. (It really becomes apparent who the station owners are when something like this happens.) Some of the CC stations clearly lacked back-up because they were down and stayed down for some time. I suppose CC considers some of its stations in a community "essential" and provides a way for them to stay on the air (John Figliozzi, Halfmoon, NY, Aug 15, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** U S A [and non]. August 15, 2003--- THE NIGHT THE LIGHTS WENT OUT IN NERW-LAND --- By SCOTT FYBUSH http://www.fybush.com/nerw.html It's been an interesting 24 hours or so here at NERW Central, and while we get our Monday issue together, we can offer this update on what we've pieced together from across the region in the wake of the Great Blackout of 2003: New York City and vicinity: Still recovering from the damage to its broadcasting infrastructure on 9/11 (see link at left), New York's broadcast scene - especially the TV stations - was ill-prepared to handle a huge blackout as well. Of the major TV stations, only WCBS-TV (Channel 2) stayed on more or less uninterrupted, again proving the wisdom (however accidental) of the decision to keep a transmitting facility at the Empire State Building after most TV moved to the World Trade Center in the late seventies. Fox's WNYW (Channel 5) and WWOR (Channel 9) were off the air much of the day, while WNBC (Channel 4) and WABC (Channel 7) apparently transmitted from the old Armstrong tower at Alpine, N.J. at low power, with WABC making some of the arrangements for Alpine on the air. Without power, though, TV wasn't the medium of choice for those in the midst of the blackout - radio was. And just as it did in 1965 and 1977, radio came through. The big AM signals had the fewest problems, with WOR, WCBS and WBBR staying on essentially nonstop, WABC experiencing a few glitches, and WINS off for the first hour or so. We learned what it takes to make WCBS dump the Yankees - with no Mets game at Shea, it was an easy decision to move the Yankees road game down the dial to WFAN and let WCBS keep rolling with news. (Later, WFAN would simulcast WCBS overnight before returning to its own programming at 5:30.) Notably absent from the dial all night was WQEW (1560); WSNR (620 Jersey City) came back on the air with Sporting News Radio rather than its usual leased-time fare. On FM, the New York dial was much quieter than usual. While some stations had backup generators at the transmitter site (especially WSKQ/WPAT-FM, WNYC-FM and the Clear Channel stations at the new Four Times Square facility), studio power failures still plagued many stations through the night and into the morning. WNEW didn't "Blink," but did come back on the air at low power with a WINS simulcast once WINS itself was back on. The Clear Channel stations without studio power simulcast WNBC's TV news, we're told. Upstate: Without being able to rotate the antenna atop NERW Central (we've been advised to buy a power inverter to run the rotor off the car battery next time), we had a hard time being certain who was on or off outside the Rochester area. Locally, all our TV stations - and most of the city's FM signals - went dark when we did, about 4:10 PM. With the AM dial missing the usual electrical noise, we were able to dial around and get a sense of who was doing what in Buffalo and Syracuse. WHEN (620) in Syracuse dumped sports to simulcast news from WSYR (570); their FM counterparts in the Clear Channel stable appeared to be off the air for most of the evening. Buffalo's WGR (550) and WBEN (930) each did their own coverage, with most of the Queen City's smaller AM signals still on the air as well. Here in Rochester, the only AM signals on the air were WROC (950), WHAM (1180) and WXXI (1370), all of them doing live blackout coverage, with Entercom simulcasting WROC on WBEE-FM (92.5), WBBF (93.3) and even WBZA (98.9) when it managed to flicker on the air. WHAM kept going with Bob Lonsberry and company all through the night (at which point Lonsberry turned around and did his Salt Lake City talk show and his regular WHAM midday shift); WROC went to network talk around 10, from what we could tell. On TV, Buffalo's signals apparently stayed on with generators, with the exception of several UHF signals (23, 29 and 49); Batavia's Pax 51 WPXJ stayed on throughout - and, as the only signal easily seen in Rochester, would have made a wonderful simulcast of LMA partner WGRZ if anyone had thought of it. Rochester's WHEC was back on at low power at about 8:45, with WOKR joining it at 1:20 AM (just after we regained power at NERW Central), WUHF (Channel 31) on and off through the night, and WROC (Channel 8) and WXXI (Channel 21) silent until Friday morning. Utica's WKTV (Channel 2) never lost power at its transmitter site; it managed to get the studios back up with a generator about 6:30 and was into live coverage by 7. Syracuse's WSTM, WTVH and WIXT all were seen here by early evening as well. And we're told Albany was a patchwork, with some FM signals on and others off through the evening. [more: see CANADA] New Jersey/Pennsylvania: Except for northern New Jersey and the Erie area, we're told everything is pretty much OK in the southern reaches of NERW-land, as well as across most of New England. Much more over the weekend here at fybush.com; stay tuned - and send in your blackout notes and observations! (Scott Fybush, NE Radio Watch Aug 15 via DXLD) Wonder where s gets all his material? He never says ** U S A. DJ'S BLACKOUT SPOOF NO JOKE TO SOME NORTH TEXAS RADIO LISTENERS --- By Paul Bourgeois, Star-Telegram Staff Writer An on-air stunt by a Dallas radio jock on Friday morning had some people believing that the blackout in the Northeast had spread to North Texas. It hadn't, but a radio personality who goes by "The Fitz," on the weekday morning show on KRBV/100.3 FM, spent more than two hours telling listeners that the power was out. . . http://www.dfw.com/mld/startelegram/news/local/6547685.htm (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. NON-LOCAL TRAFFIC --- CLEAR CHANNEL PROVIDES TUCSONANS WITH TRAFFIC REPORTS FROM PHOENIX. By Chris Limberis When you hear traffic reports on one of Clear Channel's six radio stations in Tucson, keep in mind that the bulletins are cooked up in Phoenix. We're not alone in such treatment from big brother Clear Channel, the San Antonio-based behemoth that used the Telecommunications Act of 1996 to devour station after station to build its list to more than 1,220. Las Vegas, with more rapid growth and worse traffic, also hears how things are moving on its streets and interstates from Clear Channel's Total Traffic in Phoenix. So do listeners in Albuquerque. "That they would do traffic reports for Tucson out of Phoenix is outrageous," said John Scott Ulm, host of the mostly political John C. Scott Show on AM 990 KTKT. "It's an affront to the sensibilities of the community." . . . http://www.tucsonweekly.com/tw/2003-07-17/curr4.html (Tucson Weekly July 17 via DXLD) ** U S A. UT Bountiful 101.5 --- a booster of KKIK 101.5 Oakley, requesting the KKIK-6 calls. I e-mailed the FCC not to grant those calls, and Dale Bickel replied: If you want to object to whatever KKIK has requested, you must do it formally via an informal objection [sic] filed through the Office of the Secretary. Under our processing rules as they stand now, an e-mail cannot be considered as an objection. Sorry, Dale Bickel, dale.bickel@fcc.gov My note to him read: Hi, I see that KKIK in Oakley UT has applied for a booster in Bountiful UT, asking for the calls KKIK-6. Don`t grant those calls! Make them use one of the unused calls, KKIK-2 or KKIK-4! Keep the series intact, perhaps changing KKIK-5 Price UT to KKIK-4! (Bruce F. Elving, Ph.D., August FMedia! via DXLD) ** U S A. ``A lot of politicians get ticked off at the FCC and some get ticked off at big corporations --- although there are fewer and fewer of them everyday --- but [Senator Ernest ``Fritz``] Hollings gets ticked off at both. He once told FCC chairman Michael Powell he`d make `a wonderful executive vice president of the chamber of commerce but not the chairman of a regulatory agency.``` --- Brooks Boliek, Reuters, August 12, 2003 Commentary --- THE SADDENING DRIFT OF THINGS AT THE FCC I must confess: I have put off writing this commentary for weeks now. Not that I do not have subject matter; there is enough stupidity around to warrant commentary. It`s just that, the older I get, the less stomach I have for fight. Now several years past sixty, I have come to the conclusion that the world does not change for the better, despite the urgings of Pope John XXIII and the earnest do-gooders that have turned our Church and world upside down these past 40 decades. The Catholic Catechism says the same thing in more eloquent terms. Teilhard de Chardin`s poetical ideas of a universe constantly improving and thus ascending to the perfect joy of union with Christ is nonsense. Human nature and human behavior are constants; nothing changes. In Washington, in regard to the Federal Communications Commission, the same holds true. Change the administration. Change the politicians. Change the agenda. Try as one might, one still gets stupidity, crassness, greed. To wit: In early July the FCC decided to permit historic (1946) WSNJ-FM 107.7 FM in southern New Jersey, in a town called Bridgeton, to change its city of license to Pennsauken. No big deal, right? Wrong. Pennsauken is a suburb of Philadelphia, although the Jerseyites may not think so. Pennsauken is the town adjacent to and immediately north of Camden, the hometown of the old RCA. Both are across the Delaware River from Philadelphia. Thus, WSNJ-FM becomes a de facto Philadelphia station. The owners persuaded the FCC (these days it does not take much persuasion) to drop in a Class A in Bridgeton to replace its traveling station. The value of WSNJ-FM soars as a result, and if the owners decide to hang on for the long-term revenue, the value of those revenues has increased immensely. But that is not all. In the process, WSNJ-FM will wipe out two 10-watt high-school FM stations, WHHS 107.9 FM Havertown, Pennsylvania, and WWPH 107.9 FM Princeton Junction, New Jersey. It will also wipe out a translator for classical music WWFM 89.1 FM Trenton, New Jersey, which is the only fulltime classical music service for Philadelphia since Franklin Broadcasting sold its 50-year-old WFLN 95.7 FM several years ago. Both stations, WHHS and WWPH, protested, as did two emeritus WHHS staff members, but to no avail. The FCC denied their opposing comments. To their credit, the owners of WSNJ-FM offered to work with the stations to eliminate interference, but the FCC in its Final Report & Order said that, nonetheless, if they interfere (and they are sure to interfere), then their licenses are forfeit. Please continue to read on. This may look as if it has nothing to do with Catholic radio, but it does. It has everything to do with radio in the United States today. Allow me to explain briefly the phenomenon of 10-watt radio. The FCC moved the FM band to its present 88-108 MHz just after World War II. It deliberately set aside the first 4 MHz --- 88-92 MHz --- for educational radio stations. The thinking back then was the same that would occur with educational television just a few years later, that instruction could be conveyed to school children, high school students, university students, and the general public by courses offered over educational stations. Quite a few school boards did construct pioneer educational FM stations back then, and one or two still survive, notably WNYE 91.5 FM in New York City. To compress a lot of history, it was television and not FM radio that caught the public`s eyes and ears back then, and there was even less interest in educational FM stations. In fact, there was talk about reducing the size of the FM band or even eliminating it to provide additional VHF television channels! In 1948, Syracuse University approached the FCC and suggested that it authorize 10-watt stations that would operate in the 88-92 MHz educational band with a minimum of regulations and legal requirements once the license was awarded. Nonlicensed personnel, that is, teachers, administrators, and students, could operate these stations with a minimum of log work. In such manner, Syracuse argued, the launch of educational FM stations would be accelerated and made a lot easier. Licensees could upgrade their 10-watt stations later as necessary and as resources permitted. The FCC agreed, and it opened the 88-92 MHz band to 10-watt stations. At first, it was school boards and high schools that opened these stations. Then, colleges joined them, but the great impulse came with the advent of high-fidelity (``hi-fi``) sound equipment and recordings in the mid-1950s. Dozens of colleges across the country saw students and radio-TV-theater divisions apply for 10-watt licenses and receive them. In those days, even in large cities, there was a lot of open space on the FM band, and some of these stations got out surprisingly far. One station in southern Louisiana, KRVS 88.3 FM Lafayette, could be heard 30 miles away with an outside antenna with no problem; 10 watts was the transmitter output; fed into a multi-bay antenna, the power was enhanced by the multiple bays, less an average 30% for transmission line losses. Thus, a 10-watt station feeding a five-bay antenna achieved an ERP of about 35 watts, independent of whatever antenna height it could achieve. Syracuse University proposed the successful 10-watt program, but it was not the first 10-watt FM licensee. That honor went to Haverford High School in Havertown, Pennsylvania, in 1948. It was on the air on St Nicholas Day, December 6, 1949. For 54 years, WHHS has been on the air from Haverford High, offering the students training in radio and television, and providing a local service to the suburban Haverford Township. WHHS is uniquely historical and successful; many of its fellow pioneer high school stations have long since vanished. (WWPH is much younger, 28 years old, and is operated out of West Windsor– Plainsboro High School.) You can read about WHHS at http://www.whhs.org The WWPH website is under construction and due back shortly: http://www.wwph1079fm.com/ Now, its future is bleak. About 10 years ago, the FCC reworked the regulations governing the 88-92 MHz band. Several factors caused this. First, with the advent of public radio, noncommercial stations operated as public interest and fine arts operations by not only universities but ad hoc groups, often public television licensees, the reserved 88-92 MHz frequencies came into great demand. Second, instructional radio (``radio classrooms``) had been largely abandoned by school boards. Third, the number of college and high school student stations had proliferated. In a few years, a wave of religious group applications would also be filed for these increasingly scarce frequencies, after the FCC would relent and drop its previous, long- standing refusal to allow religious stations in the band. At that time, the FCC then gave 10-watt stations an opportunity to upgrade their facilities to Class A, with a minimum ERP of 100 watts. Those that did not do so during the year after the public notice were required to find a frequency that would offer no interference to full- power stations, even among the 92-108 MHz commercial frequencies (the commercial operators protested, to no avail). Nevertheless, their immunity from interference from new applications was eliminated, and new educational and commercial stations that would cause them interference required them to find yet another frequency of minimal obstruction, ad infinitum. WHHS Havertown unwisely chose to remove itself to 107.9 FM, freeing up its 89.3 FM for two competing applications that would become a share- time operation, Cabrini College`s WYBF 89.1 FM in Radnor Township and Villanova University`s WXVU 89.1 FM at Villanova. It could have upgraded to a minimal 100 watts and thus have forever ensured its frequency. It did not do so, apparently considering that 10 watts had served it well all those decades and there was no need to block two new college stations with more power than it needed to continue to serve Haverford Township. Besides, under the regimes at the FCC back then, it had no reason to fear that 107.9 FM would ever be assigned to a full-power station in the Philadelphia area, precisely because WSNJ- FM used 107.7 FM in Bridgeton, New Jersey, 40 miles away, and there was no way under stringent FCC spacing regulations that such a station could be licensed in the Philadelphia area, nor under equally stringent FCC regulations, tested in court, that WSNJ-FM Bridgeton could move closer to Philadelphia. That, my friends, is the grain in the oyster, the pebble in the shoe, the smell in the refrigerator. There was a time when the FCC would never consider allowing a station owner to move his station into a more lucrative market. Never. When a West Virginia AM station owner proposed this 50 years ago, the FCC refused and the station closed down. Not that long ago, when the owner of WQSB 105.1 FM in Albertville, Alabama, proposed to move the 50-year-old WQSB into the Atlanta market, the FCC refused, even after lengthy appeals. The FCC opposed the move not only because of regulatory tradition, but because it also saw such an authorization as the hole in the regulatory dike that held back the flood of move-ins to larger markets to thereby enrich the owners on either immediate sale or long-term revenue, and consequently reduce service to the areas left behind, which were often left with a less desirable, lower power Class A frequency. But times and administrations have changed, and the climate at the FCC is much more conciliatory to move abouts. Suddenly the realm was filled with megamedia corporations looking for outlying AM and FM stations that could be moved into metro areas and thus be converted into stations far more valuable than the piddling price they paid for a rural station. We saw this happen in Moberly, Missouri, where the owner of a rural station in central Missouri successfully proposed to the FCC that he be allowed to move his station 140 miles west to Kansas City, where the station was licensed to the suburb of Lee`s Summit. Thirteen stations had to change frequencies as the result, and the possibility of putting KOFL-LP, a Catholic low-power construction permit, on the air in Cameron, Missouri, was rendered impossible. The KOFL-LP CP expired. This was not a unique occurrence. There is a proposal to move Hattiesburg, Mississippi`s oldest FM station, originally WFOR-FM 103.7 FM, 110 miles southwest to the New Orleans suburb Westwego. Recently, AM stations in Anadarko, Oklahoma, and Waco, Texas, have been moved into the Dallas-Fort Worth market. KREH 990 AM in Oakdale, Louisiana, in the central part of the state, was moved over 100 miles into the Houston market. There are many such proposals filed since the Albertville proposal, and the only thing that will stop this flow is when the metropolitan areas see their FM bands filled with wall-to- wall signals. KOFL-LP Cameron was the first LPFM station to succumb to move-ins. In South Carolina, the holder of a CP (Taylors Public Radio, Inc.) for another low-power station had constructed it completely and then filed for its permanent license. The application was refused and returned because a commercial FM station, WGVC Greenville-Spartanburg in South Carolina had upgraded its power, and since LPFM stations are no more protected than 10-watt educational ones, WFBP-LP Taylor, was out of luck. After having spent $20,000 to $30,000 on constructing the station, it was left with no license and a useless radio station facility. This is a grave injustice. Some of the groups getting into LPFM radio have had to scrape up the funds to put a station on the air; it is cruel that at the last minute their frequency is pre-empted and they are left with a lot of useless equipment and dashed hope. That is what happened to WFBP-LP, and it should give pause to any group, religious or not, going into low-power radio. They can expect no quarter if some entrepreneur finds he can move a station onto their frequency and they can find no other. This situation is the result of the cozy relationship between the FCC and the commercial outfits, principally the mega-media corporations that it ostensibly regulates. True, the FCC low-power website states that LPFM stations are not protected against full-power stations, commercial and noncommercial, either existing or proposed, or to be proposed at any time in the future. But what does this mean to people who usually have no background or knowledge of radio broadcasting, the very kind of people that go into LPFM station operation and, in fact, are the very kind of people who have been encouraged to do so by the FCC and various groups? This cautionary note is akin to the small print found in the bottom of contracts, the kind of print that undoes what the larger print seems to have assured and the kind of note so beloved by lawyers. That a small group can invest so much money into filing for, winning, and constructing an LPFM station, only to have it shut out of any operations by a full-power licensee is rank cynicism working against the public interest. Such maneuvers are typical of Chairman Michael Powell`s FCC, an FCC that has sold out to the giant financial interests whose sole regard is the profit margin. Such maneuvers are also the trademark of the present administration, which leaves no stone unturned in its efforts to wax the skis of big telecommunications interests. Historic 10-watt stations, existing and permitted LPFM stations, small-town America, all are left behind as the fat cats get fatter and the general public is starved. How poorly we are served by some of our politicians and their camp followers! (Michael Dorner, editor, Cathoilic Radio Update Aug 18 via DXLD) ** U S A. KAHN COY ON CAM-D DETAILS Leonard Kahn says 10 broadcasters have agreed to test his Compatible AM Digital technology, and he expects those stations to begin field tests by the end of the year. Kahn says his Cam-D technology will restore AM to 15 kHz stereo fidelity by using digital processing. Kahn declined to identify which stations had paid for his system and how much money that entailed. He said, "The receive end of this has a very big potential if it's done right. AM radio going digital and doing the tricks (the system) is capable of, can make the receiver shoot right up. That's where the money is and where our patents will go." Kahn said he would make a small amount of receivers available to his test stations as pre-production models. Industry engineers and other observers have called for details concerning the technical specifications of the system, which Kahn claims will "provide improved fading performance over vast distances at night" and "will not increase adjacent or co-channel interference." But he declined to give details. However, he said he knows he needs to do that soon. "After bragging, it's time for people to put up or shut up. ... We're not playing around and not weasel wording." Asked whether he would discuss details of his system at the NAB Radio Show, Kahn said he wasn't sure. An NAB official said in July that Kahn was not slated for a presentation. Ralph Carlson, president of Carlson Communications in Salt Lake City, plans to test Cam-D and hopes the necessary equipment would be installed in the fall. Using Kahn's Powerside AM stereo exciter, Carlson said he has increased his station's nighttime power level by a factor of three. "Previously, we couldn't get 20 miles south. Now, we can be heard 40 miles," said Carlson. Kahn has said his Cam-D system would perform using a station's existing transmitter and antenna (Leslie Stimson, RW Online Aug 13 via DXLD) ** U S A. The NRC's Chuck Hutton achieves instant Fame, and perhaps a little Fortune, as he is quoted in a story originally in EE Times and now linked on the front page of Techweb which I think does a good job of laying out the current mess in a concise format (Bob Foxworth, FL, Aug 17, NRC-AM via DXLD) Viz.: LAST-MINUTE CHANGES BLUR U.S. DIGITAL RADIO SPEC August 15, 2003 (4:10 p.m. EST [sic]) By Junko Yoshida, EE Times PARIS - Days before the launch of its heavily promoted digital radio system, iBiquity Digital Corp.-sole intellectual-property owner of the U.S. terrestrial digital broadcast scheme called HD Radio-earlier this week announced a fundamental change in the audio codec that is the heart of its system. The last-minute switch was designed to quell growing doubts about HD Radio's fitness for broadcasts, and while some observers believe the HDC codec does the trick, skeptics said the system is still not ready for the airwaves. http://www.techweb.com/wire/story/TWB20030815S0008 (via DXLD) ** U S A. DTV becomes more and more a QRM problem, to analog DXing. Aug 17 at 1520 UT I am getting WTKR-3 Norfolk VA with what would be a nice sporadic E signal, more or less free of analog QRM. But it keeps fading into snow, not correlated with its own fading, and this goes on for an hour. This must be another station running DTV on 3 nearby, undergoing its own fade cycle, and I see WBRA in Roanoke VA is the most likely culprit, per Doug Smith`s list of low-band DTV http://bellsouthpwp.net/w/b/wb9nme/articles/lowbanddtv.htm --- but how up to date is it? Says 11/21-2002! This list does have a few more channel 4 DTV than the industry list I quoted a few weeks ago (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VANUATU. R. NETHERLANDS PROGRAM PREVIEWS FOR AUG 20, 22: The Weekly Documentary: Vanuatu - The Mysterious Isles Vanuatu - the name means 'land eternal' - is a group of more than 80 islands in the South Pacific. It lies east of Australia along the Pacific ring of fire. Prior to independence from Anglo-French rule in 1 980, this dark and rugged archipelago spread over nearly 1000 km of ocean, was known as the New Hebrides. Today Vanuatu is home to about 200,000 people - the Ni-Vanuatu. Daily life for the Ni-vanuatu is bound by custom. From the goods that are traded, and the way food is prepared to the stories told, and the songs that are sung. Join us as we visit these Mysterious Isles --- a place where magic and religion go hand in hand. Where men drink kava prepared in sacred ceremonies and women are often believed to be bad luck... Broadcast times (UT): Wed 10.00 (Pacific/Asia/Far East), 11.30 (Europe/East Coast USA), 12.30 (USA WRN), 13.30 (Europe WRN),15.00 (Asia/West Coast USA), 18.00 & 19.30 (Africa), 21.00 (Europe), Thu 00.00 (North America), 04.00 (USA WRN) & 05.00 (North America) Broadcast times (UT): Fri 11.00 (Pacific/Asia/Far East/Europe/Eastern USA), 15.30 (Asia/West Coast USA), 19.00 (Africa), 21.30 (Europe), Sat 00.30 (North America) If you need to check out our shortwave, mediumwave or satellite frequencies, surf to: http://www.rnw.nl/en/html/tuning_in.html (RN program previews via DXLD) ** VENEZUELA. Recibe un fuerte abrazo desde Cumaná. El motivo de la presente es para hacerles llegar copia de un artículo de prensa publicado por el Semanario "La Razón" con información referente a la radio venezolana (Julio Trenard, Venezuela, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: TEMEN QUIEBRA MASIVA DE EMISORAS DE RADIO "Si los costos siguen subiendo, la tendencia será el cierre de emisoras en todo el país. En el interior del país, esa posibilidad es más fuerte, la inversión publicitaria está deprimida", advierte el radiodifusor Ciro García [por?] Myriam Mosquera Tras una silenciosa y paciente labor de cinco años, ejercida en cuatro ocasiones en la vicepresidencia de gestión de la Cámara de Radio, Ciro García llegó entre bastidores a conquistar la presidencia de este organismo gremial que agrupa a los profesionales y trabajadores de la radiodifusión. Una posición que lo hace sentir como pez en el agua, tal y como él mismo lo manifiesta: "Me siento bien cómodo en este cargo, no solamente conozco a mis colegas radiodifusores, mantengo excelentes relaciones con ellos, sino porque llegué a manejar el día a día en la institución". Pero, su recién iniciada gestión despierta algunas interrogantes por su acercamiento con el gobierno, el cual promete, como es lógico pensar, la más rápida solución de los problemas de un sector que tradicionalmente mantenía posiciones antagónicas, más en estos momentos cuando se anuncia la aprobación de la Ley de Responsabilidad Social de Radio y Televisión, también conocida como Ley Mordaza o Ley de Contenido, que supuestamente mediatiza el ejercicio de la libertad de expresión, especialmente en los medios radioeléctricos. Suspicacias a las que García le sale al paso, con la convicción que es necesario establecer lazos amistosos y proyectos comunes a favor de este sector de la radiodifusión venezolana. Además, dejó claro en la conversación que no está vinculado con el gobierno y que el gremio que ahora preside, "no es de militantes de políticos". "Es bueno acotar que el presidente Chávez conoce bien la situación que confronta el medio de la radiodifusión y en mi visita a Miraflores le informé al mandatario, sobre la problemática que le compete al Estado y la radiodifusión del país", agregó. - ¿En estos momentos en qué estado se encuentran las conversaciones entre el gobierno y la Cámara de Radio en relación con la Ley de Responsabilidad Social de Radio y Televisión? - Estamos trabajando. Hemos hecho reuniones en Conatel. No creemos que sea necesario ir varias veces a Miraflores. Ahora viene el trabajo con los organismos competentes. Yo precisé cuando asumí el cargo, que es un proyecto inconveniente para el pueblo venezolano y los medios de comunicación. - ¿Quién propició el encuentro de la Cámara de Radio y el gobierno? - El ciudadano ministro de Comunicaciones fue quien me llamó y me dijo que si deseaba una reunión para un encuentro con el Presidente. De inmediato dije que sí. - ¿Cuál fue la actitud del Presidente hacia el sector de la radiodifusión? - Bastante positiva. Mantiene una actitud de diálogo con el sector que represento. - ¿Hay intenciones del gobierno de presionar a los propietarios de las emisoras? - Yo no he sentido ninguna presión. No he tenido quejas de los propietarios de las emisoras. - ¿Por qué han surgido algunas especulaciones acerca que se tienen algunas negociaciones de emisoras con personeros del gobierno? - Desconozco eso. Pienso que pueden ser malas interpretaciones de algunas posiciones. No hay nada de eso. PESCANDO EN RÍO REVUELTO Entre las acciones inmediatas a tomar por el presidente de la Cámara de Radio está intensificar la lucha contra las emisoras ilegales, las cuales han tomado "mucho cuerpo en todo el país". "Siento que hay gente pescando en río revuelto, eso se lo dije al Presidente de la República y al presidente de Conatel. Hay mucha gente que coloca emisoras al aire, sin permisos y sin papeles de Conatel. Son negocios y haciendo ver que al gobierno le convendría tener emisoras comunitarias para favorecer y más que eso, son ilegales. El presidente Chávez me prometió que iba a estudiar y solucionar bien esta situación", explicó García. - ¿Las estaciones de radio comunitaria han desplazado a las emisoras comerciales? - No. Las radios comunitarias tienen un sentido comunitario y nunca desplazarían a las comerciales. Son patrones diferentes, atienden a una comunidad determinada. Las comunitarias tienen un vatiaje y localización específica. No son competencia. Las de competencia son las ilegales. - ¿Cuántas emisoras ilegales hay en el país? - Ciento cuarenta emisoras ilegales. Eso es un problema muy grave para el país. Desde hace un año esto viene ocurriendo. Hay que meter en cintura este problema. - ¿Es cierto que en Perijá y Mérida hay emisoras clandestinas de las FARC? - Nosotros denunciamos ante el gobierno una emisora clandestina que operaba desde El Vigía. No hemos tenido noticias que siga operando. - ¿La Cámara de Radio hace seguimiento de esto? - Sí. A través de su capítulo hace un seguimiento, especialmente las que violan la ley. LA CRISIS APRIETA EN LA RADIO Para Ciro García la crisis económica reinante en el país ha afectado "enormemente a este sector de la radiodifusión". Muestra gran preocupación en este sentido y a la vez, señala que también los problemas financieros arroparon a la industria. "Nosotros hemos bajado las ventas en las emisoras del país en un sesenta y cinco por ciento. Eso es producto de la grave crisis económica. En otros países, con criterios más sólidos, la publicidad se abre ante la crisis. Mientras que aquí, el mercado publicitario cerró. Estamos en situación de incertidumbre, por eso hacemos un llamado de unión, estamos en la búsqueda de mejorar las relaciones con el sector de la publicidad. Queremos contactar a los gremios del país, a los directivos de Fevap y Anda, para tratar de buscar soluciones que nos beneficien a todos. Esto también es parte de mis objetivos dentro de la presidencia de la Cámara", indicó García. - ¿Esta situación de crisis en la radio venezolana aumentó o se agravó con el paro de diciembre? - Esto venía ya rodando. La crisis lleva tiempo. El paro agravó esta situación. - ¿Hay la tendencia al cierre de emisoras por la crisis? - Si los costos siguen subiendo, esa será la tendencia. En el interior del país, esa posibilidad es más fuerte, la inversión publicitaria está deprimida. "La Cámara de Radio hace un llamado al gobierno, para que saque el dinero a la calle para que el país reviva económicamente, porque lamentablemente esta economía depende del gobierno", señaló. REUNIÓN DE CONSULTA EN EL TSJ Para mañana lunes 11 de agosto, está previsto que la Sala Constitucional del Tribunal Supremo de Justicia (TSJ) escuche la opinión de la Cámara de Radio, en relación con la nueva directiva del Consejo Nacional Electoral (CNE). Sobre el particular consultamos a Ciro García, quien dijo que sí fue citado por el presidente de la mencionada dependencia y que espera asistir con una representación de la organización que dirige. "Nos dijeron que es una reunión de consulta, aún no hemos resuelto cuál va a ser la propuesta a presentar. La junta directiva de la Cámara de Radio tomará sus decisiones y cuál es la política a seguir en este caso. Quizás hasta el mismo lunes bien temprano, esté lista esa decisión. Esperamos por una reunión. En este momento que me haces esta entrevista, no hay decisión", señaló. - ¿Usted cree que la Sala Constitucional del TSJ estaría usurpando funciones de la Asamblea Nacional? - Yo creo que no. Si el TSJ considera que es una decisión acertada, eso debe ser respetado. Aunque no me atrevo a hablar con más profundidad sobre el tema, porque sencillamente no soy abogado, legislador. Pero, creo que está a derecho para hacerlo. No sería bueno una opinión mía. - ¿Tiene la Cámara de Radio alguna propuesta de candidato para el nuevo CNE? - A título personal me gustaría hacer alguna propuesta. Pero, soy presidente de la Cámara de Radio y me debo a ciertas directrices que debo acatar. "Renny fue mi amigo" Ciro García es caraqueño, nacido en la parroquia San Juan. Se califica como un luchador gremial, y a quien le preocupan los problemas en el medio radiofónico. Su vinculación en el medio traspasa los años sesenta. Tiene bonitos recuerdos de su primer trabajo dentro de la asistencia de producción del programa televisivo "El Club del Clan", en VTV. Con especial atención refiere de un trabajo que desempeñó de extra que realizó en el programa de Renny Ottolina, "Renny Presenta". "Fui su amigo, sin duda el mejor en televisión", recuerda. "He sido de todo en el medio", manifiesta orgulloso. Desde el año 1966, su figura ocupó espacios como asistente de producción, tanto en radio como en televisión, locutor, publicista y más recientemente como gerente de ventas, de la emisora Triple X. También conduce un espacio musical llamado "El jazz y sus intérpretes", el cual le apasiona por el interés que despierta en él este género musical. Es transmitido cada sábado entre cinco de la tarde y las siete de la noche, a través de la emisora Jazz 95 FM. Tiene el empuje ganado de su padre, según su confesión, quien fue un obrero calificado de la prensa venezolana. "Mi papá trabajó por más de treinta años en el diario El Nacional, y luego ingresó a la Cadena Capriles", añade. Actualmente su máxima preocupación es proseguir en la misión radiofónica que se le ha encomendado, como voz del sentir de quienes trabajan en este medio, "y también en el sentir del pueblo venezolano", agregó. "No quiero ser presidencialista, tengo veinticuatro directores y converso con ellos día a día. Nuestras ideas se contrastan y toman cuerpo a la hora de las decisiones. No creo en los que se la dan de presidencialistas, mi trabajo está basado en la apertura, en la opinión de todos", afirmó García (via Julio Trenard, Cumaná, DXLD) ** VIETNAM [non]. Degar Voice is scheduled Tue, Thur, Sat 1300-1330 on 7115 kHz in Vietnamese (via Russia according to Wolfgang Büschel). This is a service targeted at the Degar people (also called Montagnards) in the Vietnamese Highlands. More info about the Degar people can be found e.g. at http://www.montagnard-foundation.org (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, Aug 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) You`d think broadcasts would be in their own language. That explains `DGV` in 3- 124 (gh, DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. 1020, 0450-0532 8/17. Nonstop classical music fading in and out of the Cuban buzz jammer and the Kreyol format station in Kendall, FL. My first thought was Musical Nacional on a new channel. And while it could be, no parallels located and 590 seemingly silent. Musical used to close around local midnight or 1 a.m. Anyone know if that is still the case? (Terry L Krueger, Clearwater, Florida, 27.55.83 N, 82.46.08 W, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. 1669: 0532-0535 8/17. Huge buzzing blob noted on 1670, actually seemed more like 1669 when in sideband. No audio. Anyone else hearing this? (Terry L Krueger, Clearwater, Florida, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. Al-Asr: Hi Ludo, Wonder if you can provide any info about your new addition Al-Asr Radio. Their website in Arabic only does not tell us much. Time, frequency, start date, target, organization, studio location? Of course I will not ask about the transmitter site! Thanks, (Glenn Aug 14 to Ludo Maes, TDP, via DXLD) Dear Glenn, We started broadcasting Al Asr Radio on satellite on August 7, 2003. The addition of shortwave for 2 hours per day is scheduled for early September. The station's web site is at http://www.alasr-radio.com and you can get in touch with them by writing to info@alasr-radio.com Kind regards, (Ludo Maes, Belgium, TDP, Aug 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ ALL CLANDESTINE AND OPPOSITION MOVEMENT STATIONS IN TIME ORDER http://www.schoechi.de/crw/crw140.html (Compiled from Eike Bierwirth's http://www.eibi.de.vu/ by DXA375- Silvain Domen - 3 August 2003, CRW Aug 15 via DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ CUMBRE PROPAGATION REPORT Once again a very quiet week as far as solar flares are concerned with nothing to report. As usual the effects of coronal hole windstreams have been felt, with the earth being in their path from Aug 8-10 and 12-13. We are currently in another windstream however this one is not having as great an effect as the others. At times the geomagnetic field reached storm levels and MUFs were generally enhanced except at polar latitudes. Conditions are forecast to be good until Aug 22 then becoming disturbed once again. Prepared using data from http://www.ips.gov.au (Richard Jary, SA, Aug 16, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ARNIE CORO'S DXERS UNLIMITED'S PROPAGATION UPDATE AND FORECAST The largest sized sunspot group at this moment stopped developing on Saturday, but it is still capable of producing M or even an X class solar flare. The number of sunspots is expected to diminish during the next several days, but this may change if the new sunspot active region now about to rotate into view has a complex structure. Expect much better radio reception during the next three days as compared to the previous three days, and the reason for this improvement is the much lower geomagnetic activity expected. The number of sunspots from optical observations is between 80 and 90, and the solar flux is hovering between 120 and 130 units. Expect a nice and low A sub P or planetary geomagnetic disturbance indicator on Monday UT if no further coronal hole or flare activity changes this forecast. I will recommend the 19 and 16 meters international short wave broadcast bands for easy listening from shortly before sunrise to about 2 hours after sunset in the case of 16 meters and much later into the local evening for the 19 meter band. Amateur radio operator's best DX chances continue to be on the 20 meter band, with 30 meters running a close second (Prof. Arnie Coro Antich, CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited Aug 16 via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via DXLD) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-148, August 16, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3h.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn CONTINENT OF MEDIA 03-05 Nominal schedule on RFPI, 7445: Thu 2000, Fri 0200, 0830, 1430, Sat 2130, Sun 0330, 0930, 1530 NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1195: RFPI: Sat 0800, 1400, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 on 7445 [nominal times subject to delay or pre-emption] WRN: Rest of world Sat 0800, Europe only Sun 0430, N America Sun 1400 WWCR: Sat 1030, Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 9475 WRMI: Sat & Sun 1800+ on 15725 WINB: Sun 0031 on 12160 WJIE: Sun 1630 on 7490, 13595 (maybe) WBCQ: Mon 0415 on 7415 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1195.html ** ALGERIA. Het lijk er op dat RTA Algiers definitief gestopt is met KG-uitzendingen. Op hun website is geen enkele KG-frequentie meer te vinden en ik kan ze ook nergens horen. Ik heb een mail aan hun technische dienst gezonden met een vraag om wat meet uitleg. 73 (Guido Schotmans, Antwerp, Belgium, Aug 12, BDXC via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. RA Previews: FEEDBACK* - listener letters, features and news about RA. This weekend we have some good advice for those who may be interested in setting up their own radio station. Don't whatever you do mention the word short-wave. If, like the Aboriginal Resource & Development Services in Australia's Arnhem Land, you decide to set-up a short-wave service to offer education, information and cultural reinforcement for the people of the region be prepared for a long hard slog. But, as we'll hear, the three years of hard work has paid off and the Community Development Radio Service is now broadcasting on short-wave, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. And they said that short-wave was dead! [T;%] (via John Figliozzi, swprograms via DXLD) I caught the tail end of the UT Fri 2105 broadcast, beautiful signal on 21740; but it always conflicts with the first and best chance to hear DXing with Cumbre, which spends a good many minutes wrapping up the show with no news; and I also had to be sure Mundo Radial, with which it also conflicts, was correctly airing on WWCR 15825 at 2115 (well, 2114). Other airings of Feedback are 0605 UT Sat and 0305 UT Sun. At the Feedback site, http://www.abc.net.au/ra/feedback/default.htm the `latest program` was still ``Aug 10`` when I checked at 0105 UT Aug 16, but it did have audio available; is the latest show, somewhat delayed, always available now for only a week? If that doesn`t work out, as was pointed out here a while ago, the WRN archive on Sundays includes Feedback for a week (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. For those put off by all the Portuguese in previous issues (and you should not be --- it`s a lot like English, especially when slurred), altho I mentioned the gist briefly in English on WORLD OF RADIO, the two important stories were that R. Nacional do Brasil has resumed an external service, but only to Africa in Portuguese, on existing Amazonian service frequencies; and on 3235, R. Clube de Marília which recently reactivated, has been taken over by R. Guarujá (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL [and non]. Over-reaction to Bandeirantes being reported slightly off-frequency continued: Prezado Sarmento, e demais amigos. Não se deseja polemizar. O dexista que enviou a noticia com certeza é gente boa, e que defende bem o nome do dexismo na Rep. Checa. O nosso amigo Glenn Hauser cumpre uma tarefa de reproduzir noticias que chegam até ele de todas as partes do mundo, tanto é que já publicou muitas mensagens oriundas daqui do Brasil, sobre o que acontece por aqui. O que se coloca em questão é a relevancia de discutir ou não mundialmente pouco mais de meio quiloHertz numa emissão quando deveriamos (mundialmente) nos aperceber de novas escutas, novas emissoras, a mudança da tendencia mundial nas ondas curtas (o impacto das 'grandes' abrindo espaço no dial ao sairem de algumas frequencias, proporcionando a recepção de muitas 'menores'), enfim, desejamos muito, mas muito mesmo que a Radio Bandeirantes, por ser uma das mais serias emissoras de rádio do mundo (juntando-se a outras de tantos países que seguem uma linha de ação que lhe dão a devida credibilidade), que se diga que ela foi bem recebida na Espanha, na Indonésia, no Egito, na Rep. Checa, na Nova Zelandia, enfim, em todos os quadrantes do mundo. Levantar mundialmente diferenças de menos de 1 kHz no padrão irradiante de uma emissora qualquer do mundo (ondas curtas, em especial), é algo que não leva a nada. Sarmento, voce não tem problema algum nisto. Voce apenas sem querer levantou um fato que já é notório em alguns lugares do mundo, onde se discute a cor da camisa de quem discursou e não o discurso propriamente dito. Um abraço a todos, e de minha parte dou por encerrada essa discussão que no fim pode acabando em nada (Rudolf Grimm, São Bernardo, SP/B, radioescutas via DXLD) Prezados da lista, Circulou por aqui uma interessante discução sobre o pequeno desvio de frequência da Rádiio Bandeirantes e não vou entrar nessa área técnica embora conheça um pouquinho tem experts por aqui. O que chamou atenção foi encontro do Sarmento com alguém da área técnica da emissora onde o mesmo define que as ONDAS CURTAS, são mantidas pela empresa como ''extratégica da empresa''fazendo supor que realmente são deficitárias. Devemos levar em conta que as emissoras que operam nessas faixas trabalham com transmissores valvulados de manutenção bastante cara, assim como os de ondas médias, apesar de já existir os estado sólido há bem tempo. Muitas emissoras sumiram, aliás qualquer dia quero consultar os mais veteranos dessa lista se sabem alguma coisa sobres elas. Devo louvar as emissoras RÁDIO BANDEIRANTES, RÁDIO APARECIDA, pois deste criança que ligo o rádio nunca deixei de captar uma só vez em uma de suas frequências essas emissoras.Outras de vez em quando somem voltam boas,algumas meio capengas e outras nunca mais. Abraços e boas escutas, (José Maria de Morais, Manhuaçu, MG. SONY SW ICF11, SONY SW ICF7600GR, ibid.) Estimado colega Grimm, yo tampoco quiero polemizar, pero cuando usted dice ``Levantar mundialmente diferenças de menos de 1 kHz no padrão irradiante de uma emissora qualquer do mundo (ondas curtas, em especial), é algo que não leva a nada.`` Estoy seguro, muy seguro de que la mayoria de los DXistas escandinavos no estariamos de acuerdo con usted. Permítame recordarle un caso que ocupo mucho espacio en los foros internacionales últimamente y es la frecuencia de 6010A ("A" debe interpretarse aquí como "aproximadamente", es una abreviatura caida en desuso en este país donde resido, pero en la época de los receptores convencionales de tubos sí se usaba). Aquí en los alrededores operan varias emisoras latinoamericanas, a saber de México, Chile, Uruguay, Brasil, Colombia. También operan allí algunas emisoras de países no latinamericanos, pero de ellos no me pienso ocupar ahora, porque no son DX. La mexicana Radio Mil viene utilizando la frecuencia desde hace unos 20 años y cuando surgió el otro año la colombiana La Voz de tu Conciencia en una frecuencia contigua, causó interferencia a la anterior si se escuchaba en el modo AM, pero al mismo tiempo pudo escucharse en todo el mundo para los que usaban el modo SSB. Entonces a través de un colaborador de la radio mexicana, también DXista, formularon una queja a la emisora colombiana, que por otra parte sólo habia acatado lo ordenado de Ministerio de Comunicaciones de dejar las frecuencias de 6060 y 6065 en donde antes había transmitido. Vino una fase de reajuste de frecuencias, porque la colombiana quería complacer el deseo de Radio Mil, y mientras tanto los DXistas tuvieron mucho tino a la hora de sintonizar la frecuencia para ver si era Parinacota, CX42 o alguna de las otras. En las listas internacionales salieron entonces las frecuencias de estas emisoras con 1 y hasta 2 décimos. Era información útil en ese momento. Para muchos escuchas en esta parte del mundo la medición de frecuencia se ha vuelto incluso más importante en algunos casos que la propia identificación de la emisora. Eso es absurdo, pero con los receptores que los colegas usan, NRD525, 535, Drake R8, Icom R71 y otros, la frecuencia viene indicada con décimos, y por influencia de la escucha en onda media, la moda de medir las frecuencias se ha establecido también en la onda corta. Te cuento como algunos de mis colegas DXistas de onda media trabajan, cuando están en casa o en una expedición. Se sientan enfrente de 2 ó 3 receptores que contínuamente cambian de frecuencia, pasando de una memoria a otra, o en pasos rápidos, de 10 en 10 kHz. Pocos utilizan el modo AM, sino USB o SSB (o ECSS) y por eso, al pasar de 10 en 10, es lógico que la frecuencia sea xxxx.00. Si fuera distinta la frecuencia, no se captaría sino heterodinos. Para volver a la onda corta, resulta que allí también se puede grabar la frecuencia en la memoria del receptor, y de ahí el interés en registrar que una emisora haya variado de frecuencia, aunque tan sólo fuera por un décimo o dos. Si tengo grabado una emisora en 5677.24 USB y unos días más tarde resulta que se mudó a 5676.88 (variables o no), y entre las dos frecuencias hay una señal de teletipo muy fuerte, pues entonces le aseguro que no se va a captar si la señal por otro lado es débil. Para oirla debería haberla grabado en 5676.88 LSB. No deseo polemizar más, pero quería dejar constancia de la utilidad que puede tener el registro fraccionado de una frecuencia. En el caso de Radio Bandeirantes concuerdo que resulta exagerado indicar que su frecuencia de 31 metros estaba 30 Hz por debajo de la exacta. Esa información no conduce a nada. En cuanto a las demás frecuencias de la RB pienso que tiene validez, porque un desfase de .4 o .5 kHz sí se nota inmediatamente a la hora de rastrear las bandas valiéndose del modo USB, SSB o ECSS. Me permito agregar de http://www.sover.net/~hackmohr/ la lista de Mark Mohrmann los datos actuales de las emisoras latinas que se oyen en los alrededores de los 6010 kHz: 6009.78 COLOMBIA LV de tu Conciencia, Pto Lleras [0009-1120](9.78- 11.06) Jul 03 C (fpl)To 5910 (r)AM1530 R Alcarván ex6060/6065 6009.79 MEXICO * XEOI Nucleo R Mil, Mexico City [0032-1318](09.9-10.2) Jul 03 P (r)AM1000 6010.07 CHILE R Parinacota, Putre [2308-1059](09.7-10.07) Jul 03 X *0800-1053 FM94.5 (r)R Cooperativa 0400-0800 6010.2 URUGUAY Em Ciudad d Montevideo [1300-1900/0030-0240](.02-.71) Jul 03 X ex9650 (r)CX42-AM1370 0030* 6010.24 BRAZIL * R Inconfidência, Belo Horizonte [2049-1135](.10-.2) Jul 03 X Los guarismos entre paréntesis indican registros en frecuencias diferentes a la indicada. Así, Radio Mil, en 6009.79, ha sido captada en otras oportunidades en frecuencias que han variado entre 6009.9 y 6010.2. En Europa, la única emisora realmente difícil de las mencionadas, es la uruguaya. La emisora que se capte, depende un poco de la hora y la propagación del momento. Entonces, una indicación relativamente precisa de la frecuencia viene a ser una herramienta útil a la hora de tratar de "pescar" la identificación. Hay que recordar que muchos DXistas europeos, aunque saben distinguir entre el portugués hablado en el Brasil y el castellano, no logran distinguir el castellano que se hable en Chile del que se hable en Colombia o en México. Cordialmente, (Henrik Klemetz, Suecia, ibid.) ** CANADA. CIRB, 93.9, at the Confederation Bridge [connecting PEI to the mainland], heard at 1900 UT July 3, a TIS with info on bridge and events in surrounding areas (Nigel Pimblett, visiting PEI, CIDX Messenger via DXLD) This one qualifies for the latest FM Atlas: location: Borden, stereo, 70 meters high, 37 watts (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. DIGITAL DEPENDENCY EXPOSED By JACK KAPICA, Globe and Mail Update http://www.globeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20030815.gtkapicapower0815/BNStory/Technology/ Cracks in the dream of a high-technology future appeared when the massive blackout, which covered the northeastern United States and most of Ontario, knocked tens of millions of people back to the pre- digital age. For many people, it took lot of phone calls using landlines before it they discovered that the power outage was more than a local phenomenon - in fact, it covered some 15 million square kilometres. For people using cellphones, it wasn't that easy - most cellphone relay towers, which use electricity, were knocked out, leaving owners with perfectly usable handsets that couldn't connect anywhere. A few towers had backup power, but not all. Those whose cellphones remained operational suddenly found themselves in demand. On a Toronto street, a woman who identified herself only as "Tz-zik," was offering the use of her cellphone for $2 per call. "Look, power went out, we gotta make a hustle," said the 18-year-old. "It's awesome, we make fun out of every situation." She and her group of five friends proudly flashed the eight dollars they had made in the first five minutes of their campaign. Internet sites Worse, the Internet - which has been touted as a medium of last resort during a disaster - was rendered next to useless; though the Internet stayed up for the most part, many people couldn't even turn on their computers to get to it. The only ones who could connect were those using battery-powered laptops with built-in modems and a dial-up connection to the Internet. And even then, when some areas got their power back, people still couldn't connect to the Net as random power surges knocked local nodes off-line. Fortunately, most of the telephone system continued to work - often, however, without the extra features, such as caller display, which require an additional power source. At Bell Canada, spokesman Andrew Cole said both telephone and Internet services remained uninterrupted. Bell's networks remain functional, he said, but as a result of the increased traffic, he said the company requested that customers not use their cellphones and landlines to and from affected areas except for essential purposes, and not to call the operator or 911 for information on the current situation. Even those people who could connect to the Internet couldn't reach some Web sites. Globeandmail.com remained functional on reserve power, as did CBC.ca, the Toronto Stock Exchange, Google.ca and Canada.com. Several other news sites - Eye.net, Thestar.ca, Thespec.com - all were down when checked early Friday morning. Radios led way People found themselves forced to get their news in old-fashioned ways. Commuters who were sitting in gridlocked downtown traffic could at least listen to their car radios - but only certain stations. In Toronto, for instance, the all-news station 680News was knocked off the air for a while before its owner, Rogers Radio, a division of cable-TV and Internet giant Rogers Communications, struggled to kick in emergency power. All the company's other radio stations - CHFI-FM, AM590 and Jack-FM - also experienced "brief outages," reported Chick McCoy, vice-president and general manager of Rogers Radio. Like other AM-band radio stations, 680News had to rely on its own power to broadcast. FM-band stations, all of which broadcast from the CN Tower, required only enough power to get their signals to the transmitter - the tower's emergency power system ensured that all stations that could summon a signal could broadcast it. The CBC TV News operation was forced into silence briefly Thursday as technicians scrambled with kick in emergency power and to find other ways to get its television signals across the country. Eventually, CBC Newsworld had to continue broadcasting through its Calgary bureau. CBC-1 radio (99.1 FM) experienced an extended silence, during which reporters moved to CBC-2 (94.1 FM), from which the company managed to provide continuous coverage of the blackout. The all-talk radio station CFRB, one of the authoritative voices of the Toronto radio scene, stayed on the air with its coverage of the event. [but not CFRX as previously noted] Digital systems Many industries that have switched to digital systems were affected - especially those doing business on-line. Even if they had emergency back-up power, customers without power couldn't reach their services. A number of airline flights were cancelled or delayed because of the blackout, leaving travellers to spend the night sleeping in waiting lounges or checking into hotels. About 1,000 people found themselves unexpectedly stranded in Winnipeg, which was not affected by the blackout, when six Toronto-bound flights were diverted to the Winnipeg International Airport. As well, no planes took off for Toronto, Hamilton and Ottawa Thursday afternoon. Disgruntled but orderly passengers stood in enormous lineups to reschedule flights or started working the phones to find a hotel room. The blackout also emphasized the digital revolution's dependence on electricity, and how that dependence is putting an extra strain on the power system's ability to provide it. In many stores without reserve power, sophisticated cash registers with stock-tracking barcode readers gave way to handheld calculators as clerks struggled to complete sales. In smaller grocery stores, which did not have backup power, owners were even more anxious to sell their produce before the lack of refrigeration spoiled it. In Toronto, one darkened convenience store lit only by two candles was doing a brisk business. Shoppers queued for groceries while clerks calculated prices on a solar-powered calculator held under a flashlight. There were no reports of major corporate failures. Corporations Large companies housed in corporate towers in Toronto went on emergency power almost immediately, and provided a few points of light on the city skyline after sundown. Aside from some loss of data on computers that had not been saved at the moment the power failed, central systems continued working. But with other systems down, most companies found it impossible to continue doing business and sent their employees home, ordering them not to come in today unless their work was critical. The blackout also brought out business opportunists. The insurance industry is taking the opportunity to sell "cyber-risk" packages to companies whose insurance policies have not evolved along with their computer systems. "Unfortunately, most companies are operating in a 21st-century threat environment with 20th-century insurance coverage," said John Spagnuolo, with the New-York-based Insurance Information Institute. "The dynamics of risk management have changed with technology." Regardless of its product line or service, Mr. Spagnuolo said, "virtually all major businesses today rely on computer networks to function. But they need to recognize that network security risks are fundamentally different than traditional physical risks like fire. "If a hacker or virus shuts down a network or destroys computer software or data, most businesses today have either limited or no coverage. Insurers have excluded these risks from standard commercial policies and are now offering standalone coverage. Whether your company conducts business over the Internet, stores customer data on servers or simply uses e-mail, it is at risk." The sudden reliance on older technology has verified what a number of experts have been saying about our power system - that our networks are vulnerable. A report published in 1996 by the U.S. Pentagon, concentrating on the prospect of a terrorist attack (which was quickly ruled out in Thursday's blackout) said that increasing deregulation and competition in the communications industry has created "an increased reliance on information systems to operate, maintain, and monitor critical infrastructures. This ... creates a tunnel of vulnerability previously unrealized in the history of conflict." "The energy infrastructure is vulnerable to physical and cyber disruption that could threaten its integrity and safety," warned the U.S. National Energy Policy Development Group, under the chairmanship of Vice-President Dick Cheney, warned two years ago. "Disruptions could come from natural events, like geomagnetic storms and earthquakes, or could come from accidents, equipment failures, or deliberate sabotage." The interdependence of many systems - including things as diverse as electric power, transportation, communications, water supply and banking - are also becoming more interdependent, raising the fear that they could shut down too, like Thursday's cascading power failures (via Kim Elliott, DC, DXLD) ** CANADA. TRANSISTOR RADIO THE MEDIUM OF CHOICE AS BLACKOUT AFFECTS COMMUNICATION http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/MediaNews/2003/08/14/160962-cp.html TORONTO (CP) - Old-style radio made a comeback Thursday as Ontario residents - at least those without their own generators - tuned in to radio broadcasts to find out about the great blackout of 2003. Without electricity, desktop computers were kaput and television screens faded to black - even if they could broadcast a signal. And it was touch-and-go at some newspaper offices, where editors and reporters scrambled to put out Friday editions without the benefit of electricity at deadline crunch time. With the power out, residents of Ontario hit by the massive outage shortly after 4 p.m. ET got their news about the blackout - albeit sketchy in the early going - from transistor radios, Internet sites via battery-powered laptop and through telephone calls to friends and relatives. The major television networks were on the air, but for the most part, those in affected areas were unable to tune in. Music play lists and regular programming were ditched at many radio stations, which provided live reports of the unfolding drama during the rush hour and throughout the evening. Radio reports advised commuters to treat traffic light intersections as four-way stops, to be cautious at railway crossings and noted that some people were abandoning vehicles because they couldn't fill up at electricity-powered gas pumps. Listeners were also warned to turn off electrical appliances and to be careful when using candles. And as the electricity was slowly restored to some communities, newscasters relayed the warnings of officials not to overdo it. "Hydro officials are asking you to keep everything off except for maybe one light," said a report on 680 News in Toronto. "As far as electronic appliances go, definitely air conditioners (off) because they don't want to overload the system when they try to restore power." Using emergency backup power, Broadcast News continued its national newscasts from its Toronto newsroom, and fed wire and audio reports to radio stations across the country. The Toronto Sun and the Toronto Star were among the big-city dailies trying to put out a newspaper without the benefit of electricity. The Globe and Mail had backup power in its newsroom, as did the national newsroom of The Canadian Press. "We're still planning to publish," Don McCurdy, managing editor of the Record of Kitchener, Cambridge and Waterloo, said at about 7:30 p.m., although the newspaper's offices were without power and only a few computers had hooked to backup power at the time. "All our reporters are out gathering information, they're coming back in now with stuff and they're itching to write." But even if the newsrooms were able to function, many papers were scrambling to figure out how to make it into print without working presses. At the Brockville Expositor, Doug Coward said they were looking for a generator. "We went through this in 1998," he said, noting that during the ice storm that year the paper didn't publish for three days. But, he added, it was better to be without power in the summer than the winter (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** CANADA. DIGITAL RADIO IN CARS: THE TECHNOLOGY THAT NEVER MADE IT TO THE DASHBOARD Patrick Langston, The Ottawa Citizen Friday, August 08, 2003 http://www.canada.com/search/story.aspx?id=cc939688-8633-424a-991d- 7cb631f50dd6 It promised to be the brave new world of automobile radio listening. Pristine sound. Static and interference abolished. Video screens displaying the name of the song and artist, weather and sports updates, traffic bulletins. It all sounded great when, back in 2001, GM announced plans for Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) receivers as standard or optional equipment for 2003 Chevrolet Impalas and Monte Carlos sold in Canada, with 24 other models soon to follow suit. In Europe, Asia and the United States, DAB was already old hat, but we were to be the first country in the world to enjoy manufacturer-supplied DAB systems in our cars. In fact, not a single DAB-equipped vehicle has left the factory. And don't look for one any time soon. "We were advised that this was a technology that had great demand in the marketplace," says Richard James, manager of product communications for GM Canada. "But once we had it in a sense out there, we found there really wasn't enough demand for this particular feature to drive the kind of costs that would have been involved." A quick check with Ottawa dealerships confirms James's explanation. "Never had anyone ask for it," say most local car sales reps. Nissan's Maxima and Murano do come with DAB buttons on the dash but no receivers, meaning a trip to a car radio shop for your unit. That trip will cost you. Figure $700-plus for the bargain basement variety. And you'd be one-of-a-kind: Ottawa's car radio shops also report zero demand for DAB receivers, even though some of next year's models will include such goodies as a built-in hard drive for recording broadcasts selected in advance. Then again, even if you had a receiver, your listening choices, at least in Ottawa, would be limited. Fifteen area radio stations received DAB licenses from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) last fall, but so far only CBC is broadcasting digitally (nationally, there are about 65 DAB stations, most of them in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver). Blame costs, federal regulations and technological warfare, says Mark Maheu, vice-president and general manager of CHUM Radio, which operates CFRA, BOB-FM, Majic 100 and The Team 1200 in Ottawa. CHUM stations have been broadcasting digitally in Toronto for years, but startup costs are huge, says Mr. Maheu. "For our four Ottawa stations, it's just under a million bucks. And then you've got ongoing costs because we need to rent tower space or roof space because it's not one single antenna. It's similar to a cell phone network. You're going to need transmitters in certain areas to cover certain pockets." What's more, CRTC regulations dictate that digital broadcasts be simulcast on either FM or AM. That minimizes a DAB station's ability to target niche audiences for ethnic or other specialty programming because most mainstream listeners would hit the dial the minute they heard such limited-interest broadcasts. A Toronto station was recently granted a DAB-only licence, but it remains the exception. The spectre of satellite radio is also scaring off DAB investment, says Mr. Maheu. In the U.S., radio listeners can, for about 12 bucks a month and the cost of a receiver, subscribe to either the XM or Sirius satellite services. That brings in well over 100 specialty, commercial-free channels, everything from comedy to Christian talk shows to old-style R&B. To date, no Canadian radio stations have been granted satellite licences and Canadian law forbids us from tuning in to the U.S. satellite networks, but the threat of a competing technology is one more impediment to broadcasters embracing DAB, says Mr. Maheu. So what does the future -- one that could include integrated DAB/ cellphone/handheld computer systems -- hold for DAB-hungry Canadian motorists? At GM, says Mr. James, "We are going to watch the rollout of digital broadcasting across Canada. If we start seeing demand, we'll take another look at offering it on vehicles." Meanwhile, noting the chicken-and-egg quality of his answer, Mr. Maheu says, "The car is the key. That's how FM radio took off. When it became a relatively reasonably expensed option in cars, people started ordering it. The same thing will happen with DAB and over the course of half a generation, maybe 10 years, the majority of the cars on the road will be DAB-equipped." © Copyright 2003 The Ottawa Citizen (via Harry van Vugt, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, DXLD) ** CANADA. CRTC decision, full text of decision at: http://www.crtc.gc.ca/archive/ENG/Decisions/2003/db2003-399.htm Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2003-399 Ottawa, 14 August 2003 Radio Chalom Montréal, Quebec Application 2002-0246-6 Public Hearing in Montréal, Quebec 3 February 2003 Commercial AM (ethnic and religious radio) station in Montréal The Commission hereby denies the application by Radio Chalom for a broadcasting licence to carry on a commercial AM (ethnic and religious radio) station in Montréal at 1650 kHz. The proposed station was primarily to serve Montréal¹s Jewish community, and would have replaced the service that the applicant currently provides through the subsidiary communications multiplex operation (SCMO) facilities of CIRA-FM Montréal (via Harry van Vugt, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, DXLD) ** CANADA [and non]. GUY BANVILLE, CHRONIQUEUR SUR RADIOACTU.CA Communiqué de presse --- Pour diffusion immédiate Montréal, le 15 août 2003 A partir du 18 août prochain, Guy Banville proposera une chronique hebdomadaire sur RadioActu http://www.radioactu.ca le premier site francophone d'information sur la radio. Fort de ses 30 années de carrière au Canada et en France, Guy Banville livrera au travers de cette chronique son regard parfois impertinent et sa réflexion sur le monde de la radio, ses évolutions, ses défauts, ses qualités. Il mettra à profit son expérience professionnelle et son sens aigu de l'observation dans cette chronique intitulée "Radio Ville". Cette chronique sera publiée sur RadioActu France et RadioActu Canada et sera un trait d'union entre les cultures radiophoniques de ces deux pays, tout en ouvrant un espace de réflexion et de dialogue entre professionnels de la radio canadiens et français. Selon Daniel Robichaud responsable de Radioactu.ca et Directeur des nouveaux médias pour Corus la venue de Guy Banville "amènera davantage de réflexions sur le merveilleux monde de la radio qui est en grande transition actuellement au Québec. Le site Radioactu.ca offrait beaucoup d'informations mais encore peu d'opinions l'arrivée de monsieur Banville devrait combler se vide." Pour Nicolas Chagny, PDG de MédiasActu SA, société éditrice de RadioActu, l'arrivée de Guy Banville "marque davantage le positionnement incontournable de RadioActu dans le monde de la radio. Le parcours professionnel exceptionnel de Guy Banville à la fois en France et au Canada et son activité de consultant radio viendront enrichir et renforcer la ligne éditoriale qui a fait le succès de RadioActu depuis bientôt 6 ans". Nicolas Chagny s'est également dit très heureux d'accueillir Guy Banville au sein de RadioActu. "Je suis ravi de pouvoir m'exprimer sur RadioActu qui pour moi représente le meilleur site Web destiné aux gens de la radio" a expliqué Guy Banville. "Je suis fortement motivé parce son équipe m'encourage à communiquer ce que j'entends à la radio mais aussi ce que j'y vois ! Regarder la radio, c'est essayer de la comprendre..." CONTACT PRESSE : Daniel Robichaud dan@radioactu.ca PRESS KIT : Photo Guy Banville & Nicolas Chagny : http://mediasactu.fr/presse/banvillechagny.jpg Autres logos et photos : http://presskit.mediasactu.fr/ --- A propos de Guy Banville Guy Banville fait ses débuts en 1974 à CKAC73 Montréal, la plus importante radio généraliste au Québec. Après avoir co-fondé une entreprise de production audio-visuelle avec Pierre Robert Audiomultivision ancêtre de Pram (Surprise sur prise) il retourne à la radio en 1982 sur CKMF 94 Montréal. En 1990, Télémédia, le plus important radiodiffuseur au Québec lui confie la direction des programmes de CITE FM et des 6 radios de son réseau. Créateur du mot et du concept ROCK-DÉTENTE Guy Banville innove un nouveau format basé sur les attentes du groupe-cible agé entre 25 et 49 ans. Recruté par Europe 2, il arrive à Paris en mai 1993 à titre de directeur des programmes et des communications. Guy Banville innove avec son équipe de nombreux concepts tels la série des concerts acoustiques, le train de Noel, les duos virtuels, Eurosonique. En juillet 1997 Europe obtient son record historique à 5,9 avec la matinale d'Arthur comme première émission 25-34 ans en France, toutes radios confondues. En 1998, Europe atteint 6,1 d'audience cumulée. Résultat que la radio mettra 4 ans à retrouver (avril 2002) après son départ. Guy Banville décide de retourner au Canada pour retrouver Télémédia Radio à titre de Vice-président créativité et développement au bureau chef. À l'été 2001, Guy Banville choisit de devenir consultant radio et fonde Banville Média Inc. Grâce à son expérience bi-culturelle, il est devenu une ressource externe pour diverses radios tant à Montréal qu'à Paris. Il est par ailleurs directeur artistique de la City Radio à Paris (réseau France Bleu) depuis octobre 2002. http://www.banvillemedia.com A propos de MédiasActu SA Créée en juin 2000, MédiasActu SA est spécialisée dans la création de contenu et est l'éditeur de RadioActu.com et MusicActu.com. RadioActu.com, site B2B, est aujourd'hui le premier service on-line indépendant d'information sur les radios françaises, canadiennes, suisses et belges et propose quotidiennement un fil d'actualité sur les radios ainsi que de nombreux services professionnels dont le Guide Pro. MusicActu.com, site B2C, est spécialisé dans l'actualité musicale. Outre son activité d'éditeur de sites Internet, MédiasActu est également une agence de contenu : marque blanche, contenu sur- mesure, rewriting, externalisation de rédaction, dans tous les domaines (médias, culture, sport, information générale, communication d'entreprise). MédiasActu compte notamment parmi ses clients SFR, Tv- Radio.com/Comfm, Bouygues Télécom, France Télécom, Mediaplazza, ASCO- TP. Membre du GESTE (Groupement des éditeurs de services en ligne), MédiasActu est une société du groupe Les Argonautes. http://www.mediasactu.fr/ (via Bill Westenhaver, QC, DXLD) Glenn, I don't know if you've ever seen this RadioActu Canada newsletter. I believe they're based in France, but it seems that you can find radio info from both francophone Europe and Québec, though I've never devoted much time to exploring the site. 73 (Bill Westenhaver, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CHINA. CHINA CONDEMNS FALUN GONG INTERFERENCE IN TV SATELLITE SIGNALS | Text of report in English by official Chinese news agency Xinhua (New China News Agency) Beijing, 15 August: China Friday [15 August] condemned the Falun Gong cult for hijacking again the satellite signals of government-run Sino Satellite, which violated the basic principles of relevant civilian communications. The TV satellite, belonging to the Sino-Satellite Communications Co Ltd, was taken over by illegal TV signals transmitted by Falun Gong cult followers twice, once at 9.05 p.m. Tuesday and once at 8.23 p.m. Wednesday [local times 12 and 13 August], according to the Ministry of Information Industry. The illegal signals hindered the Chinese audience from watching routine programmes of China Central Television, China Education TV Station and 10 provincial TV stations. "Falun Gong's law-breaking activity is information terrorism and banditry in the high-tech era," said a company executive. "It infringes on the rights and interests of our company, and its reputation as well. We retain the right to investigate the legal responsibility of the cult." A senior official of the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television said the TV hijacking once again indicates the cult's goal to cause damage to the country and the people. Those who back up and connive with the banned cult should be held responsible for the illegal act and will eventually eat their own bitter fruits, the official said. The public who were disrupted from receiving the country's radio and television programmes also angrily condemned the Falun Gong cult's evil act. They urged the cult be severely punished to safeguard the interests of the people. This week's hijackings were not the first time Falun Gong cult activists had broadcast illegal TV signals to cut into transmission using Sino Satellite. The satellite was taken over on 21 September last year, during the Middle Autumn Festival when people should have been enjoying entertainment programmes on TV with their families. Their attacks in late June last year also disrupted people in many remote villages in China from being able to watch the World Cup finals. Sino Satellite, launched in 1998, serves dozens of clients including those of prime importance to the daily lives of Chinese, such as the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television, the Chinese Offshore Petrol Corporation, the National Meteorological Bureau and China Unicom. Through this satellite, TV programmes are able to reach rural residents in remote villages in most landlocked areas in the country, and China Education TV Station broadcasts education programmes to students nationwide. Source: Xinhua news agency, Beijing, in English 0932 gmt 15 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** FRANCE. Three full months have passed with no interesting identifiable signal, at [25+ MHz] frequencies normally covered in this column, reaching my antenna at times when I`d been listening. Throughout that period, there were only three days when I didn`t make serious efforts to hear things. It seems that the transatlantic path for 11 metre signals pegged out, on schedule, in April. If we`re lucky, this propagation shut-down wil only last for the duration of the northern summer. We`ll have to wait until fall to discover whether the sunspot count will be high enough to sustain a further winter of long distance reception on 26 MHz via the F-layer. Oddly, all the April entries in my logsheet, five of them, are for signals from France. The RFI transmission on 25.820 MHz accounts for four of these but only the most recent one is mentioned: 25.820 AM RFI Issoudun, France, 19 Apr at 1240 UT For at least two years, the regional tourist office in the town of La Rochelle, on the west coast of France, has been using a number of low power transmitters, in the eleven metre band, to provide info about local attractions. I got to hear snippets of the one on 25.928 MHz on three occasions between February and April. Programme content was a historical audio docu-drama on how various wars affected economic development along the Charante River. Such intellectual tourists, the French: 25.928 nFM, Dépt de Tourisme, La Rochelle, France, 7 April at 1555, in French, repeating recording for tourists, poor signal (Alan Roberts, St. Lambert, QC, Aug CIDX Messenger via DXLD) ** INDIA. INDIAN NEWSREADER SCALES TV TOWER IN PROTEST OVER LOW PAY Luke Harding in New Delhi, Thursday August 14 2003, The Guardian http://www.guardian.co.uk/india/story/0,12559,1019259,00.html Disgruntled office workers have often taken drastic action to demand better pay. They have gone on strike, staged walkouts or organised pickets. But yesterday Bhaskar Vohra, an angry newsreader for India's state-run radio channel All India Radio, went one better when he scaled a 100 metre television tower in central New Delhi and threatened to set himself on fire. Hundreds of people gathered in the Indian capital to watch Mr Vohra, who reads the news in Assamese. "I am not a terrorist, I am a translator-cum-newsreader," the 24-year-old, who was armed with only a backpack, said in a statement hurled down from the tower. "If my demands are not met by August 15 I will burn the national flag and immolate myself." Police spent most of the morning talking to the newsreader on his mobile phone. They eventually persuaded him to scramble back down after three-and-a-half hours. Yesterday a defiant Mr Vohra told the Guardian that he had taken the "drastic step" of climbing the tower to try to draw attention to the abysmal pay of freelance Indian newsreaders, who earn as little as 225 rupees (£3.10) for each shift. He said he had spent a year and a half trying to meet India's information and broadcasting minister, Ravi Shankar Prasad, so he could press the issue, but had failed to get an appointment and officials had fobbed him off. "That's why I had to take this drastic step this morning," he explained. "I didn't hurt myself but I'm tired. I feel exhausted. It was quite high up there." Mr Vohra said that freelance newsreaders often had to wait four to five months to get paid, could only work 12 shifts a month and scarcely made ends meet. They wanted a pay rise of 500 rupees a shift, he said. Astonishingly, after climbing down from the tower, the newsreader was swept off to India's information and broadcasting ministry where he met the minister. Mr Prasad apparently told him he would do what he could, and would raise his grievance with All India Radio's director general. "I told the minister the quality of newsreading in this country has gone down because of low pay," Mr Vohra said. Last night detectives said it was too early to say whether Mr Vohra, a student at Delhi University, would be charged with any crime. "This is a vital installation. He should not have gone up there," said the deputy commissioner of police, Manoj Kumar Lal. "We will be interrogating him to find out why he did it. It's a strange case." Thousands of police are on duty across the capital, with security tight ahead of celebrations of India's independence day today. Copyright Guardian Newspapers Limited (via Bill Westenhaver, Jill Dybka, DXLD) AIR EMPLOYEE THREATENS TO JUMP FROM TOWER, PERSUADED TO CLIMB DOWN Onkar Singh in New Delhi/PTI | August 14, 2003 11:52 IST Last Updated: August 14, 2003 14:06 IST Police on Thursday noon managed to persuade an aggrieved All India Radio employee, who had threatened to jump off a tower in the Akashwani Bhavan premises in Delhi, to climb down. He has been taken to the Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital for a medical checkup, DCP Manoj Lal told rediff.com. Lal said that an employee of a television channel, who is a friend of Borah, played a crucial role in ending the episode. Earlier in the morning, the busy Parliament Street became even busier when Bhaskar Borah (22), an AIR newsreader and a casual employee, threatened to jump to his death if his demands were not met. Borah is the general secretary of the Association of Casual Newsreaders and Translators. He threw some pamphlets from the tower, which listed his demands. They included a meeting with the Information and Broadcasting minister and the Prasar Bharti CEO. His other demands are increase in the payment to newsreaders of regional languages from Rs 250/shift to Rs 500/shift, regularisation of all casual employees and providing I-cards to newsreaders. He also complained about payments being delayed up to 10 months. Traffic on the busy street was thrown out of gear and a posse of policemen began regulating the movement of vehicles. A huge snorkel has been pressed into service has been kept on standby. Employees from the nearby offices, including that of the Reserve Bank of India and the Planning Commission, came out and were watching the proceedings. (Rediff.com via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. XM & SIRIUS SATELLITE UPDATE XM had close to 700,000 subscribers as of July while Sirius recently passed the 100,000 mark (per Radio World). However, the solar cells aboard the XM satellites have been degrading at an accelerated pace due to a manufacturing defect, and this will cause XM to spend significant capital to construct and launch replacement satellites in the not too distant future. While the URL below discusses the launch of just one XM replacement satellite, it is our understanding that both XM birds (nicknamed "Rock" and "Roll") are affected by the sub-standard solar cell problem, so the report may understate the gravity of the situation. http://www.rwonline.com/dailynews/one.php?id=3724 (via Fred Vobbe, NRC FMTV via DXLD) XM ADDS ANOTHER $25 MILLION TO $475 MILLION FUNDING PACKAGE St. Louis - Aug 11, 2003 http://www.spacedaily.com/news/xm-radio-03c.html Boeing will build and deliver a fourth Boeing 702 satellite for XM Satellite Radio, Inc., the Washington, D.C.-based provider of the nation's leading satellite radio service. The satellite, designated XM-4, will be delivered in late 2005 for future launch to XM's orbital slot at 115 degrees west longitude in support of XM's on-going service requirements. "This order demonstrates a valued customer's continued confidence in the Boeing 702 product line," said Dave Ryan, vice president and general manager of Boeing Satellite Systems. "XM initiated commercial service with two Boeing 702 satellites plus a ground spare in 2001, and we are grateful for this new opportunity to support their continued success. This award also makes clear that Boeing is fully committed to providing reliable technology and superior long-term service to its customers in the commercial and government marketplaces." As in the first three XM spacecraft, Alcatel Espace of Toulouse, France will provide the S-band Digital Audio Radio Service (DARS) payload for XM-4. XM-4 will also feature a number of upgrades including a bi-propellant back up to its Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPS). Equipped with advanced triple junction solar cells, the satellite is designed to generate 18 kilowatts of power at start of service and 15.5 kilowatts at the end of its 15-year design life. XM is America's #1 satellite radio service. With over 692,000 subscribers as of June 30th, XM is on pace to have more than one million subscribers later this year. XM is available on a wide variety of GM, Honda, Toyota, Infiniti, Nissan and Audi models. GM recently announced that it has manufactured more than 500,000 XM-equipped vehicles and that it will exceed the 1 million mark by March 31, 2004. XM radios, including the critically acclaimed Delphi XM SKYFi radio are available at Best Buy, Circuit City, Wal-Mart and other major retailers nationwide (via Mike Terry, UK, DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. XM-EH? XM Satellite Radio is working with a major Canadian broadcast group, with the goal of providing service to the great North Woods. Their satellite footprint already covers much of the Canadian population…the great majority of which lives within 200 miles of U.S. territory. Meanwhile, comes this from ``The Washington Post``: ``XM gave investors a jolt when it revealed that its insurers rejected its $400 million claim on the two orbiting satellites its service depends on. The satellites, launched in 2001, were supposed to work for about 17 years, but defects related to their solar panels mean they will only be useful until 2008. Moreover, the malfunctions are forcing the company to take on $320 million in expenses early because XM must now launch its spare satellite next year and pay for a fourth, spare satellite in 2005. The company says it has enough money to launch the third satellite, but not enough to pay for a new spare unless the insurance settlement comes through or it can find alternative financing. The insurance dispute comes when XM is still vulnerable as a start-up. The company`s revenues have grown quickly in the past year, but it is still losing money as it attempts to lure new customers with cheeky advertising and $9.99 monthly prices. XM reported it lost $164.3 million ($1.38 per share) in the quarter ended June 30, compared with a loss of $122.4 million ($1.38) a year earlier. XM lost money despite a jump in revenue, due almost entirely to an increase in the number of subscribers. Revenue climbed to $18.3 million, from $3.8 million a year ago. The company added 210,000 customers during the quarter, bringing its subscriber count to nearly 700,000. But depreciation expenses related to the falling value of its satellites ballooned to $39.8 million from $24.5 million a year ago.`` – Just thought you`d wanna know, but don`t tell the Romulans about the Insurance thing! (Greg Hardison, Broadcast Band Update Aug 15 via DXLD) more under USA ** ISRAEL. I am 95% sure that I heard Israel Radio announce that from this coming Sunday, Aug 17, DST would end and English broadcasts would shift one UT hour later (Chris Hambly, Vic., Aug 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Maybe; the Israelis are always litigating over this matter, and some years the change has been made already in August, but http://www.timeanddate.com/time/dst2003b.html shows the change date is Oct 2, or Oct 3 on the unofficial site http://www.israelradio.org/summer03.htm (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) See also POWERLINE COMMUNCATIONS ** OKLAHOMA. Re KMKZ-1640 Enid: The FCC's records show their first CP was for a tower slightly taller than a quarter wavelength (107.4 degrees electrical height). The newer CP for the new site shows two towers exactly a quarter wavelength tall (90 degrees electrical height). Were they initially going to diplex off somebody else's tower (maybe their station that KMKZ will replace; if it's still on the air)? (Dennis Gibson, CA, IRCA via DXLD) Lobes? You mean as in directional? I thought all X-banders were non- directional, or supposed to be (Paul Swearingen, Topeka, ibid.) 1660-NJ and 1670-So. CA are both directional. (Patrick Martin, Seaside OR, KAVT Reception Manager, ibid.) Yes, they were originally going to diplex off one of the Three Towers of KCRC-1390 on the north side of Enid. Glad they thought better of that. They have no plans to turn off 1390. And yes, Paul, it will be one of the few direxional X-banders. Hmmm, now how about stereo? Mr Champlin hopes IBOC will work out now... (Glenn Hauser, Enid, IRCA via DXLD) ** ST. PIERRE & MIQUELON. R. Atlantique, 102.1 MHz, returned my original reception report with written notation in French, ``This report is correct. What do you mean by QSL dard?`` (Gauvin, NB, Verie Interesting, Aug CIDX Messenger via DXLD) Yes, the term ``QSL-card`` probably should not be referred to when writing local AM or FM stations, at least not without some explanation. Most people working at these stations do not see too many reception rpeorts and would not be familiar with the Q-code (Mickey Delmage, ed., ibid.) ** TURKEY. If pirate radio sounds too risky but you`d like to get on the air, David Crystal from Israel has written us a great solution. The Voice of Turkey has a show called Turkey Live which airs every Tuesday from 1845 to 1920 on 9785. The concept is that they give out their number after the news at 1830 and when you call in you give your name and number and they call you back at their expense. Then you can talk about anything you like for 30 minutes. This is a great opportunity to ``play radio`` and it`s legal. David says he frequently calls and takes over the airwaves when he sees no one else has. He says it`s a great way to speak to the world over a 500 kW transmitter without censorship for free. We should pass this info on to our poor brothers and sisters in Brattleboro and the Netherlands (Steve Karlock, Captain`s Log, Aug CIDX Messenger via DXLD) ** U K. BBC Downfall, Continued ``the problem here goes beyond the errors of judgment made by one reporter and the unwillingness of his higher-ups to acknowledge responsibility. It speaks to a culture of bias that has crept into the news reporting of what was once a very fine media organization.`` Wall Street Journal REVIEW & OUTLOOK THE BBC`S SEXED-UP REPORT --- NO BIAS, PLEASE. WE`RE BRITISH. Thursday, August 14, 2003 The worst thing that can be said of a serious news organization is that it is cavalier about reporting the truth as it understands it. Gain a reputation for political bias in reports billed as objective and you can be sure to lose the trust -- and patronage -- of a significant part of your audience. So only a media giant whose shareholders are under lock and key could be as sanguine as the British Broadcasting Corporation`s senior management has been after this week`s embarrassing revelations. The BBC, which is funded by a compulsory $180-a-year tax on every British household with a television, has effectively gone to war with the British government over its report that Prime Minister Tony Blair`s top spokesman and adviser ``sexed up`` a dossier on Iraq`s weapons of mass destruction. The May 29 report by Andrew Gilligan aired on the agenda-setting BBC Radio 4 ``Today`` program. It was then picked up by other reports and repeated in newspapers and broadcasts around the world. David Kelly, a senior adviser to the Defense Ministry, was the source for both Mr. Gilligan and a separate story filed by BBC ``Newsnight`` reporter Susan Watts. Ms. Watts`s report on the dossier never charged Downing Street and Mr. Blair`s chief press spokesman Alastair Campbell with deliberate tampering-- and particularly with inserting a sensational but unreliable claim that Saddam could launch a WMD attack in 45 minutes. During the inquiry yesterday into the suicide of Dr. Kelly, Ms. Watts blew Mr. Gilligan`s tendentious report out of the water. Ms. Watts released a tape of her last conversation with Dr. Kelly, who makes clear that he is not in a position to assert that Mr. Campbell inserted anything into the intelligence report. Ms. Watts said of her conversations with Dr. Kelly, ``He didn`t say to me that the dossier was transformed in the last week and he certainly didn`t say that the 45-minute claim was inserted either by Alastair Campbell or by anyone else in government. In fact, he denied specifically that Alastair Campbell was involved in the conversation on May 30...he was very clear to me that the claim was in the original intelligence.`` It`s one thing for a news report to fall short. The normal course of events is for that failing to be acknowledged and corrected. But not only has the BBC refused to do so, it appears to have tried to bury the error. A July 6 minute from a meeting of the BBC Board of Governors lamented that ``careful language had not been applied by Andrew Gilligan throughout.`` But otherwise the BBC has displayed no regrets. Ms. Watts testified yesterday that the BBC seemed primarily interested in corroborating Mr. Gilligan`s account rather than in the merits of her own reports: ``I felt under some considerable pressure to reveal my source. I also felt the purpose of that was to help corroborate the Andrew Gilligan allegations and not for any proper news purpose.`` And, ``I was most concerned that there was an attempt to mold [her reports] so that they were corroborative which I felt was misguided and false.`` As our European editorial page deputy editor Mike Gonzalez wrote last week, the problem here goes beyond the errors of judgment made by one reporter and the unwillingness of his higher-ups to acknowledge responsibility. It speaks to a culture of bias that has crept into the news reporting of what was once a very fine media organization. Copyright © 2003 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Craig, WPE1HNS, Meredith, NH USA Drake R8B/Alpha Delta DX Sloper, Sony SW-77, Sony ICF-2010, 2 x Phillips/Magnavox D2935, Uniden CR-2021 Knight Kit Star Roamer (permanently tuned to Turkey on 9460) GE Superadio II/Select-A-Tenna, Delphi Ski-Fi XM/3`` Antennae Tuning since 1963 (``King Pineapple,`` rec.radio.shortwave August 15 via John Norfolk, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Roy Neal, K6DUE, SK (Aug 15, 2003) -- Retired NBC News space correspondent, producer and executive Roy Neal, K6DUE, died August 15 in High Point, North Carolina. He was 82. Neal underwent major heart surgery August 12 and was reported to be recovering. Recognized as a leading news expert in spaceflight and science, Neal -- born Roy N. Hinkel -- covered all of the Mercury missions for NBC and later reported the Gemini and Apollo missions and the space shuttle flights. Capitalizing on his space news experience, Neal became involved with the Space Amateur Radio EXperiment Working group. SAREX -- now Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) -- is a joint project of ARRL, AMSAT and NASA that put Amateur Radio aboard space shuttles and developed the first permanent ham station in space aboard the ISS. Neal chaired the SAREX/ARISS Working Group and moderated ARISS international team gatherings and, quite often, school group contact teleconferences. Earlier this year, he was inducted into the CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame for his role in persuading NASA officials to allow Amateur Radio operation from space in the 1980s. Neal also was a regular visitor and sometime presenter at Hamvention. He hosted the 1987 ARRL video production, New World Of Amateur Radio, an overview of ham radio in space. A Pennsylvania native, Neal's broadcasting career began at WIBG radio in Philadelphia. He served as a combat infantry officer during World War II and later became a program manager for the Armed Forces Radio Network in Europe. After the war, he was a television pioneer at WPTZ-TV in Philadelphia. He subsequently set up NBC's West Coast news bureau. An ARRL member and active amateur operator all his adult life, Neal enjoyed DXing and frequented all HF bands. He also enjoyed VHF. Survivors include his wife Pat and sons David and Mark. Arrangements are pending (ARRL August 15 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. HAMS A BRIGHT SPOT DURING POWER BLACKOUT NEWINGTON, CT, Aug 15, 2003 -- When a blip on the electricity distribution grid August 14 took out power to at least a half dozen states in the eastern US, many Amateur Radio operators were ready and able to provide whatever assistance they could. Hardest hit were metropolitan areas like New York City, Detroit and Cleveland. In New York, residents and commuters found themselves stranded in electricity-dependent elevators and subway or rail cars while visitors ended up stuck at airports, which were forced to shut down. With the cellular telephone system overloaded or out altogether, the incident turned into a test of Amateur Radio`s capabilities to operate without commercial power. ``It was a good drill,`` said New York City-Long Island Section Emergency Coordinator Tom Carrubba, KA2D. But, he adds, it was a cautionary tale too. ``The lesson is that everybody gets a little complacent,`` he said. ``Have emergency power backup and make sure it`s working!`` Some repeaters in the blacked-out Greater New York City area--including the primary 147.000 ``TAC 2`` machine--were down, but several others remained on the air with emergency power. By and large, Carrubba said, the system worked according to plan, and ARES members did what they were trained to do. ``It`s going to show the worth of Amateur Radio,`` he said of the blackout response. ``There were people on the air immediately.`` Diane Ortiz, K2DO, the Public Information Coordinator for NYC-Long Island was one of them. When power went down in her Suffolk County community, she started up an informal net on the Long Island Mobile Amateur Radio Club`s 146.85 repeater. Over the next 20 hours or so, the net passed approximately 500 pieces of what Ortiz described as largely ``health-and-welfare traffic.`` A lot of it was on behalf of individuals stuck in the city and needing to contact family members. ``People are getting on and helping,`` she said. In addition to handling messages, amateurs also relayed useful information, such as which stores or filling stations were open and operating. Many radio and TV stations went dark as a result of the power failure, and hams were able to help fill the information void, Ortiz said. In the Big Apple itself, ARES New York City-Long Island District Emergency Coordinator Charles Hargrove, N2NOV, remained at the city`s Red Cross Headquarters in Manhattan, where power was restored around 5 AM. ``There are some power fluctuations going on, and that is the main concern right now--that power may go off again,`` Hargrove told ARRL. ARES support of Red Cross operations, which began yesterday, continues. ARES teams are providing communication for the Red Cross Emergency Response Vehicles (ERVs) set up at main transportation centers in Manhattan--Grand Central Station, Penn Station and at the Port Authority Terminal. ARES members also accompanied ERVs called into action to follow New York Fire Department personnel on more than two dozen fire calls. ``After a long night of operations, some ARES members went home to get some rest around 6 AM,`` Hargrove said. RACES organizations activated in most Greater New York City area counties after a state of emergency was declared. Some ARES teams -- including a few across the Hudson River in New Jersey -- activated or remained on standby to help if called upon. In New Jersey, a net set up on a back-up repeater established communication with the Red Cross lead chapter`s N2ARC in Princeton -- staffed by members of Mercer County ARES/RACES -- and other New Jersey ARC chapters. The state of emergency included five counties in northern new Jersey, said SEC Steve Ostrove, K2SO. He spent about four hours at the EOC in Elizabeth after the blackout began. ``The Elizabeth Police were impressed with the information I was able to provide,`` he said. The net stood down at about 10 PM after telephone communication among the Red Cross chapters had been reestablished and power began to be restored. In upstate New York, Fred Stevens, K2FRD, says the situation reminded him of the 1964 power blackout in the eastern US. ``This is an emergency communicator`s wildest fantasy: a major power outage in which we can demonstrate our preparedness,`` he said. In his county, Chenango, ARES has been activated and the local EOC is staffed by Amateur Radio operators and the Chenango Amateur Radio Emergency Service net is up and running with stations on battery power and standing by. ``We are ready for whatever might happen,`` Stevens said. Comments posted on the HamsEF reflector by Ken Davis, KB2KFV, who`s president of the Rensselaer, New York, County ARES/RACES Club reflected that attitude. ``It seems that the amateurs were better prepared than the government sector,`` he said. ``Amateurs in this area were up and on the air before there was any response from local government.`` Davis said Rensselaer County EC and Chief RACES Officer Jim Noble, K2ZP, activated ARES and mustered a net on the Troy Radio Club RACES repeater, requesting stations to standby and monitor the frequency for updates. Michigan and Ohio Michigan Section Manager Dale Williams, WA8EFK, reports scattered ARES activations in his state. Williams, who lives in Dundee south of Detroit, was without power this morning and relying on his emergency generator. ``It could be another 48 hours before power is restored,`` he said. Some ARES teams in Michigan were providing assistance to emergency operations centers and to the Red Cross, because the relief agency`s telephone system relies on commercial power. Nets have been brought up on both HF and VHF frequencies. In Ohio, Section Emergency Coordinator Larry Rain, WD8IHP, reports that all ARES organizations in northern Ohio were activated after the power grid went down. Still going strong are ARES teams in Cleveland and Akron -- both still without power. ``ARES is handling communication support for Ohio Emergency Management in the affected cities and communities,`` Rain said. Power has been restored in Toledo, however. Rain reports a power surge that occurred when the electricity came back on disrupted the Richland County Hospital`s telephone system. ``Amateur Radio was there to provide back-up communication until 4:30 this morning,`` he said. Ohio VHF and UHF nets and the Ohio SSB net on HF have been handling blackout-related traffic. Nancy Hall, KC4IYD -- who lives 20 miles west of Cleveland -- said she`s glad of two things: That she had taken the ARRL Emergency Communications Level I class, and that she and her husband have an emergency generator. ``We used it to run the fridge for about two hours and then used it to run the 2-meter rig and HF rig to listen to the ARES nets,`` she said. She said she just received a follow-up survey on the emergency communications class that asked if she had used any of the information she learned. ``I can now say, `yes,``` said Hall, who noted that she`s now signed up for the Level II class. ``I will again highly recommend them to anyone who wants to learn more about emergency communication.`` She and her husband also made use of their BayGen windup radio to listen to local broadcasts. ``We also own a hand-crank flashlight,`` she added. She said the family put aside drinking water early in the blackout -- which turned out to be a good thing, because their community`s emergency generator was only good for about two hours to run the water supply`s pumps. ``I have to say that being a ham and knowing about emergency preparedness did make life easier for me and my family,`` Hall said. New England New England states were far less affected by the blackout since most operate on an altogether different power grid than the one that failed. New England area ARES/RACES operators were in standby mode after the blackout rippled through the system to the south and west. Only Connecticut and sections of Western Massachusetts reported significant outages, and ARES nets activated in both states. ARRL Eastern Massachusetts PIC Jim Duarte, N1IV, reports the ARES/RACES response in the Bay State was ``quick and organized, showing that our recent drills and training sessions have proved beneficial.`` Western Massachusetts SM Bill Voedisch, W1UD, reports the Leominster EOC was activated on a standby basis. Although he is equipped with a diesel-powered generator to supply his house and ham shack, his part of Massachusetts suffered no power losses. Parts of Berkshire County in extreme western Massachusetts suffered from the blackout, although power was restored fairly promptly there. Bill Sexton, N1IN/AAR1FP, an Army MARS member, said his emergency power capability permitted him to run his station and maintain e-mail contact. ``We had the Northeast SHARES (National Communications System HF Shared Resources Program) up and running cross-country on a Condition Two readiness alert,`` Sexton said. He reports that when he called in on the SHARES channel, a MARS station in Nebraska responded to say he was ready to handle any relays. ``The experience proved once gain the great strength of ham radio in an emergency,`` Sexton said. ``It is self-starting, and it is everywhere.`` Copyright © 2003, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved (via John Norfolk, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. HAM RADIO VERSUS CELL PHONES Dear cell phone warriors, as evidenced by the unfortunate circumstances afflicting NY, Detroit, Cleveland, Erie, etc, one can now see why HAM radio is a necessity. As these areas have lost power, the cell phone networks have failed. Some of you that post to this group have suggested that Amateur Radio is a thing of the past, with world wide communication available to anyone in the terms of cell phones. This is why Amateur radio is a must, that the operators should be praised for their continuing engagement in a hobby that has great potential for the benefit of our society. Disaster communications is a specialty of HAMs, maybe not in this circumstance (maybe so), but throughout the history of Amateur radio this certainly has been true. Hurricanes, tornados, earthquakes, anything sufficiently destructive to damage or destroy common modes of communications, such as that used by the cell phone networks, and even the established communication systems used by the police, fire, etc. Our police communication system in Pittsburgh is commonly knocked out by lightning. HAMS have the versatility to create impromptu communication systems second to none. No one else has the tremendous supply and distribution of radio systems. I urge people to pursue the hobby of Amateur radio, to become proficient in it, and to be respectful of it. Besides, it's fun. Regards to all those in afflicted areas, though you might not be able to read this at this time. Never say never. Nothing is absolute. (``The Dawn Soliloquy,`` rec. radio.shortwave August 14 via John Norfolk, DXLD) Subject: Re: NY and Ontario power failure rnewell@vcn.bc.ca wrote in message ``good time to do some dxing while the interference level is low...`` Here's a report on how radio kept broadcasting during the 1965 blackout: http://members.aol.com/jeff570/blkout65.html This is from Jeff Miller's fascinating History of American Broadcasting page: http://members.aol.com/jeff560/jeff.html Frank Dresser (rec.radio.shortwave August 14 via John Norfolk, DXLD) More under CANADA! ** U S A. IN THURSDAY'S CRISIS, RADIO WAS KING AGAIN Friday, August 15, 2003 BY JOHN SMYNTEK FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER http://www.freep.com/news/latestnews/blackout/pm4123_20030815.htm Radio, the first mass broadcast medium, reassumed its dominance Thursday when power failed in the Detroit metro area. Within minutes of the power failure shortly after 4 p.m., the area's two major radio news providers, all-news WWJ-AM (950) and news/talk WJR-AM (760), abandoned most regular programming and quickly became the best means of finding out what happened. Television, dominant during most other news breaks, was largely crippled by its own power problems and the inability of many people affected to see TV. Most of the region's cable and dish systems were out, and battery or generator-powered TVs were far outnumbered by battery and car radios. TVs that worked had to use over-the-air signals that reportedly were snowy or hard to watch. According to officials at both WWJ and WJR, their emergency equipment and procedures worked as designed. However, several area FM stations were unable to operate. WDIV-TV (Channel 4) news director Deborah Collura said it allowed several Clear Channel-owned FM music stations to simulcast its news coverage, making its reportage available on radio. At WWJ, vice president and general manager Rich Homberg said the station went into noncommercial mode and broadcast phone reports from its street reporters and traffic copter all afternoon. "When it was apparent that no terrorism was involved,'' Homberg said, "it was kind of like coverage of a major snowstorm. It's been mostly service, service, service.'' Even people who aren't normally frontline reporters like traffic reporter Terry T. Brown helped out with reports from a downtown Coney Island, the Checker Bar and the MGM Grand casino. Homberg and WJR operations chief Steve Stewart praised local government and public safety officials for their accessibility and calm under fire. "They were in pretty good shape,'' said Homberg, "and there was very little sense of panic.'' At WJR, veteran news and sportscaster Frank Beckmann, working for the vacationing Mitch Albom, anchored WJR's coverage. Stewart said some commercials were run later in the evening, in part to provide on-air staff with a break. Homberg declined to estimate the cost of going commercial-free. "It's the cost of doing business, of being of service,'' he said. Both Channel 4 and WJBK-TV (Channel 2) officials scrambled to get seldom-used power units functioning in the hot weather. WJBK assistant news director Gavin Maliska said the station had to move outside with Murray Feldman's anchor reports when an inside power unit failed. It used equipment on a satellite truck until the internal generator was back online. A partial check of the dial indicated WVMV-FM (98.7), WYCD-FM, (99.5), WRIF-FM (101.1), WOMC-FM (104.3) and WKQI-FM (95.5) managed to continue broadcasting during the blackout (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** U S A. BLACKOUT --- JUST A THOUGHT: This has nothing to do with Broadcasting --- but, am I the only one who thinks this past week`s Great Computer Worm may have had something to do with Thursday`s Great East Coast Power Outage of 2003? On a more relevant angle, ``Radio and Records`` reveals that WFAN/660 was knocked off the air in the Big Apple, as were WINS/1010 (all News…ouch!), and FMers WBLS/107.5, WPAT- 93.1 and WNEW/102.7. Apparently, Radio Disney outlet WQEW/1560 was off the air longer than any other NYC station…which may say something positive about Blackouts. (`QEW`s transmitter site sits by itself in Queens; all other AMs are across the Hudson in Jersey, except for the shared site of WCBS & WFAN, on City Island.) Meanwhile, the Clear Channel NYers got together for a simulcast of audio from WNBC-TV; other stations were knocked off the air in the Hudson River Valley, and two biggies in Cleveland were bit by the bug, WGAR/99.5 and heritage Rocker WMMS/100.7. The CBC was affected in Canada, as well, with several networks having to hook together for various simulcasts. Might be a good week for auxiliary generator salespeople in the Northeast, no?? JUSTICE FOR RIGHTEOUS TALKERS: Congrats to Michael Benner for landing a daytime gig, Friday afternoons at 1 PM on KPFK/90.7. I had the privilege of working with Michael during his short-term KABC Friday Night show, for a few months back around 1985 or so. Liberal Michael and Conservative/Pragmatist Ray Briem were by far the two best hosts, in terms of dealing with opposing views. The problem is, not too many folks had the brains or other essential body parts to go head-to-head with Michael; instead he prompted several small minds to threaten sponsors, and to commit similar distasteful acts. These days, Talkradio is much more subjective…usually to the Right. Michael`s views are vital to a balanced public discourse on the air. Pacifica Foundation would be wise to A) schedule his program one hour earlier, to catch the L.A.-area lunchers, and B) syndicate his show to the other four Pacifica markets. Pacifica needs to abandon its own internal politics long enough to seize this, their best opportunity for actual growth in many years. L.A.`s own Michael Jackson is up for honors in Chicago on November 8, as he is inducted into the Radio Hall Of Fame. He joins a distinguished list, including another great talk-show pilot, Jim Bohannon, a rare voice of reason who started as Larry King`s weekend fill-in on the old Mutual network in the late `70s. Other honorees include ex-KMPC owner Gene Autry, Infinity top-cat Mel Karmazin, and 33-year WGN Farm Director Orien Samuelson, who was syndicated for many years as host of the ``National Farm Report``. This all takes place on November 8, to be covered in a live broadcast with host Larry King. The event is being produced and syndicated by Westwood One, and is slated to air on both major Chicago big-gun signals, Tribune`s WGN/720 and Disney`s WLS/890. I wonder who cut THAT deal? (No word on where, or if, we`ll hear this on the Left Coast, but at last check, WGN was streaming at http://wgnradio.com FYI, the latest Chi-town book shows perennial leader WGN on top, with a 6.7 earned through its full service/news-talk format. Westwood One/Infinity stalwart WBBM/780 (all-News) languishes with a 5.1, under the ``leadership`` of Program Director Drew (``Screw``) Hayes; and such programming could only help WLS, bringing up the rear of the big- AM-News/Talk pack with a 4.7. Infinity`s Hayes is also in charge of the other big-traditional Chicago signal, WSCR (formerly WMAQ)/670. I`m awaiting the delivery of an electron-microscope here at the Publishing Center, to examine `SCR`s Arbitron figures. Anyway, congrats to Michael – and also to Rollye James, formerly overnights on the old KMPC/710 and a future Hall Of Fame member (hopefully). Rollye has spent the past couple of years doing Midnight- 2 AM at Infinity`s WPHT/1210 in Philadelphia, and has won many fans and followers via the huge 1210 signal which bathes the East Coast and Midwest. More are on the way, as Rollye`s very different program is slated for nationwide syndication by Jones Satellite Networks. Rollye`s not just one of the best females on the air, but one of the best living-breathing talkers period, in my humble opinion…and certainly not without a history of controversy. (You may recall, she earned a visit from the Secret Service in 1996, after implying on the air that the Clintons should be shot. No charges were filed from her comments, aired on KLBJ/590 in Austin…yes, THAT ``LBJ``. She was fired, and later won a cash award due to disparaging comments made about her by a honcho at LBJ Broadcasting. Rollye has known few dull moments.) While we`re in the `hood, a tally conducted by Austin-based Benchmark reveals 61% of Talkradio listeners surveyed prefer local hosts, to syndicated fare such as Limbaugh, Schlessinger, Imus and Stern. As well as the Biz is run these days, I`m sure this will lead to a new plethora of Syndicated programming --- rest assured, though, many of those same surveyees made it clear that Talkradio was, in their views, Entertainment, NOT News! COULDN`T HELP IT: Maybe it`s my own warped perceptions, but I had to chuckle at this, from the http://dailyfreeman.com describing a lightning-hit at Christian radio station WFGB in Kingston, NY. ``Spokeswoman Connie VanKleeck said there were no injuries when the Christian radio network`s facility on Tuytenbridge Road studio was hit 6 p.m. Sunday. ``We`re saying we`ll be off two to three days, but it could be more,`` she said. ``We had smoke coming out of the control board,`` VanKleeck said. ``There was a change of shifts at the time. No one was hurt, but all the computer and broadcast electronics were just fried.`` While telephone service was restored quickly, officials said the status of other equipment was still being assessed and updates about operations will be posted on the network Web site at http://www.soundoflife.org as repairs to the studio are made. ``Our engineer is estimating there was probably more than $30,000 (in damage), but we`re not sure,`` VanKleeck said. The station began broadcasting in 1986, with a combination of local and national programming, and has grown to include relaying its signal on 12 frequencies covering parts of six states. VanKleeck said there is a slight sense of irony in having an act of God knock a religious broadcasting network off the air. ``We live in a world that is not perfect,`` she said. ``Bad things happen to all kinds of people, including (at) Christian radio stations.`` JUST ANOTHER THOUGHT: ``The New York Post`` reveals that the Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn is renting out parochial-school roof space to Cellular Telephone service providers, and some of little Johnny`s parental units are prepped to raise those roofs, in protest. Seems the Diocese is having cash-flow problems (criminal lawyers ARE expensive these days, after all!), and Those Concerned With Our Collective Well Being are a`feared of electromagnetic emissions and subsequent mutations from these cell-towers. The scientific jury is still out on such matters; my own opinion leans toward the controversy being much ado over nothing. Whether I`m right or wrong, I do see a growing number of L.A.-area Apartment houses, with those very same cell-phone sticks all over them, akin to cheap suits. It may or may not be ``safe`` to attend classes under the Cellular umbrella…what about LIVING under one?? Has the 15-plus year old Cellular Lobby put the investigative kibbosh on the EPA?? Is anyone at Underwriters` Labs listening?? Until the next, Peace and Prosperity (Greg Hardison, Broadcast Band Update Aug 15 via DXLD) more under INTERNATIONAL VACUUM ** U S A. GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE ERROR COSTS BROADCASTER $3,000 The FCC has discovered that the actual location of the WUFF AM&FM tower in Georgia differed from the authorized coordinates by over 1/3 mile. The tower owner was initially fined $4,000 for the oversight, but the forfeiture was reduced to $3,000 on reconsideration, based on the stations' otherwise excellent record of rule compliance. http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-03-2616A1.doc $10,000 FINE AGAINST THE REV. YVON LOUIS AFFIRMED This FCC case involves a series of unauthorized FM broadcasts from Calvary Tabernacle in Brooklyn, New York. Over the course of several months, the Rev. Yvon Louis reportedly transmitted on 93.7 MHz, then switched to 88.1 MHz after getting caught, then used 90.1 MHz after getting caught again, then reverted to 88.1 MHz. Amazing. http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-03-2589A1.doc (via Fred Vobbe, NRC FMTV via DXLD) ** U S A. Dear Glenn: The following press release reports on the latest - and possibly the last - step in the Rambus v. Infineon saga, one of the most closely-watched high tech court cases in years, with over a billion dollars in royalties at stake. Either the Supreme Court takes the case, or Infineon -- and everyone else who sets standards, builds to standards, or uses technology -- comes out a loser. (Priscilla McMullen, Director of Marketing, Lucash, Gesmer & Updegrove, gh at Monitoring Times via DXLD) BOSTON LAW FIRM, INDUSTRY GROUPS FILE BRIEF WITH SUPREME COURT IN CASE THAT COULD UNDERCUT TECHNOLOGY AND OTHER INDUSTRIES Brief is filed in Rambus v. Infineon on behalf of Standard Setting Organizations representing over 8,600 member entities BOSTON, August 13, 2003 - Boston-based law firm Lucash, Gesmer & Updegrove LLP today announced that it had filed a "friend of the court" brief with the United States Supreme Court in Rambus v. Infineon, one of the most closely watched cases in the technology industry. Ten major standard setting bodies, as well as several leading financial industry corporations and a standard setting joint venture, are parties to the brief. The combined membership of the standard setting bodies exceeds 8,600, including most major U.S. technology companies, as well as many government agencies, universities, and other entities. The brief was filed on behalf of the parties on a "pro bono" -- or fee-free -- basis by Lucash, Gesmer & Updegrove. "Rambus v. Infineon goes to the very heart of the integrity of the standard setting process," said Andrew Updegrove, a partner at Lucash, Gesmer & Updegrove and the author of the brief. "As we are a national leader in forming and representing the organizations which set standards, we felt that it was our duty to acquaint the Supreme Court with the importance of the issues involved. This is hardly the right time for the courts to be undercutting processes that are crucial to American technology, Homeland Security and national competitiveness." The case is so significant that additional briefs were filed by the Attorneys General of 15 States and Puerto Rico, by the standard setting body whose process was involved, and by five semiconductor companies. The case history of Rambus v. Infineon has been a roller coaster, with first one side, and then the other, gaining the advantage. Moreover, estimates of the industry-wide royalties at stake run as high as a billion dollars. But the impact of the case goes far beyond just the memory industry. If the Supreme Court does not take the case, the process that sets the more than 100,000 standards that affect nearly every aspect of daily life in this country will be undermined. As noted in the brief: Voluntary standards, especially technology standards, are vital to the national interest, affecting almost all areas of modern life, safety and commerce. The Federal government is dependent on such standards: Congress has mandated the use of voluntary consensus standards by the Federal agencies whenever possible. The failure by the courts to protect the standard setting process would undercut the American economy and impair our international competitiveness. Lucash, Gesmer & Updegrove LLP, a Boston-based technology law firm, gathered the impressive group of participants within the 30-day period allowed by court rules. The decision whether to take the case may be made by the Supreme Court as early as October of this year. ABOUT RAMBUS V. INFINEON The underlying facts are as follows: Rambus Inc., which develops semiconductor memory technology, participated in the standard setting process of the Joint Electron Devices Engineering Council (JEDEC) in the early 90's. During the design process, Rambus did not disclose that it held patents and patent applications on designs included in the standards. When companies, including Infineon, implemented those standards, Rambus sued for patent infringement. Infineon counterclaimed, citing fraud, and a trial court found Rambus guilty. To the astonishment of almost all, the fraud verdict was overturned by a Federal District Appellate Court in January of this year. In the meantime, the Federal Trade Commission had brought claims against Rambus as well. A trial based upon those claims is currently taking place before an administrative law judge. In July, Infineon took the last defensive step available to it, and petitioned the Supreme Court to intervene. ABOUT LUCASH, GESMER & UPDEGROVE LLP Lucash, Gesmer & Updegrove, a Boston, Massachusetts-based technology law firm, is the leading US law firm representing standard setting consortia. It has helped form and represents some of the largest and most influential standard setting organizations in the world. Andrew Updegrove, who leads the consortium practice group, has written and spoken extensively on the topics of standard setting, intellectual property rights and consortium formation, and has testified on those subjects before joint hearings of the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission. The firm created and hosts http://www.consortiuminfo.org, the most detailed and comprehensive site on the Internet on the topics of standard setting and consortia, and publishes a monthly eJournal on the same topics: the Consortium Standards Bulletin http://www.consortiuminfo.org/bulletins/ To view the brief as filed, see: http://www.consortiuminfo.org/news/Rambus_Amicus_Brief.pdf For more information about the Rambus v. Infineon case, see: Rambus - Hard Cases Make Bad Laws http://www.consortiuminfo.org/bulletins/feb03.php - editorial What Does Rambus Mean to You? http://www.consortiuminfo.org/bulletins/feb03.php - featured For more information about Lucash, Gesmer & Updegrove and its consortium clients, see: http://www.lgu.com/practice_areas/consortium.shtml (via DXLD) ** U S A [and non]. FREE RADIO WEEKLY #396 for 2003-AUG-16 ===================================================================== -MAIL DROPS- *Basel: Box 510, CH-4010 Basel, SWITZERLAND *Belfast: Box 1, Belfast, NY 14711 *BRS: Box 109, Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214 *Elkhorn: Box 69, Elkhorn, NE 68022 *Herten: PO Box 2702, 6049ZG Herten, The Netherlands *Hoogeveen: PO Box 663, 7900AR Hoogeveen, The Netherlands *Huntsville: Box 11522, Huntsville, AL 35814 *Merlin: Box 293, Merlin, Ontario NOP 1W0, CANADA *Providence: Box 28413, Providence, RI 02908 *Wuppertal: Box 220342, D-42373, Wuppertal, GERMANY *Ytterby: C/o SRS News, Ostra Porten 29, S-442 54 Ytterby, SWEDEN ===================================================================== -E-MAIL ADDRESSES FOR STATIONS- *Big Thunder Radio: bigthunderradio@hotmail.com *Blind Faith Radio: blindfaithradio@yahoo.com *Buckwheat Radio: buckwheatradio@hotmail.com *Captain Ron SW: captainronswr@yahoo.com *Ground Zero Radio: gzrsw@yahoo.com *Ironman Radio: ironmanradio@hotmail.com *Jolly Roger Radio Int'l: JR_Radio@hotmail.com *KIPM: kipm_outerlimits@hotmail.com *KMUD: vlfradio@triax.com *KRMI Radio Michigan Int'l: KRMI6955@yahoo.com *Laser Hot Hits: hothits@radiolink.net *Radio Alfa-Lima: info@alfalima.net *Radio Borderhunter: borderhunter@hotmail.com *Radio Omroep Zuid Roz.am@iae.nl *Ragnar Radio: ragnarradio@yahoo.com *Seattle Free Radio: seattle4166@yahoo.com *Shadow Radio: the_shadow6950@hotmail.com *Sunshine Radio: sunshineradios@hotmail.com *United Patriot Militia BINGO: yahwehradio6925@yahoo.com *Undercover Radio: undercoverradio@mail.com *Voodoo Radio: vudu11@hotmail.com *Voice of the Angry Bastard: pigmeat_voab@yahoo.com *Voice of Capt. Ron: captainronswr@yahoo.com, captainron6955@hotmail.com *WHYP: whyp6925@yahoo.com *WMOE: wmoe6955@yahoo.com *WPAT: brewmaster66@hotmail.com *WPN World Parody Network: wpn_sw@yahoo.com *Z100: bigz100fm@yahoo.com ===================================================================== (via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ COMMENTARY ++++++++++ RADIO STATIONS, SUPERMARKETS [gh`s title] I had put a ``hold-mail`` for two weeks [vacation]. When I collected the post on arrival, it was just like Christmas. Magazines (Monitoring Times and Messenger, of course), books, catalogues, and goodies from SW stations in various parts of the globe. Not only QSLs, but interesting ``gifts``. Just one of the perks of DXing! I`ve been in contact with some fellow DXers over the years and it`s interesting to find out what people have collected. I`d like readers to share stories about what they`ve received from stations since they took up their interest. Some of the print materials and souvenirs are pretty neat; one guy from New Zealand told me that after be became a monitor for Deutsche Welle, he received a ``weather station`` (I`m not sure what that includes; I assume a barometer and thermostat [sic]). After I took up the monitoring job myself, DW sent a few goodies my way, including a briefcase, portable CD player, a copy of WRTH 2003 and DW bath towels (I guess they think I needed new ones!) When I came back from holidays, the letter carrier handed over a big pile of mail which included a cassette tape of Uzbek music courtesy of Radio Tashkent (who had sent me a tourism guide earlier to Uzbekistan); QSLs and a newspaper form Radio Havana, a two-colour pen from Radio Taipei as well as a CBS facecloth (like DW, perhaps the Taiwan station thinks I`m in need of a bath?), and a QSL and postcards (the veri signer said I needed Lisbon sun, though given the brutally hot weather here I don`t think we needed it) from Radio Portugal. Perhaps one of the nicest gifts I received one time was from the Voice of Russia, a tape of their ``Folk Box`` program, which dealt with Russian songs and customs celebrating the birth of a baby. What was really touching was the introduction to the programme, which said this was for their ``listener in Canada, Sue Hickey, who was expecting her first child.`` Now when Brigid gets older, I`ll be able to play the tape for her and tell her how much that people overseas were thinking about her before she was born. At any rate, though, while the perks are great, the important thing is to keep in touch with SW stations around the world --- with financial cuts they really need to prove they have strong and loyal listeners (Sue Hickey, Grand Falls-Windsor, NF, CIDX Forum, Aug Messenger via DXLD) POWERLINE COMMUNICATIONS ++++++++++++++++++++++++ Mr. G., have a look at this... PowerLine Communication Home Network Technology eLibrary - Powerline Networking - Power Line PLC Powerline Network http://www.plugtek.com/index.shtml Israel is about to begin BPL test trials, offering the experimental service free of charge. Maybe the massive power outage will persuade the utility industry to concentrate on PPL (POWER over powerlines) instead of meddling in unrelated ventures such as internet service. 73. (Bill Smith, W5USM, TX, Aug 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ 25 MHz openings: see FRANCE above THE K7RA SOLAR UPDATE SEATTLE, WA, Aug 15, 2003 -- The average daily sunspot numbers for the week was about the same this week as last, and daily solar flux was only slightly higher. Solar flux is expected to peak over the next few days -- such as it is in this declining phase of the solar cycle. Expect solar flux values around 135 for Saturday, August 16. Solar flux is expected to gradually decline to below 100 around August 24. Geomagnetic indicators should be unsettled to active Friday, August 15, but should quiet down over the next week. Predicted planetary A index for August 15-18 is 20, 15, 10 and 10. Currently there is just one sunspot group facing Earth, and it seems to be growing fast as it moves into optimum position for Earth- directed radiation. This presents a wild card for conditions over the next couple of days, since it could be the source of increasing solar wind. Some editions of last week`s bulletin contained a claim that in 57,617 BC Mars was only 34.62 miles from Earth, which of course was not the case. This calls for a visit to a news item on the Bad Astronomy Web site. Phil Plait of Sonoma State University in California runs the Bad Astronomy site to help dissuade and debunk some misconceptions that creep into films, television, popular culture and even science textbooks. [See] http://www.badastronomy.com/bad/news/index.html In an August 13 item he talks about the excitement over Mars being close to earth, and points out that it will be only about 1 percent closer than it was in 1971. Bruce Irving of Eagle, Idaho, was K7ISM many years ago, and he wrote this week asking about some ghosting he saw on his television set after 0200 UTC on Sunday, August 10. He wasn`t able to ID the station, but noted that the image of a musical group performing wasn`t on any of his other local channels in the Boise area. He asked if this could be skip from a channel 2 station outside his area. I believe his hunch is correct. He noted that channel 2 is just about the same frequency as the 6-meter ham band, and--being the lowest- frequency TV channel--it is the one most likely to experience long distance propagation. In this case, it was probably some summertime E-layer propagation. For more information on propagation and an explanation of the numbers used in this bulletin see the Propagation page on the ARRL Web site [at] http://www2.arrl.org/tis/info/propagation.html Sunspot numbers for August 7 through 13 were 121, 111, 107, 112, 118, 114 and 112, with a mean of 113.6. The 10.7-cm flux was 137, 132.9, 130, 131.1, 129.2, 123.3 and 130.8, with a mean of 130.6. Estimated planetary A indices were 15, 32, 15, 12, 11, 25 and 17, with a mean of 18.1. Amateur solar observer Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, Washington, provides this weekly report on solar conditions and propagation. This report also is available via W1AW every Friday and an abbreviated version also appears in The ARRL Letter. Readers may contact the author via k7ra@arrl.net Copyright © 2003, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved (via John Norfolk, DXLD) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-147, August 15, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3h.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn CONTINENT OF MEDIA 03-05 Nominal schedule on RFPI, 7445: Thu 2000, Fri 0200, 0830, 1430, Sat 2130, Sun 0330, 0930, 1530 NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1195: RFPI: Sat 0130, 0800, 1400, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 on 7445 [nominal times subject to delay or pre-emption] WRN: Rest of world Sat 0800, Europe only Sun 0430, N America Sun 1400 WWCR: Sat 1030, Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 9475 WRMI: Sat & Sun 1800+ on 15725 WINB: Sun 0031 on 12160 WJIE: Sun 1630 on 7490, 13595 (maybe) WBCQ: Mon 0415 on 7415 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1195h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1195.html [these links in last issue led to 1194 instead of 1195; sorry] ** AFGHANISTAN [non]. 15615, Radio Amani heard on 15615 1628-1730 August 15th. Tones 1628, played wrong Russian or East European language programme for 30 seconds just after 1630, 1631 dramatic music and Radio Amani identification by lady in echo chamber. talks by man in Pashto or Dari with occasional bridges of local music. Fair strength with moderate fading on clear channel though splash from 15620. Audio disappeared suddenly 1707, reappeared at lower level 1715. Off mid sentence 1730. Is Fridays only per Bernd Trutenau in DXLD 3-145 (Mike Barraclough, Letchworth, UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AFGHANISTAN. NEW PRIVATE RADIO STARTS BROADCASTING IN AFGHANISTAN | Text of report in English by Afghan newspaper The Kabul Times on 10 August Afghanistan's first radio station to broadcast live 24 hours a day went on air in the capital, Kabul, this week. Radio Khilid Kabul (RKK) 88.5 FM [name as published] is one of the first private-sector radio stations in the country to be granted a government broadcasting license. "Radio Khilid will be highlighting Afghan culture, giving it back to the Afghan people as it has almost been forgotten. For 30 years Afghans have been living in other countries, and Afghan culture has not been transmitted to their children," Shahir Zahin, the director- general of an Afghan NGO, Development Humanitarian Assistance for Afghanistan (DHSA), told IRIN [as published] from Kabul on Wednesday. RKK's conception and realization is the result of a partnership between DHSA and the international media NGO, Internews. The country's airwaves have been monopolized by government-run stations for many years. Following the fall of the Taleban, however, new stations have sprung up, with the coalition forces taking the lead in establishing two of them. RKK is funded by the US Agency for International Development, and the objective of the venture is to encourage and foster the development of the independent media in Afghanistan. The new radio station, which was inspired by the success of a national magazine, Khilid [Kelid], is currently playing music only, but will also be broadcasting cultural information and chat shows, as well as news bulletins on the hour, with effect from Afghanistan's National Day on 18 August. Zahin said RKK would not only entertain but also help unite the Afghan people during this important period of national reconstruction. The station has taken a community participation approach by inviting citizens to contribute to programming by sending in ideas. The target audience is expected to be middle-class 25-to 45 year-olds. Internews envisages RKK to be the basis for a public service, but to remain a privately owned radio network spread across Afghanistan. The station will serve as a medium on-the-air training facility for journalists from other radio stations around the country. Internews is providing experienced international radio journalists as trainers for the venture, as well as studio and transmitter equipment. The project faced some difficulties at the beginning of the collaboration, which are now being overcome. "Training is the major problem, people going into modern radio who either have old radio or no radio experience," John West, the Internews country director, Afghanistan, told IRIN from Kabul. He added that the envisaged national network across Afghanistan would also help to highlight humanitarian issues. Source: The Kabul Times, Kabul, in English 10 Aug 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** ARGENTINA [non]. DÍA DE LA RADIODIFUSIÓN EN ARGENTINA Estimados Amigos: Con motivo de cumplirse el próximo 27 de agosto el 83 Aniversario de la Radiodifusión en Argentina, el programa "Antena de la Amistad" de KBS Radio Corea Internacional emitirá mis informes N 137 y N 138 los días sábados 16 y 30 de agosto de 2003 respectivamente. En los mismos se incluyen registros sonoros históricos del pionero Enrique Telémaco Susini y de su señora esposa Alicia Arderius viuda de Susini como así también la grabación del último minuto que transmitió LR2 Radio Argentina en 1110 Khz aquel 31 de diciembre de 1997 cuando el gobierno argentino la dejó morir. Es una oportunidad para retener y guardar apenas una parte de la historia grande de la radiodifusión mundial. No olviden de expresar sus comentarios, preguntas y mayores informaciones al respecto directamente a la sección española de Radio Corea Internacional: spanish@kbs.co.kr , también por carta al Apartado 150-790 - Seoul, Republic of Korea o bien en Sudamérica a la Casilla de Correo 950, S 2000 WAJ - Rosario, Argentina. El siguiente es el esquema actual de KBS Radio Corea Internacional (UT, frecuencias y áreas de destino): 1000-1100 15210 Khz p/Europa; 9580 Khz y *11715 Khz (*vía Sackville- Canadá) p/América del Sur 2000-2100 15575 Khz p/Europa y 0100-0200 11810 Khz p/América del Sur 0700-0800 13670 Khz p/Europa (El programa se transmite a los 10' de comenzada cada emisión, después de las noticias.) En el aire por Internet entrando a http://rki.kbs.co.kr en los siguientes horarios UT y canales: 2000-2100 - CH1 2100-2200 - CH2 0100-0200 - CH1 1300-1400 - CH2 También en audio por demanda entrando en http://rki.kbs.co.kr (click en Select Language/Spanish luego Antena-Buzón y elegir las fechas aludidas). El programa se carga uno o dos días después de su emisión. Están disponibles los siete (7) últimos programas emitidos. Agradeceré tengan la bondad de difundir este mensaje a través de los medios a vuestra disposición. Saludos cordiales! (Rubén Guillermo Margenet margenet@arnet.com.ar Aug 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "ABORIGINAL RESOURCE AND DEVELOPMENT SERVICES INC (ARDS)" ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ARDS is an Aboriginal controlled non-profit organisation has begun transmission on August 1 of a Short Wave Radio Service for Community Development. The service will enable the Yolngu (Aboriginal) people of north-east Arnhem Land to receive informational programs broadcast in their own language and has the potential to reach up to 7,000 Yolngu living in the five major communities and ninety homeland centres across the region. Mr Richard Trudgen (Business Manager of ARDS) stated: "ARDS is extremely pleased to be launching this much needed service. This educational service heralds an exciting new time for Yolngu people who will now be able to access all sorts of information on Health, Economics, Law and much much more." The Radio Service will use a concept developed in Africa called "Radio Browsing". This is where listeners can ring the studio to ask for information they want to hear over the radio. Radio staff research the information via the web and/or other sources and develop a program to put to air. It also allows listeners to be directly involved in the development of programs. A Yolngu person within the region and a radio announcer/interpreter can have a discussion, with a doctor in Darwin about diabetes using a three-way telephone connection. This discussion would all be recorded and then later broadcast via the Radio Service. Radio Browsing allows the people to stay in their own homes and access all sorts of information, all in their own language. The Rev Dr Djiniyini Gondarra (political leader of the Golumala clan) who has been involved in developing programs for broadcast stated: "I am very pleased and excited to be involved with this radio service. There are just so many things that Yolngu people are having problems understanding and this is a great way to get information in a quick and easy way." ARDS has secured some support from government, non-government and philanthropic organisations to develop various programs. This includes sponsorship to develop information on Renal Failure, Diabetes, Hepatitis C, HIV, Petrol Sniffing and Law and Order. They will be looking for on going support and jobs to keep this service operating. For further details contact Mr Richard Trudgen 08 8987 3910 or visit http://www.ards.com.au TRANSMITTERS The transmitters are ex-Civil Aviation, using 5050. They were manufactured by Commonwealth Electronics and are AM20 models. They can operate at 1 kW but operate continuously at 400W. The location is Humpty Doo S12.34.05, E131.04.35. Antennas are two fibreglass helical whips with a front to back ratio of -50dB and a beam of 110 degrees centred on 100 degrees true from Humpty Doo. LICENCING This is a "Broadcasting Licence Category HF Domestic Service" with the callsign VKD963. The date of effect is March 3, 2003 and expiry is March 3 2004. Special conditions apply, where the licensee may be required to cease operating the station, or operate the station under revised conditions, if the Australian Broadcasting Authority or the Australian Communications Authority receives an objection to the station's operation as a result of the international notification of the station. The intended area of coverage is "local". ARDS is also licensed for medium-frequency broadcasting, using off-band channels under the category of "Narrowband Broadcasting Station", in the Northern Territory, with 400 W: 1611 kHz VKD883 Milingimbi 1611 kHz VKD884 Groote Eyland 1620 kHz VKD885 Galiwin Ku (Elcho Island) 1629 kHz VKD886 Gapuwiyak The satellite link is allocated on 6.35794 GHZ, as a Fixed Earth Station, Nhulunby. HF SERVICE It should be noted that the HF service is for local broadcasting only, with the primary radiation pattern in an easterly direction from Darwin, generally covering the eastern part of the Northern Territory, Arnhem Land, and into NW Queensland. Side lobe radiation extends to NE Western Australia, and northern South Australia. Low level back-lobe radiation extends northerly into Timor and Eastern Indonesia. Antenna configuration has been designed to provide satisfactory coverage during daylight hours out to about 2000 km from Darwin. At night, coverage will expand. DXer reports from places well outside the primary service area complain about night-time co-channel interference from transmitters in China, Tanzania, and the USA. Such reports are of academic interest only, not affecting reception in the main service area. Similarly, It is doubtful if ARDS, with low power of 400W, will cause harmful interference to those transmitters. Reports are welcome at dale@ards.com.au or by mail to ARDS, Box 1671, Nhulunbuy, NT 0881, Australia. Studio Address: 19 Pera Circuit, Nhulunbuy NT 0880, Australia. BACKGROUNDER: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT RADIO SERVICE BRIEFING PAPER This ARDS paper will be of interest, which looks at the development of the organisation's media network, to meet the information access, self-learning and adult education needs of the Yolngu people of north-east Arnhem Land. - WHAT THE SERVICE IS ABOUT It is said that a nation's people are its greatest asset. For people who work in government departments, and all those who work in education and training, attempting to unlock the wealth of capacity within a nation's people is a continual quest. For those of us involved in community development and community education the task is the same: how to unlock the untapped energy, ability, knowledge and creative potential that is locked up both within individuals and within the community in which we work. The Community Development Radio Service will aid this need by offering education, information and cultural reinforcement for the Yolngu people of north-east Arnhem Land. - KEYS TO HUMAN CAPACITY BUILDING When it comes to human capacity building and creating social capital, there are two essential keys: purpose and communication. Loss of purpose emerges when people become confused and do not have enough information about the world around them to take control of their own lives and develop their own future. Without good communication, clear purpose is but a faint and distant hope. Without clear purpose, human endeavour stops. Human capacity building cannot happen without good communication. Good communication happens when information is provided in a way that allows it to be understood. This can only happen in the people's own language, which is the medium they use to communicate, think and construct knowledge. - EDUCATION THROUGH A MEDIA SERVICE Since ARDS was incorporated in 1974, we have been involved in active community education within Arnhem Land. It has become clear to ARDS personnel that despite this education being very effective on a one-to-one basis or in small groups, it has not expanded across the region from the original groups involved. The lack of reinforcement of new information imparted has also become a major problem. The people have little opportunity to revisit or update the information they first gained. Furthermore, the amount of information that people want and need access to is too enormous to transfer through the face-to-face educational method over an area one-third the size of the state of Victoria. This has led to many hundreds of hours of discussion with clan and community leaders as to how this problem could be overcome. As a result of these discussions, ARDS has started developing "off-site electronic classroom" material and has produced subject-specific video and audio tapes in an attempt to create some accessible