DX LISTENING DIGEST JULY 2003 ARCHIVE

Glenn Hauser's World of Radio

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DX LISTENING DIGEST JULY 2003 ARCHIVE

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-136, July 31, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1193: WWCR: Thu 2030 15825, Sat 1030, Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 9475 RFPI: Fri 1930, Sat 0130, 0800, 1400, 1730, 2330 7445, and new experimental 15115 ex-15039 WINB: Sat 0031 12160 WBCQ: Mon 0445 [or 0415? See USA] 7415 WRN ONDEMAND [from Fri]: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1193.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1193.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1193h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1193h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1193.html [from Thu] ** AUSTRALIA [and non]. Atlantic Monthly for September, in today's mail, contains 13-page story entitled "The Age of Murdoch," by James Fallows, that gives an overview of the deregulation argument and the anticipated future of the media. Interesting reading in light of discussions here (John Callarman, KA9SPA, Family Genealogist, Krum TX, July 29, WTFDA Soundoff via DXLD) ** AUSTRIA [non]. Re ``Sundry Ethiopian Clandestines`` Now I had a look into my dictionary in order to translate Sundry. Its translation isn't so difficult, but I do not remember seeing that word before. I can only agree the words that Glenn wrote. Austria relays religious stations and its own 'local community stations' (most of them via R 1476 on MW, including several programs for the Balkans in the past years) while Juelich/DTK relays everything. And Glenn is also right when he writes 'CRW will be quick to disclaim ..' CRW is never the 'judge' if a station is a clandestine or not. So as far as I see Wolf's letter was correct (despite the thing with the Austrian politician perhaps) Yours (Martin Schoech, Merseburg - Deutschland, July 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. Re Malm`s report of R. Caiari on 4785.07: Glenn, The other Brazilian on 4785 kHz is Radio Brasil, Campinas-SP, 24 hours. This station relays "Jovem Pan Sat" much of the time (Samuel Cássio Martins, São Carlos SP, Brazil, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. Pessoal, para quem ainda não conhecem, excelente site que contém links de várias radios brasileiras. Há fartas informações que valem uma boa navegada. http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/Park/3232/dxing_brazil.htm Boa sorte e um forte 73 a todos (Adiel Nunes Ferreira, São Paulo - Capital, radioescutas via DXLD) That`s part of the 1000 Lakes site, by someone in Finland. O yes, it`s Pentti Lintujärvi and the home page is http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/Park/3232/dx.htm (gh, DXLD) ** CHINA. I thought everyone who likes hearing CRI would like to know some changes to frequencies. The current frequencies for the South Pacific: 09-10 UT 15210 17690, 10-11 UT 15210 17690 FROM AUGUST 5th: CRI will broadcast a two hour programme, not the one. NEW FREQUENCIES (AUG 5th): 09-11 UT 15250 17690 Further information visit: http://www.crienglish.com Click on 'About Us'. --- Mit freundlichen Gren, (With Friendly Greetings) (Robert Wise, Hobart, Australia, July 31, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) INCREASE OF CHINA RADIO INTERNATIONAL'S GERMAN SERVICE Hi Glenn, today I received an email from the German service of China Radio International. As from August 5, CRI will start a continious two hour broadcast in German at 1800-2000 UT on 11650 and 15130 kHz (no changes). This will replace the former one hour broadcast at 1800 repeated at 1900. In addition to that the broadcast will be repeated the next morning at 0500-0700 on 15215 and 17690 kHz. The one hour broadcast at 1900 via World Radio Network and Radio Luxembourg (on 1440 kHz) are not effected. Best wishes from Wuppertal vy 55 + 73 (Manfred Reiff, (Editor of "Shortwave-News" and "News from the Middle East" of the EAWRC) http://www.mrreiff.de --- http://www.stvoy.de --- http://www.dxworld.de July 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) From August 5th, China Radio International, German service, will be extended to two hour transmissions on shortwave, twice daily: 1800-2000 UT 11650 15130 0500-0700 UT 15215 17690 1900-2000 UT 1440 via Luxembourg, WRN, - only one hour transmission. Folgende Email erhielt ich soeben von China Radio International: Liebe Hoererinnen und Hoerer, hier noch ein Hinweis: Ab 5. August steht uns die doppelte Sendezeit zur Verfuegung, sodass Sie unsere Sendung durchgehend von 20 bis 22 Uhr MESZ empfangen koennen. Die Frequenzen bleiben unveraendert, naemlich 11650 und 15130 kHz. Darueber hinaus wird diese zweistuendige Sendung am naechsten Morgen von 7 bis 9 Uhr auf den Frequenzen 15215 und 17690 kHz wiederholt. Unsere ueber WRN und Radio Luxemburg 1440 kHz ausgestrahlten einstuendigen Sendungen von 21 bis 22 Uhr MESZ bleiben ebenso unveraendert, wie die jeweiligen Frequenzen. Anmerkung meinerseits: Herr Sung Jingli, Mitarbeiter von CRI, erwaehnte beim SWLCS-DX-Camp letzten Samstag, dass CRI ein zweistuendiges Deutschprogramm einfuehren will (Willi Stengel, Germany, A-DX July 29 via Wolfgang Büschel, DXLD) ** CHINA [non]. 9930, "Dafa Hao" via KWHR. This Mandarin program is produced by World Falun Dafa Radio. The web site of World Falun Dafa Radio http://www.falundafaradio.org lists this program as their broadcast towards Asia (1500-1600 on Sat/Sun and 1600-1630 on Mon-Fri on 9930). They send me a blank QSL for my reception of "Dafa Hao". (Wakisaka, DSWCI DX Window via Cumbre DX via WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DXLD) This relates to the KWHR schedule and antenna changes recently reported under HAWAII. I`m somewhat surprised a ``Christian`` station would be open to broadcasting programs by this non-Christian ``cult`` (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** COSTA RICA. Checked RFPI Wed July 30 just in time to hear WOR 1192 starting at 1321 UT on 7445, which was about to fade out, behind Taiwan, and a swoosh-swoosh noise at irregular intervals every few seconds; while 15039 appeared to be off the air. It was back on, for a short while, the following evening, I think around 0130 --- but see far below, replaced by 15115 (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Glenn, it seems this story has made it onto at least one us TV programme: http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=03/07/29/168226 (via Andy Sennitt, Holland; and via Artie Bigley, July 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST; interview with James Latham audible via WORLD OF RADIO 1193) ** COSTA RICA. Transcript: RFPI July 29 plea for help. This aired on Radio for Peace International on Tue Jul 29 05:04 UT 2003. [James Latham] And you're listening to Radio for Peace International. I'm James Latham in the studios of RFPI, and we're sorry about that one little piece that went in there: One of the Pacifica stations is doing some of their fundraising, and it always goes on. We want to let our listeners know that your help and assistance is needed right now: RFPI is in a battle for its life. The station, which has operated for 16 years through some four or five administrations at the University for Peace, is now being asked to move, and your help is needed. If you appreciate these broadcasts and what you hear on RFPI, programs such as "Democracy Now," we want you to step forward and give us your support. RFPI is developing a legal fund for the defense of the station. We've already had contributions, and we want to thank all those who have given. It is making a difference, and we are going to win this. The University for Peace, which is under new administration, has been wishing to move the station off. We have diver --- sort of have diverged ways that we've gone in terms of our operations, and there is some political differences between the two organizations. So we really do ask you to help us, help us stay strong and stay on the air and stay broadcasting our messages of peace, hope, understanding, social justice. It is all about the difference between somebody to wishes to have peace and security in the world and those of us who wish to have peace and social justice, and that is what this radio station is about. So your support is very, very much needed and appreciated. We have gotten word that the message of our notice --- for removal from the buildings that we have constructed --- has gone around the world, for it has been posted in the Move On organization, various freedom-of-speech organizations around the world, Common Dreams, and others; and we want to thank all of our listeners for doing that and for writing. Those of you who have written in to the UN, we continuously urge you to do so. The station really does appreciate your report. There is considerable activity: There are people at the UN reviewing the letters; they do make a difference. So write to the United Nations. You can address an E-mail to Kofi Annan by sending an E-mail to him at anann@.un.org [sic], and you can send an E-mail to him there and describe the use that you use the radio station for, and tell him that you don't want it to leave the airwaves and how important it is for you. All of this is very, very much appreciated. We have --- we're busy right now behind the scenes, working on getting E-mails out and correspondence with thousands of organizations around the world who are coming forth for our help. We're still not over the hump yet: We still need to set up a very strong defense in this, what we view as an illegal action, an action that is framed in the censorship of the radio station, and we believe that censorship is not an option for us. We will not --- we refuse to be silent. On July 21st, at 12:30, officials at the, from the University for Peace, armed guards put a chain across the, RFPI's fences, the gates of RFPI. This, by the way, we want to point out was a gate that was built by the staff here at Radio for Peace International, as most of this building was. It is a two-story building, quite large, and it was built by you, the listeners. Listener-supported RFPI, through the many years, the 16 years of operation, have built the station up to its present potential, a two-story building, a transmitting facility, and an antenna farm for getting the signal out around the world. And we are now being asked to leave those facilities that we built. We think that is unfair. We think that it is unjust, and we're calling our friends, many friends out there, into action to help save RFPI. For information, and you can check out the photos if you have access to the World Wide Web, we encourage you to look at http://www.rfpi.org There are photos there, and soon we will have our http://www.saverfpi.org site up as well, where we will be listing some of the responses that you, our listeners, have sent in, and the marvelous letters that have been sent in to the United Nations, to the University for Peace, and to others. We believe that this struggle is a decision of one individual and not the decision of all of the University for Peace. It was not a very democratic decision, we believe, and we're asking, also, you to correspond and were in contact with the council, the governing body of the United Nations, of the UN- -University for Peace, I should say --- to see if they can also be notified of this. We're not sure if they have had full information about this, and we're going to be contacting them as well. So your contribution and help and assistance in this is very very much appreciated. Naomi, do you have anything to add? We have --- Naomi Fowler just walked into the studios here of RFPI. I was --- been giving out the E- mail addresses and everything else that people need to correspond with. And of course, your contributions, you can send them, they've been getting contributions to our organ office for the defense fund in donations large and small, and we appreciate them, is Post Office Box 3165, Newberg, Oregon, 97132, USA. Post Office Box 3165, Newberg, Oregon 97132, USA. You can also go onto PayPal and donate that way on our Web site by clicking on it. Please mention with any of the contributions that you wish it to go to a legal defense fund for support of the station, and that's very much appreciated. So, are we ready to go for another program? No, nothing yet. OK. Yeah, that ended it. That program is done, ended early, So it finished up early. The, you know, the struggle goes on, and as we, as things develop, we will be keeping you up-to-date, our listeners, our supporters out there, as to what is happening and keeping you informed on this as any progress. Again, on July 21st, at 12:30 in the afternoon, the gates were, RFPI's gates were chained and locked, locking us and the staff inside the studios, which we still are here and have been here all this time, and staff continues to stay on premises to, you know, to support the station. We do not want to leave the station for fear that the station will be in some way damaged. [Naomi] Yes, this is, just to add a few comments, this is Naomi Fowler here, Radio for Peace International's program director. I just want to call on all listeners and friends of Radio for Peace International who are in Costa Rica at the moment to please come and support us on August the 4th, which is the deadline for the eviction by the University for Peace of a fellow peace organization, Radio for Peace International. We need as many people here supporting us and witnessing what goes on as possible: That is our most important day, and we need your presence here, too, and witness goes on. We intend to act at all times as a peace organization upholding peaceful values, and we call upon the University for Peace to do the same thing and to respect us as a peace organization, and if they want to continue this process, then they should do so in a peaceful manner and a respectful manner, and we ask all of you out there, if you're able to get here and physically come and witness what happens on that day, then we do please ask you to do so. We're going to try to bring out some more press releases during the day today. Please keep looking on our Web site, on http://www.rfpi.org There is another Web site being set up at the moment. We will give those details out as and when we have them. Thank you very much for all the support, financial and moral support, and please keep monitoring the situation with us, and we will update you as and when we can. We're gonna get on with our normal programming now. Here's this week's "Making Contact." [James] Stay tuned for that and much more. [excerpts of another monologue aired on Radio For Peace International at Thu Jul 31 02:09:04 2003 UT:] [James Latham] We are continuing holding vigilance here at the station -- the staff is all here -- and we have no intention of leaving this facility that you, our listeners, have built and helped us construct of the many -- 16 -- years of operation. On July 21, when we were handed the notice, armed guards of the University for Peace put a chain across the gates leading into the facilities of Radio For Peace International. This is hindering our operations at the station, and causing us considerable difficulties in continuing these broadcasts. With your support, both in letter writing and to our financial campaign, our legal defense fund, is very, very much appreciated. We have more programming forthcoming, and we will be giving you announcements and progress reports as the campaign continues on. We've been getting a multitude of international organizations behind us. The community broadcasters at AMARC, the international organization of community broadcasters, are supporting the radio station with a strong letter to the Secretary General. [end of transcript by Michael L. Semon] A Web site http://www.saverfpi.org is now up. I wonder if RFPI is locked out of its main site and has started a site that they can control. This is pure speculation, of course, but I've been waiting for days and days for http://www.rfpi.org to be updated (Michael L. Semon, Lakeland, FL, USA, July 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) On August 4th 2003 RFPI is hosting an Open House. We are inviting our listeners and supporters to protest against the gates of our facilities being chained and padlocked by University for Peace armed guards. We need as many witnesses as possible and support on this day that we have been given as a deadline to vacate our building. We are calling on the University for Peace to act in a peaceful manner on August 4th. Your presence is crucial and will be very much appreciated. [via WORLD OF RADIO 1193] Maurice Strong is the newest administration head at the University for Peace in Costa Rica. Here is an article about him from Forbes Magazine. SAVING THE PLANET WITH MAURICE STRONG by Dyan Machan, Forbes Magazine, January 12, 1998 Source: http://www.survivalistskills.com/strong.htm [referenced in WORLD OF RADIO 1193] Maurice Strong 68, and his wife, Hanne, fancy themselves quite the environmental couple. He was chairman of the far-out Earth Council, earning the nickname Father Earth. In 1992 he orchestrated the United Nations Earth Sumniit, which called on the developed world to fork over, for its environmental sins, $600 billion to the Third World. Together the Strongs run the private Manitou Foundation. A gathering place for religious sects (Hanne is into "spiritual interests"), it backs, among other things, research into ethnobotany-the interactions between humans and plants. Odd stuff, yes. But odder still is Strong's business career, which has been marked by one misfortune after another. To many of those who know him for his U.N. and environmental work, Strong's business affairs are a bit of a mystery. Nevertheless, Strong's a chap to be reckoned with. Congress says that without belt-tightening the U.N. can kiss good-bye $I.'3 {sic} billion in back U.S. dues. He is the driving force behind a U.N. reorganization plan aimed at dealing with Congress' objections. Strong's solution is hardly draconian: Add a layer of management, cut costs, and abolish redundant obs through attrition. "Underwhelming," arouses Morris Abram, president of Geneva-based U.N. Watch. While that controversy rages, Strong is up to his eyeballs in Molten Metal Technology, a busted handler of hazardous waste notorious for its flaky technology and ties to presidential hopeful Al Gore (FORBES, Jan. 22, 1996 and Apr. 21, 1997). A big contributor to Gore's campaigns, Molten Metals has surfaced in the Senate hearings on corrupt campaign financing. A member of Molten's board, Strong sold some shares at around $31 apiece a month prior to the stock's October 1996 collapse. Today the stock is at 13 cents a share and Strong is being sued by San Diego class-action shark Milberg Weiss. This mixture of do-goodism and obvious self-interest got his start in the oil business. By his 30s he had made millions in small energy companies, rising to become president of Power Corporation http://www.survivalistskills.com/canpol.htm a Montreal holding company. In 1976 he ran Petro Canada, the national oil company. By 1981 he had moved on to Denver oil promoter AZL Resources, where, as chairman and the largest shareholder, he was sued for allegedly hyping the stock ahead of a merger that eventually failed. Strong says he settled for $4.2 million at the insistence of his insurance company. Nonetheless Strong came out a winner. AZL, which owned a number of western ranches, merged with oil refiner Tosco Corp. in 1983. Tosco unloaded some AZL ranch land at fire sale prices, and Strong got the Baca Ranch-160,000 acres in south central Colorado. Today Baca houses the Manitou Foundation. Back at the ranch he started American Water Development Inc. to grow high-protein grains. Soon the plan became a scheme to pump water from under Baca to Denver suburbs, an idea that the locals said would harm the ecosystem. Caught between his reputation as an environmentalist and his pocketbook, Stroniz bailed. "My partners called me softhearted," he says. His next major business venture was equally controversial. In 1992 he became chairman of Ontario Hydro, North America's largest utility. One of his stranger recommendations: that Hydro buy a 3 1,000 acre Costa Rican rain forest. Why? Strong said the deal was fair compensation for the harm Hydro was doing to the local environment. By happenstance he owned a hotel that catered to ecotourists in the same country. So how did Strong come to be picked to reengineer the U.N.? The way we hear it, former secretary general Boutros Boutros-Ghali wanted to recruit someone close to the current Administration. Strong, Al Gore's pal, fit the bill. Boutros-Ghali was tossed out last year, but his successor, Kofi Annan, allowed Strong to stay on. Strong says he doesn't want the U.N.'s head honcho's job. His mission, he says, is to save the planet from industry's depredations. Will the real Maurice Strong please stand up? [some images as captioned:] Former President of Costa Rica joins the crowd, showing his support for Radio for Peace International. Radio For Peace International General Manager James Latham, Former president of Costa Rica and University for Peace co-founder Rodrigo Carazo Odio and RFPI's Costa Rican lawyer Arcelio Hernández. http://www.saverfpi.org/article.php?story=20030729163254921 David Moore, son of Pacifica Radio Station founder Lou Hill delivering food to staff locked in at RFPI. http://www.saverfpi.org/article.php?story=20030729163107824 The RFPI Building: http://www.saverfpi.org/article.php?story=20030729162926969 Radio For Peace International General Manager James Latham and Program Director Naomi Fowler releasing a press release on the air waves. http://www.saverfpi.org/article.php?story=20030729162742127 A Press Event was held on July 27th to clarify RFPI's position on this conflict. A crowd of listeners made their presence and support count. Supporters, staff, lawyers and Board of Directors locked behind the access gate to Radio For Peace International studios. http://www.saverfpi.org/article.php?story=20030729160611546 From a new fact sheet http://www.rfpi.org/fact_sheet.html --- Why is the University for Peace trying to evict Radio for Peace International? After being asked repeatedly why RFPI is being asked to leave the UPAZ campus, the university has given no formal explanation to RFPI for the eviction. RFPI believes the eviction is being done for political reasons, and is a form of censorship. UPaz has told the press that RFPI owes UPAZ $14,000, and that RFPI is broadcasting illegally. Both reasons come as a surprise to the staff of RFPI, and are not sufficient grounds to evict the station that was built by the design and funds of RFPI staff. Is Radio For Peace International Transmitting on a registered frequency? Radio For Peace International is registered with the High Frequency Coordination Committee, an international commission that coordinates shortwave stations. RFPI does not have credentials with the National Radio Control of Costa Rica, because Radio For Peace is on international territory and is broadcasting to an international audience. The issue of RFPI's legality on the airwaves did not come up until the eviction notice was given. When Radio For Peace and University for Peace decided to collaborate, it was the University for Peace's responsibility to acquire the legal permissions that gives Radio For Peace International the right to broadcast. Does RFPI owe UPAZ money? The University claims that RFPI owes them $14,000 for an internet network system. A written agreement said that RFPI would pay UPAZ in kind or in cash, but the UPAZ never followed up. The university then decided that they don't want affiliation anymore, and then said that RFPI owed them money. RFPI then felt that the money for this equipment had to be part of the negotiations process. If RFPI were to abandon its building on UPAZ premises, UPAZ would be left with a building worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, including the internet infrastructure that UPAZ was requesting payment for. Some background information about the new administration at the University for Peace: The Radio station was working harmoniously with the University until the most recent administration, led by Maurice Strong in 1999. Maurice Strong has served on the board of multiple corporations, and is currently the Director of the Foundation Board of the World Economic Forum, and has served as a Special Advisor to the President of the World Bank. (In the past 3 years, RFPI has given tremendous airtime to the anti-globalization movement) In April 2002, the University refused to let RFPI students and staff ride the UPAZ buses. RFPI students report that UPAZ employees were instructed not to offer rides to RFPI staff, or risk termination. What are the consequences of evicting Radio For Peace? 1. Cutting off the only shortwave station dedicated to peace and justice, giving voice to indigenous peoples and other under- represented peoples around the world. 2. Denying the opportunity to study peace journalism to hundreds of international students & the only shortwave station whose mission it is to train young journalists. 3. Cutting off a venue to 50 independent radio producers. 4. Elimination of the UN voice on shortwave. 5. Eliminating research and monitoring of organized hate groups using shortwave to facilitate hate crimes (i.e. Timothy McVeigh) What are some of Radio For Peace International's accomplishments? RFPI has received awards from: Rotary Club International, 1993. Ministerio de Educación Pública, 1993. Colorado Cross Disability Coalition, for Access Improvement 1996. Unity Church of Costa Rica, for "Constructor de la No Violencia," 1998. Universidad Para la Paz, as "Miembro Honorario," 1991. RFPI has donated equipment to the International Red Cross. RFPI is the only shortwave station that gives UN Radio a daily voice. What has Radio For Peace International contributed to the University for Peace since 1987? RFPI helped produce videos and radio programs to promote the University for Peace programs. RFPI has done public relations for the University for Peace events. \ RFPI has helped UPAZ set up their homestay program in Ciudad Colón for their students. RFPI is incurring steep legal bills in its fight to stay alive, eating deeply into our operating budget. We need to raise several thousand dollars to keep up the struggle. Can you help us? Just click on the button below to donate whatever you can. Or send your contribution to: RFPI, PO Box 3165, Newberg, OR 97132. Be sure to note "Legal defense fund" on your check. This is your radio station and the only one of its kind in the world. Let's make sure that it survives!! And be sure to check back here often for updates to the current situation and how you can stay involved. We greatly appreciate your support! [end of website notice] The crucial question is the following: RFPI`s mission has not changed in the last 16 years. Until the latest administration headed by M Strong, we have operated harmoniously with UPaz, a fellow peace org. It begs the question, how and when did the Uni's mission and stated goals change? In a letter to Mr. Roberto Tovar, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Costa Rica, the University for Peace states: that the "current activities of RFPI are inconsistent with the international emphasis currently being developed by the university" THIS STATED IN SPITE OF THE FACT THAT over the past sixteen years RFPI has remained true to its ORIGINAL goals, TRANSMITTING PROGRAMS CONCERNING PEACE AND JUSTICE WORLDWIDE. HOW THEN has the University diverged from its strategy stated in 1999, and CERTAINLY CONTRARAY TO ITS OWN GUIDELINES as a fellow peace organization? (Naomi Fowler, RFPI, July 30, WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RFPI on new 15115! Tune-in, about 1550 UT July 31, discussion of death penalty in Puerto Rico. 1600 Naomi talking about new web site (no web access here) then into Democracy Now. Reception was quite good on Satellite 800, actually, a little better than 15,039, perhaps just propagation. I'd give it 3, 4, 4. Took my little Sony analog radio outdoors and could hear it even on that fairly well. Since 15 MHz is sometimes off the air, I`ll bet a lot of folks, checking 15039, and not finding anything, just assumed you were off the air. I don`t even usually listen to Glenn on Wednesday night, as reception isn't that good, so, it was pure coincidence that I found you (Tim Hendel, AL, to RFPI, via DXLD) 15115 OK here at 1635 check, but in the 1700-1800 period, weak co- channel presumably from IBB Morocco was enough to make RFPI unlistenable, also with a SAH of a few tens of Hz, clear again after 1800. I am more concerned about Spain 15110 after 1900, which is likely to splash it considerably. IBB services via Morocco are supposedly on 15115 at various times, but aside from that it should be reasonably clear after HCJB closes at 1300. In the afternoon, RFPI might need a different frequency such as 15190 (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. I suggested to Radio Habana Cuba that they consider an old time Latin American AM DX program this winter. Late night, multi- lingual from their high power transmitter. I had a reply finally. Apparently they do not have the political clout to do it. They did suggest I submit it to the Cuban Institute of Radio and TV and I will do so. If any DXers wish to join in, the address is: ICRT, Calle 23 #258, El Vedado, entre L y M, CP 10400, Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba. (Colon, July 29, IRCA via DXLD) Well, RHC is not a MW station, so naturally they would refer it to the parent organization. But, but, we Americans are supposed to be put off by the high-power MW transmitters, not *want* to hear them! (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** DENMARK. ``WMR World Music Radio is planning to resume operation late 2003. Test transmissions are due in August 2003 on 15810 kHz and a frequency in the 6 MHz range yet to be announced.`` Quote from: http://www.wmr.dk (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DXLD) ** ECUADOR. What happened to the DXPL website http://dxpl.hcjb.org/index.php --- This has stopped working (Larry Nebron, CA, July 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Well, I just found it here. At least they have updated it, but not the separate DXPL schedule page linked which is still pre May 31! http://www.hcjb.org/modules.php?op=modload&name=Sections&file=index&req=viewarticle&artid=173&page=1 (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) {= http://www.tinyurl.com/j7g7} ** GUAM. Good morning. When I checked my email this morning there was a message titled "Guam". Upon opening it I found a word document attached from the Naval Media Center verifying my reception of the Guam Transmission heard night before last. It printed up as a nice verification letter with full color header etc. That is really quick response, even for email since I just sent the report yesterday afternoon! Veri signer is Brooke Armato JO3, though of course there is no actual signature since it was a Word document. Anyway, I printed it up then scanned it into my SWL logging program along with the gazillion other SWL QSL's in there. That way anytime I check that logging the QSL comes up too. Now if they just verify the Hawaii Transmission heard the same evening and IF I can hear the other sites (I have two QSL's for the Puerto Rico site). (Phil Atchley, swl at qth.net via DXLD) ** ISLE OF MAN. 1368 kHz Manx Radio is now 24h. Also "Kick FM" slogan is NOT used (this was on FM only at weekends). Carries sponsored religious programmes Sun 1900-2200 (Jack FitzSimons via EMWG (22/7- 2003) via Ydun`s MW News July 30 via DXLD) {see 3-137, 3-139} ** ISRAEL. WEST BANK AND GAZA/ISRAEL: MINISTRY DENIES LICENSING PALESTINIAN-ISRAELI RADIO STATION | Text of report by Palestinian radio Voice of Palestine on 30 July The Information Ministry has denied reports circulated by local and foreign media to the effect that the PNA [Palestine National Authority] granted a licence to a Palestinian-Israeli radio station called The Voice of Peace. A statement issued by the Information Ministry explained that the ministry's Press and Publications Department did not grant a licence to any joint radio station, but rather issued a temporary three-month permit for a Palestinian radio station called The Voice of Peace. Hani al-Masri, head of the Press and Publications Department, said that the ministry has a policy of advocating political and intellectual diversity, but this, however, does not give anyone the power to take the law into their hands and impose a fait accompli policy. He added that any radio station co-founded by foreigners should receive political approval and then the approval of the Interior Ministry and the Ministry of Telecommunications. Al-Masri rebuffed media claims that the US Arab-language Radio Sawa leased a frequency to broadcast in Palestine. He noted that a local radio station, in violation of the law and applicable regulations, leased the frequency it had been assigned by the PNA. Source: Voice of Palestine, Ramallah, in Arabic 0900 gmt 30 Jul 03 (via BBCM via WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DXLD) ** ISRAEL. TWO PIRATE RADIO STATIONS RAIDED (IsraelNN.com 16 Jul. 29, '03) Police raided two pirate radio stations operating in Ashkelon, the Kol Hesed and Kol Emet stations. The broadcast equipment was confiscated and one person was taken into custody... From http://www.israelnn.com/news.php3?id=47290 (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** ITALY. Dall'Abetone (Pistoia) ho ascoltato qualche link di radio in FM: 52.15 Discoradio 52.39 R. Centro Emilia (prg multietnico africano in EE e altre lingue... Occhio eh eh) 52.60 Rete Radar (studi Porretta Terme, BO) 53.50 Pane burro e marmellata 56.90 Modena Radio City 58.60 Unid diretta balera 60.90 Bum Bum 61.30 Unid mx classica 63.30 Santerno studio ? Debolissima jingle quasi inaudibili Rx AOR5000 + stilo Miracle Whip Ciao (Giampiero Bernardini, Avvenire, Milano, Italy, July 29, BCL News via DXLD) But there are 8-MHz-wide Italian TV channels, A and B, with video carriers at 53.75 and 59.75 MHz, per WRTH 2003 (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** KOREAS. N KOREA TO STOP ANTI-S. KOREA RADIO BROADCASTS From http://www.japantoday.com/e/?content=news&cat=7&id=268067 Thursday, July 31, 2003 SEOUL --- North Korea will stop its anti-South Korean propaganda broadcasts that a radio station has aired for decades, Yonhap News Agency reported Wednesday, quoting government officials. "The Voice of National Salvation," run by the Korean People's Democratic Front Radio, said Tuesday that anti-Seoul broadcasts would be stopped from Friday, Yonhap quoted a Unification Ministry official as saying on condition on anonymity (Kyodo News via Mike Terry, DXLD) In another goodwill gesture, North Korea promised to stop broadcasting propaganda against South Korea. The decision brings to an end a radio program called "Voice of National Salvation," which the North has directed against the South for the past 33 years. . . http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/30/international/asia/30CND-KOREA.html?ex=1060228800&en=3bc669d93eb35efd&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE (via Jilly Dybka, WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DXLD) NORTH KOREAN CONCERNS OVER IMPACT OF SOUTH'S PROPAGANDA BROADCASTS SAID "SERIOUS" | Text of report in English by South Korean news agency Yonhap Seoul, 30 July: North Korea has admitted for the first time that it lied by claiming a clandestine pro-communist radio station was operating in South Korea, government officials said Wednesday [30 July]. For decades, the "Voice of National Salvation" has aired anti-South Korean broadcasts almost around the clock. Pyongyang claimed the station is based in the South, but Seoul has said it is located in Haeju, a North Korean city close to the border. On Tuesday, the station, run by the Korean People's Democratic Front Radio, announced anti-Seoul propaganda broadcasts would be stopped from Friday, said a Unification Ministry official on condition of anonymity. On Wednesday, North Korea sent a telephone message urging South Korea to follow suit and stop its own anti-Pyongyang broadcasts, said the official. In the latest round of inter-Korean ministerial talks in Seoul earlier this month, North Korean officials proposed that the two Koreas stop airing propaganda broadcasts, including the use of loudspeakers along the border, effective 15 August. Both sides agreed to discuss further details after forming a bilateral body to handle social and cultural issues. The North Korean announcement came before the envisaged committee has been formed, said Unification Ministry officials. Launched in 1970, the Voice of National Salvation appealed to some South Korean dissidents under past military governments. But as a result of South Korea's increasing democratization, the broadcast has lost much of its intended effect. Experts say that Pyongyang's move seems to indicate that its leaders have serious concerns about the negative impact South Korean propaganda broadcasts have on the North Korean society. In a survey on 103 North Korean defectors in February, 67 per cent of them said they had listened to South Korean radio broadcasts before fleeing their country. Though North Koreans are officially banned from listening to news from outside and radios are soldered to monitor only state programmes, an increasing number of North Koreans began to gain access to outside information, according to human rights groups in Seoul. Currently, South Korea's state-run Korean Broadcasting System airs 20 hours of programming a day that is critical of the North Korean regime. Recently, the US Congress passed legislation calling for the US provision of radios to people in the isolated regime while mandating the Washington-based Radio Free Asia to extend Korean-language broadcasting for North Koreans to 24 hours a day from the current four hours. "US radio broadcasting is indeed one of our greatest hope for communicating with the isolated North Korean population," Sen. Jon Kyl of the Republican Party recently said in a seminar. "While actively working to sever the regime's life line, we should also use all of the tools to promote democratic change." Source: Yonhap news agency, Seoul, in English 0743 gmt 30 Jul 03 (via BBCM via WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DXLD) NORTH STOPS BROADCASTS BLAMING SOUTH From: http://www.koreaherald.co.kr/SITE/data/html_dir/2003/07/31/200307310074.asp North Korea's latest decision to halt the anti-South radio broadcasts intends to pressure the South to reciprocate while indicating the isolationist country recognizes the futility of its finger-pointing approach, experts and officials said yesterday. The Unification Ministry said the North sent a telephone message yesterday that it will stop from Aug. 1 the Voice of National Salvation, which has been operating since 1970 to criticize the capitalist South and to propagate its communist regime. The message called for the South to follow suit. "I think North Korea has taken the initiative on this move to put pressure on South Korea to follow the lead," a Unification Ministry official said. The North's recent measure is in line with its suggestion during the 11th ministerial talks in Seoul July 9-13 that the two sides stop using their national airwaves as blame-slinging arenas. They promised to review the proposal in detail after organizing a committee on social and cultural affairs. Both the North and South have broadcast to each other for decades, with the former focusing on defaming the South and the latter mainly delivering information about its own affairs. Prof. Koh Yu-hwan of Dongguk University said the North decided to suspend anti-South broadcasts because it has come to question their benefits considering the cost of airing them. "It shows that North Korea admits it has reaped little fruits from propaganda broadcasts aimed at the South, whereas North Koreans have been increasingly affected by the South's radio broadcasts," Koh said. Koh said North Korean propaganda tactics have lost its impact because the South Korean public recognize the superiority of their system. In contrast, South Korean broadcasts featuring examples of prosperous economic development have unsettled North Koreans, he added. "I feel this is a desperate message indicating that North Korea anticipates the South will stop its psychological warfare," the government official said (via Ulis R. Fleming, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) SEOUL SAYS NORTH KOREA TO END ANTI-SOUTH BROADCASTS North Korea will end propaganda broadcasts aimed at South Korea from September. An official at the policy division of Seoul's Unification Ministry told Reuters news agency that North Korea announced its decision in a TV broadcast. "It appears that they are taking the initiative on this move and thereby urging us to do the same," he said. For decades, North Korean TV and radio have broadcast scathingly critical propaganda about the capitalist South, at times accusing leaders of being greedy womanisers and the South Korean people of suffering under US oppression. The South also broadcasts to the North, but Seoul says the content is mostly information about the South rather than criticism about the North. The Unification Ministry official said North and South Korea had promised to stop critical propaganda broadcasts during the summit meeting in 2000 between North Korean leader Kim Jong-il and former South Korean president Kim Dae-jung. Pyongyang raised this issue again during recent ministerial talks, and both sides agreed to discuss this in detail at working-level committees, the official said. The two sides remain technically at war since the 1950-53 Korean War ended without a peace treaty (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 30 July 2003 via DXLD) Voice of National Salvation, presumed them at 1252 on 4120.5; Voice of the People, tentative at 1255 on 6600; listed // of 3912 just offering a carrier. Can also be heard on East Coast of North America a bit earlier. Per Ulis' report this is their last day. Heard on 4120.5 and 4450 at 1247 July 31 (Hans Johnson, WY, Cumbre DX via WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DXLD) ANALYSIS: SEOUL SAYS NORTH KOREA TO END ANTI-SOUTH BROADCASTS ON 1 AUGUST | Text of editorial analysis by BBC Monitoring Media Services on 31 July North Korea has officially admitted for the first time that it operates a clandestine pro-communist radio station broadcasting to South Korea, officials in Seoul said on 30 July, according to a report by the South Korean news agency Yonhap. Since 1970, the North Korean-run Voice of National Salvation has carried anti-South Korean broadcasts almost around the clock. The radio station favours the reunification of Korea from the North Korean point of view. North Korea has maintained that the station is based in South Korea, but Seoul has said it is located in Haeju, a city close to the border with South Korea. On 29 July, the Voice of National Salvation announced that it would stop airing anti-Seoul propaganda broadcasts from Friday 1 August, according to a South Korean Unification Ministry official, speaking to Yonhap news agency on condition of anonymity. South Korea also broadcasts to the North, but Seoul says the content is mostly information about the South rather than criticism about the North. The South Korean-run Voice of the People radio station is believed to broadcast on shortwave from transmitters in South Korea, although it claims in its announcements to broadcast from Pyongyang. The station has been on the air since 1986. In the latest round of inter-Korean ministerial talks held in Seoul earlier in July, North Korean officials proposed that the two Koreas stop transmitting all propaganda broadcasts, including loudspeaker broadcasts along the border, from 15 August. Both sides agreed to discuss details later, after the formation of an inter-Korean body to handle social and cultural issues. North and South Korea suspended loudspeaker propaganda against each other along the demilitarized zone once before, shortly after the June 2000 summit. North Korea's move is seen as an attempt to lead the South to stop airing propaganda broadcasts as well, Unification Ministry officials cited by Yonhap said. "Launched in 1970, the Voice of National Salvation has found its way through some South Korean dissidents under past military governments. But as South Korea has been democratic, the North's broadcast has lost much of its intended propaganda effect in the South," the agency commented in a dispatch in English. North Korea's "serious concerns" over broadcasts from South "Experts say that Pyongyang's move seems to indicate that its leaders have serious concerns about the negative impact South Korean propaganda broadcasts have on the North Korean society," the Yonhap report went on. It recalled that in a survey of 103 North Korean defectors in February, 67 per cent of them said they had listened to South Korean radio broadcasts before fleeing their country. Although North Koreans are officially banned from listening to news from outside and radios are modified to receive only programmes broadcast by the state, an increasing number of North Koreans are now accessing information from outside, according to human rights groups in Seoul which were cited by Yonhap. South Korea's state-run Korean Broadcasting System currently airs 20 hours of programming a day that is critical of the North Korean regime. The Yonhap report recalled that the US Congress had recently passed legislation calling for the US to provide radios to North Korean citizens, as well as mandating the US surrogate broadcaster Radio Free Asia to extend Korean-language broadcasting to the North to 24 hours a day from the current four hours. Seoul urged to reciprocate The South Korean newspaper Hangyore on 31 July said "the South should reciprocate North Korea's suspension of anti-Seoul propaganda". The paper said in an editorial that the move by Pyongyang "also appears to have something to do with the marked increase in the pressure shaking the North Korean regime under a `North Korea democratization theory', amid the recent flare-up of tension between North Korea and the United States". The fact that anti-South propaganda broadcasts "are virtually ineffective in practice" must have been also taken into consideration, it added. The South Korean paper described the Voice of National Salvation as "a major relic of the Cold War era spanning over a period of 33 years". It said that by moving first to stop the propaganda against South Korea, the North "has scored political points in terms of giving momentum to the mood for reconciliation, cooperation and peace". "Whatever motives North Korea has, its move to stop propaganda broadcasts against South Korea is very welcome, and we should reciprocate positively. If we play down North Korea's decision to stop its broadcasts as a move to ditch an outdated `drug' and favour continuing our anti-North broadcasts deemed still effective, it is exactly a display of Cold War attitude. The day of national reconciliation will come closer when we extend respect and trust, especially in these difficult times," the Hangyore editorial concluded. North and South Korea are still technically at war since the 1950-53 Korean War ended without a peace treaty. Source: BBC Monitoring research 31 Jul 03 (via DXLD) ** KOREA SOUTH. RADIO KOREA INTERNATIONAL LAUNCHES 50TH ANNIVERSARY WEB SITE Radio Korea International (RKI), the overseas service of the Korean Broadcasting System, has launched a special Web site http://rki.kbs.co.kr/50yers/e_index.html to mark its 50th anniversary on 15 August 2003. The Web site features the yesterday, today and tomorrow of RKI, its vision for another half century of broadcasting, and congratulatory messages from dignitaries from home and abroad and worldwide listeners. RKI has also launched a special 50th anniversary animated logo (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 30 July 2003 via DXLD) And special broadcasts, ceremonies and so on. A whole new set of 50th anniversary web page, the best being http://rki.kbs.co.kr/50yers/eng/introduction/rki_info/rki_info.html where we can finally see the faces behind the voices. They seem to have a policy of new faces on the web pages for each language (Daniel Say, BC, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO. 6045, R. Universidad (tentative) had a nice peak at 1235- 1240 July 31. Alas, too short, no ID. Wasn't playing classical music, but rather what sounded like Mexican music. Went away as fast as it came up. About 35 minutes after sunrise (Hans Johnson, WY, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** MEXICO. MEXICAN REBEL MOVEMENT ANNOUNCES RADIO BROADCASTS Wednesday, July 30, 2003 (07-30) 06:15 PDT http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/news/archive/2003/07/30/international0915EDT6140.DTL SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, Mexico (AP) -- Mexico's Zapatista rebel movement, noted for spreading its message over the internet, is turning to an older technology: shortwave radio. In a communiqué published by local newspapers on Wednesday, Marcos said the movement would begin shortwave broadcasts at a still-undetermined hour on August 9. He said transmissions were planned on 5.8 megahertz, though he said that in case of government interference, "move your dial in the same way you would your hips in a cumbia (dance) and hunt until you find us." The announcement was part of a general invitation to a three-day party Aug. 8-10 that the Zapatistas plan in the village of Oventic, a few miles north of here. The event is to mark the creation of more formal methods for the movement and its 30 "autonomous municipalities" in remote parts of Chiapas state to deal with outsiders. After years of clandestine organizing, the Zapatistas seized several cities in Chiapas on Jan. 1, 1994, then quickly withdrew into the jungle. About 145 people died in 12 days of fighting before a cease- fire was declared. Once based on Marxism-Leninism, the rebel movement has turned to political action to promote its calls for Indian rights and for a vision of democracy that is deeply skeptical of political parties. Meanwhile, some of the foreign aid destined for Chiapas, one of Mexico's poorest states, following the Zapatista revolt is being reduced. A spokesman for the European Union's humanitarian office, Jean-Charles Ellerman-Kingombe, said Wednesday that funding for activities there would be phased out by the end of this year. The office has given 7.6 million euros (now about $8.7 million) over past six years, including 1 million euros ($1.145 million) approved last year for health and water sanitation projects that are being carried out by the Spanish, German and International Red Crosses. "There is no longer any immediate humanitarian needs that need to be catered for," he said. "What there is more need for now is more long- term development (via Artie Bigley, Mike Terry, and Jilly Dybka KF4ZEO, and Ulis Fleming, Cumbre DX, July 30, WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DXLD) EZLN ANUNCIA LA CREACIÓN DE RADIO REBELDE miércoles 30 de julio, 09:40 AM SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, México --- El Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (EZLN) anunció el inicio de transmisiones en onda corta de la llamada "Radio Insurgente". El subcomandante Marcos informó en un comunicado que el próximo 9 de agosto se escuchará la primera emisión de la radio zapatista, a una hora todavía no determinada y en el marco de una reunión de tres días para anunciar la creación de los "Caracoles", que sustituirán los centros de reunión conocidos como "Aguascalientes". "La banda y la frecuencia precisas son: banda de 49 metros, en los 5.8 megahertz, en onda corta", precisó el líder rebelde. "Como es de esperar que el supremo (el gobierno) interfiera la emisión, muévase en su dial con el mismo contoneo de las caderas en una cumbia (baile) y busque hasta encontrarnos", añadió en la séptima y última parte de una serie de comunicados denominados "La treceava estela". La emisión de "Radio Insurgente" es parte de una serie de actos que el EZLN realizará del 8 al 10 de agosto en la comunidad de Oventik, al norte de esta ciudad del estado sureño de Chiapas. Esos días se anunciará la muerte de los "Aguascalientes" y la creación formal de los "Caracoles". Además, iniciarán sus actividades las "Juntas de Buen Gobierno", instancias autónomas que vigilarán el cumplimiento de las leyes en comunidades zapatistas y regirán las relaciones con los grupos civiles de México y el extranjero. Marcos señaló que a la entrada de la comunidad de Oventik habrá un letrero con la leyenda: "Está usted en Territorio Rebelde Zapatista: aquí manda el pueblo y el gobierno obedece". El líder guerrillero recomendó a quien asista llevar paraguas, plásticos, impermeables "o de perdida un periódico" para cubrirse de la lluvia. También propuso llevar "una ración adecuada" de comida enlatada y galletas. El EZLN apareció públicamente el 1 de enero de 1994 en varias comunidades de Chiapas, estado fronterizo con Guatemala (AP via Héctor García Bojorge, DF, July 30, Conexión Digital via WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DXLD) MEXICO [non?] This is a comunicado by German zapatista support groups on Radio Insurgente, the radio station of the Zapatista movement in Chiapas planning to broadcast on SW. It refers to a statement of subcomandante Marcos in late July announcing the start of SW broadcasts to northern and southern America. No further technical details. It's said that they are now broadcasting 12 hours a day on FM and the station is mainly run by women. As they expect growing tensions in Chiapas the statements says that there need for a medium like this now. They need money to buy equipment and ask everybody (no: international civil society) not to schedule any other activities for August 8-10 (Thorsten Hallman, referring to a long document in German, July 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) {in full: 3-137} ** MYANMAR [non]. FOREIGN RADIOS MOST POPULAR SOURCE OF NEWS IN MYANMAR YANGON, Myanmar (AP) - Myo, a taxi driver, has memorized the entire daily broadcast schedule of the BBC, the Voice of America and two other foreign radio stations. . . http://www.thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2003/7/30/latest/13267Foreignra&sec=latest (via Jill Dybka, DXLD) {related: BURMA [non], 3-139} ** NEPAL. MAOISTS TO LAUNCH OWN FM RADIO STATION From http://www.hinduonnet.com/thehindu/holnus/03252109.htm Kathmandu, July 25 (UNI): The Maoists are planning to launch an FM radio station in Western Nepal, the Nepalese news agency, Rashtriya Samachar Samiti, today said quoting the Kathmandu Post. "The people of far western region would be able to listen to the programme aired by the Maoists Peoples radio," an unnamed Maoist leader said. The radio station would be situated in an undisclosed location somewhere between Dadeldhura and Baitadi the paper quoted the leader as saying. "Our party has successfully installed an FM radio station in a secured location," he said without giving any details of the plan. This would be the first FM radio station of the Maoists in the Himalayan kingdom since the insurgency began in 1996. The news of establishment of radio station of the Maoists has come at a time when the Government and the Maoists are preparing to hold the third round of peace talks to end the problem of the seven-year-long insurgency which has claimed over 7,500 lives. The FM station would be established within two weeks to one month and at the beginning would broadcast for 10 hours daily, Nepali language daily, Nepal Samacharpatra, quoted the Maoist leader as saying (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. I assume RNZI's 2nd transmitter will be 100 kW; even in the South Pacific, 50 kW does not 'cut it' due to a long term increase in urban electrical noise above 3000 kHz. That said, I hope that RNZI fixes the broken http://www.tcibr.com link on the [technical] webpage. This link has been broken for ~ year. Lazyness? Also, the PDF brochure for the Thomson transmitter needs to be added to the website, along with the applicable PDFs for the TCI antennas. Also, I want to put in for quarterly updates of RNZI's 'pattern' in the region using VOA_area, or equivalents. Sadly, no antenna file has been created to describe RNZI's combining both HR antenna arrays (Max Power, Seattle / Vancouver / Victoria, ripple via DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. Special event to mark NZART branch anniversary: One of the oldest Amateur Radio clubs in New Zealand, the Otago Branch of the New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters (NZART), celebrates its 75th anniversary during August. Members will use the special event call sign ZM4A, and a commemorative QSL will be available. QSL via the bureau direct with an SASE (DX stations should include one International Reply Coupon) to ZM4A, PO Box 5485, Dunedin, New Zealand. There`s more information on the NZART Otago Branch Web site [at] http://www.qsl.net/zl4aa/index.html (The Daily DX via ARRL July 30 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** NICARAGUA. Hola Héctor! Y transmitía por los 5950 o 55 y entraba muy bien a Buenos Aires hacia las 0500 UT aproximadamente. Justamente los otros días comentábamos con unos colegas sobre la política QSL de esta emisora. La única nicaragüense en la onda corta pasó a ser Radio Miskut, pero hace mucho que no la veo reportada en los 5770 khz. 73's (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentina, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Comentarios del director de Radio Nicaragua Don Héctor García Bojorge, Muchas gracias por su correo. En lo tocante a su comentario y pregunta sobre la onda corta, puedo decirle, que desde hace varios años, Radio Nicaragua no cuenta con un transmisor de Onda Corta. No existen planes para volver a tenerla, especialmente ahora que contamos con la gran carretera de la comunicación, como es el internet. Con respecto a la frecuencia 620 AM, ciertamente, hemos tenido problemas, pero hemos adquirido un nuevo transmisor, que nos permitirá bañar todo el territorio nacional, como siempre ha sido, y más allá de nuestras fronteras. Muy pronto podrá usted escuchar nuestra señal en esa frecuencia. Saludos y éxitos para usted. (Alfonso Moncada Cuèllar, Director General via García, ibid.) ** NIGERIA. Voice of Nigeria. Today, the usual antenna switch on 15120 at 1100 was two minutes late, so I could hear the announcement: "Voice of Nigeria now welcomes listeners in southern Africa for the English service on 15120." After switch very weak as usual. Yesterday, also the sign-on on 11770 was at 1602. Their clock is wrong, it seems (Thorsten Hallmann, Muenster, Absurdocratistan [sic], July 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. Radio Sabor (1610 kHz), logged as far away as Sweden by Hasse Mattisson, is located in Arequipa city, not Paucarpata, as the official frequency listing of the Peruvian Comms Ministry has it. The station`s address is Oficina 430 at the Centro Comercial Independencia, which is also the location of the company`s main station Radio Alegría (1510 kHz). Alegría, listed as station number 637 in WRTH03, is to celebrate its 13th anniversary on Aug 3 next. This is what I gathered from a phone call to the station on July 30. The phone number was kindly supplied by the webmaster of http://www.arequipalinda.com José Antonio Pastor D. who has made an all-out effort in trying to help, actually sending a messenger to the town of Paucarpata in order to locate the station. Thanks to José Antonio for his resourcefulness and thanks also to Björn Malm, without whose tip we would have been unaware of this Peruvian X-bander in the first place. Thanks also to Alfredo Cañote and César Pérez Dioses for taking their time to monitor the station (Henrik Klemetz, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Numerous unIDs IDed: see UNIDENTIFIED [non] below ** PHILIPPINES. Glenn and Ydun, I have been informed by one of the IBB staff in country that the Harris transmitter is still on 1143 and the CEMCO is used for the weekly tests (on 1170). Regards (Ben Dawson, July 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) {Re: 3-129, 3-130} ** POLAND. Courrier de la section anglaise de Radio Polonia qui semble contredire des informations selon lesquelles la station aurait l'intention de reprendre des émissions en français. "J'ai le regret de vous annoncer que Radio Polonia n'a pas dans l'idée de reprendre un service français. En réalité, pour des raisons financières, nous avons dû fermer 3 services. La station continue de diffuser en anglais, allemand, esperanto, russe, ukrainien et biélorusse" NDR : et en polonais bien sûr. Les 3 langues supprimées sont le tchec, le slovaque et le lituanien. La plupart des autres langues ont connu des réductions de programmes ou de fréquences (Rafal Kiepuszewski, service anglais - 28 juillet 2003 --- les informations sont issues de http://perso.wanadoo.fr/jm.aubier via DXLD) ** SAUDI ARABIA [non]. SAUDI DISSIDENT MOVEMENT LAUNCHES AL-ISLAH TV ON HOTBIRD 31 JULY | Text of unattributed report entitled "Al-Islah Television Channel begins transmission on Hotbird today" carried on Movement for Islamic Reform in Arabia web site on 31 July Al-Islah Television Channel began transmission on the Hotbird satellite this evening. The details of the transmission are as follows: Broadcast: on Hotbird 6 at 13 degrees East Frequency: 12520 Polarization: Vertical Symbol Rate: 27500 Forward Error Correction, FEC: 4/3 The transmission will remain experimental for several days. Source: Movement for Islamic Reform in Arabia web site, London, in Arabic 31 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** SOLOMON ISLANDS. Robin Harwood alerted people to some interesting listening on SIBC on 5020 with the arrival of the Australian-led intervention force. A program on SIBC called 'Talking Truth' is part of the communications strategy to explain to the people of Solomon Islands the role of the intervention force and its activities. The program was featured in a recent report on Radio Australia's 'Asia Pacific' program. Transcript [plus audio link] at http://www.abc.net.au/ra/asiapac/programs/s904932.htm (Matt Francis, Counsellor, Public Diplomacy, Australian Embassy, 1601 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington, DC, USA, July 29, WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SUDAN [non]. New "target radio" for Sudan (I would like to avoid the term "clandestine"). M-F: 1600-1700 on 17630, 1700-1800 on 17660 kHz (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, DX LISTENING DIGEST) via IBB? where? Quote from: http://www.usaid.gov/hum_response/oti/country/sudan/rpt0303.html United States Agency for International Development Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance Office of Transition Initiatives Field Report: SUDAN, March 2003 In March, OTI awarded a cooperative leadership award to Education Development Center for the development of a radio service for southern Sudan. The OTI assessment team determined that a lack of access to information in southern Sudan, particularly regarding the on-going national peace process, is a significant problem. Sudan's great size, with a topography that makes communication and transportation extremely difficult, and largely impossible during the rainy season, and the widespread illiteracy of the generation that has grown up during the war, make radio the first choice for disseminating information. Existing radio broadcasts in regional languages have been limited to broadcasts from the north and sporadic coverage from various international services like the BBC. The scope and duration of these international broadcasts is very limited. To that end, OTI is funding the development of a radio service for southern Sudan. Radio can be an effective vehicle to address two major concerns: The lack of human capacity and the lack of information about events that affect the everyday lives of the people of southern Sudan. The provision of timely and accurate information can provide motivation for greater civic participation. The radio service will present a diverse mix of timely and relevant programming broadcast in Sudanese languages, (initially Juba-Arabic, Nuer, Dinka and English with the potential to include other major languages of southern Sudan) by Sudanese presenters. The amount of airtime proposes to start at a realistic level of two hours/day within four months and expand to six hours/day (via Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, DXLD) Thanks Bernd's tip. African-sounding music here in Wyoming at 1602, weak, but clear signal on 17630 (Hans Johnson, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Nothing audible here at 1730+ on 17660 (Glenn Hauser, OK, July 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) {more: 3-138, 3-139...} ** TANZANIA. 5050, R. Tanzania (Dar es Salaam) Partial-data yellow and blue African map card in 1 month after my last follow-up report was sent via registered mail from Hungary. I also enclosed $1.00, and mailed my report to the v/s N. Nyamwocha. I've been trying for this one for over 6 years; my 50th African country verified (George Maroti, NY, July 29, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** TIBET. Let`s try one more time to get the Tibet PBS schedule correct. In 3-117, it was in local time. In 3-123 I subtracted 8 hours for UT, but missed one of the entries, the one at 1000-1535 on 9490 and 9585, which should have been changed to 0200-0735, so: China Tibet PBS Tibetan channel is scheduled [corrected2] 2250-0735 on 594 4905 4920 5240 6110 6130 6200, 0950-1700 4905 4920 5240 6130 6200 7385 9490, 2250-0200 7125 7385, 0200-0735 9490 9585, 0950-1735 6110 (Sergey Kolesov, Ukraine, July World DX Club Contact via Mike Barraclough, DXLD) ** UGANDA. UGANDAN INFORMATION MINISTER SAYS INDEPENDENT RADIO CLOSED FOR ABETTING REBELS | Excerpt from report by Ugandan newspaper The New Vision web site on 31 July The government has discovered evidence incriminating Radio Veritas Kyoga in acts intended to aid the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) rebels. The state minister for information, James Nsaba Buturo, told members of parliament yesterday that the police had discovered an audiotape containing information, which was being aired by the radio to undermine the security situation when the LRA attacked Teso [northern Uganda]. The government closed the radio in June on the recommendation of the Soroti District Security Council. "Police investigations have revealed interesting information and a file has been sent to the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) for legal advice," Buturo said. He was appearing before the Parliamentary Committee on Presidential and Foreign Affairs to defend his department's budget. Flanked by Omwony Ojwok (economic monitoring state minister), Buturo said the government regrets the closure, but added that the conduct of the radio warranted police action. "It is not that the government is intolerant or dictatorial but information incriminating the radio has been collected, analysed and established to have some connection to the anti-terrorist law. Let's allow the DPP to do his job independently," he told MPs. Committee chairperson Salaam Musumba (Bugabula South) cautioned the government against employing illegal procedures to discipline suspected criminals.[Passage omitted] [See similar report by the Monitor newspaper entitled "Ugandan MPs take ministers to task over fate of independent radio station", filed on 31 July.] Source: The New Vision web site, Kampala, in English 31 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** U K. The 'Washington Post' has an interesting story about the BBC and the current controversy surrounding its reporting on Iraq. The article offers a very good insight into the unique role of the BBC in British public life and its position as a publicly-funded broadcaster that now finds itself at odds with the government of the day. This is a debate that is very familiar for Brits, Australians and Canadians who all have significant national broadcasters funded from tax revenue that vigorously assert their editorial independence, but something of a revelation for Americans who don't have a comparable public institution. It also addresses the problem of how public service broadcasters can be relevant to audiences in competitive media markets, which some commentators believe is the cause of the type of reporting which sparked the current debate. The report is at http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A64586-2003Jul29.html (Matt Francis, Washington, DC, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: IRAQI WEAPONS REPORTS BRING VENERABLE BBC TO A DEFINING MOMENT WITH CREDIBILITY IN QUESTION, CRITICS CALL FOR REFORM --- By Glenn Frankel, Washington Post Foreign Service, Wednesday, July 30, 2003 LONDON, July 28 -- Rod Liddle recalls that when he first interviewed for the job of overseeing "Today," the BBC's flagship news radio program, he half-jokingly set a goal: "I said I wanted a complaint from Alastair Campbell every week." Five years later, Liddle's heirs at the British Broadcasting Corp. have succeeded with a vengeance. Campbell and his boss, Prime Minister Tony Blair, who faces the worst crisis of his six years in office, in part because of a "Today" report, are complaining long and loud. . . http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A64586-2003Jul29.html (via Kraig Krist, Mike Cooper, DXLD) BBC CONTROVERSY DISCUSSED ON DIANE REHM SHOW, Thursday at 10:00EDT http://www.wamu.org/ram/live-toad.ram then on-demand The British Broadcasting Corporation is coming under increasing fire for an Iraqi weapons report that aired in May. A panel joins Diane to discuss the role of the BBC, patriotism and the press. Andrew Kohut, director of the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press Terence Smith, media correspondent and senior producer for the Newshour with Jim Lehrer; former national and foreign correspondent and editor with the New York Times Michael Tracey, professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Colorado at Boulder (via Larry Nebron, DXLD) ** U S A. Hi Glenn, I have a few WBCQ programming notes of interest for your show. As usual, I should have sent them out yesterday, so, sorry about the late arrival. In the "off the schedule" department: Blind Paul's "Pan Global Wireless" Previously heard on Friday 5-5:30 Eastern / 7415 MHz and Saturday 3- 3:30 Eastern / 17.495 MHz. Reason: Hiatus to rebuild studio and production facilities. (Blind friendly computer production is tough) Hopefully PGW will return in the fall on 7.415 MHz in a weekend evening time slot. Pirate John's "Radio DC" Previously heard Monday mornings 12:15-12:45 am Eastern / 7.415 MHz Reason: No problem with show content or financial status, but rather that John apparently made insulting anti-Semitic remarks to station owner Allan Weiner during a business phone call in which John had called to complain about a problem with the broadcast of his show. As a result, Allan exercised his right as owner and general manager of WBCQ to drop "Radio DC" as clients. In the "on the schedule" department: "Area 51" Hosted by Tim Smith and / or Michael Ketter --- Heard Sunday from 6pm - Midnight Eastern on 5.100 MHz. [Sun 2200-0400 Mon UT] It will feature the best of WBCQ's entertainment programming, with an emphasis on shows that have been off of the schedule for awhile. Rebroadcasts of "The Radio Detective", "Planet Lavender", "Ideo Audio", "Seldom Heard Radio", Le Bon Bon Club and more. Plus there will be new shows and current reruns of favorites like "Marion's Attic", "The Lost Discs Radio Show", Radio TimTron Worldwide and others. Basically, it will be a kind of "Best of WBCQ" program with an hour or so of live talk and e-mail / phone in interaction mixed in. You can contact the show at: area51@wbcq.us Requests are definitely welcome and encouraged. Well, as far as other things go, Tasha did agree to do a newsletter starting in the Fall, (electronic, weekly with program features and stuff). As far as WOR goes, I don't know whether your Monday morning show will move up a half hour or not. I haven't heard from Allan about it yet, as he has been on vacation. I more than likely won't have the opportunity to speak to him till Friday. My best guess is that WOR will move up to 12:15 am Eastern (where Radio DC was before). I'll let you know as soon as I know. Well, I hope that you are having a good week, and thanks again for any mentions of programming notes that you give WBCQ on World of Radio. Take care, (Michael Ketter / WBCQ, July 30, WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. I have been moved to write a radio related column for the Aug. 1 edition of the weekly Krum Star, under my "Krumudgeon" logo. It reads: Bob Hope was not my No. 1 favorite radio comedian, but he was up there among the greats on my personal favorite list. His death this week means the last of the giants from the glory days of network radio has passed away. Well, before you jump in to remind me that Art Linkletter is still alive, let me make a distinction between comedians and masters of funny ceremonies. Hope, Jack Benny, Fred Allen, George Burns (whose wife, Gracie Allen, was not related to Fred), Jimmy Durante and Red Skelton topped a list of comedians who got their starts in the old vaudeville days of the '20s, then made the transition to that magic medium of the '30s that brought voices, music, sound effects and other artifacts of the theater of the imagination into our homes. During my childhood, there were no computers, no camcorders, no television sets. To see a movie, we had to go to the theater downtown. To listen to music, we had to turn on the radio or put an easily breakable 10-inch disk that could hold a maximum of five minutes of sound on each side onto the spindle of our phonograph and, after the needle ran through the grooves a few times, listen to the resultant scratches as well as the music. Or, in a throwback to the turn of the previous century, we could play the piano in the parlor. Sunday in Oregon was the greatest day for radio in the '40s. Jack Benny came on at 4 p.m. (7 p.m. in the East) and his program was repeated at 9:30 p.m. on the coast. Benny's musical sidekick, Phil Harris, had a show at 4:30; then came Fred Allen at 5. Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy were also in the Sunday lineup . imagine a radio ventriloquist. It didn't matter that Bergen's lips moved when Charlie McCarthy, Mortimer Snerd or Effie Clinker spoke. All these shows had, essentially, the same format. There'd be an introductory bit, a skit, a musical interlude, an announcer whose commercials would be interspersed into the continuity of the program, and some patented, ongoing gags that were even funnier when you knew they were coming. Each show was a half hour long, and was sponsored by just one company. There'd be three commercials, mostly integrated into the script, for the single product, and the listener would associate the star with the product. I still think of Pepsodent tooth paste when I think of Bob Hope, and it was a traumatic adjustment when Jack Benny went from Jell-O to Lucky Strike cigarettes. (I never took up smoking, but slogans like "LS-MFT - Lucky Strike Means Fine Tobacco," "Keep Your Eye on the Red Bullseye," and "Sold to the American" immediately come to mind. One of my favorite memories from my own radio career was a 30-minute interview I did in Pampa in the '60s with Speedy Riggs, the tobacco auctioneer on the Lucky Strike commercials.) Fibber McGee and Molly and Johnson's Wax are interconnected in my mind. Edgar Bergen's voices flow on the mythical voice track in my head and Chase and Sanborn Coffee or Royal Pudding, "Rich, rich, rich with flavor, smooth, smooth, smooth as silk; more food energy that sweet, fresh milk" are tracked right along with them. TV advertising today does not imbed itself into my brain - not since the Energizer Bunny, at any rate. I've developed an immunity to it. By the time this column is in print, Bob Hope's legacy will have been touched upon in every newspaper and on every television network. I'm writing this on Monday morning, just after the news of Hope's death broke, and already, Cable News Network is promo'ing a Larry King special to be aired in just a few hours on the man. Hope's work in the classic road pictures with Bing Crosby, his monumental efforts to bring entertainment to U.S. troops on the battlefields during World War II and subsequent conflicts around the globe and his charity activities through the Bob Hope golf classic at Pebble Beach, Calif., are just a few of the memories that, I daresay, any American my age remembers. Hope was a master of the one-liners. Johnny Carson and Jay Leno, on the "Tonight Show," put together routines that follow the Hope pattern, building one topical one-liner after another, but if one put Hope, in his prime, head-to-head with Carson and Leno, the latter two would merely sit down and learn at the master's feet. One advantage Carson, to a small degree, and Leno, on a more wide-open basis, have had over Hope is that the more modern comedians' material doesn't have to stop at suggestive. Hope was known for crossing the line, and there were a couple of legendary occasions when the network cut him off for quips, usually involving the female anatomy, that would be routine and tame by today's standards. The censor, since Hope's heyday, has fallen asleep. Hope satirized himself as the debonair Lothario whose flirtations fell flat. His nose was almost as famous as Jimmy Durante's. "Ski-nose," Hope was called, because the curvature reminded one of a ski-jump. Durante was "El Schnozzola" because of the very size of his proboscis. These things you did not see on radio . well, I take that back. Radio was the theater of the mind, and most of us who sat by our radios and listened to these grand programs had seen pictures in the popular magazines of these people, and they were there, big as life, on the screens inside our heads. I stole a few lines from Hope back in my high school days. I did a routine where I painted myself as the same kind of star athlete Hope painted himself. My favorite: "Football? You should have seen me, dodging, twisting, weaving, turning. Got so I was moving around so much, nobody'd sit on the bench with me." Unlike me, Hope actually had some athletic ability. Before he turned to vaudeville, he'd been in the ring as a prize-fighter, calling himself Packy West. My ambition as a high school class clown was to be a radio comedian. But television came along, enabling those of us with lazy minds to turn them off and substitute the tube, and TV held no appeal for me. There was still good music, and room for satirical disk jockeys, so my love affair with radio continued, even in transition. Then the music changed, and the tastes of the lowest common denominator changed with it. Comedy was no longer wit. It became the stuff we little kids giggled about when there weren't any adults around. Why it's called "adult material," I have no idea. If Bob Hope and Jack Benny had been on the air at the same time, I would have listened to Jack Benny. But in the long term, I believe Hope's contribution to the history of the entertainment industry and its positive effect on American culture is second to no one. Somewhere on high, there's a gathering of fallen American veterans . and Bob Hope now is with them, bringing them the simple joy of laughter (John Callarman, KA9SPA, Family Genealogist, Krum TX, July 28, WTFDA Soundoff via DXLD) ** U S A. JIM BUTLER, LONGTIME KMOX PERSONALITY, DIES IN CALIFORNIA JIM SALTER, Associated Press Writer Wednesday, July 30, 2003 (07-30) 08:49 PDT ST. LOUIS (AP) -- Jim Butler, whose KMOX radio show was once so popular he was deemed the "night mayor of St. Louis," has died. Butler, 76, died Monday at a hospital in Folsom, Calif. A native of Olney, Ill., Butler came to the St. Louis AM radio giant in 1951 and took over the morning show. But he was best known for his nighttime program. "As soon as Jim opened his mouth, people knew who he was," said Frank Absher, the historian for KMOX. "His voice was so unique and so perfect for radio. But he had the intelligence to go with the voice." Butler also covered news stories and was a sports commentator, covering the football Cardinals and the NBA's St. Louis Hawks for several years. In later years, Butler was an executive at the radio station until his retirement in 1989. Butler helped train many prominent broadcasters who began their careers at KMOX -- Joe Garagiola, Jack Carney and Bob Costas, who interned under Butler. "When I was little, he took this new guy under his wing -- Jack Buck," Butler's son, Michael, recalled. "They kind of started out together. That's a pretty good club." Buck, voice of the St. Louis Cardinals for nearly 50 years, died last year. Butler, who wore thick glasses to overcome poor vision, was a longtime volunteer for the blind. In San Francisco, he hosted a weekly radio program in which he read news stories and offered commentary for the blind, Michael Butler said. He also did charity work in which he read letters and other items to visually impaired people. "He touched a lot of individual lives in addition to those he touched over the airwaves," Michael Butler said. A funeral was scheduled for Wednesday in San Francisco. Survivors include three children and five grandchildren. Steve Heesen and Guide Dog Princess Rattan. ACB-L is maintained and brought to you as a service of the American Council of the Blind (via Ray T. Mahorney, DXLD) ** U S A. GRAND TOUR OF RADIO CITY http://www.antiqueradios.com/radiocity.shtml ENJOY! (Mark Durenberger, Vice President, Technical Operations Victory Sports, LLC NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. Not sure if you had seen this yet...and not sure what it means. From http://www.wdaf.com/ Just Released: (Monday, July 28, 2003) After 26 years as ``61 Country`` at 610 on the AM dial, Bob Zuroweste, Entercom Kansas City Market Manager, announced at 7:36 a.m. that WDAF will find a new home at 106.5 on the FM dial ``sometime in the near future.`` Concerning rumors 61 Country`s all- service format may change, Zuroweste reassured listeners, ``It`s like moving your house. There will be a few window dressings and upgrades but in essence, everything will stay the same.`` 73, (Ken Kopp, Amateur Radio: WØNXS, July 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. HAM RADIO DISTRESS CALL YIELDS HELP FROM NEXT STATE When 83-year-old Walter Siebert, K3KBR, of Valley Lee, Maryland, started suffering serious chest pains July 15, he called 911. For reasons yet to be determined, no one answered. So Siebert turned to ham radio and put out a cry for help on 75 meters, saying he was having chest pains and needed to go to the hospital. Larry Wheeler, KG4RGN, heard Siebert`s plea in Williamsburg, Virginia. At the time, Wheeler was monitoring a net on 3947 kHz as part of Amateur Radio Emergency Service District 7`s participation in a Surry Nuclear Power Plant VOPEX (Virginia Operations Plan EXercise) drill. He notified the net to clear the frequency and contacted Siebert to get the necessary details. Wheeler then got in touch with the 911 dispatcher in James City County, Virginia. The 911 dispatcher in turn was able to reach the proper authorities in Maryland and get medical help to Siebert, who was hospitalized. Siebert told his son Martin, with whom he lives, that ham radio saved his life. Wheeler told reporters that he was in the right place at the right time (ARRL July 30 via John Norfolk, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ZIMBABWE. IRANIAN TEAM IN HARARE TO "RESUSCITATE" STATE BROADCASTER ZBC | Excerpt from report by Zimbabwean radio ZBC National FM Radio on 29 July The Iranian delegation which arrived in the country yesterday held a meeting with the minister of information in the president's office, Prof Jonathan Moyo, in his Munhumutapa offices in Harare. The delegation is in the country to lend technical expertise to the ZBC [Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation] so that the improved broadcaster would be able to air programmes that have relevance to the changing Zimbabwean needs. Professor Moyo hailed this expertise as important as it would ensure that the whole country receives coverage of local programmes, thus protecting the nation from receiving American programmes such as those of Studio Seven. He further praised the relations between Zimbabwe and Iran, which he said started a long time ago. The Iranian ambassador to Zimbabwe, Mr Hamid Moayyer, said Iran will open offices in Harare to enable the ZBC project to be carried out with ease. He added that the Iranian delegation currently in Zimbabwe is here to resuscitate the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation. [Passage omitted] Source: ZBC National FM Radio, Harare, in Xhosa 1620 gmt 29 Jul 03 (via BBCM via WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DXLD) ``Protecting from receiving programmes such as Studio Seven`` --- Iran ``protects`` itself against American programs by extensive jamming on SW, MW, and as we have seen recently, satellite. How kind of them to extend this expertise to Mugabe (Glenn Hauser, WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ZIMBABWE: MOYO ATTACKS US "PROPAGANDA" The Zimbabwean Minister of Information, Professor Jonathan Moyo, has accused the United States of intensifying its hostility towards Zimbabwe by setting up a radio station targeting the country's rural people and churning out propaganda about regime change. Moyo said the US government was sowing seeds of division among people in rural areas using a radio station known as Studio 7 [sic]. Professor Moyo was speaking as he received an Iranian delegation on a five-day working visit to assist in the revamping of the TV and FM transmitters of the state-run Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation. He said the revamping of the FM network was an important national obligation, which must be fulfilled as a matter of urgency. Areas such as Victoria Falls and Kariba which have poor reception should be given priority as they were exposed to hostile broadcasting by the British and Americans, according to the Minister. Andy Sennitt comments: Studio 7 is in fact not a radio station, but a programme produced by the Voice of America that was introduced in May this year. It is on the air Monday to Friday at 1700-1800 UTC in English, Shona and Ndebele on mediumwave 909 kHz and shortwave 13600 and 17895 kHz (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 30 July 2003 via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED [non]. Amigos DXistas! En DXLD 3-134 tiene Adán González de Venezuela algunas estaciones no identificadas: En 4426.59 kHz, 0048 UT, 12/07, sermón religioso. Bjorn Malm: "Es Radio Bambamarca (Perú) que tiene programación religiosa la mayor parte de la noche. No estoy seguro pero creo que se llame la programación religiosa `LV de la Salvación`. En 4460.81 kHz, 0044 UT, 12/07, SINPO 2/1. Bjorn Malm: "Es Radio Nor Andina, Celendín (Perú)". En 4650.35 kHz, a las 2226 UT, con SINPO 2/2, anuncios de servicio público y menciones constantes de "Acapulco". Demasiada estática. No pude identificarla. (27/07). Bjorn Malm: "Es Radio Santa Ana (Bolivia). Estaba antes en aproximadamente 4949 kHz". En 4716.77 kHz, 12/07, 2327 UT. Baladas en español, locutora de guardia. SINPO 3/2. Bjorn Malm: "Tiene que ser Radio Yura (Bolivia)``. En 4815 kHz, a la 0110 UT, locutora de guardia presentaba música romántica en español: Marco Antonio Solís "Vivir sin tí" y Enrique Iglesias. Saludos al aire. Identificaba el programa como "Variedades musicales". En ningún momento la locutora dijo el nombre de la estación, en más de 15 minutos. Promociones con demasiados efectos de "eco", que dificultan la escucha de un nombre concreto. Sugerencia: como locutor profesional, creo que los colegas deberían poner más ciudado en decir el nombre de la estación y dónde se halla, al menos cada dos canciones. Sería lo ideal. (27/07). SINPO 32432. Bjorn Malm: ``Es Radio Buen Pastor, Saragúro (Ecuador). No se identifica a menudo. Es más común que se identifique usando su frecuencia en FM sin nombre`` En 5460.33 kHz, el 28/07, a la 0148 UT, música andina. Sin identificar. Bjorn Malm: ``Es Radio Bolívar (Perú)``. En 5470.75 kHz, a las 2348 UT, música rumbera. Señal muy débil: 2/1. (27/07). Bjorn Malm: ``Es Radio San Nicolás(Perú) recientemente reactivada``. En 5637.21 kHz, a las 0154 UT, música andina instrumental, con SINPO 2/1, con clara inteferencia de radioaficionados. (28/07). Bjorn Malm: ``Es Radio Perú, San Ignacio (Perú)``. En 5677.98 kHz, muy buena señal con música y locutor de guardia. Hablaba demasiado rápido y atropellado. No se le entendía nada. 0158 UT, SINPO 4/3. Despedida a las 0218 UT. Sin identificar Bjorn Malm: ``Es Radio Ilucán (Perú). Bastante común también en sus harmónics de Onda Media 1420 kHz: 2840 y 4260 kHz". Björn Malm, La Prensa 4408 y Vaca de Castro Quito, Ecuador. (+593 2) 2598 470. JRC 535 – HF 150. MFJ 616 – MFJ 1025. 12m LW + 24m LW + Longwire Magnetic Balun 73s de..... (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ POWERLINE COMMUNICATIONS ++++++++++++++++++++++++ The real threat of PLC may not come from electricity companies, but from your neighbor's PLC LAN (local area network). In the German ham magazine 'Funk' 6/2003 there is a test of one of one of the new PLC-modems connecting more computers in a flat or a house via your existing power lines, making a local network including internet from your DSL connection. They test the PLC-Modem Easyhome using the 'Home-Plug Power Alliance' standard with 84 carriers between 4.3 and 20.9 MHz in the OFDM mode (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing). The speed is up to 14 Mbits/second. The modem is sold by Deneg in the German city of Garbsen near Hannover. The company's German info is at: http://www.easyhome.deneg.de/produkt/details.php?ProduktID=002+02+01 and a drawing of how the system may be connected is at: http://www.easyhome.deneg.de/produkt/beispiel.php?ProduktID=002+02+01&PHPSESSID=f0f374cad0e6396b1ff761b1e86e6fc3udio The test showed that the ham bands were not affected, but the broadcast bands were heavily disturbed. Signals of up to S9+10dB drowned in noise from the many carriers 200 kHz apart in the broadcast bands. But of course, stronger signals were less noisy. Even when the computers were not in use the modems sent short pulses to check the system. But these were so short that they actually didn't disturb reception. Unfortunately the test didn't show how far away these disturbances occur, but your reception surely is affected if your neighbor installs the modems and surfs the net all day long! Audio samples are available from http://www.qsl.net/dg5dbz/plctest/index.html where you also can read the test - if you know German! I was able to download the latter four clips, not the first ones, and they sure are convincing!! Another German company, Devolo in Aachen, has a dLAN system using adapters put directly into your AC plug, and then again using your existing wiring to connect other computers up to 200 meters away. But they state that your household electricity meter serves to block out unwanted access from the outside. I guess they use the same system making the same unwanted 84 carriers in the short wave spectrum disturbing reception in the neighborhood. I asked the Director of Marketing and Public Relations about the signal power of their system, and the German reply reveals that they also show special attention to the ham bands: "Die spektrale Sendeleistungsdichte ist -50dBm/Hz, auf Amateurfunkfrequenzen -80dbm/Hz, bei einer Bandbreite von ca. 17MHz sind dass ca. +22dBm (160mW) bzw. ca. -8dBm (160uW).(Alle Werte auf 50 Ohm bezogen.) Da die Einkopplung symmetrisch erfolgt wird nur ein kleiner Teil dieser Leistung vom Leitersystem der Stromleitung abgestrahlt. Mit freundlichen Grüssen, Christoph Rösseler" Or for non-German speakers: The spectral density of the transmitting power is -50 dBm/Hz, on amateur frequencies -80 dBm/Hz, and at a band width of approx. 17 MHz this is approx. +22 dBm (160 mW), respectively approx. -8 dBm (160 uW). (All values at 50 ohm). As the connection is done symmetrically only a small part of the power is radiated by the power lines. An English description is seen at: http://www.en.devolo.biz/products/dlan.php (click on the product name for specifications). Finally, here in Denmark I believe that PLC coming from the electric power companies now is out of the question. Instead they - and others - concentrate on delivery of Internet, Radio, TV, Telephone... via optical fiber cables (Erik Køie, Copenhagen. July 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Larry, you bring up a good point with cable tv. It is getting almost impossible to DX the AM band with the cable TV leakage. Ever since they started using the cable for internet and more recently (and worse yet) broadcasting digital cable signals over the wire. This (30 year) old cable wiring can't seem to handle the job. I now have noise across the entire band--a sort of morse code sound with medium pitch. Yes it is coming via the cable line as I have checked it out. The cable company admits there is problems but will not do anything. When they originally installed the underground wiring 30 years ago, they also put it too close to the electric wiring going into all the houses. So we get noise going into the power lines too (besides poor reception). The cable company says it is too expensive to lay new wiring and will not be done. The techs don't care about the MW dxing (most don't understand it). I would like to dig up/pull out the wiring from the house to the cable box, but I have to consider my elderly mother and what little TV she watches. Broadband over the power lines?... just wonderful (Robin Christoff, Welland, Ontario, Canada, NRC-AM via DXLD) I'd bet if you suggested that you hire one of their subcontractors to dig out the old line and replace it with new cable on a different path, you might get a different answer - and hopefully you could afford it. I've heard of some folks hereabouts who have done that - not for DX reasons, but on account of unwanted pickup or leakage on the cable lines coming in with the power lines as you mentioned. (Russ Edmunds, Blue Bell, PA, ibid.) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ FORECAST OF SOLAR AND GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY 30 JULY - 25 AUGUST 2003 Solar activity is expected to be at low to moderate levels. Region 421 has the potential for M-class events through the first half of the period. The block of active longitudes (L = 190 - 205), which rotated around the west limb this period, will return by mid August and may produce moderate solar activity levels. No greater than 10 MeV proton events at geosynchronous orbit are expected. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux is expected to reach high levels on July 30 - 05 August, 10 - 11 August, and again on 13 - 16 August, due to recurrent coronal hole high speed streams. The geomagnetic field is expected to range from quiet to major storm levels during the period. A large, recurrent coronal hole high speed stream in expected to become geoeffective on 28 July – 03 August, and produce active to minor storm levels. Coronal hole effects are expected again on 7 - 9 August and again on 11 – 17 August. :Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt :Issued: 2003 Jul 29 2211 UTC # Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Environment Center # Product description and SEC contact on the Web # http://www.sec.noaa.gov/wwire.html # # 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table # Issued 2003 Jul 29 # # UTC Radio Flux Planetary Largest # Date 10.7 cm A Index Kp Index 2003 Jul 30 115 25 5 2003 Jul 31 120 20 4 2003 Aug 01 115 20 4 2003 Aug 02 115 20 4 2003 Aug 03 110 15 3 2003 Aug 04 110 15 3 2003 Aug 05 105 10 3 2003 Aug 06 105 10 3 2003 Aug 07 105 25 5 2003 Aug 08 115 20 4 2003 Aug 09 125 15 3 2003 Aug 10 135 15 3 2003 Aug 11 135 25 5 2003 Aug 12 140 25 5 2003 Aug 13 140 20 4 2003 Aug 14 140 15 3 2003 Aug 15 140 15 3 2003 Aug 16 140 15 3 2003 Aug 17 140 15 3 2003 Aug 18 140 15 3 2003 Aug 19 135 12 3 2003 Aug 20 135 12 3 2003 Aug 21 125 20 4 2003 Aug 22 115 15 3 2003 Aug 23 110 12 3 2003 Aug 24 110 12 3 2003 Aug 25 115 15 3 (http://www.sec.noaa.gov/radio via WORLD OF RADIO 1193, DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-135, July 29, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1192: RFPI: Wed 0130, 0800, 1400 on 7445, 15039 [based on monitored first airing around 1930 Tue instead of 1900] WWCR: Wed 0930 on 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1192.html FIRST AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1193: Wed 2200 on WBCQ 7415, 17495-CUSB Thu 2030 on WWCR 15825 Fri 1930? on RFPI 15039 Sun 0031 on WINB 12160 ** ARGENTINA. 5241.00 LSB, Broadcast feeder - FM HIT 105.5, Buenos Aires, Jul 27, 0135-0300, pop music, ads, announcer between songs, 0230 telephone talk, ID's "FM Hit", "105.5", fair to good signal with harsh ute QRM from 5237 (Mark Mohrmann, Coventry, VT, NRD 535D, V-Beam 140m at 180 deg. "VT-DX" http://www.sover.net/~hackmohr/ DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BELGIUM. This week`s RVi Radio World features vintage recordings of KOHO 1170, Hawaii, with Hawaiian music, Japanese announcement; R. Cook Islands from the 1970s; R. Huaraki(?) and R. Windy 2XW, 890, Wellington, New Zealand. Listen for one week only: http://www.vrt.be/wm/rvi/rw_HI.asx or http://www.vrt.be/wm/rvi/rw_LO.asx (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOLIVIA. Retorno frecuencia: 4930 Radio San Miguel, Riberalta, 2300, 27th/july, ID (Rogildo Aragão, Bolivia, hard-core-dx via DXLD) [Previously:] 4734.3v, RADIO SAN MIGUEL, 2305, 25th July distorted audio Spanish, program "Integración Docente" 2330 ID "...toda Bolivia, señal internacional, (YL) en Riberalta, Beni, 4925 kHz, onda corta, San Miguel, formar y informar es nuestra meta con un formato noticioso, cultural y educativo" 73 (Rogildo Fontenelle Aragão, Quillacollo, Bolivia, Sony ICF2001-Lowe HF-225E LW50m, ibid.) ** BRAZIL. Among the wealth of resources at the Nagoya DX Circle website is this page listing Brazilian stations by state, not only SW but also those with webcasts and direct audio linx; and then a SW frequency list, researched by Shigenori Aoki: http://www2.starcat.ne.jp/%7Endxc/br.htm (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. No dia 4 de agosto, estréia a nova programação da Rádio Ribeirão Preto, de Ribeirão Preto (SP). A emissora pertence, agora, aos jornalistas José Luiz Datena e Jorge Kajuru. Vários anúncios estão sendo veiculados pela emissora a respeito da mudança da programação. Um deles diz: "rádio nas mãos de quem é do rádio". Outro fala na história dos jornalistas. Foram gravados por Marcos Hummel, apresentador da TV Bandeirantes, e Walker Blás, noticiarista da Rádio Bandeirantes, de São Paulo (SP). A Rádio Ribeirão Preto, que também se identifica como Rádio 79, transmite em 3205 kHz, em 90 metros. Tem sintonia boa em diversos locais do Brasil e exterior. É ver para crer! BRASIL - A equipe de esportes da Rádio Bandeirantes, de São Paulo (SP), vai acompanhar os atletas brasileiros no Pan-Americano de Santo Domingo, na República Dominicana, a partir do início de agosto. Serão apresentados, na programação da emissora, flashes das competições e resultados das últimas provas. Em ondas curtas, você confere em 6090, 9645 e 11925 kHz. BRASIL - A Rádio Clube, de Marília (SP), voltou a emitir em ondas tropicais. Foi ouvida, em Porto Alegre (RS), em 25 de julho, a partir de 0130, em 3235 kHz. Na oportunidade, levava ao ar o programa De Tudo um Pouco, na apresentação de TJ. Foi monitorada, em outros horários. Ao que tudo indica, pode ser captada entre 2100 e 1000. Ao amanhecer, a emissora apresenta um programa sertanejo, com comando de Arari. Em seu programa, à noite, TJ informa que a emissora "espera cartas do Brasil e do exterior". Para tanto, anuncia o seguinte endereço: Caixa Postal 326, CEP: 17500-970, Marília (SP). Vale informar que, em anúncio da indústria Phillips, do início dos anos 70, a Rádio Clube aparecia emitindo pela freqüência de 3255 kHz (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX July 28 via DXLD) ** COOK ISLANDS. See BELGIUM ** COSTA RICA. Contrary to the earlier info, as confirmed on the RPFI website, one of Kofi Annan`s addresses is sg@un.org and not orsg@un.org (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Heard yesterday on RFPI that August 4 is the eviction date. This may or may not be the last day for RFPI. Who knows? Checked their new website, http://www.saverfpi.org and it is up (Ulis Fleming, MD, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) The new web site for RFPI [basically a forum board] is up and working --- http://www.saverfpi.org "RFPI is incurring steep legal bills in its fight to stay alive, eating deeply into our operating budget. We need to raise several thousand dollars to keep up the struggle. Can you help us? Please donate whatever you can. This is your radio station and the only one of its kind in the world. Let's make sure that it survives!! And be sure to check back here often for updates to the current situation and how you can stay involved. We greatly appreciate your support!" The question arises --- is RFPI going to attempt some kind of emergency broadcasting configuration after August 4? (Mike Terry, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Tuesday morning heard Naomi announcing that RFPI supporters were invited to be present at the station next Monday morning August 4 at 9 a.m. local to `observe` what happens when the eviction deadline arrives (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) The University for Peace wants RFPI to move by Monday next week. For the time being there are staff members in the studio and continuing the broadcasts. I can actually hear the signal quite well during the night time BST on 7445 kHz. So, still enough time for those of us who wish that RFPI survives to send a letter or an e-mail expressing our support. More info in previous postings on this list or on the RFPI website http://www.rfpi.org Greetings from London (Thomas Voelkner, hard-core-dx via DXLD) 15038.78 at 0100 with usual good signal in South Florida. 73, (Bob Wilkner, UT July 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Parece una comedia clásica del siglo XVI. ¡La Universidad por La Paz pelea contra la Radio por La Paz!...... ¡gringos! (Elmer Escoto, Honduras, radioescutas via DXLD) ** CUBA. LA MAYOR CÁRCEL DE PERIODISTAS DEL MUNDO En Cuba ya no se censura, se encarcela. El 18 de marzo la policía de Fidel Castro detuvo a 26 periodistas independientes al mismo tiempo, y por los mismos motivos, que a medio centenar de disidentes políticos. http://www.rsf.fr/rubrique.php3?id_rubrique=372 (RSF via gh, DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. Radio y Televisión Martí en la mira de la Casa Blanca RUI FERREIRA, El Nuevo Herald TOMADO DE LA SECCION METROPOLIS DEL PERIODICO "EL NUEVO HERALD" DE FECHA LUNES 28 DE JULIO DEL 2003. http://www.miami.com/mld/elnuevo/news/local/6398572.htm El Nuevo Herald | 07/28/2003 | Posted on Mon, Jul. 28, 2003 Después de las irregularidades detectadas en la anterior administración de Radio y Televisión Martí, un alto funcionario del gobierno del presidente George W. Bush informó a El Nuevo Herald, bajo condición de anonimato, que la Casa Blanca tiene los ojos bien puestos en los nuevos directivos de las estaciones de transmisiones hacia Cuba, y agregó que exigirá responsabilidades por las decisiones de éstos. El importante funcionario continuó diciendo que esta vez no van ''a tolerar ningún problema, porque el Presidente está bien consciente de la importancia de Radio y Televisión Martí''. ''Estas trasmisiones son una prioridad de esta administración para promover la democracia en Cuba'', añadió la fuente. El anterior director de la Oficina de Transmisiones hacia Cuba (OCB), Salvador Lew, prácticamente fue obligado a renunciar hace unos cuatro meses, después de que un informe de la Oficina del Inspector General del Departamento de Estado concluyó que en los primeros seis meses de su mandato hubo irregularidades en su gestión que incluyeron amiguismo, contratos firmados sin cumplir con los parámetros legales, y mala administración en general. ''Aquello fue un desastre, por eso no lo vamos a tolerar de nuevo'', afirmó la fuente. Una vez que lograron su salida, la administración nombró al abogado Pedro Roig, conocido por su activismo político anticastrista, y quien colaboraba ya con Radio Martí. ''Pedro sabe perfectamente que será llamado a dar explicaciones si las cosas no marchan bien'', enfatizó la fuente. La semana pasada, Roig nombró como nuevo director de Radio Martí al ex jefe de prensa de la alcaldía de Miami, Jorge Luis Hernández, de 62 años, quien fue ejecutivo de Unión Radio y de La Cubanísima (1140 AM) hace 15 años. ''Creo que es el hombre ideal porque tiene experiencia en asuntos cubanos y en la radio. Tiene dominio en el manejo de este tipo de operaciones y conoce la mecánica de las relaciones con el gobierno'', señaló Roig a El Nuevo Herald. Durante su labor en la alcaldía, comisionados municipales se quejaron de que Hernández no sabía organizar las operaciones de su oficina y se preocupaba demasiado de las actividades del entonces alcalde Joe Carollo. Roig afirmó no estar al tanto de los detalles de la salida de Hernández de la alcaldía, pero restó importancia al hecho. La fuente de la administracion Bush coincidió. ''Fue una decisión de Pedro; nosotros aquí hemos escuchado cosas buenas de él'', añadió. Para Hernández, los cuestionamientos de los comisionados eran sólo ''política'', y ''cuando la política está involucrada en algo quien sufre es el servidor público'', aseguró el nuevo director de Radio Martí, quien recibe un salario de $97,000 anuales. ''Aquí mis intenciones son claras, estoy entusiasmado con este trabajo, y quiero hace un trabajo lo más profesional posible, y ayudar a promover la democracia en Cuba'', señaló. En días pasados, Roig también tomó otra decisión. Despidió al jefe de despacho que heredó de la anterior administración, Fernando Rojas, otrora asesor político del líder de la Fundación Nacional Cubano Americana, el fallecido Jorge Mas Canosa. Rojas estuvo casi dos años en la OCB, donde tuvo siempre un perfil discreto, tratando de aplacar los ánimos entre los empleados descontentos, velando por la buena imagen de la entidad y lidiando con los exabruptos de Lew. Roig no quiso dar detalles sobre la salida de Rojas porque ``es un asunto privado, sobre el cual no tengo comentarios''. Pero El Nuevo Herald supo que entre los dos hubo ''fuertes divergencias, casi de fondo'' sobre el funcionamiento, la organización y la contratación de personal. A los empleados de la OCB no les informaron el cambio. Oficialmente, Rojas se encuentra de vacaciones. ''Pedro tenía toda la autoridad para cambiar a su jefe de despacho. Esas cosas suceden, y sobre ello puedo asegurar que la Casa Blanca le proporcionará un trabajo acorde con su preparación, porque Fernando es una persona muy preparada que conoce muy bien cómo funciona la política y no debemos desperdiciarla'', indicó la fuente de la administración. Cordiales 73's (via Oscar de Céspedes, FL, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** ECUADOR. Ecos del Portete, Girón (cerca Cuenca) ahora de nuevo está en la misma frecuencia de 1610.10 [que R. Sabor, Perú] después de una visita corta en aproximadamente 1613v kHz. Tengo que escuchar después a las 2100 hora local, Portete está saliendo más o menos a esa hora, y tempranito en la mañana. 73s de (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, July 28, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** ECUADOR [and non]. New schedule for HCJB"s "DX Partyline" effective from July 24, 2003 Sat 0900-0930 5070 via WWCR 1230-1300 15115 via HCJB QUI 1430-1500 15390 via HCJB KNX Sun 0000-0030 12160 via WINB 0200-0230 5070 via WWCR Tue 0830-0900 11750 via HCJB KNX 0930-1000 9475 via WWCR Thu 2000-2030 15825 via WWCR (Observer, Bulgaria, July 29, via DXLD) ** FRANCE. New MW stations: A N N E X E (*) Nom du service : Superloustic. Zone de planification : Paris. Fréquence : 999,00 kHz. Adresse du site : rue de la Plesse, 91140 Villebon-sur-Yvette. Altitude du site : 157,00 mètres. Altitude de l'antenne : 227,00 mètres. Puissance (PAR max.) : 5 kW. Contraintes : néant. (*) Sous réserve de l'avis favorable de la coordination internationale J.O n 173 du 29 juillet 2003 page 12895 Conseil supérieur de l'audiovisuel Décision n 2003-414 du 22 juillet 2003 autorisant la SA Télérama à exploiter un service de radiodiffusion sonore par voie hertzienne terrestre en modulation d'amplitude analogique intitulé Radio Livres Télérama-RLT NOR: CSAX0301414S A N N E X E (*) Nom du service : Radio Livres Télérama-RLT. Zone de planification : Paris. Fréquence : 1 062,00 kHz. Site d'émission : Etoile du Pave Meudon, 92360 Meudon. Altitude du site : 171 mètres. Altitude de l'antenne : 271 mètres. Puissance (PAR max.) : 5 kW. Contraintes : néant. (*) Sous réserve de l'avis favorable de la coordination internationale ______________________________________________________________________ J.O n 173 du 29 juillet 2003 page 12896 Conseil supérieur de l'audiovisuel Décision n 2003-415 du 22 juillet 2003 autorisant la SA La Radio de la mer à exploiter un service de radiodiffusion sonore par voie hertzienne terrestre en modulation d'amplitude analogique intitulé La Radio de la mer NOR: CSAX0301415S A N N E X E (*) Nom du service : La Radio de la mer. Zone de planification : Paris. Fréquence : 1 080,00 kHz. Site d'émission : Etoile du Pavé, 92360 Meudon. Altitude du site : 171 mètres. Altitude de l'antenne : 271 mètres. Puissance (PAR max.) : 5 kW. Contraintes : néant. (*) Sous réserve de l'avis favorable de la coordination internationale ______________________________________________________________________ J.O n 173 du 29 juillet 2003 page 12897 Conseil supérieur de l'audiovisuel Décision n 2003-416 du 22 juillet 2003 autorisant la SAS Image On Air à exploiter un service de radiodiffusion sonore par voie hertzienne terrestre en modulation d'amplitude analogique intitulé La Radio du temps libre NOR: CSAX0301416S A N N E X E (*) Nom du service : La Radio du temps libre. Zone de planification : Paris. Fréquence : 1 314,00 kHz. Site d'émission : rue de la Plesse, 91140 Villebon-sur-Yvette. Altitude du site : 157 mètres. Altitude de l'antenne : 227 mètres. Puissance (PAR max.) : 5 kW. Contraintes : néant. (*) Sous réserve de l'avis favorable de la coordination internationale ______________________________________________________________________ J.O n 173 du 29 juillet 2003 page 12898 Conseil supérieur de l'audiovisuel Décision n 2003-417 du 22 juillet 2003 autorisant la SAS Compagnie de Larmor à exploiter un service de radiodiffusion sonore par voie hertzienne terrestre en modulation d'amplitude analogique RNT Radio Nouveaux Talents NOR: CSAX0301417S A N N E X E (*) Nom du service : RNT. Zone de planification : Paris. Fréquence : 1 575,00 kHz. Adresse du site : Etoile du Pave Meudon, Meudon (92360). Altitude du site : 171 mètres. Altitude de l'antenne : 271 mètres. Puissance (PAR max.) : 5 kW. Contraintes : néant. (*) Sous réserve de l'avis favorable de la coordination internationale ______________________________________________________________________ J.O n 173 du 29 juillet 2003 page 12898 Conseil supérieur de l'audiovisuel Décision n 2003-418 du 22 juillet 2003 autorisant la SAS Editions Hiddekel à exploiter un service de radiodiffusion sonore par voie hertzienne terrestre en modulation d'amplitude analogique intitulé Ciel AM NOR: CSAX0301418S A N N E X E (*) Nom du service : Ciel AM. Zone de planification : Paris. Fréquence : 981,00 kHz. Site d'émission : Ecluse d'Alfortville, 94140 Alfortville. Altitude du site : 33 mètres. Altitude de l'antenne : 56 mètres. Puissance (PAR max.) : 5 kW. Contraintes : néant. (*) Sous réserve de l'avis favorable de la coordination internationale Union des Ecouteurs Français --- Radiodiffusions, utilitaires, radio- écouteurs, radioamateurs, techniques... Courriel: tsfinfo@magic.fr Web: http://www.radiocom.org U.E.F.: B.P.31, 92242 MALAKOFF Cedex, FRANCE. (TSF 2132, excerpt of official notice, via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** HAWAII. See BELGIUM ** HONDURAS. 2859.98 (harmonic 2 x 1430), HRSJ Radio Futura, Jul 25- 27, 0115-0300, fair to good signal all 3 days, sign-off at 0300 with canned announcement, positive ID heard on Jul 26; thanks to Jay Novello, Terry Krueger and Bjoern Malm for IDing this one (Mark Mohrmann, Coventry, VT, NRD 535D, V-Beam 140m at 180 deg. "VT-DX" http://www.sover.net/~hackmohr/ DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. Fred's Close Encounter of the Jovian Kind got me to chase down some facts about actually listening for signals from Jupiter. SPACE TODAY ONLINE has a site dedicated to "How To Hear Radio Signals From Jupiter". http://www.spacetoday.org/SolSys/Jupiter/JupiterRadio.html This page discusses how the signals are generated and points to a NASA project named "Radio Jove" which has some "how to's" in the sidebar of its home page. Apparently a pair of 15 meter dipoles, a hamband receiver that will tune near 21 MHz and a little patience are all that's needed. See the STO page for explanation of Jupiter's 9 hour 55 minute cycle time and something about two trillion Watts. (Damn, sounds like a Canadian NDB! I wonder if its one of those 'Z'-series IDs.) Good DXing, (Joe, K9HDE, swl at qth.net July 28 via DXLD) Hamband receiver? How about a general coverage SW receiver? (gh, DXLD) ** IRAN. Summer A-03 schedule of Voice of Islamic Republic of Iran (VOIROI/IRIB): ALBANIAN 0630-0727 15235 17680 1830-1927 9545 9570 2030-2127 9535 11725 ARABIC 0230-0627 9890 0330-1527 13770 0330-1627 15125 15150 1230-1627 13820 1530-1927 7285 1630-1927 3985 6025 9705 11740 1730-1927 9935 2030-2127 6025 2030-2227 9935 2030-0127 3985 2030-0327 7285 9705 11740 2130-0127 11710 ARABIC# 0330-0427 9610 11875 1930-2027 3985 6025 7285 9705 9935 11740 ARABIC* 0330-0527 7120 7175 7245 ARMENIAN 0300-0327 11860 0930-0957 11700 15260 1630-1727 7230 9780 AZERI 0330-0527 13710 1430-1657 6200 BENGALI 0030-0127 9855 9890 0830-0927 11705 1430-1527 9520 9810 12015 15395 BOSNIAN 0530-0627 15235 17680 1730-1827 7295 9835 2130-2227 9810 11870 CHINESE 1200-1257 17535 21460 21490 21630 2330-0027 11750 15490 15570 DARI 0300-0627 9580 0830-1157 11880 1200-1457 7295 ENGLISH 0030-0227 9590 11920 1030-1127 15450 15550 15600 21470 21730 1530-1627 7245 9635 11775 1930-2027 9800 11670 11750 11860 2130-2227 9870 13665 GERMAN 0730-0827 15084v 17590 {out of order; how come?} 1730-1827 11765 11855 15084v FRENCH 0630-0727 17590 17780 21645 1830-1927 11860 11880 13785 2330-0027 9560 12005 HAUSA 0600-0657 17600 21810 1830-1927 11930 15435 HEBREW 0230-0257 9910 11925 0700-0727 21560 1900-1927 5970 7175 7315 HINDI 0230-0257 15165 17635 1430-1527 11695 12030 13805 15490 extended, ex 1500-1527 ITALIAN 0630-0727 17560 17825 1200-1257 15084v 15235 1930-1957 7295 13650 JAPANESE 1300-1327 15555 17810 2100-2127 11855 13635 KAZAKH 0130-0227 11935 13770 1300-1357 11665 13755 15330 KURDISH/S 0330-0527 15425 KURDISH/S 1130-1427 15440 KURDISH/K 1430-1627 15605 MALAY 1230-1327 15200 17555 21745 2230-2327 9685 11965 PASHTO 0230-0327 7130 9605 11790 0730-0827 15440 1230-1327 9790 11870 13785 1430-1527 7270 1630-1727 6015 7195 9725 PERSIAN 1630-1727 15084v 1930-2027 15084v RUSSIAN 0300-0327 9805 11830 0500-0527 11870 15215 21480 21610 1430-1527 7165 9580 9615 11820 1700-1757 5985 7210 1800-1857 6205 7260 1930-2027 7125 7175 SPANISH 0030-0227 9515 9655 11610 0230-0327 13730 0530-0627 17590 17785 2030-2127 11765 13755 SWAHILI 0330-0427 15265 17570 1130-1227 17800 21810 1730-1827 9655 11995 TAJIK 0100-0227 7180 1600-1727 5955 TURKISH 0430-0557 15260 15365 1600-1727 7165 9550 URDU 0130-0227 9525 11880 13640 1330-1427 9665 11695 13805 15490 retimed, ex 1330-1457 1530-1727 7270 1730-1757 7225 9530 additional transmission UZBEK 0230-0257 7180 1500-1557 5985 # VOICE OF ISLAMIC PALESTINIAN REVOLUTION * VOICE OF ISLAMIC REVOLUTION OF IRAQ S=SORRANI DIALECT K=KIRMANJI DIALECT [of KURDISH] (Observer, Bulgaria, July 29, via DXLD) ** ISRAEL. Hi to you all; You probably are wondering why I have not replied to the postings on the "new Voice of Peace", so here goes. I will make a full and clear statement about this next week, as I have promised Henry AlkSlesi (Abie Nathan's right hand man for the past 30 years) not to react to the news conference that was held yesterday, and press releases and interviews that were given. What I WILL say is this. This group calling themselves the Voice Of Peace, have no legal right to use the name, and its jingles. The name Voice of Peace belongs to Abie Nathan. For the past few months, there has been another group working to return the VOP to the airways --- with the full backing of Abie Nathan and Henry. As we learned of this second group, a meeting was held last Sunday to see if we could come to some middle ground. The meeting was not a success, as the other group wanted the station to be a political station, whereas our plan is to avoid politics altogether, and go on the format of the old VOP, with a humanitarian slant. It seems this left wing group wanted to "beat us to the press". But as we had no plans of going to the press before anything was concrete, this idea seems to be very babyish. To summarize: There are two groups. One, wants to start a peace station with cooperation between the Israelis and the Palestinians. I see nothing wrong with this by the way. The other (the group I am involved in) wants to return the VOP in the way Abie would like it - with some improvements, of course; we can't stay in the 70 and 80's. The name and jingles, etc., belong to Abie Nathan, and only WE have the right to use them. The group I am involved in, has the full backing of Abie, and the people around him. I am sorry it has come to this. We did not want to go public until we had something concrete to go on, and only a few people on this list knew of it. But the going public of this other group has forced my hand to reveal a bit of our plans. As there will be developments over the next few days, I will not write any more. I am also going away for the weekend, and I will come out with a full statement and clarification next Monday. By the way, the project will NOT be offshore (Mike Brand, Israel, From radioanoraksuk via Mike Terry, BDXC-UK via DXLD) "The resurrection of the Voice of Peace is a powerful public expression of the faith still held by the people who pioneered the Israeli-Palestinian peace process a decade ago that dialogue and mutual generosity can bring about an end to the bloodshed. The radio station was operated from 1973 to 1993 by Israeli activist Abie Nathan on a vessel known as the Peace Ship. Saddled with a $300,000 debt due to operating costs and declining advertising revenues, Nathan closed down the station in 1993. He had hoped to attract investment to turn the ship into a floating peace museum, but when that did not work out he scuttled it. The Peace Ship lies today at the bottom of the Mediterranean. But the Voice of Peace is back for a rerun, with an annual budget of nearly half a million dollars, 80 percent financed by the European Union. It is a joint project by Givat Haviva, an Israeli center for Jewish-Arab dialogue, and the Palestinian weekly newspaper the Jerusalem Times. The station will mainly broadcast music, with three hours of original programming in Arabic, Hebrew and English. It will be managed and run by a joint Israeli-Palestinian staff." (An extract of Detailed commentary at http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/07/29/MN72365.DTL via Mike Terry, DXLD) Dear Glenn, Re the return of V. of Peace: I was really happy to hear such a thing as I remember I used to stay awake almost everyday till around midnight to be able to get that station on 1539 kHz. One of the reasons of remembering that station is playing real cool music. They used to play ``I want your SX`` by George Michael almost on weekly basis --- which was COOL for a teenager like me. HI! they used to host BIG NAMES. I remember once the Host of the show was Rick Astley. I don't know bout you guys but when I was a kiddo, his hits were topping the charts all over Europe! Glad to have them back (Tarek Zeidan, Cairo, Egypt, July 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ITALY. ITÁLIA - O que está havendo com a Rai? Recentemente, Caio Lopes, de Itajubá (MG), enviou um informe de recepção para a emissora e recebeu o envelope com os dizeres: "casella chiuso". Pelo visto, o dinheiro anda curto, em que pese um certo político daquelas paragens ser bem abonado. Então, o jeito foi cancelar a tradicional caixa postal 320? (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX July 28 via DXLD) ** LATVIA. According to Latvian sources, the new frequency for the 100 kW Ulbroka SW station will be 9290 kHz (ex 9520, ex 5935). This frequency has been coordinated and will be registered at the coming HFCC conference in August. The transmitter is beamed towards the UK (250 degrees) and is open for customers, with Laser Radio UK as one of the potential users (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, Cumbredx mailing list July 29 via DXLD) ** LIBERIA. NUMBER OF LIBERIAN REFUGEES SEEKING SHELTER AT ELWA REACHES 2,100 Posted by: newsdesk on Monday, July 28, 2003 - 12:53 PM The number of Liberian refugees seeking shelter at Radio Station ELWA`s facilities in Monrovia reached 2,100 on the weekend as fighting among rebels and government forces continues to intensify in the capital. SIM Liberia Business Manager Joe Wankollie said an additional 500 to 600 displaced persons arrived at the ELWA campus on the weekend. ``In addition, there is starting to be a serious food shortage in the area,`` he said in a telephone conversation with SIM Liberia Associate Director Rick Sacra Monday morning. ``A 50 kg bag of rice that had been selling for US$20 was selling for US$35 a bag -- but now can hardly be found.`` Sacra described fighting this weekend as the ``heaviest yet`` as LURD rebels continued attacking key bridges from the port area into other parts of the city. ``The fighting seems to be a standoff,`` he said. ``Neither side is strong enough to convincingly defeat the other. [Since the present siege of the city began on July 4] supplies such as food and medicine are all running short. There is no functioning port in Monrovia now, so no way to get in bulk shipments.`` There were also reports on the weekend of fighting between the government and the MODEL rebel group in Buchanan, Liberia`s second- largest city, 20 miles southeast of Monrovia. Many civilians had fled to Buchanan during the last seven weeks of fighting. Sacra urges people to pray that believers will stand firm amid the turmoil, for successful peace talks in Ghana, for safety of civilians and for the arrival of peacekeeping troops, primarily Nigerians. ELWA continues Christian broadcasting a message of hope -- music, Bible teaching and testimonial programs such as ``Unshackled`` -- on a reduced schedule of about three hours each morning and evening. ``The ELWA hospital also remains open and is treating many sick people, coming especially from the nearby soccer stadium where thousands of displaced people are taking shelter,`` Sacra said. HCJB World Radio works in partnership with ELWA, a ministry founded by SIM in Monrovia in 1954, to air the gospel across the country and West Africa. The radio station was destroyed twice by civil war, first in 1990 and again in 1996. ELWA went back on the air in 1997 with a small FM transmitter. Then in 2000 HCJB World Radio provided a low-power shortwave transmitter, again enabling the station to cover the region. ELWA broadcasts the gospel in 10 languages and plans to add more as resources become available. In recent developments, a Nigeria army spokesman said the first peace troops could deploy as soon as Tuesday for a force seen as crucial to ending two months of fighting for the capital. In Accra, Ghana, however, another day in what have been weeks of off-and-on talks on the peace mission brought no immediate announcement of any firm deployment date. The U.S. has said that West African nations and the U.N. must take the lead in any multinational rescue mission for Liberia. Officials of debt-strapped Nigeria, however, have asked the U.S. for greater assistance. Meanwhile, shelling and other fighting accompanying rebel assaults on the capital have killed hundreds of civilians since June. One rocket, fired by troops loyal to Liberian President Charles Taylor troops from a high building this morning, fell short and plowed into the bedroom of a home on the government-controlled side of the capital, injuring eight civilians, aid workers said. Under international pressure to intervene, President George W. Bush has ordered U.S. ships to take up positions off the coast of Liberia to offer still-unspecified support for a West African-led force. Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz on Sunday repeated U.S. insistence that any American role in the peace force would depend on the West Africans deploying first, and on the departure of Taylor who says he will leave only when peacekeepers arrive. Since June, Taylor has held out promises to step down, only to later renege (HCJB World Radio/SIM/AP July 28 via DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. RADIO NEW ZEALAND INTERNATIONAL TE REO IRIRANGI O AOTEAROA, O TE MOANA-NUI-A-KIWA P O Box 123, Wellington, New Zealand Phone: (64 4) 4741 437 Facsimile (64 4) 4741 433 E-mail address: info@rnzi.com Web Address: http://www.rnzi.com Radio New Zealand International (RNZI) is going to be on air for 24 hours with a new extended news and current affairs service from the beginning of September. A new daily regional current affairs programme called Dateline Pacific will be broadcast at 0800 UT [2000 NZST] Monday to Friday. Dateline Pacific will provide a daily round-up of the very latest news from the Pacific with interviews and features with all the region's newsmakers. It will draw on the work of RNZI staff and 20 Pacific journalists based in the region. An updated version of the programme will run in RNZI`s Pacific Breakfast Show and it will be rebroadcast at different times to give our audiences around the Pacific in different times zones a chance to listen in. Dateline Pacific will also be available to listen to or download from the RNZI web site http://www.rnzi.com The Bulletin service is also being extended with extra hourly Pacific News at 0100, 1100, 1300, and 1500 UT. During our extended hours of broadcasting, Radio New Zealand International will run a mix of RNZI-originated material and the best of New Zealand`s National Radio. All this from 1 September, 2003 RNZI on the air 24 hours a day. Dateline Pacific will play at these times on Short-wave to the Pacific and also the Internet -: 0308, 0808, 1108, 1308, 1508 , 1815, 2015, 2215 UT Pacific News Bulletins can be heard at these times: 0100, 0300, 0800, 1100, 1300, 1500, 1700, 1800, 1900, 2000, 2100, 2200 UT (Adrian Sainsbury, RNZI, also via Wolfgang Bueschel, DX LISTENING DIGEST) See also BELGIUM ** NICARAGUA. A chronology of Radio Nicaragua concludes with: . . .El Ingeniero Enrique Bolaños Geyer, asume la Presidencia de la República en Enero del año 2002. Con su apoyo decidido, Radio Nicaragua contará, a más tardar en el mes de Abril del 2003, con un transmisor de amplitud modulada (AM), con potencia suficiente para llegar hasta el rincón más recóndito de nuestro país y allende nuestras fronteras. Radio Nicaragua está, hoy más que nunca, preparada para cumplir con su misión fundamental, de ser la VOZ OFICIAL DEL ESTADO y servir fielmente al pueblo nicaragüense. Sitio Web de Radio Nicaragua http://www.radionicaragua.com.ni Para complementar la historia de Radio Nicaragua, hay que decir que actualmente transmite en los 620 kHz (OM) y 88.7 Mhz (FM) y también en vivo desde Internet, ya sea en Real Audio o en Winodws Media Player A principios de la década de los año 90, Radio Nicaragua cesó sus transmisiones en onda corta. Recuerdo que era en la banda de 49 metros, aqui en México se escuchaba bien, con interferencia moderada por Radio Canadá. Yo escuchaba esta emisora cuando tenía el nombre de "La Voz de Nicaragua" (Héctor García Boijorge, DF, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** PARAGUAY. El plan de Radio América, del Paraguay, es transmitir, con mucha más potencia, en las siguientes frecuencias, según nos informa Adán Mur, desde la emisora: 1480 KHZ, 1 KW, ZP20 Radio América, desde Ñemby 1480 KHZ, 5 KW, ZP20 Radio América, desde Villeta 1590 KHZ, 1 a 5 KW, Radio Villeta, desde Villeta 9905 KHZ, 1 a 5 KW, ZP20 Radio América, desde Villeta 15483 KHZ, 1 a 5 KW, ZP20 Radio América, desde Villeta (via Arnaldo Slaen, July 28, Conexión Digital via DXLD) So ex-15185 ** PERU. VOLVIO AL AIRE PANAMERICANA TELEVISION LIMA (extraido de El Comercio, Lima) --- Panamericana Televisión volvió a transmitirse para ciudad de Lima. A las 12:01 pm el patrón de sintonía reemplazó a la mancha negra que se apoderó de la señal durante los últimos nueve días. Alejandro Guerrero inició la cuenta regresiva y cuando el rostro de Gunter Rave apareció en la pantalla, los aplausos y abrazos entre técnicos, operadores y directores de cámara no se hicieron esperar. . . http://www.elcomercioperu.com.pe/Noticias/html/2003-07-26/Lima0033842.html (via Arnaldo Slaen, July 28, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** SOLOMON ISLANDS. FYI the radio station has never been off the air and can be heard on 5020+/- 200 Hz. After 1100z they relay the BBC W/S until 1900z. Very interesting listening at present with plenty of appeals for people to co-operate with Task force which arrived on Thursday (Robin L. HARWOOD, Tasmania, July 28, swl at qth.net via DXLD) ** SWEDEN. Frequency change for Radio Sweden International NF 13580, ex 17505 effective July 27: Swedish 1030-1040 Mon-Fri 1030-1100 Sat/Sun 1215-1230 Mon-Fri 1300-1315*Mon-Fri * Radio Prague in English on same 13580!! 1300-1330*Sat/Sun * Radio Prague in English on same 13580!! English 1230-1300 Daily (Observer, Bulgaria, July 29, via DXLD) ** U K. BBC and the government --- Poor reception Jul 24th 2003 From The Economist print edition THE BBC FACES AN UNCERTAIN FUTURE. GOOD WHO should regulate the BBC? And who should pay for it? Until recently, the status quo looked unshakeable. On important questions, like whether its journalists were biased, the BBC would regulate itself, just as it always has. And when its charter comes up for renewal in 2006, few doubted that it would gain another juicy increase in the licence fee, the annual tax paid by every television-owning household in Britain, which currently stands at £116 ($186). Since the row over Iraq's arsenal, those questions look more interesting and open. The BBC has never managed complaints well: robust self-scrutiny is not a strong point of its bureaucratic, inward-looking culture. The final court of appeal is the 11-strong board of governors. But the governors also appoint the BBC's director- general, which critics say makes them too close to the organisation to be able to regulate it properly. The government certainly feels that its complaint over Andrew Gilligan's reporting was badly handled. The governors leapt to Mr Gilligan's defence, largely echoing the BBC management's line and admitting only minor procedural flaws in the reporting of the story. In retrospect, the governors might have done better to wait for a formal complaint from the government and then to investigate it with visible thoroughness, rather than rushing to support their own. Reports suggest that some have since voiced private doubts, but too late to dispel government fury. The most likely alternative to the current system would be to widen the remit of Ofcom, a new communications industry regulator that takes over from five existing bodies at the end of this year. One of these, the Broadcasting Standards Commission, does deal with complaints about the BBC on issues of taste and decency (ie swearing and nudity), but not the most crucial subject of journalistic bias. Although the BBC would resist Ofcom oversight furiously, the day-to- day difference would probably be minor. Ofcom aims to be a light-touch regulator. But, crucially, a complainant with a serious grievance would have an umpire to turn to. The much bigger question is about future financing. Technology is steadily undermining the BBC's main justification for the licence fee: that as everyone benefits from at least some of its services, everyone should pay. Viewing figures are dropping steadily as viewers turn to digital television, which now reaches nearly half the households in the country. The BBC's response so far has been to provide ever more services. Sometimes this is uncontentious—for example in digital radio, now booming, which would never have taken off without BBC backing. But other offerings are controversial—internet-based education, for example, or a specialist history channel that competes directly with an independent commercial outfit. An outside regulator could stop the BBC from treading on so many private-sector toes. Falling viewing figures have not created a financial problem for the BBC, since thanks to the government's generosity the licence fee has been rising at 1.7% above inflation since Labour came to power. But big rows with politicians could undermine the chances of a similarly lavish settlement in 2006. Copyright © 2003 The Economist Newspaper and The Economist Group. All rights reserved (via Neil T. Greenidge, DXLD) ** U K. NOTES FROM THE PREVIOUS WAR --- BIZARRO BROADCASTING COMPANY By Denis Boyles, From National Review- July 29, 2003, 9:55 a.m. A great deal of the current criticism of the British Broadcasting Corporation is based on the BBC's appalling, biased coverage of the war in Iraq. As the war began and the Coalition invasion proceeded across the desert toward Baghdad, I sat watching French TV and listening to the BBC's World Service. That's as close to a state of suspended disbelief as a man can get. As the capital finally fell to the Americans, I made a few notes. Here they are. "I was wrong." Of all the words in all the paragraphs in all the stories ever written by journalists anywhere, the simple inability to utter those three syllables is what distinguishes, say, a Howell Raines from, say, a Michael Kelly. At the end of the day on April 5, 2003, it was also what finally distinguished the BBC World Service's coverage of the war in Iraq from what was going on in the real world. First, a sense of scale: The World Service of the BBC is the planet's radio station, broadcasting around the clock in virtually every major language, from Arabic to Urdu, to some 150 million people - far more than listen to the Voice of America and CNN Radio combined. While most BBC services are funded from the licensing fees charged to U.K. television and radio owners, the World Service is different: Its annual budget of nearly $370 million comes from a direct government grant funneled through the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, to whom it is indirectly responsible. In theory, every significant aspect of broadcasting by the World Service must be justified in its annual report in terms of its "Benefit to Britain." But, in fact, what the World Service does is the World Service's business. And for the most part its business is largely unknown in England, anyway. World Service broadcasts are intended for those living elsewhere. For years, most listeners thought that was fine. The BBC World Service was once the great pleasure of ex-pats and traveling Brits, Aussies, and Americans. It seemed to represent all that was great about faraway Great Britain. Fair, careful news broadcasts, offbeat but intelligent radio documentaries about Patagonia, music from Wales, and goofy old guys with their collections of treasured classical music created a broadcast environment that can only be described as "well-upholstered" - the World Service was a decided luxury for those like me who spent a lot of time away from home in places like Africa and India. But not long ago, and perhaps with some justification, the World Service started taking hits for being too "colonial" in its programming, too British, and not nearly worldly enough. Plus, its numbers started to erode. So the World Service said goodbye to its nutty assortment of odd and unusual radio plays and documentaries. Even "Lilibulero [sic]," the World Service's jaunty, top-of-the-hour signature tune was faded out. Instead of programs that reflected old-fashioned British virtues (like common sense), the World Service adopted an all-news-and-analysis format meant to reflect modern British values - things like "oneness" and tolerance and, lately, a disdain for all things formerly British, like an instinctive trust in the Atlantic alliance. Normally, news-oriented programming at a time when British and Americans are involved in a war would be welcome. But the World Service's revision of focus also coincided unhappily with a key decision announced early in March, as events in Iraq grew hot, by the BBC's controller of editorial policy, Stephen Whittle. It was Whittle's wish that corporation broadcasts specifically reflect antiwar opinion. Imposing a point of view on events before they unfold is a bit audacious. But it was done, and as a result, the Whittle Rule had far-reaching, although not perhaps unintended, consequences. It's also led to some pretty awful examples of lousy journalistic practices. As the first round of explosions rocked Baghdad, for example, the World Service's on-air "Middle East analyst" was a chap from the Arab-funded, pro-Palestinian agitprop group called The Council for the Advancement of Arab-British Understanding (CAABU) - an affiliation never disclosed to listeners. A rough equivalent: CNN hiring an "analyst" to comment on an invasion of Israel without disclosing the fact that he's from the Jewish Defense League. So when the World Service anchor asked him for his analysis, the man promptly pronounced the bombardment "an example of pure American imperialism." Nobody challenged this assertion, [nor?] was he challenged on any of his volatile comments during what became fairly regular World Service appearances. In fact, during it war coverage, the views of guests like the man from CAABU were very rarely balanced with opposing viewpoints, and World Service anchors almost never offered a differing opinion. Instead, the convention is to ask patently biased "analysts" to simply restate their propaganda in more detail: "So, Mr. Hussein, you think this is an illegitimate war, then?" He did, he does and he will tomorrow, too. This insistent bias isn't limited to the World Service's English- language broadcasts, unfortunately. The all-news Arabic service is perhaps worse --- and with consequences far more potentially harmful. As Barbara Amiel has noted in the Telegraph, in the days and weeks leading up to the war, the BBC's Arabic service offered no "Saddam's family firm and the political system underpinning it; there has been virtually no discussion of how he keeps control or the role his sons play in the country. no analysis of [Baathist] war crimes, no serious inquiry about weapons of mass destruction or the policy to destroy oil wells." Instead, listeners were invited to vote on whether the Coalition's invasion would be legal and "and whether the Americans would be looked on as liberators or invaders." In English, Arabic, or any of the other 43 languages used by the BBC World Service, attaching a virulently anti-American viewpoint to one of the most trusted brands in the world has a deep significance. When the Iraqi leadership calls on suicide bombers to attack British and American soldiers, the call goes out over the BBC, without any attempt to deflate the accompanying rhetoric. If a child is hurt anywhere in Iraq as a result of Coalition activity, the World Service is there, broadcasting from bedside and full of sanctimonious fury. You might read about cheering Iraqis greeting troops as they advance through the country, but you will never hear about such a thing on the World Service. The German newspaper Der Tagespiel recently compared CNN Radio to the World Service. CNN, supported by advertisers, was seen by the paper as a uniquely American broadcaster. The World Service, however, was "UN radio." The newspaper meant this as flattery, but it might have added that the World Service resembles the U.N. in other ways, too: it's unresponsive to critics, certain of its virtue, fascinated by radical governments, dependent entirely on taxpayers' handouts for its survival and, after a while, stupidly self-serious, and profoundly depressing. I know. I've been listening to the World Service and nothing else for weeks. I've had a full life. I'm ready to die. Saturday, April 5: this will be the day most people will remember as the day when the journalistic standards of the World Service committed suicide. The BBC's bad day in Baghdad started early: A column of U.S. soldiers had entered southwestern Baghdad just after daybreak. The soldiers - in tanks and armored personnel carriers - drove through the city for several kilometers encountering only sporadic resistance. Near the university, the column turned left, drove out of the capital and parked at the international airport, which was already securely in American hands. In Qatar, the Coalition command center announced the incursion, saying that elements of the 3rd Infantry had gone into the center of Baghdad. At first, the maneuver was reported as a grab for urban territory. Later, more accurate reports, however, said that it was a demonstration by the U.S. that it could and would enter Baghdad at will. Cut to: Andrew Gilligan, the BBC's man in downtown Baghdad. "I'm in the center of Baghdad," said a very dubious Gilligan, "and I don't see anything --- But then the Americans have a history of making these premature announcements." Gilligan was referring to a military communiqué from Qatar the day before saying the Americans had taken control of most of Baghdad's airport. When that happened, Gilligan had told World Service listeners that he was there, at the airport - but the Americans weren't. Gilligan inferred that the Americans were lying. An hour or two later, a different BBC correspondent pointed out that Gilligan wasn't at the airport, actually. He was nearby - but apparently far enough away that the other correspondent felt it necessary to mention that he didn't really know if Gilligan was around, but that no matter what Gilligan had seen or not seen, the airport was firmly and obviously in American hands. It was clearly important to the BBC that Gilligan not be wrong twice in two days. Whatever the truth was, the BBC, like Walter Duranty's New York Times, must never say, "I was wrong." So, despite the fact that the appearance of American troops in Baghdad was surely one of the war's big moments, and one the BBC had obviously missed, American veracity became the story of the day. Gilligan, joined by his colleagues in Baghdad, Paul Wood and Rageh Omaar, kept insisting that not only had the Americans not gone to the "center" - which they reckoned to be where they were - they hadn't really been in the capital at all. Both Omaar and Wood told listeners that they had been on hour-long Iraqi Ministry of Information bus rides - "and," said Wood, "we were free to go anywhere" --- yet they had seen nothing of an American presence in the city. From Qatar, a BBC correspondent helpfully explained that US briefings, such as that announcing the Baghdad incursion, were meaningless exercises, "more PR than anything else." Maybe, implied the World Service, the Americans had made it all up: all day long, Wood repeatedly reported that there was no evidence to support the American claim. At a lunchtime press briefing, the surreal Iraqi Minister of Information, Mohammed Saeed al-Sahaf, gave the BBC some solid support: The American incursion was a hoax, said al-Sahaf. Not only that, he added, the Iraqis had retaken the airport, the Americans had been driven out, and Republican Guard units were "pounding" trapped American troops in a suburban area. The bizarre announcement was accepted at face value by the BBC. For most of the rest of the day, the BBC's correspondents, including its diplomatic correspondent, Peter Biles, confessed to being "confused" by the conflicting statements of the Coalition military command and the Iraqi information ministry. Who could you believe, they kept asking themselves? The BBC's Wood and Omaar, meanwhile, had been reporting from more of Baghdad in interviews organized by the Iraqi government. For example, for most of the day, the World Service broadcast hourly, sometimes without any disclaimers whatsoever, an interview by Paul Wood of a Palestinian in Baghdad. The interview was obviously arranged by the Iraqis; it was exactly the kind of Iraqi-sponsored propaganda that got Peter Arnett, then with CNN, in trouble in Baghdad twelve years ago. Then, like now, everything British and American correspondents in Baghdad did was monitored and approved by the Iraqis. But like the use of "analysts" with unannounced axes to grind, the BBC made little effort to make it clear that its journalists were shoveling manufactured "news." In this instance, Wood had been taken to a poor neighborhood of angry Palestinians. He dutifully described to listeners the broken glass and bent window bars he saw when he entered one man's house. ("Excuse me for not taking off my shoes," he mumbled.) The Palestinian was apparently sheltering his whole family in a couple of rooms and dealing irritably with the shelling and bombardments that have become a fact of life in Baghdad lately. He was not happy. Neither were his kids, although happily they hadn't been harmed. Except psychologically: "What happens to the children when there's bombing?" Wood asked, urgently, compassionately, deeply worried. "Do they cry?" Oh boy, do they ever, said the man. "And what will happen when the Americans come to this street?" Wood asked. We will fight them, said the man, to keep them from taking our homes. NO COALITION HERE! Mid-afternoon, April 5: I have listened to the World Service for five straight hours. During that time, the World Service, in its reporting and analysis, has been obviously deeply skeptical of any Coalition claims of success and insistent that the Americans be denied simple good faith. The anger of Iraqis, however, has been widely and consistently featured. No indication of any spontaneous support for Coalition troops was ever mentioned. Of all of the things the World Service reported during those hours, one item caught my attention and held it: Iraqi TV had been blacked out for most of the day by a power shortage. "How are people in Baghdad getting their information, then?" an anchor asked a correspondent. From the World Service, he said. What a chilling thought. So I decided to try an experiment - kind of a private Reed Irvine science project. I have a friend in a neighboring village here in France who gets most of the English-language TV news channels - not Fox, but CNN, BBC News, ITV, Euro News, Sky, the usual - on a satellite dish. So I gave him a ring, invited myself over, and walked the three or four kilometers to his house, listening to the World Service on a pocket radio as I went. The afternoon of April 5 was a beautiful one in northern France - bright, crisp, clear. But it was dark and gloomy in Baghdad, I was sure. "The Americans are bombing again," the BBC mourned. I imagined angry swarms of citizens gathering in homes and cafes to listen to World Service reports about the duplicitous Americans and their phony incursions. (In fact, I might have passed a few such places in my walk through the French countryside.) When I arrived at my friend's house, I set up my little test. I watched the TV while listening to the World Service on my hand-held radio. It was a startling multimedia event. I could listen to the BBC's Paul Wood telling me once again that there was no sign of the American incursion into Baghdad. Yet on the screen in front of me there was the 3rd Infantry. They were cruising through Baghdad, driving down the highway, turning into the streets. Look! Along the sidewalks, there were waving children and adults, cheering them on. Men in passed by in trucks and cars crying out, "Saddam down!" and giving the soldiers big smiles and waves. I finally turned off the World Service and turned up the television. At the airport, a correspondent was asked about the Iraqi claim that the Americans had been driven out of the airport and were being "pounded" by Republican Guards. He looked around, mystified, then replied that he'd been at the airport for two days, that it was securely in Coalition hands, and that the only Iraqi challenge he had noticed had been a couple of small skirmishes that were quickly quelled by Coalition forces. "Maybe that's what he meant," he said, generously. Behind him, soldiers lounged around like the stranded tourists they were. On the BBC News channel, the anchors got Wood on camera and very gently pointed out to him that they were getting a lot of video in showing the Americans had indeed taken a drive deep into Baghdad and that the information minister's odd claims didn't seem to be holding up. Wood was kind of chubby, younger than I expected. He seemed obviously pained. But he had his story - no Americans in Baghdad as far as he was concerned - and he was sticking to it. But of course he didn't have the story. One of the war's turning points had taken place under his nose and he and Gilligan the rest of his BBC colleagues in Baghdad had missed it, simply because they were convinced of American deceit and could not bring themselves to look for what they refused to believe had taken place. I turned off the TV, had a cup of coffee with my friend, and returned home. After a half hour or so - call me crazy - I once again tuned into the World Service. By now, I wasn't so much interested in how the war was going. I knew American troops weren't trapped anywhere. But the BBC had trapped itself in a big hole, and I wanted to see how they'd get out of it. Jonathan Marcus, the BBC's correspondent in Qatar, was being interviewed by a troubled World Service anchor, "Jonathan, who should we believe? The Americans? Or Saddam?" It's obvious the Iraqis are lying, Marcus shot back, adding that the American incursion was not only real, it was significant and had gone deep into the capital. "Anybody who questions that can't see the forest for the trees," he said. It was the only real-world comment I had heard in a full day of World Service listening. That was the last I heard of Marcus that day. The anchor instantly went to another, more trustworthy correspondent. As midnight approached, the World Service finally conceded that, okay, the Americans had probably reached into Baghdad, but the real story was the way the military guys in Qatar had misled the BBC's correspondents. It was just another reason why nobody trusted the Americans. For example, the BBC correspondents reported, the incursion didn't go to the "center" of Baghdad - or at least far enough to the center that Gilligan and Wood and Omaar could be satisfied. It was confined to the "fringes" of the city. It was a minor thing, really, and the Americans, in their typical cowboy way, had blown it up into something it wasn't. Baghdad was still safely in Saddam's hands, the World Service wondrously reassured its listeners. The Iraqi government's claim to control over the airport was still being reported without comment or qualification. The World Service was still saying the situation was "confused" - and, for the BBC, no doubt it was. CRAZY NEWS FOR CRAZY PEOPLE The World Service began April 6 by broadcasting to the citizens of Baghdad and the rest of the world the report that an Iraqi mullah had called for the faithful in Baghdad to engage in "holy war" against the Americans and the British who would soon be in their midst. I finally turned off the radio and went to bed. Perhaps reporting the mullah's call for jihad at the moment troops were entering the city was just thoughtlessness, the way reporting the Palestinian's call to arms was thoughtless. Or maybe not. Certainly, the men and women who work at the World Service, from director Mark Byford on down to the likes of Andrew Gilligan or Paul Wood, do not expect to have to answer for any of the consequences of their decisions. If confronted, they will claim they are just the messengers. Of course, that's the journalist's equivalent to the Nuremberg defense. But as Andrew Sullivan recently wrote, "What the BBC is able to do, by broadcasting directly to these people, is to... make the war more bloody... If you assume that almost all these reporters and editors are anti-war, this BBC strategy makes sense. They're a military player. And they are objectively pro-Saddam." Baghdad has been Saddamized for decades, so the World Service is just piling on. And while most Iraqis obviously don't like their brutal government, along the streets and down the alleys of Baghdad, there are some pretty crazy people getting their news tonight from the likes of Wood, Gilligan, and the others at the BBC. The Americans will return tomorrow and the next day and the next and the next. Soon, they will be everywhere in Iraq, trying to rebuild the place. But one day, one of those crazy teenagers they produce over there might remember the World Service interview with the Palestinian guy, or that Iraqi mullah's call for jihad. Maybe he'll grab a gun and go out to welcome the British and American newcomers - and get shot before he blows anybody away. Some hopeless, misguided young BBC correspondent, riding his big Scoop moment, will report it on the World Service as an outrage. And he won't be wrong. Denis Boyles, an NRO contributor, is a journalist based in Europe (via Hans Johnson, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** U K [non]. COULD IT BE ANOTHER BRITISH INVASION? By Meg James, Los Angeles Times HOLLYWOOD - The British Broadcasting Corp. has long been an idea factory for American TV producers, dating back to that United Kingdom export "Til Death Do Us Part," recast for U.S. audiences as "All In the Family." But the BBC has been particularly busy in recent months, scripting itself as a bigger player in Hollywood, hoping to wring more money from its concepts and programs. BBC Worldwide Limited, the commercial arm of the venerable network, sold CBS an idea for a unscripted show called "Sack Race," in which a contestant spends a day at work trying to get fired. The unit also recently hooked ABC with a pitch for a dating show, "Nice Package." Plans are in the offing to launch a 24-hour BBC cable news channel in the United States. And BBC executives last week entertained movie executives at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles to angle for a distributor for their feature-length ocean documentary, "The Blue Planet." And while most Hollywood honchos were off celebrating America's July 4th declaration of independence from England, the Brits were busy putting the final touches on a TV development deal with Universal Television and producer Ben Silverman. "We really want to get ourselves into a position where we provide more of the programming of broadcasters' schedules," said Mark Young, president and chief executive of the BBC Worldwide Americas. "We've changed our strategy from being an exporter of British programming into being a creator of global programs." The BBC already has built a presence around the globe. Its news and entertainment channels reach more than 500 million homes in Latin America, Africa, Australia, Europe and Asia. Now, the BBC Worldwide is aggressively making inroads in the United States, hoping to capitalize on its increasing profile. Five years ago, a dozen public television stations in the United States carried BBC's World News program. Now, it's on more than 225 stations nationwide. In the days leading up to the Iraqi war, more than a million U.S. homes tuned into the nightly BBC newscasts. In May, after major combat was declared over, viewership averaged nearly 900,000 homes - a more than 20 percent increase from the previous year. [not in OK! --- gh] Executives said the recent controversy surrounding the BBC's reporting about the British government's use of intelligence to make the case for a war in Iraq, and the subsequent suicide of one of the network's key government sources, has not dampened expansion plans. BBC Worldwide this month reported a record year, with sales topping $1 billion and profits of more than $50 million. Sales in the United States exceeded $160 million last year. BBC executives' appetite for more American dollars was whetted four years ago after watching the U.S. version of the British game show "Who Wants to Be A Millionaire," explode on ABC. Although the BBC did not own the rights to that program, it saw the potential and quickly offered up "The Weakest Link" and other shows that have gone on to success in the United States. Now, one of the most popular programs on Discovery Networks' The Learning Channel is the home design show "Trading Spaces," a takeoff of the BBC's "Changing Rooms." TLC also duplicated the BBC's "What Not to Wear," a critique of fashion faux pas. But the BBC's biggest marketing weapon in the United States has been its nascent BBC America cable channel. BBC America, launched five years ago by the Discovery Networks, has watched its ratings and ad revenues swell. Available through satellite and digital cable service, BBC America reaches 35 million homes, up from 28 million homes a year ago. Years ago, Americans had little exposure to BBC programmes other than occasional imports that aired late at night or on public TV stations. Fox Broadcasting Entertainment President Gail Berman remembers growing up in Philadelphia and the troubles she had following her favourite British show, "The Interns." "It ran on some UHF channel in the middle of the night," Berman said. "For kids these days, these shows are cool and funny, and easy to find." Big kids are watching, too. NBC Entertainment President Jeff Zucker was channel surfing about a year ago when he landed on BBC America and "Couplings," a show about thirtysomethings looking for love. "It was sophisticated, smart and funny," he recalled. "I came into work the next day and asked: `Has anyone seen this show?'" NBC will roll out a version of "Couplings" this fall. Meanwhile, Fox hopes to capture some of the success of "The Kumars at No. 42," a comedy that delves into Indian immigrant culture. But, on Fox, the Kumars are morphing into Mexican immigrants called "The Ortegas" who live in Los Angeles. "British formats are very appealing to us, in our endless search of new material and being on the cutting edge," Berman said (via Harry van Vugt, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. US BROADCASTER EXPRESSES CONFIDENCE IN FUTURE OF SHORTWAVE The US-based International Broadcasting Corporation (IBCS) today declared its confidence in the future of shortwave by announcing its intent to raise $4 million to $5 million to help successfully implement its business plan. Two weeks ago, the IBC Radio Network announced that it has acquired large blocks of airtime at the weekends on Miami shortwave station WRMI. IBCS says this is simply the beginning, as it believes there is a resurgence in the popularity of shortwave. "Shortwave has not yet been fully exploited commercially," says Daryn Fleming, CEO of IBC. "The future of shortwave is digital; the first experiments are already underway [sic]. With the introduction of digital shortwave, the quality of sound will improve to FM quality. We believe that this quality, coupled with the huge distances a shortwave signal can travel (IBC Radio Network recently received shortwave reception reports from as far away as Nigeria) provides a very significant market that must be exploited. Furthermore, free radio services on an international medium like shortwave provide an opportunity to capture a large market of listeners that will not pay for services offered by satellite radio broadcasters." (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 29 July 2003 via DXLD) ** U S A. CLEAR CHANNEL SEES 5.5 PERCENT BOOST IN EARNINGS By L.A. Lorek Express-News Business Writer Web Posted : 07/29/2003 12:02 PM Despite difficult economic conditions, Clear Channel Communications saw its earnings for the second quarter increase to $251.3 million, up 5.5 percent from a year ago. The San Antonio-based company reported revenue of $2.32 billion, up 6.6 percent from the same quarter a year ago bolstered by higher sales in its outdoor advertising business and lower interest expenses. . . http://news.mysanantonio.com/story.cfm?xla=saen&xlb=110&xlc=1032318 (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. HOWARD STERN DROPPED FOR POLKAS This according to Tim Noonan's excellent web site "Radio/DX Information from Wisconsin" http://www.angelfire.com/wi/dxing/index.html "WI Columbus (Madison market) WTLX 100.5 noted with polkas this morning in place of Howard Stern. A stunt that precedes a format change? (Tim Taugher) Update: I see in their web site that Howard Stern has been dropped; a polka show called "Happy Times for Jolly People" is listed in the 5-10 a.m. slot" Here is what the station's web site http://www.wtlx.com says: "**100 X Announces New Temporary Morning Show** Mon 07-28, 10:43 am As of Monday, July 28th, 100X will be airing the type of morning show that will make you want to tap your steering wheel perpetually. You'll want to tap your feet so bad that your vehicle will jerk back and forth. You'll want to get out of bed at five every morning so you can shimmy around in time to the music. That's right, its time to polka! ''Happy Times for Jolly People'' will be five hours of non-stop pleasure for the hidden polka beast that resides inside every soul. Featuring a combination of American, German, Swiss, Polish, Norwegian, and Balkan/Slavic polkas, with a heavy emphasis on bands cultivated by the Dairy State itself, ''Happy Times for Jolly People'' fills a gaping void in the Madison radio market. No longer do you have to desparately try to pull in WTKM out of Hartford. You can now polka to a signal that comes in loud and clear. Alas, you'll want to tape as many shows as you can (with an eye toward re-sale on e-Bay and untold profits), because ''Happy Times for Jolly People'' is temporary. 100 X has another show in development and ready to explode down the pipeline with unequaled aplomb! Another quality offering to satiate the desires of a demanding public. But for now, let's give it up for the 11th president and polka!" I wonder what Howard thinks about being done in by "Oom-Pa-Pa!" 73 (via Bill Dvorak, Madison WI, WTFDA via DXLD) ** U S A. Major changes coming to KC: WDAF-AM 610 will soon begin simulcasting its signal on 106.5 FM --- this means the end of 106.5 the city, which was smooth jazz. Some time after 60 days of simulcasting, WDAF-AM 610 will move to 106.5 FM, and a new Sports talk station will emerge on 610. Problem I see is the fact KC already has one full time sports station. What I think is the worst is the fact that Entercom is also saying there could be a format swap (WDAF`s current format would be "freshened up a bit" to make it more "young and hip" (Glen Briggs - KB0RPJ Grundy County Amateur Radio Emergency Services Coordinator, July 28, amfmtvdx at qth.net via DXLD) Actually, KC has two full-time sports stations, 810 WHB and 1340 KCKN, plus 1320 KLWN in Lawrence. WHB and KLWN both use ESPN. KCKN uses Fox Sports. The new 610 will use Sporting News, which is what KMBZ used overnight. By the way, we forget to mention that KMBZ will become full-time News/Talk (with the exception of Royals and Jayhawk games). Now they'll have 3 city-grade country stations on FM (not counting KMZU, KAIR-FM, Topeka stations, etc), and possibly 4 because the hot rumour is that Union Broadcasting (WHB, KCTE, KZPL) has a personal revenge plan against Entercom, and might start its own country station via LMA. By the way, in the spring book, WDAF, KBEQ and KFKF were 4, 5 and 6 respectively in the 12+ numbers (Rob Zerwekh, Topeka KS, http://kcradio.tripod.com http://zerwekh.hypermart.net ibid.) ** U S A. COMMUNITY AIRWAVES COMING TO SILVERTON [Colorado] July 28, 2003, By Jennifer Kostka, Herald Staff Writer http://durangoherald.com/asp-bin/article_generation.asp?article_type=news&article_path=/news/news030728_3.htm Rumors fly quickly down the unpaved, Old West streets of Silverton on a daily basis. Rather than relying on word-of-mouth, Silverton residents may soon have their own community radio station to air issues and ideas unique to the mountain town, population 475. A group of residents has been raising money, applying for federal licenses and setting up equipment to begin broadcasting on KSJC-FM (92.5) from the Old Miner`s Hospital at 13th Street and Snowden Street in Silverton. The station plans to air Silverton`s public meetings, music and talk shows, and avalanche and road condition reports. The station could also provide students with a chance to learn about radio and perhaps broadcast their own programs. The station has received its construction permit from the Federal Communications Commission, which allows it to broadcast until its official broadcast license comes through. However, it is trying to find a way to broadcast without drowning out a signal from KSUT-FM (98.3) in Ignacio. The station`s volunteer organizers hope it will bring Silverton residents together through common town issues and concerns. Dave "Fid" Fiddler, a Silverton resident of 10 years and president of the station`s board, said the radio station is similar to his house in Silverton. "It`s just one big lump of potential. What comes from it is what we`re looking to put into it," Fiddler said. "I don`t think there`s a segment of this community that this won`t affect." KSJC should soon receive its broadcast license from the FCC, which would require it to broadcast for the next three years, said Kyle Roberts, a former member of the station`s board who is working with other Silverton residents to get KSJC on the air. The station successfully tested its equipment in June. Roberts, who has lived in Silverton for 12 years, began investigating ways to establish a community radio station shortly after he moved there. After talking to other residents who sounded interested, Roberts applied for a FCC construction permit for a low-powered FM radio station in 2001. The group received the permit in December 2001. The construction permit gave the group 18 months to have a working transmitter and antenna to broadcast at 100 watts. At about the same time, another group of residents began approaching KSUT to see if the radio station could bring its signal to Silverton. About 250 Silverton residents signed a petition that said they would like 24-hour programming from KSUT, and the station found a way to transmit its signal at less than one watt into Silverton, said Beth Warren, executive director of KSUT. The Durango Herald is one of KSUT`s underwriters. The station also allowed Silverton residents to broadcast their own programs through its signal. Since KSUT began airing in Silverton in 2001, residents have held their own music and talk shows about once a week, said Scot Jackson, a Silverton resident of 33 years and a member of a loose-knit committee for KSUT in Silverton. Since KSUT started transmitting its signal in Silverton, KSJC has organized and elected a board and begun raising money. The group raised about $500 from the sale of bumper stickers and pledges at the Silverton Jubilee Folk Festival, said Ellen Stein, vice president of the KSJC board and executive director of the Mountain Studies Institute in Silverton. Fiddler also donated about $5,000 for the purchase of the station`s initial equipment. Bruce Conrad, the station`s treasurer, is putting together the station`s first fund-raising event Aug. 7. Papa Mali, a funk and soul band from Austin, Texas, will perform for the fund-raiser. The station is working on the time and location of the event. The station`s organizers hope to garner more support after the station is on the air. "It`s got the support of the community, but right now people are waiting to see if we can get our technical problems fixed," said Jay Canode, a Silverton resident who has worked with other community members to establish KSJC. The Avalanche Coffee House & Bakery, which Canode co-owns with his wife, is an underwriter for KSUT. KSJC tested its 100-watt signal in mid-June from its antenna on top of the Old Miner`s Hospital, next to KSUT`s antenna. The test revealed that KSJC would drown out KSUT`s signal, making it impossible for people to listen to KSUT, Canode said. "We power up and KSUT disappears," Canode said. The two stations hope to find a way for both to broadcast before KSJC begins airing regular programming. Members of KSUT`s staff will meet with KSJC board members in Silverton this week to discuss solutions. "We did say we would help, and what better way to help than by bringing management and engineering to Silverton and getting a plan in place," Warren said. All local programming will go to KSJC when it begins broadcasting, and KSUT plans to continue airing its regular programming in Silverton, Warren said. Once KSJC begins its programming, Conrad believes it will unify a cross section of the small community. "Having a really strong community voice that everyone can tune to could really be strong in this town," Conrad said (Durango Herald July 28 via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. Large TIS systems In the current issue of the Information Station Specialists (ISS) newsletter there is a story about the Brazosport Emergency Response Agency's new TIS system designed around the huge Dow Chemical plant in the Freeport, Texas area. The system presently consists of 6 GPS synchronized TIS transmitters simulcasting on 1610 kHz (WPXH924). The addition of a 7th transmitter is planned by the end of the year. The story says that the largest system prior to this was a simulcast system of 5 transmitters on 940 kHz in Pinellas County, Florida (WPTI814) installed in 2001. The article also mentions that Naperville, Illinois was the first city in the nation to have a series of TIS simulcast transmitters. They were installed in 1993 and are on 1610 kHz (WPFP929). The article doesn't specify the number of transmitters in that system but I seem to recall that it was 3. I also found that ISS maintains a state by state list of the TIS stations they have installed. Some of these stations are listings that I have not been able to find elsewhere including some Federal installations. The list is at http://www.theradiosource.com/the_source_news_ears_across_usa.htm (Patrick Griffith, N0NNK, CBT CBNT CRO, Westminster, CO, USA, July 27, NRC-AM via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ Re Harry Helms` comments: Ah, truer words were never spoken. Remember quadraphonic? How about stereo AM? Where in the world can you buy a stereo AM receiver? The only AM stereo transmitter that I know of is a talk station! Okay, there is some music on the weekends, but hardly worth stereo. Who is going to spring for those millions of receivers across Africa? I just popped for $1500 for receivers, and there is no WAY that I'm going to spend more, not with a brain tumor and partial paralysis! (Richard Dale, Collins, MO, July 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) SAFETY CAST SIGNS DEAL, by Devan Stuart SOUTHSIDE -- Jacksonville's Safety Cast has signed its first distribution contract -- a three-year, $3.3 million deal -- with Miami-based Ander Police Supply. Safety Cast makes radio transmitters that can be installed in emergency vehicles, railroad locomotives and school buses. The devices transmit an alert tone and a verbal message over all AM and FM radio frequencies warning motorists that an emergency vehicle is nearby. Ander, a leading distributor of public safety products in South Florida and South America, agreed to buy at least 3,000 of Safety Cast's devices at $1,100 each. "This is an exciting piece of technology," said Ander Police Supply President Andrés Dielingen. "Each time I speak of it, we generate a great deal of enthusiasm and interest." Safety Cast officials are trying to drum up more business through meetings with a variety of possible interested parties, including the U.S. Air Force, and in demonstrations, including the International Association of Chiefs of Police conference in Louisville, Ky. "Hopefully, we'll have a thriving enterprise here in Jacksonville in the not-too-distant future," said Safety Cast CEO Mark Foss, who projects $70 million in annual revenues in five years. Foss' big regret is that his company's technology wasn't up and running six months ago to aid in the war on Iraq. "It wasn't ready because we didn't have the funding sources," Foss said. "Everything accelerates when you have a little extra fuel in the tank." That extra fuel recently came by way of Jacksonville's Inman Co., an Ortega investment firm that landed financial commitments needed to move Safety Cast into the testing and production phase. Safety Cast also aims to penetrate foreign markets. With a simple chip exchange, the technology can be switched to any language, an important selling point for Ander's South American markets. © 2003 American City Business Journals Inc (via Patrick Griffith, N0NNK, CBT CBNT CRO, Westminster, CO, USA, NRC-AM via DXLD) What this press release doesn`t tell you is that there is an official FCC complaint on file regarding potential interference to licensed services from this device. Don`t hold your breath waiting to hear this as DX (Paul Smith, W4KNX, Sarasota, FL, ibid.) The way I read it, one interpretation would be that the whole purpose of the device is to cause interference to licensed services.... (Russ Edmunds, Blue Bell, PA, ibid.) Actually any Part 15 device (unlicensed) is prohibited from interfering with any licensed service, i.e. commercial, utility, government, amateur, etc. If the Part 15 device is found to be causing interference it must be shut down until the interference is eliminated. I really hope this doesn't fly even though some will say it is a good and wonderful thing. We already have lights, sirens, and strobes on emergency vehicles. We don't need this. If people would drive past their windshields and pay attention to what is going on around them there would be no need for these at all. It's a bad bad bad idea! (Larry R. Fravel, ibid.) While I'm not sure whether or not this is a good idea, I am sure that sirens and lights and what-all aren't much good when all of your windows are closed to maintain a sane temperature in the vehicle and the EV isn't in your line of sight. The township where I work has been using those devices with which they can take over control of traffic signals and make them red all around- - I've twice now in the past couple of months nearly been hit by other vehicles because the light suddenly turned red unexpectedly almost immediately after turning green - or just enough after to get a car into the middle of the intersection. At least if they take over my radio, they're not endangering me !! (Russ Edmunds, Blue Bell, PA, ibid.) Sorry, but it's still a bad idea. If you are looking around --- checking mirrors, etc., every ten seconds or so like we are all taught in drivers-ed --- rear, right side, left side, etc. (but do not do, myself included), we would be much more aware of what is happening around us. Granted, there are times when the emergency vehicle wouldn't be readily apparent, but the lights and sirens and strobes sure beat another government invasion of our space. In response to the radio on and windows up argument, that is fine for those listening to the radio. What about those who do not turn the radio on but rather play CDs, tapes, or the annoying "bumpers" with their stereos blasting steady "thump thump thump" so loud they couldn't hear a .44 magnum if it was fired next to them. This "take over radio" certainly will not help any of those people. It won't turn down their stereos, eject their CDs and tapes, and turn on the radios. Also for the system to be totally effective it would require it to be extremely broad banded - take over the entire AM and FM bands when it broadcast or not all of those listening to the radio would get the benefits of the marvelous technology. I for one do not want to see this system adopted for any reason. I sincerely hope the FCC does not allow this. The Pandora's Box of interference problems is unimaginable. The first time someone ran in front of an emergency vehicle and got plowed into by it after the system is operational because they said "it wasn't working", "they didn't hear it", they didn't understand it" (how many languages will it broadcast in besides English in this Politically Correct Country of ours) or any other excuse they could come up with, the lawyers will all be jumping on the case faster than the "fast food makes us fat" crowd. Bad Bad Bad idea. We cannot make everything totally safe and perfect. We need to be aware and responsible, especially when we are behind the wheel of a very large steel guided missile (Larry Fravel, ibid.) Actually Paul, I'm presently building a beta version of this device which I will soon begin testing during my daily commute here in the Denver area. The 50 watt transmitter will feed a full size 3 element yagi, tuned to the center of the FM broadcast band, and extending forward from the hood of my SUV. It will be aimed directly at any vehicles in my path. It will broadcast a continual recorded message that says MOVE TO THE RIGHT LANE IMMEDIATELY. I obtained the transmitter surplus from the defunct SETI program at the U of C. It is capable of simultaneous transmission on every frequency in the FM broadcast band, every frequency in the cellular and PCS telephone bands, and most VHF and UHF public safety and amateur radio frequencies. With this acquisition I also obtained a 50 kw mobile RF amplifier. I have connected its power control to a relay activated by my horn button. In case anyone fails to yield to my vehicle I can temporarily switch to the higher power setting and simultaneously activate the horn. The horn is a 7 tube compressed air device which I obtained surplus from the Union Pacific railroad. I expect my test to also demonstrate the added benefit of an extremely reduced commute time resulting in reduced particulate emissions from my vehicle. The FCC will have no choice but to approve it or face the wrath of the tree hugging public. Since most of my commute is westbound in the morning and eastbound in the evening, I hope DXers in those directions from Denver will listen and send reception reports. If you do not hear the tests don't despair. I may visit your city soon! :-) (Patrick Griffith, N0NNK, CBT CBNT CRO, Westminster, CO, USA, ibid.) You forgot the AM Broadcast band. I would recommend a trailing full sized zep. It should be broad banded enough! (Fravel, ibid.) Not necessarily. If I were designing such a system, I would have it transmit in FM at 10.7 MHz and in AM at 455 KHz. I believe a similar system has been in use in tunnels here in the Boston area. Of course inside a tunnel where nothing else is heard it is easier to implement (Allan Dunn, K1UCY, ibid.) Even if you came in on the IF frequencies of the radio's AM and FM bands when you are out of a captive area like a tunnel the required RF to cover an area of two to three city blocks The area that would be needed for this to effective and remember that area would always be moving) with all the signal blocking buildings and other items would require a very high amount of RF Power and that would cause the interference to the licensed services. Sorry, but nothing anyone can say will ever convince me that this invasive thing is needed. I'm all for progress when it is necessary. This is not. It falls in the realms of a gadget. To quote someone that always speaks his mind, "Of course that's just my opinion. I could be wrong" - Dennis Miller (Fravel, ibid.) And now Miller is wrong about most of what he rants (gh) If I were told to design such a thing, I guess I'd start with an oscillator on, say, 2 MHz. Pass it through a modulated amplifier. Mix with a 10 kHz squarewave. Amplify it to a few dozen watts. And pass it through a sharp bandpass filter. But I agree, it's unnecessary. Most of those whose stereos are cranked too loud to hear sirens are listening to CDs. I'd also be worried about these devices getting "into the wild". You've got to know it would become a huge temptation for unscrupulous advertisers. (you know, the kind who jam crap in your email box...) A device that lets them get their ad on *every* station on the dial? The CRTC in Canada has authorized a few stations to provide a similar service. However, they're authorizing spot frequencies on FM. (to be fastened to trucks to warn motorists on logging roads of their approach). That suggests a different dilemma: how does the motorist know when to tune? (or are they supposed to listen to open-channel noise until a truck shows up?) (Doug Smith, TN, ibid.) It`s bad enough that we have Internet over electrical lines, manmade interference from computer devices, and the auto companies dumbing down the radios to avoid a "quality issue". I would not like something that transmits like this device does. To be honest, if I'm not in the area where the event is occurring, I don't need to hear it. And we know that RF is not confined to a stretch of roadway. The solution is to enforce the traffic laws, and get the bad drivers off the road --- and not to make one more source of RF interference. I still don't feel that we need a radio system to alert drivers. I don't think we need more or better alerting devices. Drivers are well aware of emergency vehicles, (although the jury is still out about drivers with cellphones). I just think that the larger portion of drivers don't know, or care to get out of the way of emergency vehicles and as such should be removed from the roadways until they learn how to drive responsibly. It's not a technology issue. It's an issue of stupid people behind the wheel with no common sense nor sense of responsibility (Fred Vobbe, OH, ibid.) I have been driving fire apparatus and ambulances professionally in an urban setting here in the Denver metro area for almost 17 years. My station alone responds to almost 2000 calls a year. Failure to yield situations occur here on a daily basis. Almost every time we are out there is at least one incident of this. You have no idea what it feels like to be piloting a 48,000 pound fire truck through an intersection and have someone zoom across in front of you so close that they disappear from sight below your field of view. We must also be very careful about how we park at scenes. We use the apparatus to protect us from being run over while we are trying to perform our jobs. Although we are required to put someone outside while we are backing, we would never put a firefighter in the street to stop traffic. If they can't see a huge fire truck with all of the lights on, they surely can't see a small target like a firefighter standing in the street. We would rather have them hit the fire truck than a firefighter. I can tell you some failure to yield stories that are almost unbelievable. But I really don't see this type of radio device helping our situation. If all of our sirens, lights, horns, and traffic control devices don't get people to yield, a message on the car radio is probably not going to help either. Does anyone remember the European test of a similar system a couple years ago? It may have been in the UK. It had to do with a digital broadcast system. I recall that their system could force your radio to tune to the specific frequency that the emergency vehicles or roadside devices were transmitting on and it could even turn the radio on if it was off. I wonder what the results of these tests were? (Patrick Griffith, N0NNK, CBT CBNT CRO, Westminster, CO, USA, ibid.) This thing is going to blanket the FM BC band right up to 107.999 MHz and then leave unharmed the VHF Omnirange frequencies (aircraft navigation) that begin at 108.001 MHz?? I can't believe no one has yet remarked on this, especially the pilots on list. || Bad Bad Bad idea. Yes Yes Yes, that it is. And as for transmitting at 455 or 10.7, just how much energy does one think would be needed to couple into these relatively well-shielded devices? (Bob Foxworth, FL, ibid.) This would take considerable energy, and would be very hit-and miss -- - too many variables involved. It's quite feasible (using digital signal processing techniques) to produce a raster of FM signals, each with identical modulation, on every channel from 88.1 to 107.9. If done properly, the signals could also be compliant with the FCC mask. Same thing applies to the AM band. That said, I agree that it's a very bad idea (Barry McLarnon, Ont., ibid.) The FCC has apparently considered issuing Safety Cast an experimental permit to try this: http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-03-2109A1.txt RDS has the capability of causing your radio to tune to an emergency broadcast. It really wouldn't be suitable for this application though, as the data is broadcast over the station you're listening to - and thus would retune every radio within the station's coverage area (not just those near the emergency vehicle). (Doug Smith, TN, ibid.) It was RDS, Doug. But I'm pretty certain the test I read about involved mobile and roadside transmitters capable of taking control of the RDS receivers within a small circumference. I remember that the article mentioned that several pirate stations had used the technology to take control of the RDS radios within their coverage area and that a "fix" was being established to prevent such occurrences (Patrick Griffith, N0NNK, ibid.) Seems to me that the FCC is really leaning in the direction of big business no matter what the rules say. The whole broadband over power lines issues is a prime example. There is another example of what will be unlicensed services causing massive interference to a licensed service. In a lot of places I've been you can't use the AM radio in your vehicle any more due to cable TV leakage and nothing is done. It is not enforced and the cable companies know it and don't care. If we get broad band over the power lines; emergency services able to capture our radios because idiots behind the wheel can't, don't, and won't pay attention while driving; and all the other Part 15 devices the FCC has allowed that cause RFI to licensed services the radio world will be going to hell in a hand basket. No wonder all the so called free banders feel they can transmit anyplace they want. Big business is. And the FCC allows it. It's time we started stop selling spectrum and start enforcing the no interference parts of the rules. (Larry R. Fravel, ibid.) This is a very bad idea because the interference is going to be awful. What needs to be done is fine the people out east as they do out here and then the AM and FM bands will be left alone. What about people listening to a CD or tape in the car? What about people listening to XM? The whole thing seems a waste of time to me and another way to pollute the spectrum which is already in a hell of a mess (Kevin Redding, Mesa AZ, ibid.) I have doubts that I would ever hear any kind of "emergency broadcast" even if such a hare-brained radio scheme comes to pass. Not unless they figure out how to override my CD player, anyway. It's not that the radios don't work, but aside from ball games, there's so little worth having on in the car while I'm driving. I'm too busy watching the road to DX while commuting, and I can program music to my tastes with considerably more interest and accuracy than any of the current crop of PDs and consultants. So all that said --- they can build it, but I'll probably never know. What does worry me is that municipalities would want one for "anti-terrorism" or some other government control action hidden behind a security blanket, and use the thing indiscriminately. Or worse, just forget to turn the thing off when done with today's anti-liberty activity, and simply jam the bands. But that's okay, I'm sure. It's all about public safety and security in "these troubled times." (Ever known any times that weren't "these troubled times"?) But, as has been observed here of late, where the FCC is concerned, only money talks now. It's a shame James Madison is dead and his ideas are dying, innit? (Gerry Bishop, Nicenottodayville, FL, ibid.) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-134, July 28, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1192: RFPI: Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 7445, 15039 [times variable] WWCR: Wed 0930 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1192.html WORLD OF RADIO WATCH. Sunday`s anomalies: on IBC Radio via WRMI 15725, noted ending around 1840, so must have started late around 1811. On RFPI 15039 noted ending around 2009, so must have started around 1940 instead of 1830; and repeated until about 0210, so 0140 UT Mon, and heard again around 1355. UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIALS I have enjoyed your show since I got my first SW radio in 1993. World of Radio helped me figure out a little more of what I was doing back then and I have always liked the fact that you take an interest in the content of the broadcasts, rather than taking the narrow and limiting DX only path. I listen primarily for information and not just to put a pin in the map. Yours is an entertaining program, packed with content. The name is Michael Lijewski (pronounced in various ways Lee-eff-ski is the closest to the original Polish, though I prefer the American phonetic Lie-jew-ski, and my parents say La-jess-key; take your pick.) I reside in Harford County MD, 25 miles north of Baltimore near the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay. SOLICITED TESTIMONIALS Hi Glenn, Last week on WoR you asked on what station listeners hear the programme. I hear World of Radio on the WRN 1 channel of Worldspace Afristar on Saturdays 9 am local time, 8 UT. (In 'near-fm' audio quality, no less!) All the best, (Daniel Atkinson, Kirkby Lonsdale, England) Mr. Hauser, Hi! I catch you either on Saturday nights 9:30 on WWCR 5070, or Sunday nights 10:30 [CDT] on WSUI 910. My radio is a 1968 Pomtrex! (Bill Vaughn, Charles City IA) ** AUSTRALIA. HCJB, Kununurra, 11750, 1117-1131, July 25, English, Religious program, "Truth for Life" # 1084, followed by announcement of new frequency schedule effective July 21 with full "HCJB, V. of the Great Southland" ID. New program begins at 1130, Fair signal at tune- in, quickly deteriorating to poor at tune-out (Scott R Barbour, Jr, Intervale, NH, July 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) HCJB-AUSTRALIA. The new schedule for HCJB-AUS from Kununurra started on July 21, including the introduction of Urdu programming: 0100-0130 15420 Urdu to South Asia 0130-0330 15420 English to South Asia 0800-1230 11750 English to Australia and New Zealand 1230-1700 15390 English to South Asia 1700-1730 15405 Urdu to South Asia 1800-2030 11765 English to New Zealand and Australia Unfortunately, this transmission plan is of very limited effectiveness, due to - propagationally incorrect frequencies - interference caused to other broadcasters on some channels - interference on the same or adjacent frequencies from other stations broadcasting to the same target areas - unsuitable timings The plan appears to neglect the special conditions which exist in providing reliable and satisfactory long distance coverage across trans-equatorial circuits from Northern Australia. There are also serious technical constraints at Kununurra due to antenna inflexibility: two antennas are installed, one orientated 106 degrees (which puts the major lobe into the general direction of Fiji). This antenna can only be used currently on the 11 MHz band, and the back lobe pattern puts substantial energy into China. The other antenna is at 307 degrees, and available at the moment only for 15 MHz, which puts a primary radiation pattern into the general direction of Jakarta. There is also substantial back-lobe radiation into Eastern Australia. 11750 0800-1230 for Australia and New Zealand. This is a replacement for 11770 which was co-channel with WYFR Florida - reception in NZ was seriously degraded by the USA transmitter. WYFR claimed prior occupancy and declined to move. 11770 was in fact a substitute for 11755 used during B02, which was a disaster due to co-channel Radio Finland. 11750 now suffers extreme adjacent channel interference in New Zealand for the first hour of the transmission, from Radio Finland which uses 11755 for its service to the same region! This will intensify over the coming months as the northern winter approaches. 11765 1800-2030. This is a new morning service for New Zealand. Unfortunately, the signal is completely inaudible in New Zealand, as it too low for satisfactory daytime propagation across the Tasman! Recent checks of reception in Wellington, using the IBB's Remote Receiver facility in Wellington confirm this problem. No signal - no listeners! There is also co-channel use on 11765 by Radio Tupi, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil! Reception here in Melbourne is poor, due to strong adjacent interference from China Radio International on 11760 with its French service to Europe from Urumqi which runs 1830-2030. The timing is quite unsuitable for Australia - 1800 is 2 am in Western Australia, and 4 am in the Eastern States! 15420 0100-0330 to South Asia. Radio Australia, Shepparton, uses the ADJACENT FREQUENCY of 15415 to the same target area at 2130-0900, as it has done for years. On the other side, 15425, there is FEBA via Kalatch (Russia) using this frequency 0015-0130, to the same target areas! HCJB-AUS is squeezed between these power-houses. There are many other clear channels on 15 MHz at this time which could have been used! 15390 1230-1700 and 15405 1700-1730 to South Asia. The 15 MHz band is not suitable for propagation from Northern Australia into the target area at that time period, as the OWF is below 15 MHz. That is the problem which affected 15480 prior to July 21 - the signal was barely audible in India. the change was made to avoid interference from/to BBC Woofferton 15485, and China National Radio 15480. 15390 is also in use that time period by Radio Romania International (1000-1400), and 15405 is in use by Russia (Omsk and Novosbirsk) 1200-1800, as well as Romania 1700-2200. I was advised that the 15390/15405 combination was recommended by a non-technical listener in South Asia. There is background to all off this which you will find interesting... For some months I had been providing unremunerated professional support to HCA-AUS, working closely with the Frequency Manager (Ian Williams) here in Victoria, in looking at signal effectiveness. Ian had been doing this work for some time, on a voluntary basis. We had worked together in attempting to develop operational plans for the station for the remainder of 2003, to incorporate the new services to India and New Zealand. Due to other commitments, Ian had advised that he would not be able to continue with this work after May, and had recommended that I pick up this responsibility as an interim arrangement in my capacity as a professional communications engineer. We believed that this would be satisfactory, as the HCJB-AUS offices are located only a few km from my home. I had agreed to do this, without remuneration, apart from reimbursement of direct operating expenses, which would require coordination with the Australian Communications Authority and the technical department of the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union, as well as many broadcasters. Ian and I had submitted joint formal papers to HCJB-AUS outlining the processes which would be followed, and I had also offered to prepare, free of charge, training manuals for technical staff located at Kununurra, covering issues such as practical frequency management, propagation, remote monitoring and interactions with bodies such as the ABU-HFC, ITU, and the HFCC. Everything was set to go, and we had worked out a timetable for transfer of these responsibilities, following Ian's formal withdrawal from the role. HCJB-AUS then issued a policy directive which advised that they were no longer able to outsource the frequency management function, and that this would from now on be done "in house" by their own personnel. You now see the results... Sorry! (Bob Padula, EDXP World Broadcast Magazine July 27, used by permission http://edxp.org via DXLD) Just tuned into HCJB Australia at 1410-1700 on new 15390. Strange they didn't inform me because I am the one who suggested it! Frequency is clear of any co-channel, but HCJB is very weak 2-3 and at 1430 splatter from IRN too bad. 1600-1700 picks up to fair to good. They ought to be at least on 9 MHz. They have only one antenna and 75 kwatts. Regards (Victor Goonetilleke, Sri Lanka, July 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Victor G. hardly qualifies as a ``non-technical listener`` (gh, DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. ABC STAFF TO LEARN FATE THIS WEEK Staff of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) will learn by the end of this week whether they are likely to lose their job as a result of looming budget cuts. The ABC board will meet on Thursday to thrash out ways of cutting AUS$18 million from the programming budget, on top of the AUS$5 million which has already been agreed from other areas of the Corporation. Sources inside the ABC suggest that as 80 jobs may go in news and current affairs, with the closure of some foreign bureaus. However, it's thought that the new media division will escape the cuts. ABC management will negotiate with staff and unions before a final package of cuts is approved by the ABC board in August (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 28 July 2003 via DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. 4600.33 (tentative) Perla del Acre, Cobija. July 2003 --- 1050 UT. No ID but for sure Bolivia and besides I have logged the station here on exactly the same frequency. I haven`t observed this Bolivian for a long time. New Bolivian or San Miguel, Riberalta on new frequency? 4734.00 Radio San Miguel "LV del Norte", unknown QTH (Bolivia). July 2003 --- 2350 UT. Heard with good signal and distorted audio during the last days. Announces 4730 kHz. San Miguel, Riberalta on 4930 is off air so it ought to be this one who has moved? "La Voz del Norte" mentioned several times might be a program title (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin July 27, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOLIVIA. Dear Thomas, I notice that you have a clear path for listening to Bolivia and Peru at 2300 to 0000 GMT. I would think that this would be about 2:00 am in Sweden. Dedicated DXer listening at this time. I believe that Radio La Palabra is operating on 4731.62 as I heard it briefly from 0003 to 0010*. The signal was best in LSB to avoid the RTTY. Signal strength was marginal at best! Radio La Palabra has in the past seemly had problems with their transmitter with intermittent signals. I hope that you will find this of value. 73's (Robert Wilkner, Florida, SW Bulletin July 27 via DXLD) ** BOUGAINVILLE. 3850, R. Independent Mekamui, Bougainville. Very weak signal of male speaker in unID language. Not readable, 1019 12/7 (Jones) Reactivated, fair at best 0920, frequency announcement, 0922, all in Pidgin, 26/7 (Craig Seager, Aug Australian DX News via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. 4785.07, Radio Caiari, Porto Velho. July 2003 --- 0105 UT. Radio Caíari with ID at this time. Our member Christer Brunström/CB has noted 2 (unID) Brasilians on the frequency. I have so far heard only this one here in Quito (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin July 27, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. CJRS Radio Montreal http://www.cjrsradio.com -- Not really a radio station, only an online operation. No apparent relation to ex- CJRS 1520 Sherbrooke. Only music, mainly French, stretching as far back as the 1950s. Apparently, no announcers either (International Radio Report July 27, CKUT, notes by Ricky Leong via DXLD) Believe I heard an announcer when I checked it briefly (gh, DXLD) ** CANADA [non]. Dear Glenn; Here's an interesting, and possibly useful, short wave story from The Voice Of The Martyrs. They've even included the frequencies. That in itself is amazing. Maybe my note to Glenn Penner did the trick. VOM LAUNCHES TWO NEW SHORTWAVE PROGRAMS (EGYPT, ERITREA) In recent weeks, The Voice of the Martyrs and High Adventure Gospel Communication Ministries have launched two new shortwave radio programs into Egypt and Eritrea. The Road to Emmaeus, an Arabic program, is being broadcast into Egypt every Friday at 0845 UT (10:45 a.m. local Cairo time) on shortwave frequency 17.595 on the 16-meter band. The Voice of Light program airs on Tuesday evenings at 1700 UT (8:00 p.m. local Eritrea time) on shortwave frequency 13.810 on the 22-meter band in Tigringa. Both programs are produced in Canada by local pastors. Glenn Penner, Communications Director for The Voice of the Martyrs, said, "We are so pleased to have a significant role in these programs. Both programs are meeting a vital need in their respective countries. The Road to Emmaeus presents the gospel in a way accessible and understandable to Egyptian Muslims, while The Voice of Light is more directed to encouraging Eritrean evangelicals who are being persecuted for their faith, as half of the program consists of dramatic readings of our best-selling book 'Jesus Freaks.'" I hope that story was of use to you. It's so wonderful when news agencies give details like which broadcaster is airing the programs, the times they'll be on, and the frequencies. Don't other news services realize that people may have friends who they can advise regarding the news story? I suspect that most news directors don't know a frequency from a hole in the ground. Yours, (Bruce Atchison, a freelance writer and electronic music composer in Radway, Alberta, Canada, http://gideon.www2.50megs.com July 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CHINA. CHINA NATIONAL RADIO --- CNR's Second Network offers English Teaching programs at various times on MW, SW, VHF and the Internet. The early morning release is at 2225-2245, and here in Melbourne best HF signals are on 6010 7335 7360 and 11985. This assists preparation of reception reports for QSLs, rather than the bland/inappropriate "woman talking in Chinese..." ! (Bob Padula, EDXP World Broadcast Magazine July 27, used by permission http://edxp.org via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. 5955.52, CARACOL, Villavicencio now on this frequency 2980.00 harmonic, unID "Radio Pampa", unknown QTH. July 20 2003 - 1030 UT. Decent signal and TexMex-music. First I thought I listened to Radio Punto Cinco in Colombia (harmonic from 1490 kHz) which I have heard here earlier. Talk about Colombia and ID as "....aquí en Radio Pampa". (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin July 27, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) Colombia H2980 Radio Pampa... Or Radio Paipa, which would be a match unless they still use their Radio La Paz slogan (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** COSTA RICA. 5054.59, Faro del Caribe back with lousy audio as usual (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin July 27, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** COSTA RICA. It is often ignored or forgotten that RFPI has never had a license from the Costa Rican government to operate a radio station. I thought the hammer would come down when RFPI decided to open an FM outlet for their station. As many of you may or not know Costa Rica is my home away from home so I am not surprised that it has taken this long for things to wind down for them. In Costa Rica they call it Tico Time. I would not be surprised if this was not something that came from the top of the Tico government. i.e., they told the officials at UPAZ to cut the station off or else (Ulis Fleming, Maryland USA, swprograms via DXLD) RFPI`s position, I believe, is that under auspices of UN from UN territory, it does not need authorization from CR (gh, DXLD) RFPI (I quote) has trained over 300 peace journalists who now work all over the world, RFPI (I quote) runs courses in Peace Journalism and Progressive Media through Radio, RFPI (I quote) specializes in the monitoring and documenting of hate radio and the use of media by extremist groups. Let's take a closer look at the last statement. From their UN programming one would think that the RFPI outlook was global in scope, but actual listening shows that the focus is limited to the USA. Here is RFPI's list of study targets. PRIVATE U.S. SHORTWAVE BROADCAST STATIONS Call letters Location Designator Special Notes WSHB SC R/MN Owned by Christian Science Monitor WCSN ME R Sold by C.S.M. to another religious group KGEI CA R KJES NM R Cultish sounding program KTBN UT R Part of Trinity Broadcasting network KNLS AK R KWHR HI R Sister station to WHRI WHRI IN R/RFR Has 100,000 watt capacity KCBI TX R/RFR Rumored Dr. Gene Scott silent partner WEWN AL R Four 500,000 transmitters WINB PA R/RFR Pastor Pete Peters considering buying WJCR KY R Small church station 50,000 watts WMLK PA R Owned by Assemblies of Yahweh WRMI FL P/PFR Anti-Castro broadcaster WRNO LA P/R/PFR/RFR One 50,000 watt transmitter WWCR TN P/R/PFR/RFR Three 100,000 watt transmitters WYFR FL R Per the RFPI website, these are stations susceptible of airing "far right" radio, a.k.a. "hate radio". So who is then trying to be mean to such a 'progressive' entity as RFPI? Well, perhaps the Colombian paramilitary groups, or... eh, on second thought perhaps it's not them after all: "There have been recent concerns that the violence of Colombia's civil war may be spilling over into Costa Rica, including the possibility of paramilitary groups from Colombia operating in-country. While details remain very sketchy, it doesn't seem they are involved in the RFPI siege; the initial report cites 'guards from the University of Peace,' where RFPI has its studios." (http://www.diymedia.net/archive/0703.htm#072303) [The above item about Colombia was not put out by RFPI itself; tho the study target list is somewhat outdated, I don`t see what your point is about that somehow indicting RFPI --- gh] I have tuned in to their unauthorized frequencies on many occasions, listening to their homebrew Far Right Radio Review, and I have listened to some of their Spanish language programs (including those on female emancipation), none of which I deemed worth the while. An exception to their dull programming is WOR (World of Radio), but this program has been and is still aired elsewhere, including stations considered by RFPI as outlets of "hate radio". RFPI has been operating thanks to a presidential decree, but their frequencies were considered illegal by the frequency board of Costa Rica already from the very beginning. This I learnt on a visit to the country in 1987. Their eviction is long overdue (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, July 26, hard-core-dx via DXLD) I'd respect your letter a bit more if you were more honest with us. We all do listen to the radio you know, and most of us have listened to RFPI. It's not all U.S. programming, though a good portion of it is. We have heard them read the Tico Times, and are well aware that it is not a U.S. paper. We also know the Zapatistas don't haunt the streets of Chicago. And while the United Nations news show broadcast by RFPI actually is based in NYC --- I've heard tell that the U.N. is known to take a global perspective: fancy that. Nor can I say I have ever heard RFPI "target" the U.S. commercial shortwave broadcasters you mentioned simply because they are commercial broadcasters and anybody with the cash can buy an hour of time; even you, even me. They do target the various Neoklannazimilita shows that are broadcast from said stations and speaking as a person who lives in these United States, I am glad they have been doing it. Why is North America's only national left of center! radio station based in Central America? I get worried when everybody's on the right, and I get worried when everybody is on the left. Those kinds of majorities are grotesque, disfiguring, and dangerous. I liked RFPI, and I also had my share of complaints. I think the Far Right Radio Review got too casual and lost much of its effectiveness. I recently tuned into some of their in house programming that consisted mainly of some cranky guy spouting off for ever and ever. That's not radio. Mostly though, I'll miss them. For all its technological prowess and wealth, or perhaps because of it, American journalism - left, right, and center - is horrible. To find an American who's well informed about international affairs is a rare find indeed. There are a few people here that would like to become well informed, but they really have to dig deep to find a good source. It was a horrible irony when the BBC World Service started cutting back transmissions to the U.S. We don't need foreign aid here, we don't need food, but we sure could use some information aid. The same goes for opinion. We have huge debates between the marginally left and the marginally right and that's about it. RFPI had lots of news, and lots of opinion. They had American labor news! Labor is a dirty word here. You can talk a lot of trash but don't say that dirtiest word of all, UNION. So a lot of my labor news came out of Costa Rica. For me RFPI's finest hour was back in '94 or '95 when they had gotten an email from someone in a town in Mexico that had been surrounded by the army who were about to go in and stomp anything that moved, but somebody had a computer and a modem, somebody got the word out in real time. RFPI was asking everyone to immediately send email to the responsible parties and get things cooled off. I never did hear any follow ups on the incident. I hope things got settled down. The idea of someone throwing a rock over the wall of a besieged city and having it land in a million mailboxes made a big impression on me that day and that's the day I decided that I needed a computer. I hope RFPI gets through this trouble. Someone once said of the Grateful Dead that it "isn't that they are the best at what they do, they are the only ones that do what they do", and that surely sums up this little station. They did a lot with what they had too. For some odd reason they seem to have placed their antenna farm in some sort of tornado alley kind of place and it blew over once a week. They never got the funding they needed to get a sure grip on things, simply because most of the Americans with disposable income have never even seen a shortwave radio and their Central American audience is not all that wealthy. RFPI would sputter and spark for days on end and then roar back to life, only to have something else blow a fuse. People did send money though, lots of people, just not enough I guess. It is unfortunate that there is not an endangered radio genre law because there's a million preachers and 10,000 Brownshirts rantin` and a ravin` on the radio at any given minute of the day, but only one free voice from the left. I am decidedly left of center in my outlook; however I like to have the "loyal opposition" around too, but I want them to be honest. I won't stand behind any dishonest speech from my own people and I think you do your cause a disservice by playing fast and loose with the truth. It's easier to just make stuff up, anybody can do it, but it takes hard work and determination to check all of your facts and think out something that's honest and persuasive. And if you're angry, really angry: take what you wrote and put it in a drawer 'til you calm down and then look at it. Now if you're always angry, you have a problem unrelated to your politics that is in serious need of attention. This is a common malady; the one who can't blame himself, so he blames the Other. If the cause is just, no deceit is needed. If the heart is pure, the anger will subside (Michael Lijewski, Maryland, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Hi, Glenn, Many thanks for your advice ten years ago about getting help with direction finding re interference with RFPI's signal, and for the broad variety of topics you cover in your broadcasts. If any of the following is useful for your weekly program or the Continent of Media, feel free to use it there. In September of 2002, I spent a week doing volunteer work at RFPI, and was impressed with the smart, dedicated and generous public service activities I saw at the station. At that time there were already rumblings of trouble from the new administration of the University for Peace. An independent observer I happened to meet, outside the RFPI community, filled me in on the dangers lurking. I was told that a billionaire administrator - who was invited to lead the university under the theory that this would shield the UN-chartered University for Peace from economic stress - had purged the university of professors and staff who showed too great an interest in the institutional causes of poverty and environmental degradation. This week, a representative of the University for Peace delivered an eviction notice to the station's staff, and armed guards patrol the now-chained gate of the station, and the notice calls on the staff to leave within two weeks. This dramatic challenge to free speech and advocacy for a better world raises questions over how the university could develop such hostility to a station invited by the university's leaders, and independently supported by listeners all over the world. It is listeners' contributions that paid for the building, the transmitters, and the operating expenses. The university's administrator, Canadian Maurice Strong, came in on a wave of influence based on the promise of Ted Turner's foundation to give a billion dollars to the UN. His connections to the Turner foundation, the World Bank, and to those environmental groups you hear criticized for allowing domination by big business, are just the tip of the iceberg. Anyone searching "Maurice Strong" on the web encounters a very interesting array of entries. (To quote Lewis Carroll, the story becomes "Curious and curiouser") If we can believe even 10% of the story of his ascent to power and influence, an astonishing tale of subterfuge emerges, consistent with his attack on RFPI. Beyond the fig leaf of NGO's that he uses for cover, Strong's real alliances are with the enemies of the UN, which they are busily "reforming". His comprehensive biography is posted on the webpage of an anti-UN organization. On the sovereignty.net website, click the Sustainable Development link in the left column. When that page opens, look near the top of the list for "Maurice Strong: The New Guy in Your Future". http://www.sovereignty.net/p/sd/strong.html As the 16th anniversary of RFPI's broadcast approaches, it is in our power to help this station survive! The station web address offers breaking news and ideas for supporting the station's continued good work. http://rfpi.org Legal defense and other expenses need our help, with contributions of any size. Tax-deductible contributions may be sent to RFPI, Box 3165, Newberg, OR 97132. The station broadcasts on 7445 and 15040 kHz am (Jerry Markatos, Balance & Accuracy in Journalism, NC, 919 542- 2139, July 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) On various DX lists, several people, who I am sorry to see apparently have a longstanding grudge against RFPI --- how dare RFPI come from the left??? --- have mouthed off to the effect that it serves RFPI right --- don`t pay your rent: get evicted. Believe me, there is a lot more to this than back rent, as I hope is now becoming obvious to those taking the trouble to read info in and linked from DXLD (gh) RFPI program director Naomi Fowler says to DXing.info that a year ago the station did receive a letter requesting them to leave their premises, but without a reason. "They gave no reason for this to us, unlike their current claims that we were broadcasting illegally or that we owed them money," Fowler says. "We explained to them that they were trying to evict us from our own building! They did not appear to know that the building did not belong to them, as their institutional memory is short due to the five administration changes over the last 16 years," Fowler writes. "That eviction attempt we assumed was legally unenforceable and we never heard anything from them after that until this latest eviction order." In an earlier email to DXing.info, the staff of RFPI says that "ideological differences" between the station and Maurice Strong, President of the University for Peace Council, are partly to blame for the conflict. As to broadcasting on an illegal frequency, the staff email says that the station is looking for another frequency to replace 15040 kHz, which according to a letter received from the authorities, is reserved for air traffic. Despite the conflict, RFPI has continued to broadcast on shortwave (DXing.info, July 27, 2003, also via Mike Terry, DXLD) Per James Latham, they are on 7445 and 15038 kHz. Nothing has really changed since last week, the gates are still locked, but people are passing them supplies through the locked gates. He says that the audio stream of their short wave broadcasts has been down for quite some time. He also said that there will be a website http://www.saverfpi.org as well as some updates on their website soon. They have a number of people who will be coming next week to witness anything the University may do, but Latham is hoping for a peaceful resolution (Hans Johnson, Cumbre DX July 28 via DXLD) RFPI is still on the air, whenever I check; at 2235 UT July 28, 15038 in as usual and 7445 beginning to fade in (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. In all the years of TVDXing, since 1955, I have seen stations from Cuba many times. However, I have never seen any Cuban sign on the air, until today. At 1145 EDST [1545 UT] on channel 4, I notice a test pattern with no ID. I was sure it was Cuba. At 1200 the test pattern went away and the Cuban flag came on the screen with their national anthem. This was followed by the news in Spanish (Willis Monk, Old Fort, TN, July 28, NRC FM-FV via DXLD) ** CUBA [and non]. While poking about the FCC database, I found a rather interesting document of a few years ago (FCC 95-160) relating to the USIA wanting to counter Cuban jamming of its transmissions on channel 13 by being granted authority to broadcast on channels 18, 50 and 64, with the transmissions being rotated on these three channels to foil jamming efforts. The document went into detail as to how under the provisions of the International Telecommunications Convention, UHF TV broadcasts to Cuba did not constitute harmful interference, as Cuba had no UHF television broadcast services. This seems to have been the impetus for the Cuban government in recently initiating UHF TV broadcasting, as with UHF now in use, TV Martí could be construed as causing said harmful interference. TV Martí also seems to be the reason behind Cuban television broadcasting hour after hour of test patterns. TV Martí apparently broadcasts in the middle of the night when Cuban television is off the air so as not to violate the harmful interference provision of the ITC treaty. If Cuban television keeps the channel in use, even while not actually broadcasting anything other than a test pattern, then it can argue that TV Martí is causing harmful interference to their broadcasts. This whole mess will add a big footnote upon TV DX'ing history eventually. When the changeover to DTV comes, TV Martí will be the only American station continuing on NTSC. It's quite a shame they aren't running anything on a Band I channel; their Band III service will be a bit difficult to DX from much of the country (Curtis Sadowski, IL, July 27, WTFDA via DXLD) Basulto & Co. were going to try this again on May 20, but some technical problem prevented it. That was also when TV and Radio Martí beefed up their broadcasts to Cuba. This was all covered in some depth in DX LISTENING DIGEST, mid to late May. http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3e.html 73, (Glenn Hauser, ibid.) Many thanks! I do read DX Listening Digest, but I must have missed that issue. As always, you're right on top of all things DX. I've read about TV Martí`s tethered balloon with the directional antenna; is there any anecdotal information that you've heard about how well that puts a signal into Cuba? I know they used that to prevent CCI with American broadcasters (and to keep things cheap), but I would have gone with an airborne station (like Stratovision). From what I've read that system was very adept at providing wide area television coverage. I suppose if one REALLY wanted to get a signal in there, a powerful transmitter could be set up on a navy ship. It could take up a patrol some miles off the Cuban coast in international waters beaming the signal in on a directional antenna. Granted, you wouldn't be able to achieve much in the way of tower height that way, but it could be used for beaming in signals to an urban area in strength (Curtis Sadowski, ibid.) [Later:] I guess it isn't strictly a pirate either --- according to the Miami Herald they could be received on channel 58 "on any cable ready TV", in other words, it was over a standard amateur television rig, and apparently used the call letters of the ham operating it. So, for all intents and purposes, it was all a publicity stunt that no one saw in Cuba UNLESS they had advance notice AND a modern cable-ready set. They seem to have achieved their aim in beefing up broadcasting to Cuba, which as far as I'm concerned is not much more than a sop to the exile community. I hope Basulto's stunt didn't cause the Cuban government to initiate jamming on amateur television frequencies (Curtis Sadowski, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ECUADOR. During the building of a second floor on our tiny house during next week I must remove my antennas. I hope I can put up some temporary antennas instead but it means my activity will be considerably lower here in Quito. 73 from BM in Quito! bjornmalm2003@yahoo.com (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin July 27, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) In this issue see BM`s logs under BOLIVIA, BRAZIL, COLOMBIA, COSTA RICA, HONDURAS, PERU, UNIDENTIFIED ** EGYPT. Queridos Radioescuchas, los invitamos a enviarnos las fechas de eventos especiales que quisieran mencionaremos al aire, por ejemplo: Cumpleaños, Aniversarios, Bodas, etc. Nos gustaría mucho compartir al aire con ustedes su alegría. También envíenos frases célebres o algunas citas que consideren nos inspirarán a sentirnos mejor cada día y a reforzar los lazos de amistad. A partir del 9 de Agosto tendremos música oriental especial dedicada a los cumpleaños y podrán conocer cuáles son las melodías típicas para esas ocasiones aquí en Egipto. Esperamos sus e/mails o cartas via el correo postal. Un abrazo y Suerte (RADIO EL CAIRO EN ESPANOL via Pedro Sedano, Spain, July 27, Noticias DX via DXLD) ** GUYANA. I spent some time in Guyana a few years back and listened to the VOG every day and also saw them in action at many public events, so it was nice to hear you praise them for their efforts a few months back. They have true grit and little else to work with, yet come up with some great programming. One has to love a station that broadcasts the national Parliament one hour and a children's cricket banquet the next. Guyana is in a state of constant political/racial tension and VOG has taken the high road remaining objective at all times. Sadly it's not only a tough catch here, but also a tough one there too. We were with the Akawio Indians in the upper Mazaruni district where they scrimped to buy a few batteries for their flimsy little analog radios each week, deftly working the dial every night for the BBC, VOA, and Radio Netherlands, but no Voice Of Guyana --- not enough money to get out that far. Even the tribal Yaesu transceivers and the Icoms owned by the traders couldn't pick it up. I tried and tried with the handheld Yaesu VR-500 I had with me (a great little travel radio if you ever need to travel very lightly and need a DC to daylight device), stringing wires in every way possible with little effect. Thanks again, (Michael Lijewski, Maryland, July 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HONDURAS. 2859.98 harmonic, HRSJ, Radio Futura, Tocoa. July 19 2003 --- 0200 UT. After listening to Glenn Hauser`s "World Of Radio", where Mark Mohrmann and other North American DX-ers have heard an unIDd LA "Radio Cultura" on 2860 kHz, I checked the frequency and mailed the message below to Glenn Hauser [as in DXLD 3-129] (listen to the recording from this occasion here): http://homepage.sverige.net/~a-0901/ (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin July 27, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDIA. Dear Glenn Hauser, Ref: All India Radio Bangalore on SW mentioned in DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-126, July 15, 2003 by Dan Goldfarb, Brentwood, England. As far as I know, earlier one transmitter was on standby mode only. Now they are using it also for regular transmissions. They have 6 nos of 500 kw tx in all. Sincerely, (Jose Jacob, India, DX LISTENING DIGEST) BTW, I notice Allen Graham has started pronouncing ``Joe`s`` as ``JAWS`` instead of ``ho-ZAY``. No cigar. . . (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL. REPORTERS WITHOUT BORDERS SUSPENDED FOR ONE YEAR FROM UN COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS The organisation publishes a report on the commission's accelerating decline, entitled Wheeling and dealing, incompetence and "non-action," in which it recommends a radical overhaul. Reporters Without Borders's consultative status with the United Nations commission on human rights was suspended on July 24 for one year at the request of Libya and Cuba because activists with the organisation staged a protest during the inauguration of the commission's last session in March against the decision to let Libya chair the commission. Reporters Without Borders insists that granting the chair to Col. Gaddafi's regime has been a disgrace to the commission. The UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), the body that took this decision, never invited Reporters Without Borders to explain its action. The failure to respect sanction procedures has been criticised by the French government, which lodged a request for a postponement of any decision to suspend the organisation. This suspension of one of the few press freedom organisations to have consultative status with ECOSOC is farce of the kind that increasingly characterizes the commission on human rights. Reporters Without Borders today publishes a report which details the excesses, shortcomings and accelerating decline of this commission, which dictatorships such as Cuba and China have taken over in order to strip it of all substance. The reports proposes a series of reforms that are essential if the commission is to be rescued : limiting the right to vote to those states that have ratified the main international human rights covenants, naming an independent human rights expert to chair the commission, and abolishing the so-called "non-action" motions that have repeatedly been used to block debates. The results of the vote on the suspension of the consultative status of Reporters without borders: In favour (27) : Azerbaijan, Benin, Bhutan, Brazil, Burundi, China, Congo, Cuba, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Iran, Jamaica, Kenya, Libya, Malaysia, Mozambique, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Qatar, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. Against (23) : Andorra, Australia, Chile, El Salvador, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Nicaragua, Peru, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Sweden, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and United States. Download the report (PDF): http://rsf.fr/IMG/pdf/Report_ONU_gb.pdf (Reporters Without Borders, July 24 2003 via David E. Crawford Titusville, Florida, DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL WATERS [and non]. The official Radio Caroline site has been updated yet again and is now of a high quality. Well done to Ryan and Nigel --- superb, brilliant. I should thank the photographer(s); the photos are excellent. Have a look at http://www.radiocaroline.co.uk/ (Mike Terry, UK, July 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) CAROLINE AND "LOVING AWARENESS" From http://www.getintola.nl/ In the 60's economic growth was prospering and for the first time a lot of young people got better education and more free time to spend than generations before. This released a lot of energy into new activities where youth was interested in: music, movies, travelling, love and friendship, relaxation and having fun while meeting each other. New products like the electric guitar, the amplifier, and the transistor radio (for on the beach!) changed life. . . click here - for more. http://www.getintola.nl/index5.html (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** ISRAEL [non?]. PEACE ACTIVISTS TO REVIVE VOICE OF PEACE RADIO STATION 28/07/2003 20:40 By Anat Balint, Haaretz Correspondent and DPA From http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=323074&contrassID=1&subContrassID=1&sbSubContrassID=0&listSrc=Y A joint Israeli-Palestinian initiative will see the re-establishment of the Abie Nathan's Voice of Peace radio station. Yesterday, Israeli and Palestinian peace activists signed an agreement to begin the new broadcasts on November 4, the anniversary of the assassination of former prime minister Yitzhak Rabin. The station will use archive material of the original Voice of Peace station; and in order to refrain from breaching Israeli law, it will split its operations: The station's studios will be located in East Jerusalem, while its transmitters will be positioned in the West Bank town of Bitunia, near Ramallah. The Palestinian Authority has already allocated to the station two frequencies, which were originally assigned to the PA by Israel, but the station's range of reception remains unclear. The idea to revive the Voice of Peace came from Mussi Raz, a former MK for Meretz and current deputy director-general of the Jewish-Arab Center for Peace in Givat Haviva, and Palestinian businessman Hanna Siniora, publisher of the Jerusalem Times weekly. According to Siniora, the station received the broadcast frequencies following a meeting with PA Chairman Yasser Arafat, who gave his blessing to the initiative, but commented when he heard its name: "But that's Abie Nathan's station, isn't it?" Siniora said the station's objective was to rebuild trust and narrow the distances between the two peoples. It also aimed at fighting stereotypes presented in the media about the Palestinians and Israel, he added, stressing that the station would not relay political programs, nor would it be funded by any party. Instead, it would mainly broadcast Arabic and Hebrew music as well as entertainment programs for children and youth. "It will not focus much on news or current political issues. It will mostly be about the cultures of the two peoples, their similarities and differences," Siniora said. Reviving the station was made possible thanks to a $600,000 donation from the European Union that was approved recently. From day one, the station will broadcast 24 hours a day, dedicating three hours each day to programs dealing with coexistence and serving as a mouthpiece for associations and organizations involved in promoting such issues. The station's presenters will include Israelis and Palestinians who will broadcast both in Hebrew and Arabic. The original Voice of Peace was a legendary pirate radio station run by Israeli peace activist Abie Nathan. It broadcast from a ship anchored just outside Israeli territorial waters and its slogan became something of a catchphrase in Israel - "From somewhere in the Mediterranean, we are the Voice of Peace." In 1993, after Nathan decided to shut down the original Voice of Peace and scuttle the ship from which it transmitted, he donated the station's archives to the Givat Haviva center. Nathan is currently in ill health, but his associates have given their consent for the new station to use the archive material (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** ITALY. GOVERNMENT REMOVES FM ANTENNAS NEAR ROME AS RESULT OF STRINGENT ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES LAW Rome, July 18 (CRU) --- ``In a couple of days, according to a report by the news agency ANSA, removal of `abusive` antennas --- radio and television --- located near Leopardi Elementary School on Monte Mario near Rome will begin,`` Emilio Pappagallo reported on the Italian radio website FM World. ``The radio stations involved are RTL 102.5 on 91.45 FM, Radio Subasio 94.0 FM, and Radio Maria 94.8 FM. The daily newspaper Il Messaggero has anticipated that the transmitter buildings and towers of these networks will be demolished next September 1st. Radios Subasio, Maria and RTL are still present in Rome on other frequencies, respectively 94.5 FM, 95.1 FM, and 102.1 FM.`` In a related development two weeks ago, the Italian Supreme Court reversed a lower court ruling and said that Radio Vaticano officials must stand trial in regard to alleged criminal allowance of Radio Vaticano transmitters to exceed stringent Italian electromagnetic radiation standards, said to be the toughest in all Europe. HVJ Radio Vaticano was built in what was then the rural area of Santa Maria di Galeria outside Rome, but since World War II, the population has swollen to surround the antenna farm, and residents attribute every medical or genetic aberration to the high-power AM and shortwave transmitters. The previous leftwing government had brought the charges. Anti-clericalism runs as rife in Italy as it does in Latin America. The report from FM World was used with the permission of Nicola Franceschini, editor (Mike Dorner, Catholic Radio Update July 28 via DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH. Re English effective May 6th (one hour duration): 1600 3560, 9975, 11710: Just listened to this transmission, and they are on 9975 and 11735 (Erik Køie, Copenhagen. July 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO. A good sporadic E opening on July 28 from Mexico, including XEFB-2 Monterrey NL at 1735 UT with local weather, 5-day forecast, and news; MUF made it to channel 6 at 1813 when I had an Azteca-7 network relay judging from the bug in lower right, a show measuring some woman`s waist, and at 1815 what looked like an ID supered, two lines, at upper right, but could not make it out. According to Doug`s database http://home.earthlink.net/~w9wi/tvdb/channels/6.htm there are four possibilities, two of which are in the area open a bit earlier, but the other two also possible by skip distance if not likely by power: Torreón, DU XHGZP-TV 50.00 0.00 N H 0 0' 0"N 0 0' 0"W XV-XE Acapulco, GR XHACC-TV 5.00 0.00 Z H 16 50'41"N 99 54'39"W XV-XE San Luís Potosí XHCLP-TV 89.80 0.00 Z H 22 9'10"N 100 58'37"W XV-XE Cd. Camargo, CI XHCGJ-TV 1.00 0.00 + H 27 41'49"N 105 10' 8"W XX-XE So Torreón, which is in Coahuila, not Durango! --- unless the unknown G.C. puts the site across the state line, which could well be the case --- seems most likely, with second place going to SLP. But I have another potentially identifiable factor: when the signal faded up, the audio cut off. This is because I had my Sanyo TV set on STEREO(SAP), meaning automatic switch to SAP when transmitted, otherwise receiving in stereo when transmitted, otherwise receiving in mono. By turning off the SAP, the audio came back, so this station was broadcasting silent SAP, an otherwise totally useless practice also engaged in by some US stations, such as KOED-11 Tulsa. So now all I need to have confirmed is which of the four A7 stations on 6 does this (if not more than one). Now, how can I possibly find this out? Has any other DXer noticed this, or anyone in Torreón or SLP to check? (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NETHERLANDS. Hola Glenn, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA. He recibido de parte de la pirata holandesa, Alfa Lima Internacional, una hermosa QSL, la cual confirma mi captación del 28/09/2002, en la frecuencia de 15070 kHz. También viene adjunta una hoja informativa de la emisora y una especie de certificado donde puede leerse la potencia de la emisión por mí reportada (300 watts). Mi carta fue enviada el 21/05 del presente año (con un IRC) y la buena noticia la recibí esta mañana (28/07). Estoy muy feliz por esa QSL; sin duda alguna es una pieza de colección. Incentivo a mis colegas para que también manden sus reportes de Alfa Lima; no perderán su tiempo. Saludos, (Adán González VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PARAGUAY. After many years of listening to Paraguayan stations I got a QSL verification via e-mail from RADIO AMERICA. Frequency: 9905 khz. Hour: 0411 UT. V/S: Don Mur. e-mail: radioamerica@lycos.com (CESAR PEREZ DIOSES, CHIMBOTE, PERU, July 27, hard-core-dx via DXLD) What was the programming? ** PERU. Quito 26/Jul/2003 23:32, Hola Amigos DXistas Hénrik, César y Alfredo! 1610.11 kHz: La encontró Hasse Mattisson ARC/SWB-Suecia La identificó Bjorn Malm ARC/SWB-Ecuador La regaló un QTH Cesar y Alfredo del Perú. Henrik (Klemetz), estoy interesado de saber qué tipo de música tiene Radio Sabor 1610.11 kHz. Música típica de Paucarpata? Música típica de Arequipa? La programación de música de Radio Sabor para mí parece ser el mismo tipo todo el tiempo procedente de la misma región del Perú. Esta noche escuché Radio Sabor durante más de dos horas. Nadie dijo nada, solamente el mismo tipo de música. La señal era muy débil y solamente pude grabar algunos minutos de la música. Enviaré la grabación a Henrik Klemetz que sabe mucho sobre la música peruana. Una preguntita: ¿dónde se puede encontrar la página WEB de Henrik Klemetz con "Música de América Latina"? 73s de (Bjorn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, July 26, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Mañana día 28, todos los peruanos celebran sus fiestas patrias, pero pienso que para la semana que viene puede que haya alguna novedad acerca de la identidad de la emisora, pues le pedí el favor a una persona que reside en Arequipa a ver si encuentra la emisora ubicada en "la falda del Cerro Nueva Alborada". Björn, la página que mencionas, la puedes encontrar ahora en http://home.swipnet.se/gersnaes/henriks/lamusic.html Lo que escuchó Hasse Mattisson era lo que en algunas emisoras peruanas llaman "música vernacular", es decir huaynos, tanto instrumentales como vocales. Esta música es la típica de Huánuco, Huancayo, Andahuaylas, Ayacucho y la que se oye en todo el país, incluso en Lima. Había un par de anuncios bilingües, en español y quechua, y una clara mención de "el centro del Perú", quizás en alusión a la procedencia de la música. (Como lo sabrán explicar mejor los colegas peruanos, la música de Cajamarca y la del Cusco no suena como la del Centro, pues la orquestación es diferente, y tampoco suele escucharse en las emisoras del resto del país). Saludos, HK (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** PERU. The official Peruvian frequency list has a 0.5 kW station on 1605 kHz [!] located at Paucarpata, Arequipa, with OAU6O as their call sign. The registered company name is Empresa Radiodifusora Flor de los Andes SCRL. There is no indication of a station slogan such as Radio Sabor, which is the one Björn Malm, Alfredo Cañote and César Pérez Dioses have reported hearing on 1610. On a surprisingly clear recording made on 1610 kHz by Hasse Mattisson at the end of May, there is lots of Peruvian "vernacular" music and some announcements in Spanish and Quechua, none of which appear to contain an ID. The exact location per the Peruvian list is given as Falda del Cerro Nueva Alborada, Paucarpata, Arequipa (Henrik Klemetz, hard-core-dx via DXLD) El colega Björn Malm me acaba de enviar un archivo de audio de lo que oyó anoche sábado en los 1610 kHz. No hay identificación alguna, pero sí cuatro temas definitivamente peruanos, todos de corte "andino", y uno de los cuales interpretado por el cantante conocido como "El Jilguero del Huascarán" (un ejemplo de su música se encuentra en la página musical que indicaba en el correo anterior). Gracias, Björn, por el envío. HK (Henrik Klemetz, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Hola hola! Bueno, el tema es simple. La emisora se llama Radio Sabor. Paucarpata es un distrito de la capital de Arequipa. Tiene mucha música andina, puesto que Arequipa está dentro de los Andes. Que transmite música vernacular. Sí, y no sorprende ya que hay que analizar la cantidad de puneños y/o cusqueños que se han instalado en la capital arequipeña. Lamentablemente no se identifican en la noche. En las mañanas peruanas (1100 ut) la capto con dificultad extrema y tengo la esperanza de aumentar más información sobre la radio en mención. Lo que sí se escucha "mejor" (sinpo = 32412) es WDHP (US Virgin Islands) en 1620 khz (gracias henrik por ayudarme a identificarla!) Lo mejor para ustedes siempre amigos del DX!!!!!!!!!! (Alfredo Cañote, Perú, July 27, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** PERU. 2003v (Harmonic?), Radio Libertad, región de Cajamarca. July 2003 --- 0040 UT. The station could be heard here around July 22 and has been on the frequency both mornings and evenings. Ought to be a harmonic from OCY2N Radio Libertad, Cajamarca listed on 890 kHz and in that case slipped up to a full 1000 kHz. Program title in the morning "Despertar Campesino". 4750.10, Radio San Francisco Solano, Sóndor, la provincia de Huancabamba, el departamento de Piura. July 18 2003 --- 2345 UT. The station has been off air for a pretty long time and heard only this date. Close down at 2353 UT. Info from "Ventanaperú": Provincia de Huancabamba, cuya capital es Chanchaque. Sus distritos son: El Carmen de la Frontera, Huancabamba, Huarmaca, Lalaquiz, San Miguel de El Faique, Sóndor, Sondorillo; con una población total de 125,458 hab. 4835.47, Marañón active again but extremely weak modulation. 4940.00, San Antonio back with good signal. A Quillabamba station has moved! 5121.11, Radio Suroriente, Quillabamba. July 2003 --- 0035 UT. New frequency for Ondas del Suroriente, sometimes also with ID as "Radio Suroriente". Ex-5067.11 kHz (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin July 27, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hello Glenn! 5121.24, Ondas del Suroriente/Radio Suroriente, Quillabamba. Señor Adán González de Venezuela tiene una estación peruana no identificada en la frecuencia de 5121.24 kHz. Hace una semana aproximadamente se movió Ondas del Suroriente de 5067.11 kHz a 5121.24 kHz. También se identifica como "Radio Suroriente". (73s de Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador ARC - SWB América Latina via DXLD) ** PERU. Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA. Ayer llovió en la ciudad y tuve un día muy productivo en la escucha: La Voz del Campesino, con buena señal, audible desde las 2026 UT (jamás la había captado tan temprano), con música andina y locutor de guardia, en los 6956.69 kHz. SINPO 44333. (27/07). Radio Unión, captada en los 6114.94 kHz, a las 0438 UT, el 28/07, con música romántica y rumbera. Armando Manzanero y Elvis Presley, entre otros. SINPO 32532 (desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Adán González, July 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) also see his unIDs below ** SOUTH AMERICA. 11429.97 USB, 0315 27 July. Jolly Roger Radio International broadcasting via Radio Cochiguaz with frequent English IDs, with address in Ireland, and acknowledging Radio Cochiguaz. Best ever reception here in Victoria, BC. SIO of 3-3-3, with mild degradation from static crashes (Walter (Volodya) Salmaniw, MD, Victoria, BC, Canada, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** TAIWAN. CHINA. The ITU does not recognise "Taiwan" as an official entity for radiocommunications' planning purposes. HF planning is managed by the Broadcasting Corporation of China, in Taipei, and there is no formal technical representation in the HFCC or the ABU-HFC. HF transmission planning is carried out generally in isolation from the rest of the world, and the authorities in Taipei decline to recognise Beijing as the parent regulatory body. Entries will be found in the HFCC data for "Taiwan", but these are limited to the use of relays, such as arranged by Merlin, and other international brokers. Operational dates for HF transmission plans for the CBS are not aligned or coordinated in advance with those in use by the majority of other broadcasters, which is the reason for the activation of the schedules at unusual times during the year. There is no acknowledgment of the official "A" or "B" seasonal timetables. That is the reason for the many frequency collisions for the CBS national and international transmissions, where CBS services are on top of established broadcasters (Bob Padula, EDXP World Broadcast Magazine July 27, used by permission http://edxp.org via DXLD) ** U K. BBC ``SPINNING TO WIN`` Warning: The following paragraphs reflect my opinion on a program I heard on SW today dealing with current and past political propaganda. If you believe political issues have no place in a SW programs forum, delete this message now. I awoke early this morning and accidentally stumbled across the first episode of a BBC documentary entitled, "Spinning to Win." It was a 30 minute program narrated by Robin Lustig which examined how the USA and the UK had warped the truth in past conflicts to mobilize public opinion. The subject is very timely as both governments are today under the gun for recently "spinning" facts to justify what the governments wanted to do. For that matter the BBC itself is under the gun for its involvement in spinning or not spinning (depending on one`s perspective) the data leading up to the Iraq attack. "Spin" is a word that has evolved to replace "propaganda" which has such a negative connotation. (As an aside, do you remember an old BBC TV show called "Connections?" The program showed how ancient discoveries eventually resulted centuries later in new discoveries or inventions and tied seemingly unconnected events together. Well I had a "Connection" moment while listening to the program as the BBC explained the origin of the word "propaganda". According to the BBC, "propaganda" derives from an agency of the Roman Catholic Church located in the Vatican whose mission is the "propagation of the faith." I never realized the connection before but I heard of that agency when I was a student in a Catholic high school listening to Radio Moscow propaganda while I did my homework.) The BBC program, "Spinning to Win" examined how the Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher administrations spun public opinion regarding problems in the Suez (Egypt), the Falkland Islands (Malvinas), Nicaragua and El Salvador as examples. One thing the show confirmed for me was that the more things change, the more they remain the same. I heard the program at 0900 UT on 15,400 kHz which is shown in PWBR to be beamed to West Africa from the Ascension Island relay station. I plan to catch the remaining segments and recommend the program to anyone trying to better understand the search for weapons of mass deception. From the BBC web site: MONDAY 28th July 2003 --- PRESS RELEASES 14.07.03 WORLD SERVICE The selling of war - Spinning to Win on BBC World Service How governments sell war to voters is explored in Spinning to Win from 28 July on the BBC World Service. Robin Lustig investigates the relationship between politicians, the military, the media and the public by drawing on the recent war in Iraq and other wars of the broadcast era. Politicians who have led their countries into war will be featured, together with newspaper, radio and TV editors who have covered war stories. The series will question whether journalists have to give up their usual stance of neutrality during times of war, whether the public can expect to be given a full picture of what is going on and how war changes political communication. The first of the three programmes charts the rhetorical transition from the possibility to the inevitability of war. Philip Knightley, journalist and historian, discusses the need to persuade the public of the rightness of the cause, a goal sometimes achieved by portraying an enemy as a psychopathic monster. In the second programme on 4 August journalists discuss how their approach to coverage changes once the conflict gets underway and politicians give way to the military as the main news source. Robin Lustig discovers that a sophisticated PR machine has evolved. During the Iraq conflict, for example, former J Walter Thomson advertising executive Charlotte Beers was employed to rescue the United States government from a dip in support for the war. PR firms Hill and Knowlton and the Rendon Corp were hired by the Kuwaiti government as part of a campaign to denounce Iraq's 1990 invasion and mobilise public support for Operation Desert Storm. Robin Lustig says: "Military press officers are no longer lowly operatives. They have become key strategists in the war of words." The final programme on 11 August reflects on how journalists, politicians and the military decide if they've had a "good war" and examines the manipulation of casualty and death statistics. The late Godfrey Talbot, a veteran BBC broadcaster, explains that in World War II journalists had to use government figures which exaggerated German casualties and minimised Allied ones. Recent wars in the Gulf and Afghanistan were possibly the first where the public didn't expect soldiers to be killed. How do people then react to body bags and friendly fire deaths when things go wrong? Notes to Editors Spinning to Win is a series of three programmes, 25 minutes each. The presenter is Robin Lustig and the producer is Ivor Gaber. International Broadcast Times West Africa: Mon 0906, 1606 | Tues 0006 | Sun 2206 Europe: Mon 0806, 1306, 1806 | Tues 0006 | Sun 1906, 2306 E and S Africa: Mon 0806, 1306, 1806 | Tues 0006 | Sun 1906, 2306 Middle East: Mon 0706, 1606 | Tues 0006 | Sat 1806 | Sun 1306, 2306 South Asia: Sun 2306, Mon 0506, 0906, 1406 | Sun 0606 East Asia: Mon 0206, 1706, 1206, 1806 | Sun 0806 Americas: Mon 1406, 1906 | Tues 0006, 0506 | Sun 2306 Listen online from 18 August (updated weekly on Mondays) at http://www.bbcworldservice.com/programmes - choose Spinning to Win from the drop down list of programmes ~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-., (Joe Buch, DE, July 28, swprograms via DXLD) -*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^ ** U K. BBC CHAIRMAN MOUNTS SAVAGE ATTACK ON THE GOVERNMENT By Colin Brown and Chris Hastings (Filed: 27/07/2003) The row between the BBC and the Government escalates dramatically today, as Gavyn Davies, the corporation's chairman, accuses Cabinet ministers of seeking to destroy the independence of the BBC in revenge for its refusal to back down in the Iraq dossier controversy. Writing in The Telegraph, Mr Davies says: "We are chastised for taking a different view on editorial matters from that of the Government and its supporters. "Because we have had the temerity to do this, it is hinted that a system that has protected the BBC for 80 years should be swept away and replaced by an external regulator that will 'bring the BBC to heel'. "I trust that wiser heads in the government will prevail. There is only one reason why the BBC has been able to build the trust of its audiences over so many years, and that is because it is emphatically not the voice of the state . . . During and after the war, the BBC [has] upheld its traditional attachment to impartiality and the truth under almost intolerable pressures." It is unprecedented for a serving BBC chairman to attack a government of the day in such stark terms. His remarks underline the level of animosity that now exists between the corporation and Tony Blair's most senior cabinet allies. The BBC had informally agreed a truce not to continue the feud until after Lord Hutton delivers his judicial inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the death of Dr David Kelly, the government scientist who was the main source of the BBC's attack over last September's dossier on Iraqi weapons. Despite this, Mr Davies and his colleagues felt provoked beyond endurance by last weekend's claim by the former minister Peter Mandelson that the BBC was to blame for Dr Kelly's death and by subsequent hints from Tessa Jowell, the Culture Secretary, that the corporation's governors were not fulfilling their statutory obligations. One senior executive in the corporation claimed that Ms Jowell had privately left BBC chiefs in no doubt that she might use the review of the BBC charter - due later this year - to pressure the governors into sacking Greg Dyke, the director general, change the composition of the board or even change the size and scope of the broadcaster. The corporation has resisted attempts to make the new regulator Ofcom responsible for policing its impartiality and accuracy - a function still performed by the governors. Much of the row now depends on whether Dr Kelly was an authoritative source for the BBC's claim that the intelligence service had been unhappy with the Government over the September dossier. The Government remains adamant that the BBC has provided no conclusive evidence that Dr Kelly was a source of this calibre. The BBC is determinedly sticking by its claim that Dr Kelly was correctly described by Andrew Gilligan, a BBC defence correspondent, as "an intelligence source". One BBC executive claimed yesterday that the scientist had been "seconded" to MI6. However, intelligence officials said that while Dr Kelly had had "some contact" with the intelligence services, he had absolutely no formal connection with MI6. In his article, Mr Davies also hits out at Alastair Campbell. He accuses the Prime Minister's outgoing director of communications of using the row over Mr Gilligan's report - which said that No 10 had inserted the claim that Saddam Hussein could deploy weapons of mass destruction within 45 minutes into the September dossier - to mount a wide-ranging assault on the BBC. Mr Davies writes: "The main purpose of what we did in our special governors' meeting on July 6 was to repudiate Mr Campbell's central charge that the entire BBC was running a campaign against him, the Government and the [Iraq] war. I am very gratified that Mr Campbell now seems to have withdrawn these wider charges." Last night, Ms Jowell hit back at Mr Davies's comments. "There is absolutely no question that the independence of the BBC is under threat," she said. "I have repeatedly made that clear and that the present row over the Andrew Gilligan report will have no bearing on the charter review." Mr Davies's intervention is a measure of how high the stakes have become in a row which has its origin in a single news story. It is all the more embarrassing for the Government because Mr Davies was a Labour Party member until he accepted his BBC post in 2001, donating -L-10,000 to the party over seven years. He is a close friend of Gordon Brown, and his wife, Sue Nye, is the Chancellor's political secretary. No 10 insists that Dr Kelly played only a peripheral role in the drafting of the Iraqi weapons dossier and was not, therefore, a credible source for the BBC's story. However, a member of the Commons foreign affairs committee told The Telegraph that Dr Kelly may have misled the MPs about his role. Richard Ottaway, a Tory member of the committee, said Dr Kelly may have been "economical with the truth" by understating his importance in the drafting of the dossier. The BBC says it has a tape, made by Susan Watts, the Newsnight reporter, of Dr Kelly accusing No 10 and Mr Campbell of interference in the compilation of the dossier. (c) Copyright of Telegraph Group Limited 2003 (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U K. BBC FACES NEW QUESTIONS AS CHARTER DEBATE REIGNITES Matt Wells, media correspondent, Monday July 28, 2003, The Guardian A senior BBC executive cleared Andrew Gilligan's controversial newspaper article in which he first linked Alastair Campbell to the "sexing up" of the claim that Iraq could launch weapons of mass destruction within 45 minutes. The Guardian can reveal that the Today programme editor Kevin Marsh approved the June 1 Mail on Sunday piece, in which Gilligan connected Mr Campbell, director of communications at Downing Street, to the dossier story for the first time. In Gilligan's original May 29 reports on Today, Mr Campbell's name was pointedly absent. Lord Hutton's inquiry into the death of David Kelly, who was Gilligan's source for the story, is likely to ask why the BBC executives felt unable to allow Mr Campbell's name to be mentioned on the Today programme, but were sufficiently comfortable to see it used in the MoS. He may also ask whether the article was changed between approval and publication. The BBC said last night that, by the time the MoS went to press, Mr Campbell's named had been connected to the dossier row by several other newspapers. "That relaxed the attitude a little bit," a spokesman said. It is understood that Richard Sambrook, BBC director of news, has always believed the MoS piece was the most difficult part of the Gilligan story to defend. Once the Hutton inquiry is complete, Mr Sambrook will deliver to the corporation's board of governors a review of the rules governing freelance work by BBC staff. This review, however, is not Mr Sambrook's main concern this week, as the corporation prepares to mount its make-or-break case to the Hutton inquiry. A team of QCs, in-house lawyers, BBC executives and communications staff has been assembled to make the best of the corporation's argument. A key plank will be the recording made by the Newsnight science editor Susan Watts of her conversation with Dr Kelly, the existence of which was disclosed by the Guardian, in which he expressed concerns about Downing Street's use of the 45-minute claim. One problem for the BBC, however, is that while Dr Kelly identifies Mr Campbell on the tape, he appears to use his name synonymously with "Downing Street" and "No 10", rather than blaming him individually and directly for exaggerating the case for war. For Dr Kelly, as with so many observers of the political scene, the words "Alastair Campbell", had become inextricably associated with the government's communications machine. In addition, the BBC will rely on the notes of Gilligan, defence and diplomatic correspondent of the Today programme; and Gavin Hewitt, a Ten O'Clock News reporter, who also spoke to Dr Kelly. The Guardian understands that Dr Kelly spoke to a fourth BBC reporter, Jane Corbin of the Panorama programme. As it prepares for the Hutton inquiry, the BBC has also been fighting on another front: every 10 years, the government carries out a review of its royal charter, which sets the corporation's method of funding and outlines its role and remit. As the broadcast media has expanded in recent decades, the licence fee has become tougher to justify, but never before has the charter renewal process been coloured by such political animosity. The BBC has become increasingly concerned about the mutterings over charter renewal: Gerald Kaufman, chairman of the Commons media select committee, has used the Iraq dossier story to justify a call to clip the BBC's wings by bringing it fully under the remit of the new communications regulator Ofcom. (At the moment, Ofcom will rule on taste and decency issues while the governors will maintain their remit over the BBC's impartiality and accuracy.) Threatened Peter Mandelson, the twice-resigned former cabinet minister, is reported to have threatened the BBC privately over its future. Yesterday Peter Hain, leader of the Commons, claimed the BBC had acted like a tabloid newspaper by exaggerating the claims made by Dr Kelly. Even Conrad Black, owner of the Telegraph newspapers, waded in to say the BBC was the "greatest menace facing the country it was founded to serve and inform" and accused it of trying to "destroy and supplant the government". But it was an interview by the culture secretary, Tessa Jowell, that appears to have goaded the BBC chairman, Gavyn Davies, into action. On Friday, Ms Jowell promised, in a discussion about the licence fee and the BBC's governance on Radio 4's World at One, to "take very seriously" any recommendations on the BBC made by the Hutton inquiry Mr Davies felt it was time to draw a line in the sand with an article in the Sunday Telegraph in which he warned that 80 years of the BBC's independence was under threat. Ms Jowell, who accused Mr Davies of inflaming the row, went back on Radio 4 yesterday to clarify the government's position, putting it "on the record" on The World this Weekend that the dossier row would not influence the charter renewal process. The BBC welcomed her comments, but some continue to harbour doubts. One source, quoted at the weekend, succinctly echoed the concerns of many senior journalists at the corporation: "There's a sense they are going to the wall at the wrong time over the wrong story and the wrong correspondent." Until the row is resolved, few think it likely that the questions over the BBC's future will disappear. Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003 (via Daniel Say, DXLD) ** U K. THROUGH THE ROUND WINDOW The BBC has always called itself a temple of the arts. Now it's getting the buildings to match. By Jonathan Glancey Jonathan Glancey, Monday July 28, 2003, The Guardian Scaffolding and extensive building works mean that the art deco lobby of BBC Broadcasting House in London's Portland Place has been out of bounds for some months. It will be, in all probability, for another five years. Directly opposite the entrance, the great, stentorian Latin inscription booms out: "This temple of the arts and muses is dedicated to Almighty God by the first Governors of Broadcasting in the year 1931, Sir John Reith being director general. It is their prayer that good seed sown may bring forth a good harvest, that all things hostile to peace or purity may be banished from this house, and that the people, inclining their ear to whatsoever things are beautiful and honest and of good report, may tread the path of wisdom and uprightness." The sense of occasion this great ocean-liner of a building has always instilled is part and parcel of the BBC's resilient belief, even when under attack from left, right, spinning and reeling governments, that its mission is beyond that of pure information and entertainment. It must also educate and inspire. But, how could it hope to inspire those visiting and working in its more recent buildings? The worst of these is the infamous "tin box" at White City, a cut-price design raced up in 1990 when Stuart Young, a former head of Tesco, was BBC chairman. A rotten place to work, and an eyesore, without even a vulgar Latin inscription to adorn it, the tin box represented the BBC's sad, if temporary, slide into managerialism, bureaucracy and a wilful, lowbrow contempt by well-educated, middle-class managers for the arts and muses. "I'm on record, I'm pleased to say," says Alan Yentob, the BBC's director of drama, entertainment and children's television, "for having a rant at the time. How could we build this appalling carbuncle when we had the chance to build a truly inspirational new design by Norman Foster on Portland Place? I remember being humoured by top executives. All very charming and artistic, but which of us really cares about architecture?" Now, though, the BBC is making an extraordinary architectural comeback. Putative ideas spawned in the 1990s under former director general John Birt and Tony Hall, his head of news, have been fully hatched by a creative team led by John Smith, the BBC's director of finance, property and business affairs. Broadcasting House itself is being reconstructed and added to by architects MacCormac Jamieson Prichard, whose magnificent vaulted newsroom will be the largest of its kind in the world when completed in 2008. Broadcasting House will then be open to the public, as far as security allows, so everyone can witness what have been its secret ministries. Laced through the building will be a programme of artworks, including Rachel Whiteread's nearly complete Room 101, a cast of the room that is said to have inspired Orwell's room-of-terror in 1984. The greatly extended Broadcasting House will wrap around a new public square. It will be both finely crafted and heroically, elegantly modern, as the building was when it opened to great acclaim. Broadcasting House is, however, just the mighty tip of an even mightier architectural iceberg. Over at White City in Shepherd's Bush, the tin box is being flanked by a street of handsome new BBC broadcast and office buildings, due for completion this autumn, designed by Allies and Morrison and, when the costs are finally sorted out, a new BBC Music Centre. The idea is for White City to become one ambitious, 17-acre BBC "campus", connecting existing buildings, including the fondly regarded, soon-to-be-rebuilt TV Centre, a design by Graham Dawbarn from 1960 that I have always thought of as a bit of late-flowering Soviet constructivism landed in west London. The new look BBC White City will plug into the new shopping centre being built here along the approach road linking Shepherds Bush roundabout with the elevated A40 (M) to Oxford and Birmingham. And there is more. By 2001, the BBC occupied some 520 buildings in more than 40 cities. Most were prosaic, often ramshackle, and even downright shabby, held together with seemingly little more than Valerie Singleton's famous sticky-back plastic. Those high up in the BBC, like Yentob, had watched in the early 1990s as rival European broadcasters invested in swish and dramatic new buildings, including Richard Roger's Channel 4 headquarters, Norman Foster's ITN building, both in London, and Richard Meier's Canal+ broadcasting station in Paris. Now the BBC is moving into notable new buildings across the whole of Britain, from the big and blowsy Mailbox in Birmingham by Building Design Partnership, to the brave new Forum, by Michael Hopkins and Partners, overlooking the market square in Norwich. On Glasgow's Pacific Quay, alongside the steely and striking new science centre, David Chipperfield's BBC Scotland building is almost complete. A fine and handsome thing, boasting a dramatic tiered atrium, it has a great sense of openness and exudes quality. How did this sea change in the BBC's design values come about? On a practical level, John Smith has done a deal with developers that will see a £2bn investment in BBC properties over the next 30 years, with no cost to licence holders. There is a precedent for the BBC acting as a commercially-minded developer. Before it occupied the whole of Broadcasting House, the idea was to let out space to pay for the running costs of the building. In a delightful Reithian touch, the BBC drew up a list of prohibited lessees: "Slaughtermen, sugar baker, fellmonger, beater of flax, common brewer, quasi-medical or quasi-surgical establishment, brothel or bagnio keeper." The most hotly debated of the new BBC buildings is the Music Centre at White City. Due to open in 2006, this will house the BBC Symphony Orchestra, BBC Symphony Chorus, BBC Concert Orchestra and BBC Singers in two concert hall studios. As this will be the gateway to the vast White City campus, the BBC is looking for an eyecatching design, "an iconic building", says John Smith, "which makes a statement and creates a buzz both inside and outside the BBC. We're not afraid to champion a controversial design; indeed, we relish the opportunity to rise to this challenge. We already attract the very best broadcasters, writers, actors and technicians. Now we want to add architects to the list." Architects shortlisted for the Music Centre are Foreign Office, Future Systems, MVRDV (from Holland), Ushida Findlay and Zaha Hadid. Any one of these is capable of shaping an "iconic" building. All five have submitted what Smith describes as "thrilling" designs, and all five have been told to have another go because Smith and his team of judges believe they have all gone way over budget. The point about the BBC is that it belongs to all of us. It is, in a cynically privatised world, a public corporation. Nothing, Lord Reith liked to say, "is too good for the public". Whether standards of broadcasting or of architecture, art and design. © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003 (via Daniel Say, DXLD) ** U S A. The latest 'Economist' magazine offers a review of a history of VOA by Alan L. Heil (Voice of America: A History, Columbia University Press, 2003). Among the examples of the reach of shortwave broadcasts, the book contains this episode: 'A few years after the creation of the Tibetan service, a National Geographic Television crew recorded chants in the kitchen of a Buddhist monastery. Once back in Washington, they discovered that the lyrics were actually: "This is the Voice of America in Tibetan, coming to you from Washington."' The review notes the use of anecdotes to tell the VOA story, but cautions about its readability: 'Readers fascinated by the technical intricacies of radio and the arcana of Washington's broadcasting policies will no doubt be riveted. Others may feel that the book reads a little too much like an internal corporate memo.' The reviewer also notes that VOA is a "well-respected multimedia operation heard in over 50 languages by more than 90 million people - except, ironically, in the United States." (Matt Francis, Washington, DC, July 28, 2003, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Really??? ** U S A. LAWSUIT EMBROILS SPANISH STATIONS --- BITTER LEGAL DISPUTE BETWEEN STATION OWNER AND PROGRAM COMPANY INVOLVES MUSIC, MONEY By Terry Horne July 27, 2003 All-Spanish, all-the-time radio in Indianapolis is just un niño. Already, though, a bitter paternity fight has arisen for control of this broadcast child. Continental Broadcasting, which owns the city's Spanish radio stations, WSYW-AM (810) and WEDJ-FM (107.1), this year kicked Fiesta Mexicana, a radio programming company, off the air and accused Fiesta workers of burglary and theft. Fiesta in turn accused Continental in a civil lawsuit of breaking an agreement giving Fiesta exclusive rights, among the two stations, to play the regional Mexican music favored by much of the Hispanic community. And it claims that someone at Continental falsified a contract to evict Fiesta. The lawsuit, which continues in Marion Superior Court but may be settled soon, is a testament to the thousands of Mexicans and other Hispanics who immigrated to Indianapolis in the past 10 years. The revenue from Spanish radio in Indianapolis is finally worth fighting over. . . http://www.indystar.com/print/articles/1/061012-3471-009.html (Indianapolis Star July 28 via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. Boston's 1150 attempts to seal its record for most callsigns on a single Boston station, ever, by changing yet again from WBPS to WYTS. (That's ten, by the way: WCOP, WACQ, WHUE, WSNY (followed by a return to WHUE), WMEX, WROR, WNFT, WAMG, WBPS and now WYTS, making 1150 sort of the Ted Williams of Boston call changes. 1510 is in second place with eight, and Bob Bittner would have to get very busy with 740, now mired in third place with six calls, to compete for this particular dubious honor.) And a story that's been simmering all summer: Lowell's WJUL (91.5) will apparently have some different programming this fall, as the Lowell Sun takes over 25 hours a week of the UMass/Lowell station's programming. According to a letter that's been sent out by the station's current student board to station alumni, the Sun will program a local news-talk format on the station at 5-10 AM weekdays, operating from a new studio inside Lowell's Tsongas Arena. The deal raises all sorts of questions, first and foremost about how the Sun would make money on a deal with what is, after all, a noncommercial station - but also about what the long-term effects of such a deal would be on student control of WJUL, not to mention the added competition the deal would create for commercial WCAP (980 Lowell). We'll have much more on this story in the months to come, no doubt --- and we hear this isn't the only format change on the way in the Merrimack Valley, either. Stay tuned! (Scott Fybush, Northeast Radio Watch July 28 via DXLD) ** U S A. RE: [WTFDA] CBS network feed question. When I interviewed for a job at KPNX-12 (Phoenix NBC) in 1990 I was shown a rack with a computer and a bunch of tape machines. It was their network delay system. Just last week I spoke with our corporate director of engineering who told me the custom software we were installing for automated recording of our WSMV-4 newscasts was in use at KPHO-5 to handle the delay of CBS. I've heard similar tales from engineers at at least two other Mountain Time Zone stations. || gh: Standard rant about how the networks ignore the MT zone in program time promos, and, increasingly the CT zone!! And even the PT zone, by a lot of stuff originating on the east coast, The Only Zone That Matters. And Pacific time (it does have a name) being called `West Coast Time`.|| (sarcasm mode on:) They probably figure the average American doesn't know the difference between the Atlantic and the Pacific... (sarcasm mode off) (curiosity mode on:) Why is it Eastern Daylight Time but Pacific Daylight Time? Why not Western Daylight Time? Why did we cede "Atlantic Daylight Time" to the Canadians? (curiosity mode off) -- (Doug Smith W9WI, Pleasant View (Nashville), TN EM66, http://www.w9wi.com DX LISTENING DIGEST) Glenn, I hate to betray a fellow CST/CDT person, but I often wonder why the Central Time zone isn't absorbed into Eastern time? I live near Thunder Bay ON and Bruce Crossing MI, both near the western edge of Eastern Time, and wonder why it doesn't encroach farther west? The only people who might really be bothered live in or near Bismarck ND, where in summer the sunset is around 10 p.m. CDT. Of course, I am with you on "daylight shifting time." Why have it at all? My mother remembered when Hancock-Houghton MI were on Central Time, and when I lived in NE I heard stories how the Central time zone boundary has been moving farther west (Bruce Elving, Esko MN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) There has been a proposal to merge the four US timezones into two, but that would be disastrous, in effect forcing more year-round DST on large areas. Here in Enid, we are already on double-daylight shifting; should be in UT -7 MST zone, as we are west of the 97.5 meridian where the CST/MST boundary ought to run (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. PUBLIC [sic] TV RUNNING OUT OF TIME By CHRISTINA L. ESPARZA/Staff Writer Tuesday, July 22, 2003 http://www.vvdailypress.com/cgi-bin/newspro/viewnews.cgi?newsid1058880330,70552, HESPERIA --- Shag carpeting, platform shoes and TV translators are all relics of the 1970s. But while butterfly collars and polyester suits are nothing but a painful memory, the aging translator that's used to provide free network signals to the residents of the Victor Valley is still a part of our everyday lives. The Victor Valley Public Translator, which is in the care of Hesperia Parks and Recreation District, was installed between 1978 and 1982 and had a life expectancy of 10 to 12 years, said Don Webb, supervisor for the parks district. With a very tight budget and replacement parts increasingly hard to find, the translator is still up a quarter of a century later --- but barely running, Webb said. "Channel 27 (KCAL 9) has been down since February," Webb said. "That's a parts problem and we can't find them. ... They don't make them anymore." Over the weekend, channels 25 and 51 (KNBC 4 and KCOP 13) went out, Webb said. In addition, the Federal Communications Commission is requiring all public television translators to convert to digital in 2006. The price of conversion could cost anywhere between $200,000 and $320,000, officials said. "There are multiple things going wrong with it," said Larry Sihock, general manager of HDTV 55, who also repairs the translator when it goes out. "The biggest thing is that it was built in the '70s." Sihock said he normally goes up to the translator every week, but lately has been there every day to fix small problems because of lightning storms. Fund-raising efforts have not yielded much, as most people expect their free network television to be just that --- free, Webb said. Last year, a collection drive by the parks district raised about $400, after spending money on radio and newspaper advertisements. It's a Catch-22, Webb said: People don't want to donate until their service is better, and it can't get better without donations. Sihock added that he and the parks district are looking into federal grants to pay for the conversion, but hasn't heard any word on it yet. "We can't spend money," Webb said. "It's not there." WANT TO HELP? To make a donation to the Victor Valley Public Translator Service, send a check to VVPTS, P.O. Box 401055, Hesperia, CA 92340 (via Brock Whaley, DXLD) ** VENEZUELA. Este próximo 29 de julio, Radio Nacional de Venezuela cumple 67 años de fundada. 73's y muy buen DX... Saludos (desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Adán González, July 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. Unusual Logging on 1340 AM. Last night heard two clear IDs at both 2100 CST and 2200 CST [sics] for a station with a TOH ID of what sounds like, "K1E4RTM Beaumont 1340 10 O'Clock". Male announcer followed by USA Radio Network News. I can't find any GY stations in Beaumont Texas...any idea what I could be hearing? 73, (Les Rayburn, N1LF, Navy MARS NNNØHSI, "Proudly Serving Those Who Serve", Helena, AL 35080 --- Try the 1750 Meter Band: http://www.highnoonfilm.com/xmgr July 27, NRC-AM via DXLD) Les, it's a pretty safe bet (at least on this end) that what you heard was KOLE in Port Arthur, Texas. The "4RT" was probably "Port Arthur" (located next to Beaumont). KOLE gets out pretty well, and has been heard by me from a couple different QTHs in Iowa over the past decade (Rick Dau, Omaha, Neb., ibid.) UNIDENTIFIED. 3920 \\ 3940 at 1048-1053, OM in Asian? language on 20 July. Best opening to Asia and Pacific this week, some audio on 2960.25v, possibly Indonesia. This was through severe local AROs. Looking for Korea. No joy since 20 July during 1000-1100 (Bob Wilkner NRD535D Pompano Beach, Florida, US, July 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED [non]. Re 5134.0 USB: Hi, it is Mayak (RUS) in Russian relayed via Belarus. Parallel to 4982.0 kHz, both in USB. If you try the frequencies early in the morning, you will find very good signals. They start at 0300 UT. GOOD DX, (Karel Honzik, the Czech Republic (Czechia), AOR AR-7030 30 m Long Wire, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Just now (27-7-03, 1630z) the Belarus` military relay of a BLR (or Russian Mayak) broadcasting station is active again on 5134 kHz (USB and LSB). When they operate same pattern as last time they should be QRV till 1800 UT. Maybe anybody with Russian language knowledge will be able to identify the station which is relayed. For my "idea" it sounds not like the Russian Mayak but a more to a "youth public" directed? Any sense to send reception reports to the station relayed? Do they know that the BLR military (?) is relaying them ? What about the (c) ? hi 73, (Tom - DL8AAM, ibid.) UNIDENTIFIED. 5240.26, unID LA SS, unknown QTH. July 2003 - 1120 UT. Weak signal and impossible to locate (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin July 27, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. 6200.3, 24.7 0055. Here I found a signal, extremely weak sounding like a Spanish Latinamerican. Reports from the "streets". I have absolutely no idea what this can be (probably a mirror?) but perhaps something to check. In 9 times of 10 there is a Chinese on the frequency, but this one can be attenuated by the K9AY-loop. 0-2 RÅ (Roland Äkesson, Sweden, SW Bulletin, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIEDS. En 4426.59 kHz, 0048 UT, 12/07, sermón religioso. En 4460.81 kHz, 0044 UT, 12/07, SINPO 2/1. En 4650.35 kHz, a las 2226 UT, con SINPO 2/2, anuncios de servicio público y menciones constantes de "Acapulco". Demasiada estática. No pude identificarla. (27/07). En 4716.77 kHz, 12/07, 2327 UT. Baladas en español, locutora de guardia. SINPO 3/2. En 5470.75 kHz, a las 2348 UT, música rumbera. Señal muy débil: 2/1. (27/07). En 4815 kHz, a la 0110 UT, locutora de guardia presentaba música romántica en español: Marco Antonio Solís "Vivir sin tí" y Enrique Iglesias. Saludos al aire. Identificaba el programa como "Variedades musicales". En ningún momento la locutora dijo el nombre de la estación, en más de 15 minutos. Promociones con demasiados efectos de "eco", que dificultan la escucha de un nombre concreto. Sugerencia: como locutor profesional, creo que los colegas deberían poner más ciudado en decir el nombre de la estación y dónde se halla, al menos cada dos canciones. Sería lo ideal. (27/07). SINPO 32432. En 5460.33 kHz, el 28/07, a la 0148 UT, música andina. Sin identificar. En 5637.21 kHz, a las 0154 UT, música andina instrumental, con SINPO 2/1, con clara inteferencia de radioaficionados. (28/07). En 5677.98 kHz, muy buena señal con música y locutor de guardia. Hablaba demasiado rápido y atropellado. No se le entendía nada. 0158 UT, SINPO 4/3. Despedida a las 0218 UT. Sin identificar (desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, Adán González, July 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ HAM PREFIXES A complete list of Prefixes assigned by International Telecommunications Union can be found on the Trans Provincial Website: http://www.tpn7055.ca/callsign.html (Trans Provincial Net newsletter July 27 via Jim Taylor, VA3KU, July 26, ODXA via DXLD) MASSIVE FREQUENCY LIST A very large text file titled "Shortwave Frequency List A-03" has appeared on a Website, from the Nagoya DXers Circle. The list is in descending order of frequency, showing national, international, and non-official broadcasters. The data gives frequencies, times, days, languages, sites, powers, azimuths, ITU coordinates, geographical zones and organisations. The list appears to be a combination of current registered frequencies for A-03 (many of which are not active), plus many redundant assignments for past seasons. The list is available at http://www2.starcat.ne.jp/~ndxc/ (Bob Padula, EDXP World Broadcast Magazine July 27, used by permission http://edxp.org via DXLD) WTS (Where's That Station?) MW DX Utility for Windows® The [FREE] WTS (Where's That Station?) MW DX Utility for Windows® has been released and is now available for download. Visit: http://www.dobe.com/wts/ The four databases used by WTS: North American Medium Wave (AM/BCB) Stations U.S. Zipcodes Station Keywords and Slogans U.S. and Canadian Telephone Area Codes are also available as individual downloads. Come on over and take a peek. Best Regards, (Eric Force eric@dobe.com http://www.dobe.com/wts/ rec.radio.shortwave via SW Bulletin July 27 via DXLD) CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ EDXP CONFERENCE EDXP is an affiliate organisation with the EDXC, but I will not be able to attend this year's Conference to fly the Australian flag! My New Zealand trip will not allow me time to get back to Melbourne and then fly away again in a couple of days to Europe --- it is also very expensive at this time of year, being the peak season (Bob Padula, EDXP World Broadcast Magazine July 27, used by permission http://edxp.org via DXLD) Padula was still being mentioned as attending on this week`s EDXC report via DX Partyline. I too was invited, and regret that I will be unable to attend. Fortunately, I never said that I would (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-133, July 26, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1192: WWCR: Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 9475 RFPI: Sun 0412? See USA/WRMI; 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 7445 and/or 15039 WRMI: Sun 1800+ 15725 WBCQ: Mon 0445 7415 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1192.html ** ALASKA. TRUTH STRANGER THAN FICTION FOR NICK BEGICH Mayor`s brother writes on edge of technology By NEIL ZAWICKI Alaska Star . . .In the early 1990s, he was working as a manager with the Anchorage School District when he read an article on the Alaska-based HAARP project, or High Frequency Active Auroral Research Project. ``I just couldn`t believe what I was reading,`` Begich said. He then embarked on a journey of research, which culminated in his first book, ``Angels don`t play this HAARP,`` co-authored by freelance journalist Jeane Manning, and published by Earthpulse Press - a Begich-owned company --- in 1995. The book presents the project - billed by the U.S. Government as a tool to study the ionosphere - as a secret weapon. ``This is a significant amount of power,`` reads the book in chapter 16. ``When beamed into a dynamic portion of the planet`s upper atmosphere in order to create artificially controlled high energy interactions.`` The book spawned speaking engagements in Europe, and in 1998, Begich was invited to Brussles {sics}, Belgium to debate NATO on the subject. ``What happened was Tom Spencer contacted the American Mission in Brussles, and contacted the Secretary General of NATO,`` he said. ``Both of whom denied any detailed knowledge of HAARP, any detailed knowledge of ionospheric modification for weapons application which is the essence of what HAARP is.`` Russian president Vladmir Putin this year announced opposition to the project on similar grounds. . . http://www.alaskastar.com/stories/072403/new_20030724001.shtml (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** ANDORRA. RÀDIO I TELEVISIÓ D'ANDORRA, SA en http://www.rtvasa.ad/ (via Pedro Sedano, Madrid, España, Noticias DX via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. More on alleged political bias at the ABC..... Glenn, The latest round of discussion in the press on alleged bias at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation against our conservative government is nothing new. Traditionally, the conservative political parties here have been suspicious of our public broadcaster`s motives and tend to regard the ABC as the last journalistic haven of cardigan- wearing old lefties. The current Communications Minister and his colleagues would like nothing better than to see the ABC ``dumbed down`` to the level of the commercial media in this country; the so- called ``reality TV``, lifestyle shows, highly commercialised sport and mindless sitcoms disseminated by the privately owned stations are seen as much safer for an incumbent government than any hint of the incisive and questioning investigative journalism that has traditionally been the cornerstone of ABC programming. The tactics have always been the same; stack the ABC board with sympathetic conservatives that are bound to put pressure on the programmers, squeeze the funding, and ensure that the commercial media moguls are holding all the aces when it comes to exploring new broadcasting opportunities, such as digital transmission. Unfortunately, the lowest common denominator is extremely low indeed, and the triumph of dross over quality is almost complete. Accordingly, the Philistines will probably win the battle as a result of general apathy towards the ABC`s fate amongst the public at large (Craig Seager, Bathurst, Australia, July 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRIA. Radio Austria Internacional emite segmentos de 15 minutos en español. Escuchada el 22/07, a la 0100 UT y luego a la 0130. Excelente señal en 9870 kHz. Emitía un documental con la voz de Jaime Carbonell (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, July 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOLIVIA. Radio San Miguel, escuchada el 22/07, a las 2302 UT, en los 4930 kHz. Transmitía el espacio ``Mensajeros de paz``. SINPO 3/3 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, July 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) {Oops: originally misplaced under PERU; see 3-132} ** CHILE. CHILE/NUEVO PROGRAMA DX Según me informa por carta nuestro socio chileno CE-5524V Saul Vergara, recientemente empezó un nuevo programa DX en Radio Primera FM a través de las dos frecuencias de la emisora y por internet en RealAudio. El programa DX se emite a las 17:00 horas locales, 2100 UT, el tercer lunes de cada mes [18 agosto] y la dirección de la web es http://www.radioprimera.cl Tanto el director de la emisora, Hernán Carrasco, como el propio Saul, estarían muy agradecidos a aquellos amigos que les puedan mandar grabaciones de emisoras a la siguiente dirección: Radio Primera FM. Programa DX, calle San José nº 1053, Comuna Independicia, [sic] Santiago, Chile. (Pedro Sedano, España, lista ConDig, Jul 19 via Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** COSTA RICA. All ears were on RFPI, following this week`s news --- at least two of mine were, UT Sat July 26, when at 0240-0330 James Latham and Naomi pre-empted other programming to talk about the situation. Started by reading the press release previously published, so I will concentrate on what additional information emerged. Besides annan@un.org other ways to protest were given: orsg@un.org for the same gentleman, and the UN Public Inquiries Office, 212-963- 4475. Kofi Annan is being asked for binding arbitration on this matter, or conflict resolution. [you might think that should be sg@un.org but I listened again to her spell it out: orsg@un.org --- the same recording was being re-aired UT Sunday at 0200] {without embargo, orsg@un.org is a mistake} RFPI believes strongly in the UN, and has always supported it. The UN was offered its own broadcast channel via RFPI, and had started to seek funding for the project. James said many of the staff are camping at the station to protect it from takeover or any possible damage. Some listeners have brought in food to keep them going. RFPI needs your support now, more than ever, in the past 16 years. Naomi said ``we`re under attack``. Relocation cost would be huge; RFPI has the right to remain where it is, and should not conflict with UFP`s stated mission. James then went into a lengthy chronology of RFPI`s accomplishments, year by year, starting with its first 40-watt broadcast on September 16, 1987, carrying three programs, one of which was WORLD OF RADIO. This took about half an hour, with Naomi spelling him. A quick check at 1230 UT found the chronology being repeated, some 10 hours later instead of the usual 12+ (perhaps because it had also aired around 0030). No doubt there will be further disruptions in RFPI`s nominal schedule, and I`m not sure if this week`s WOR can be aired. Just hope they can remain on the air on 7445 and 15039. See note under USA --- WRMI/IBC Radio (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) On Saturday, July 26, 2003, Radio for Peace International in El Rodeo Costa Rica will hold a press conference at 9:30 am outside the locked gates of Radio For Peace International. General Manager James Latham and ex- president Rodrigo Carazo will give speeches about the importance of Freedom of the Press in regards to the recent eviction notice issued to RFPI by the University for Peace. Radio For Peace International staff will answer questions from the press following the speeches (updated press release via Thomas Voelkner via Mike Terry, DXLD) This is Thomas Voelkner, I have been a rather `passive` BDXC member for the past two years or so. I would like to share some insights with you about the current situation at RFPI. From November 1999 until April 2000 I was working at RFPI as a volunteer. I can say I learned a lot about radio production and running a speech-based radio service --- with limited resources. Together with other volunteers and regular RFPI staff I was editing a weekday newscast called Progressive News Network; maybe some of you still remember the show. I was also responsible for a weekly programme in my mother tongue (German). Since coming back to Europe and subsequently moving to London, I have been keeping in touch with my friends in Costa Rica, and earlier this year I had the chance to visit the current crew and spend a few days with them. There is an awful lot of confusion on the legal side surrounding the current situation. Why has the eviction notice been issued? What`s the relationship like between the radio station and the university? Who`s host, who`s guest, and what does RFPI own? Almost 25 years ago, Costa Rica suggested to the United Nations to establish an international academic institution to research conflict resolution and promote peace studies. For the past 50 years or so, Costa Rica has considered itself to be a `peaceful` state, having abandoned its army in the late 1940s. The UN general assembly agreed on establishing a University for Peace (UPaz --- because of its Spanish name). One of the founding members was then Costa Rican president Rodrigo Carazo. In the mid-1980s Carazo invited a group of radio producers who previously had been doing non- commercial local radio, to come to the campus of the UPaz to start an international radio voice as a kind-of sister-organisation for the university. So, RFPI is in Costa Rica on invitation by a UN academic institution. There is nothing like a `classical` contract between landlord and tenant. In the early years the radio station had rooms within the UPaz buildings, but for many years all RFPI buildings (the ones you might know from the website or other publications) are fully-owned and fully-paid RFPI property. This includes the radio building, the transmitter building and the antenna towers. All transmitters are RFPI-owned. Still, press reports say that RFPI owes money to UPaz. This refers to the installation of a high-speed internet connection some two-and-a-half years ago. While RFPI was willing to pay the money or offer the university airtime or similar services, it looks as if the university never followed this up. RFPI says that the working relationship with subsequent UPaz administrations had been very positive, and indeed when you visit their radio building you can see a whole archive of programmes done jointly with the university or on their behalf. During my time at RFPI the latest administration came into power. It is headed by the Canadian Maurice Strong, and it soon turned out he was not very fond of continuing the working relationship with RFPI. -- With the UPaz wanting to see RFPI leaving the campus, it is also interfering in another established working relationship between the radio station and the UN: As you will know RFPI has been broadcasting United Nations Radio programmes for a long time on a regular basis. Back in 2000, I recorded incoming UN Radio newscasts as part of my duties as a volunteer and prepared them for transmission. When UN Radio had to stop using high-power VOA transmitters in the 1980s, it was mainly thanks to RFPI that the United Nations could still be heard on shortwave for quite a while. So, I see a strange situation here with the interests of two UN entities clashing, both having a different stand on RFPI. Now, RFPI is asking supporters and DXers to help them to escape eviction. From what I wrote you will have realised that I have more than just fond memories of my stay in Costa Rica. I think the station adds a real value to the range of broadcasts usually heard on the international radio bands, and it would be a big loss for a lot of listeners. For the time being there are at least two staff members in the radio building, and they have continued broadcasting over the past days. So you can listen to RFPI, and you can get in touch with them via info@rfpi.org or via phone +506 249 1821. You should really consider giving them your support, either by writing to the UN Secretary General at sg@un.org [sic] or by other means. If you like to I will be happy to discuss the issue further or to answer your questions on this list. 73s from London (Thomas Voelkner, July 26, BDXC-UK via DXLD) ** CROATIA [non]. Hola Glenn, Saludos desde VENEZUELA. La Voz de Croacia ahora transmite media hora de programas en español. La escuché este 22/07, a las 0230 UT, en 9925 kHz (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, July 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. MIAMI CUBANS RECALL 1953 ATTACK, LAMENT CONSEQUENCES This story can be found at: http://ap.tbo.com/ap/florida/MGAE0UYAKID.html (via David E. Crawford, Titusville, Florida, DXLD) Nothing really about radio here, tho one of the subjects is Húber Matos, once of La Voz del CID (gh, DXLD) ** CUBA. Al menos por un día -24/07- Radio Habana Cuba cambió su habitual frecuencia de 15230 kHz, por la de 15120, en su servicio nocturno hacia las Américas. Captada con SINPO de 5/5, a las 0316 UT, con el programa ``Voces de la Revolución``. Desde hace algún tiempo, una emisora en 15230 causa bastante interferencia a RHC, a partir de las 0230 ó 0300 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, July 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RHC is not currently broadcasting on SSB. Old transmitters are being retired, and new ones are on the way. When they go on the air, SSB on one or two frequencies to NAm will resume (Arnie Coro, DXers Unlimited July 26, notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) 8070, Spy numbers 2nd harmonic (2 x 4035), 1019 July 26, Fairly strong 2nd harmonic. Lots of hum and over-driven audio on both fundamental and harmonic. Typical Spanish speaking lady. Fundamental quite strong. I also noted a Spy letters station sending in Morse Code on 3243 with identical background audio as 4035. Using a 2nd receiver I was able to confirm the match. The Morse code message was just random 5 letter groupings. At 1038 the message concluded with AR (end of message) SK (silent key) repeated 3 times. Most likely this was from Cuba (David Hodgson Nashville, TN, USA, Icom R75, 40m fullwave doublet, harmonics yahoogroup via DXLD) ** DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. HIJQ, Super Q, la estación de los 4959.86 kHz, transmite casi todos los días desde aproximadamente la 0130 UT, hasta las 0400 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, July 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** EASTER ISLAND [non]. Parked a receiver on 11430-USB 0400-0500 UT July 26, and no trace of R. Mahute via R. Cochiguaz here --- but then it was supposedly aimed some 90 degrees away toward the Pacific (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 11430U, Radio Cochiguaz, 0352-0400, July 26. USB mode. Very nice Andean music. At 0356 ``El condor pasa`` (instrumental version) and identifications in English: ``You`re listening to Radio Cochiguaz, a free station broadcasting from the Andes, in South America``; Spanish: ``Ésta es Radio Cochiguaz`` and Quechua (¡!): ``Radio Cochiguaz... tokoi manta... pankunata Radio Cochiguaz``, 44444. 11430U, Radio Mahute, via Radio Cochiguaz, 0400-0421, July 26. USB mode. Instrumental song with percussion instrument. Transmission in Rapa Nui language!!!!!!!!!!!! Identification by male at 0401: ``...Mahute Radio``; music and other identification at 0406 as: ``Radio Mahute``. Songs and ID in English at 0411 as: ``You are listening... Radio Mahute... Polynesia``, a few songs and other ID as ``...Radio Mahute``. Afterwards, more music. 34443 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentina, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** GERMANY. The most recent frequency list for Deutschlandfunk reveals that Berlin-Britz 6190 is now operated with only 6 kW anymore (Kai Ludwig, Germany, July 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. DW is distributing two literature free of cost. First one is a 64 page souvenir in English & German ``50 years at the heart of Europe``. It includes messages from German President Mr. Johanes Rau, DW head Mr. Eric Betterman, Mr. Frank Beckbauer & many more. It also tells the history of DW during last 50 years. Second one is a folder giving a short description of DRM, what is DRM, how it works & DW`s participation in DRM. And DW will discontinue its German program at 1000-1355 UT on 21790 kHz w.e.f. August 1st 2003. 73s (Swopan Chakroborty Kolkata, India, July 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GUYANA. 3291.07, Voice of Guyana, 0927-0936 July 26. Initially noted Hindi type music until 0931 when man talks. This followed by the news. At 0935 noted ID as, ``Good morning this is the Voice of Guyana...`` Back to Hindi music at 0936. Signal was fair (Chuck Bolland, Clewiston, FL, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDONESIA {+non]. The increasing use of more frequencies on various amateur bands by the Indonesians and other South East Asian nonamateurs for their personal or business traffic, is a VERY SERIOUS TOPIC to be dealt at the higher levels. The Indonesians are using the lower 40 kHz of 40 meters, and frequencies around 14100 kHz of the 20 mb --- most of the time. They have not spared EVEN THE 10.0 to 10.1 MHz segment which carries air-traffic-control communications. Thus, the seriousness of the situation, which may endanger the lives and safety of air travellers and aircraft in Region 3, has to be considered on TOP PRIORITY. All the other information from the other Regions can be looked up in their web sites please. http://iarums.com/ http://www.echelon.ca/iarumsr2/contact.html INTRUDER WATCH - ENFORCEMENT ZONE - CHRIS VK2UW VK Federal Coordinator. VK8HA Henry Andersson vk8ha@octa4.net.au P.O. Box 619, HUMPTY DOO N.T. 0836 (Wireless Institute of Australia Queensland Q-News script for July 27, 2003 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. Feed Hunters is an internet based group of like minded satellite TV enthusiasts. Real-time feed info is available to members. To subscribe send a blank E-mail to feedhunters-subscribe@egroups.com (July 2003 SW Magazine via DXLD) Sic. That`s actually a yahoogroup now, with somewhere around 3000 members; there are 3 other sub-groups (gh, DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL WATERS [non]. MV COMMUNICATOR Update from the official site 26 July 2003 http://www.mvcommunicator.com/8326.html We are now preparing for the ship to be placed in dry dock at IJmuiden before she returns to the UK. On the night she arrived, 25 June 2003, a sabotage attack happened once again, and with much respect to the Harbour Master Pete Decker and Mr Jim Iskes, the ship was saved. Over this next week power will be restored on board and after a short stay in dry dock we are hoping to be on our way in the next 2 weeks. The emails of support have been greatly appreciated and we will keep you updated as much as we can (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** NIGERIA [non]. Hi all DX-ers, I got an e-mail from the new program via IRRS on 5780 kHz, Radio Abeokuta. The v/s, Mr. A.O. Akande, gave me permission to tell you all, that he can be reached via the following postal address: Mr. A. O. Akande, 12917 Latchwood Lane, Austin, Texas 78753, USA. He doesn`t want the station to be considered as a ``clandestine``, but as an ``African`` station, promoting the culture, language and the music of Abeokuta (a town in West Africa). 73 from (Björn Fransson on the island of Gotland in Sweden, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. Dear Henrik, Tonight I have a long listening of Radio Sabor 1610 from 2325 until 0330 UT and I can tell you that this station Radio Sabor transmits from Paucarpata, an Andean region in Arequipa. I could listen to vernacular music ``Huaynos`` and an ID with a music jingle : ``...desde la ciudad de los Andes ...Radio Sabor...`` At 0030 the disc jockey was talking about a special celebration: ``Radio Alegría is celebrating 30 years of broadcast and the party will be on August 3rd....`` I couldn`t find out what is the relationsship between those stations; perhaps one is a branch of the other. In Paucarpata there are several AM stations I could identify: 01.- R. presume ``Alegria`` on 870 MW with 1 Watt --- call sign: OCX6F 02.- Radio ``Azul`` on 840 MW with 1 watt --- call sign : OBX6Y 03.- Radio ``Endesa`` on 1000 MW with 1 Watt --- call sign : OBX6R (César Pérez Dioses, Chimbote, Perú, hard-core-dx via DXLD) 1 kW? ** PERU. Estación peruana en 5121.24 kHz; captada el 22/07, a las 2349 UT. SINPO 24222. Repetía una promoción de una feria municipal que se realizaría el 24/07. Asumo que es peruana porque uno de los patrocinantes de la feria era la famosa cerveza ``Cusqueña``. Desconozco el nombre de la estación (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, July 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) {see 3-134} May be same one as from Malm in DXLD 3-096, on 5120.44v at 0100. Possible 4th harmonic of 1280, I might add (gh, DXLD) Radio San Miguel, escuchada el 22/07, a las 2302 UT, en los 4930 kHz. Transmitía el espacio ``Mensajeros de paz``. SINPO 3/3 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, July 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST){Oops: this is BOLIVIA; see 3-132} ** RUSSIA. See UK below, `jamming` ** SLOVAKIA. Radio Slovakia, the relative newcomer, also uses the tried and true magazine format for its half hour broadcast. The station seems intent on raising Slovakia`s profile internationally by emphasizing local business and scientific achievements, and this may account for the station`s style seeming somewhat drier in comparison to the longer established Czech broadcaster. To my ears, Radio Slovakia`s best feature offering is its Friday quarter-hour segment after the news (heard Saturday UT beginning around 0110, in North America) that is hosted and produced by Pete Miller. It could be titled ``Pete Miller at Large,`` as the brief for the program appears to give its presenter wide latitude in coming up with perennially interesting observations and interviews. Miller, who many (including me) had the distinct pleasure of meeting personally at this year`s SWL Winterfest, has a unique understated style --- correct, but friendly; a bit formal, but reassuring and good humored. In a recent program, he had sought out university students from abroad who were studying in Slovakia to get their impressions of the country. He clearly knows how to bring out the best in his subjects (John Figliozzi, Programming Spotlight, Global Forum, August MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) ** SOLOMON ISLANDS. (& Pacific). Glenn, here is the site to keep current on Harold Keke's actions, and all of the Pacific area. http://www.pacificislands.cc/pm72003/ (David Norcross, Calif Central Coast, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. KELLY INQUIRY `AFFECTS BBC FUTURE` The inquiry into the death of David Kelly will influence BBC`s future, says Culture Secretary Tessa Jowell. Full story: http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/em/-/1/hi/entertainment/tv_and_radio/3095393.stm Have a read, folks --- so yet again the government doesn`t like what it`s getting from radio and decides it`s time for the size nine boots. Hang on; we`re very close to 14 August. I wonder if Tessa Jowell believes in history repeating itself :-) (Eric Wiltsher via Paul David, DXLD) ** U K [non]. Re jamming discussion, 3-132: Had the "ditter" here very weakly on 15421 until 0330 BBC sign-on buried it tonight; `twas very weak, but sounded like it was probably REA4, purported to be Russian Air Force, Moskva. If so, it normally IDs and sends a few 5 figure groups on autokeyed morse hourly at minute :40; otherwise it's continuous dits or FSK reversals. They have been known to show up in SWBC bands infrequently, and tend not to use a given frequency more than a few days at a time. The station normally runs several parallel frequencies from one end of HF to the other (David E. Crawford, Titusville, Florida, July 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Checking out 5100, I found it on the air UT Sat July 26 at 0520 with a call-in show apparently originating in Norman OK! Calls were from that city and there were several ads for local businesses, such as Norman Music Center http://www.normanmusic.com as well as a new age/pagan store, and Red Horse Grill. Discussed security at Wal- Marts; name of the program seemed to be ``The Edge``, and network name ``Hall of Fame``? Reception was poor, on Compatible USB, so presumably WBCQ as previously testing here, tho no IDs heard, with only 3 kW. Yes, at 0534 mentioned being on The Planet, 50,000 watts from Connecticut (! --- confused with Kennebunk?) and another 50,000 from WRMI. Gave a website ending in .ws but I couldn`t copy it; however, I seriously doubt Western Samoa has anything to do with this. Checked 7415, 7385 but not parallel. No hint of any such program on WRMI posted schedule. Possibly part of Christian Media Network? No sign of it on their schedule and the new age/pagan angle seems incompatible. However, the annotated WBCQ schedule http://www.zappahead.net/wbcq/main.php?fn=show_program&id=10 --- read their review! --- shows CMN on 5100 at 2300-0600, while CMN`s own site http://www.christianmedianetwork.com/bschedule.htm shows the hours on 5100 as 2100-0400. Some confusion about timezones there? Searching various keywords on Google got nowhere. I assume this is originally on some station in Norman; not \\ 640 WWLS either. So what is this? (Glenn Hauser, Enid, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Checking out IBC Radio, Sat July 26: first on the webstream, noticed R. Polonia before and after 1700 UT, and at 1720 recheck there was R. Japan news during the half hour scheduled for ``Changesurfer Radio``: ``Changesurfer Radio -- Transmitting a sexy, high-tech vision of a radically democratic future. Topics such as cloning, futurism, space, technology and a multitude of others. The latest edition: ``Interview with Dr. Ben Goertzel, AI guru.`` Dr. Goertzel is chief designer of the Novamente AI system, and director of the AGIRI think tank. (30 min)`` At 1730 promptly went to Dan Roberts` SW Report. Then on the car radio tuned to 15725 and heard absolutely nothing from WRMI, but fortunately it faded up just before 1805 to hear the start of WORLD OF RADIO 1192, with good non-distorted audio, following some music vamping and a minute of IBC self-promotion; after a quick lunch I checked again at 1832, but classical music was playing! So the almost-29-minute WOR must not have aired in its entirety, WRMI losing the internet feed from IBC in the meantime. Recheck of the IBC stream at 1848 confirmed it was not they playing the classical --- after all, IBC is ``all- talk``, but instead news about Switzerland, from SRI? This resumed on 15725 at 1854, interrupted for a full WRMI ID at hourtop 1900. WRMI and its other external programmers do not coördinate ID breaks either, which is most annoying. When the input programming does not break, a simple ``WRMI Miami`` ID would be legally sufficient, while someone takes a breath. By now it`s getting distorted again. The IBC Radio schedule at http://www.ibcradio.com/radioschedule.htm for Saturday shows only ``Shortwave Radio Network`` from 8 am to 1 pm EST (meaning EDT = UT 1200-1700), and 2:30-9 pm (1830-0100 UT): ``Shortwave Radio Network (SRN) -- News, features, business, talk and other radio shows from shortwave broadcasters all over the world, all in English. You won`t find these broadcasts on your local AM or FM Station! Broaden your horizons by listening to media outlets outside of the United States or on the fringes. Some of it is political propaganda and religious programming. If you ever thought about getting into shortwave radio or wondered what you are missing out there in the world of shortwave radio, this broadcast is for you! (length varies)`` I suppose there are no specific details for most of the IBC time on WRMI since the mix of stations relayed is flexible, three of which I found upon the chex above. The Sunday schedule shows SWRN also at 1830-0100, with Old Time Radio up until 1700. BTW, IBC has a photo page, apparently including investors in the company: http://www.ibcnn.com/photogallery/ibcphotogallery/album/ibcphotogallery.html third shot from the left on top row is Daryn Fleming, CEO, who invited WOR onto the service: http://www.ibcnn.com/photogallery/ibcphotogallery/album/daryncorporate1.html In other WORLD OF RADIO airtime news, the disruptions at RFPI caused it to appear at the odd time of 2212 UT Sat on 15039 --- so also at 0412 UT Sun? and with DXPL starting and running late, not until 0033- 0102 UT Sun on WINB 12160 (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. JUSTICE DEPT. PROBES CLEAR CHANNEL The Associated Press Friday, July 25, 2003; 6:34 PM http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A47426-2003Jul25?language=printer SAN ANTONIO --- The Justice Department is investigating Clear Channel, the nation`s largest radio owner, amid complaints about consolidation and the use of coercive tactics by the company, officials said Friday. R. Hewitt Pate, assistant attorney general for antitrust, told a House subcommittee that there is an investigation into Clear Channel. Officials would not disclose any details about the nature of the probe. Pate said in a hearing Thursday that the Justice Department had interviewed people that Rep. Howard Berman, D-Calif., had referred to the agency after they complained of coercive tactics. San Antonio- based Clear Channel, which owns 1,200 radio stations, played down the investigation, saying in a statement that the department ``has evaluated, on a routine basis, nearly every acquisition that Clear Channel has made and approved each one. ``When you run a big company, engaging in complex transactions, inquiries of this sort become fairly routine. We are cooperating fully with all DOJ requests and we are confident the DOJ will find, as it has in the past, that our company is managed with the highest degree of integrity.`` Berman wrote the Justice Department and the Federal Communications Commission in 2002 complaining that consolidation in the entertainment and media industries was hurting recording artists, copyright holders, advertisers and consumers. He said earlier this year in a Senate hearing that after his letter went out he was inundated with complaints from independent broadcasters, concert promoters, venue owners, radio disc jockeys, musicians, bands` agents and managers, actor`s representatives and recording industry executives. ``Virtually all decried the evils of consolidation in the radio and concert industries,`` he said. He added that most complained about Clear Channel. Among the complaints were allegations that Clear Channel punished artists who didn`t use the company`s concert promotion arm by denying, or threatening to deny, radio airplay for their songs, he said. When Berman complained during the hearing Thursday that he hadn`t heard back from the Justice Department about his complaints, Pate replied that the department had two ongoing investigations into Clear Channel. But he would not elaborate. Shares of Clear Channel fell 25 cents to close at $40.40 in trading Friday on the New York Stock Exchange. © 2003 The Associated Press (via Alton Peltier, DXLD) CLEAR CHANNEL FACES US INQUIRY From http://media.guardian.co.uk/radio/story/0,12636,1005833,00.html Chris Tryhorn, Friday July 25, 2003 Radio giant Clear Channel is being investigated over claims of abusing its market dominance, a US government official has revealed. The justice department official said an "open investigation" was being conducted into the US' largest radio group one sesquiyear after a congressman first called for an inquiry. Hewitt Pate, the department's head of antitrust, told a congressional committee investigators had made "significant efforts to find additional evidence" and had held "a number of interviews". "The Clear Channel matter is one of importance to us," Mr Pate said. "We have an open investigation and we're going to continue to pursue that." Mr Pate was replying to congressman Howard Berman, who had criticised officials for their "unwillingness" to follow up formal complaints he made against the radio group in January 2002. Clear Channel, which owns more than 1,200 stations in the US, has been accused of using its market position to shut out its competitors. Two sets of allegations were being pursued by the justice department, Mr Pate said, including a charge that Clear Channel restricted the airplay time of music artists unwilling to use its concert promotion services. But Mr Pate warned: "Commercial frustration that artists know that they have with Clear Channel from time to time is a different question from whether we can prove the presence of market power and the use of that power in a tying situation under [antitrust law]." The senior vice president for government affairs at Clear Channel, Andrew Levin, said the company was confident it would escape censure. "When you run a big company, engaging in complex transactions, inquiries of this sort become fairly routine," Mr Levin said in a statement. "We are co-operating fully with all DoJ requests and we are confident the DoJ will find, as it has in the past, that our company is managed with the highest degree of integrity," he added. Clear Channel has become the chief target for critics of media laws in the US, and has been accused of stifling voices opposed to the Bush administration. In the UK Clear Channel is now the leading player in the outdoor advertising market, and owns the SFX sports agency that handles the likes of David Beckham, Michael Owen and Gary Lineker. Many commentators expect the group to take a keen interest in the UK radio market following relaxation of ownership rules in the Communications Act, looking to snap up companies like Capital Radio. The Capital chief executive, David Mansfield, has said he would reject a merger, arguing there would be a "cultural clash" between his company and the American group (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. Hi Folks, I've got a question that the Coloradans should easily answer --- is the CBS network feed in the Mountain time zone the same as the West Coast feed? I'm trying to narrow down that CBS reception I had earlier, which was running the correct programming for their West Coast feed (Curtis Sadowski, IL, WTFDA via DXLD) Hi, Curtis: I work for CBS TV in NYC. Unfortunately, there is no answer to this question. CBS is capable of at least ten networks at any one time. This allows us great freedom to service our advertisers. This is especially true during periods where we run several sports events simultaneously (e.g. March Madness NCAA basketball). Here's the theory: It's winter and I want to market snow tires. I want to run a different ad in San Diego than I want to run in Seattle. Or say a McDonald's promotion is different in some areas than others. The networks are truly fluid. We have been known to run networks to just one (or just a couple) of station(s), like when WCBS-TV and WFSB-TV in Hartford takes the Yankees and then begins the network offerings out of sequence with the rest of the country. The network config. changes a great deal! You can say WCBS-TV is usually East and WBBM is usually Central and KCBS is usually Pacific, but this really isn't accurate because you have to ask "Which Eastern?" Sorry, but it is confusing! (Karl Zuk, N2KZ, near NYC, ibid.) I don't think there *is* a CBS Mountain Time feed. I know of at least one affiliate that has to delay the Central Time feed themselves (the network doesn't do it for them). It was my understanding the other affiliates in the MDT zone do the same thing. I suppose in Arizona they carry the Pacific feed in the summer --- unless the issue of regional commercials/programming Karl mentions gets in the way (Doug Smith, TN, ibid.) Actually, it was channel 2; my Es had a low MUF today. Indiana doesn't observe daylight time either; stations there run shows one hour after we get them on the Eastern feed, which does make it easy to tell if you're getting that state. I looked the tape over and while I can categorically state I did get a CBS station with the Western feed, I haven't anything to make a guess on as to which one. My antenna heading at that time was to the Southwest (from Rantoul, IL), and the CBS reception came in about the same time I had that Televisa station with an XEW-TV news promo on it (Sadowski, ibid.) Above covers the exceptions, but as far as prime time is concerned, the rule is that CBS and other major networks in the MT zones run network programming at the same local time as in CT, i.e. one real hour delayed from the original ET/CT feeds, except in summer Arizona where it`s two hours delayed. The PDT stations are 3 hours delayed. Except some Sacramento station was experimenting with running prime time at 7-10 pm local instead of 8-11 pm. Is this still going on anywhere in the PT or ET zones? When I`m visiting Albuquerque, I notice KRQE-13 (CBS) with flexible program start times (like a minute early) indicating they do their own tape-delaying. Makes it easy to cram in more commercials when the rates are higher. Standard rant about how the networks ignore the MT zone in program time promos, and, increasingly the CT zone!! And even the PT zone, by a lot of stuff originating on the east coast, The Only Zone That Matters. And Pacific time (it does have a name) being called `West Coast Time`. 73, (Glenn Hauser, OK, ibid.) ** U S A. DAVID BRANCACCIO JOINS PBS` NOW WITH BILL MOYERS NEW YORK, July 24, 2003 --- Two of public broadcasting`s most recognized journalists --- Bill Moyers and David Brancaccio --- will soon be a team. Brancaccio is leaving his role as host and senior editor of Minnesota Public Radio`s national daily business program Marketplace and as anchor of public television`s California Connected to join PBS` weekly public affairs series NOW with Bill Moyers, where he will share hosting duties with Moyers, conduct interviews, and report on special assignments in the field as a correspondent. Brancaccio will join the series as co-host in September. ``I am delighted to have David join us,`` Moyers said. ``We set out to find the right combination of vitality, judgment and experience, and we found just what we were looking for in one of public broadcasting`s own. David will bring to NOW the passion for analysis, lucid reporting, and storytelling that helped make Marketplace one of the most popular and dynamic broadcasts in all of public broadcasting-and the best of its kind anywhere.`` ``PBS is pleased that NOW has found a journalist of David`s stature to join Bill Moyers,`` said Jacoba Atlas, PBS`s co-chief of programming. ``His excellence as a writer and journalist is evident from his work on both Marketplace and California Connected. His insights and perspective always bring depth to the stories and issues he covers.`` Brancaccio is an award-winning broadcaster with 27 years experience. During his 13 year tenure at Marketplace, the series tripled its audience and received a duPont-Columbia Award (1998) and the George Foster Peabody Award (2001). In addition to hosting California Connected, an innovative news program seen on public television throughout that state, Brancaccio has contributed to CNN, CNBC, and PBS` Wall Street Week with Fortune. His print work has appeared in such periodicals as the Wall Street Journal and Psychology Today. He is also the author of the book Squandering Aimlessly, an account of his pilgrimage to talk with Americans about wealth and values. Before becoming host of Marketplace, Brancaccio worked from London as the program`s European editor and covered diplomatic stories for the radio service of the Christian Science Monitor. Brancaccio will be based in New York and will report regularly from the field. NOW with Bill Moyers is a production of Public Affairs Television, Inc. for PBS. NOW is a national presentation of Thirteen/WNET New York. The senior executive producer is John Lewis Siceloff. The executive producer is Felice Firestone. NOW with Bill Moyers, which was called ``public television at its best`` by the Philadelphia Inquirer, airs Fridays at 9 p.m. on PBS (check local listings). (via TV Barn via Current via DXLD) MARKETPLACE, PUBLIC RADIO`S POPULAR BUSINESS PROGRAM, CHANGES HOST David Brancaccio Moving to Television, David Brown Promoted to Host LOS ANGELES and ST. PAUL, Minn., July 24 /PRNewswire/ -- David Brancaccio, host of Minnesota Public Radio`s popular business program Marketplace for the past decade, will leave the program in August to become co-host of public television`s weekly public affairs series NOW with Bill Moyers. Minnesota Public Radio announced that David Brown, veteran broadcaster and current Marketplace senior producer, will take over as host on September 1. ``I am sorry to see David Brancaccio leave Marketplace, but happy to see his talent recognized by so prominent a journalist as Bill Moyers and happy to see him remain part of the public broadcasting family,`` said Jim Russell, senior vice president of Minnesota Public Radio and general manager of Marketplace Productions. He added that Brancaccio plans to continue contributing to Marketplace, which is distributed by Public Radio International (PRI) each weekday to 340 stations across the country. ``At the same time, we are excited that David Brown, one of public radio`s most highly respected and broadly experienced hosts and producers, will bring his tremendous energy to the program,`` Russell added. Brown joined Marketplace as senior producer in the fall of 2000. He previously worked for Monitor Radio, where his positions included anchor of the daily international news program Monitor Radio, Washington bureau chief, European correspondent based in London, national correspondent based in Boston and program producer. Before that, Brown was executive producer of CalNet, the California Public Radio News Network, and worked in commercial radio news in his hometown of Atlanta. He holds a law degree from Washington and Lee University in Virginia, a master`s degree in classics/Great Books from St. John`s College, Annapolis, and a bachelor`s degree in journalism from Georgia State University, Atlanta. Brown is a member of the California Bar. Asked whether the program will change with a new host, Executive Producer J.J. Yore said, ``Every host brings his own personality to the anchoring position, but Marketplace has been on the air for nearly 15 very successful years. We know that David Brown will merge his abilities and the program`s track record to continue its success.`` ``I`m absolutely thrilled, and a little overwhelmed, by the thought of taking the reins at Marketplace,`` Brown said. ``In my three years working as senior producer here, I`ve thought many times about how blessed we`ve been to have David Brancaccio as our anchor. But I`ve also discovered that the real key to the Marketplace`s remarkable success is the people behind the scenes: the spirit of creativity and the `spark` they provide is quite rare in this business. The opportunity to host Marketplace in collaboration with such a smart bunch of radio pros was an offer too good to resist.`` David Brancaccio joined Marketplace in 1990 as a freelance reporter based in San Francisco, opened its London bureau and became the Los Angeles-based host in 1993. Brancaccio`s on-air style came to epitomize Marketplace`s informal and irreverent approach to the ``serious`` subject of business and finance. For example, when journalism faced the daunting task of explaining the merger of AOL and Time Warner in 2000, David hosted a fanciful 60- second quiz segment, ``Who Owns What?`` that humorously conveyed the new company`s enormous reach. On a more serious note, Brancaccio`s ``Lives Beyond Measure: Assessing Value`` special looked at the value of human life one year after the September 11 terrorist attacks. During Brancaccio`s time as Marketplace host, the program`s audience has tripled. (The combined weekly audience for Marketplace and its sister program Marketplace Morning Report is now 7.2 million). The program has won the duPont-Columbia Silver Baton, a Peabody Award and numerous other awards. Brancaccio`s last day at Marketplace will be August 22. ``I often brag that Marketplace is the best gig in broadcast journalism,`` Brancaccio said. ``The honor of serving a huge audience of smart people is one that I leave with enormous reluctance. But in my book Squandering Aimlessly, I write about the fine return on investment in life-long learning. This new venture is an opportunity to explore a new beat, politics, in a different medium, television. I assure you it is only a coincidence that Marketplace is currently running a series about career choices entitled `Starting Over.``` Marketplace is produced in Los Angeles by Minnesota Public Radio in association with the University of Southern California and distributed by PRI. The program has a bigger audience than any other radio or television business program in the United States. Minnesota Public Radio(R) produces more national programming than any other station-based public radio organization in the country, reaching 12.4 million listeners nationwide each week. National programs include A Prairie Home Companion(R), Saint Paul Sunday(R), Marketplace(R), The Savvy Traveler(R), Sound Money(R), The Splendid Table(R), Pipedreams(R), and Classical 24(R), a live, nationally broadcast classical music service. Minnesota Public Radio and its sister company, Southern California Public Radio, are parts of a larger family of companies within American Public Media Group-a national nonprofit organization whose purpose is to develop resources, services and systems to support public media for public service. A complete list of stations, programs and additional services can be obtained on Minnesota Public Radio`s Web site at http://www.mpr.org Source: Data are copyright Arbitron, Inc. Arbitron data are estimates only. Fall 2002 SOURCE Minnesota Public Radio (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. KENNETH, WHAT *IS* THE FREQUENCY? OFTEN, LISTENERS KNOW How do your listeners identify your station? Increasingly, they do so by frequency, rather than call letters. Arbitron has released an analysis about how diarykeepers use station identifiers to record their listening. It says a shift has occurred. In 1996, call letters were the most common identifier. The new analysis of 2001-02 data shows that diarykeepers are now principally recording stations` frequencies instead. Use of station name and program or personality have generally remained stable. ``The rise in the proportion of listening reported by frequency may be attributed to a couple of factors, one being that stations, particularly those on the FM band, increasingly identify themselves over the air by exact frequency,`` said John Budosh, senior policy analyst for Arbitron`s Diary Analysis and Communications group, in the company`s statement. ``The increased penetration of digital-display radios at home, in the car and in the workplace has also influenced diarykeepers` tendency to record station frequency more often than other station identifiers.`` Arbitron`s Scott Musgrave, senior VP and GM of Arbitron Radio, stated, ``Stations would be wise to examine the primary identifiers they are using on the air and make changes, if necessary, so they stay in step with recent trends. ... Stations should also take note that diarykeepers` use of program and personality names is marginal.`` (Radio World Newsbyte July 22 via DXLD) ** U S A. UPN`S TINY, TWISTED WINDOW ON AMERICA By John Doyle, July 24, 2003 LOS ANGELES -- The teeny-tiny UPN network is eight years old and it has the mentality to prove it. Started in 1995, this little squirt with the official title The United Paramount Network isn`t actually owned by Paramount and isn`t much of a network. It`s owned by Viacom, the superconglomerate which owns CBS, and UPN is bossed around by big brother CBS. UPN`s single long-running success is WWE Smackdown, a wrestling show on Thursday nights. Apparently, while grownups watch Friends, Survivor, or something scintillating on ABC, little boys watch UPN. The channel exists for advertisers to part eight-year-olds from their allowance. It is the purveyor of the worst TV shows ever made. It is the United Parade of Nobodies. It annoys the hell out of me, as you can gather. Some of you don`t even have to acknowledge its existence, because UPN is only available in parts of Canada (lucky Vancouver!) and few of its shows are picked up by Canadian channels. Still, it continues to exist and I happened to be here at TV Hacks on Tour (TVHOT) when UPN presented its new lineup, so I paid attention. It is a tiny window into the soul of American TV and the American culture itself. Call me a crank or call me a curmudgeon, but before you rush to judgment, consider the evidence. There is a new sitcom on UPN called Eve. It stars a singer named Eve who is called Shelley on the show. There is nobody called Eve. It`s about guys and gals and dating and stuff like that. In the opening scene, two guys in a bar size up the ladies. One guy sees the back of a lady and rhapsodizes. Then he sees the rest of her. He says: ``Ooooh. A body like J.Lo. And a face [pause] like, hell- no!`` The laugh track erupted with such ferocity that I dove to the floor, thinking I was under incoming fire, this being LA and all. As far as I can tell, UPN has one thing going for it this season -- Will Smith. It thinks it has Loni Anderson, but for 30 years everybody has had thoughts about having Loni Anderson. Will Smith, as an excited UPN publicist put it, ``is a superstar of the entertainment world.`` He makes money-making movies -- Men In Black, Bad Boys. He had one good role in Ali. Anyway, Will is really rich and he and his wife, Jada Pinkett Smith (famous for dresses at awards shows, I`m told), wanted to do a TV sitcom about their amazing life. They didn`t want to star in it, you understand. They wanted to be producers and give jobs to their friends. Smith and Pinkett Smith came to talk up the show, called All of Us. It`s about this guy who has an ex-wife, a girlfriend and a kid. The girlfriend looks forward to when he gets divorced so they can marry. Divorce papers arrive, he dithers and eventually has an epiphany -- he`s going to have ``a blended family`` and his new wife and ex-wife are going to have to get along for his sake and his son`s sake. This dude is making decisions. Smith made many pithy comments. One was, ``Look, we`re in Hollywood. We gotta to do like white people do -- give each other jobs.`` Well, somebody`s given Loni Anderson a job. You remember Loni Anderson? Think back 30 years, if you can. She got famous as Jennifer, the spectacularly enhanced, bleach-blond secretary on WKRP In Cincinnati. That`s right -- a perambulating, permanently smiling promise of pneumatic bliss for bosses everywhere. In the 1970s she was a sort of Farrah Fawcett without the edge. Later, if memory serves, she married Burt Reynolds. She also starred in the memorable movies Stoker Ace, Blown Away and 3 Ninjas: High Noon at Mega Mountain. Then the relationship with Burt Reynolds fell apart. Doing deep research on this part of her career -- that is, talking to a person at TVHOT who brags about knowing this stuff -- I learned that the epilogue to the Burt thing was a revelation about her failed attempts to arouse Burt`s interest through the womanly wile of wearing sexy underwear. Now Loni Anderson stars in a new UPN series called The Mullets. Her name on the show is a fine double-barrelled moniker: Mandi Mullet- Heidecker. But you can forget that instantly because the only memorable part of The Mullets is the still spectacularly double- barrelled Loni. The Mullets is about Dwayne and Denny Mullet, two hosers with mullet haircuts. They`re roofers and ridiculously stupid. Comedy is alleged to arise from their love of classic rock, Doritos and mutual interest in a gal who works at the convenience store. Loni plays their Mom, who has married a stuck-up guy (John O`Hurley, the stuck-up boss of Elaine on Seinfeld) and loves her moronic sons. Loni showed up here at TVHOT and actually added some class. She looked incredibly fragile -- pale, slight and as if she were trying excruciatingly hard to bring some ladylike dignity to the ugliness known as The Mullets. Dressed in a tight black skirt and a brocade top that unveiled the requisite amount of her legendary cleavage, she looked so lost. She sat up straight, crossed her legs, leaned forward to clutch her knees and smiled her long-practised, mile-wide smile. The look on her lovely face indicated that in her long career, nobody had told her there would be days like these. Me neither, and I`m glad it`s over (Globe & Mail via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** U S A. BERKELEY RADIO PIRATES BROADCAST DESPITE FCC INTERVENTION, THREATS From http://www.infoshop.org/inews/stories.php?story=03/07/24/1960695 Berkeley Daily Planet: Edition Date: Tuesday, July 22, 2003 By AL WINSLOW Special to the Planet (07-15-03) The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has been trying to silence Berkeley`s pirate radio broadcasters for 10 years. The broadcasters continue to broadcast, but they say it`s getting harder. ``[The FCC] is starting to pick on people who have property, who have something to lose,`` said labor activist Michael Delacour, who quit Berkeley Liberation Radio (104.1 FM) last year after being threatened by the FCC with a fine of up to $100,000. ``I was afraid they were threatening my retirement,`` said Delacour, 65, who receives a pension from the Boilermakers` Union. A current broadcaster --- ``Captain Fred`` --- said the ranks of Berkeley Liberation Radio have thinned and that some local pirate stations --- such as Queer Kids Radio and Vulcan Radio, an anarchist music station --- went off the air entirely after getting an FCC letter. ``Typically, what happens is they get a letter called a notice of liability and a letter threatening dire consequences if they don`t go off the air,`` Captain Fred said. Another broadcaster-``DJ Advocacy``- added: ``Usually, for most people, that`s all the warning they need.`` DJ Advocacy said broadcasters use pseudonyms because, ``Basically, the FCC doesn`t know who we are. They didn`t know where to send the letter to, so they sent it to Delacour.`` The May 6, 2002, letter to Delacour, five-time Peace and Freedom Party candidate for mayor and Berkeley`s best known usual suspect, reads: ``[The FCC] has received complaints from residents ... concerning interference to reception of FM broadcast signals ... investigation revealed that you lease space at Skyline Studios ... and that that space is used by the illegal radio station known as Berkeley Liberation Radio ... You are hereby officially advised that operation of radio transmitting equipment without a valid license ... may subject the operator to penalties of a maximum criminal fine of $100,000 and/or one-year imprisonment, a civil forfeiture up to $11,000 or seizure of the equipment for the first offense.`` When shown the letter, the Berkeley civil liberties lawyer David Beauvais said, ``They`re intending to chill people out with it. That`s the point.`` The radio station is breaking the law, he said, and the FCC is enforcing it. ``It`s a civil disobedience kind of thing, and when you do civil disobedience, you`ve got to take your lumps,`` Beauvais said. The FCC made good on its ``seizure of the equipment`` threat Dec. 11, storming the Berkeley Liberation Radio station at 2427 Telegraph Ave. at 55 Street. The pirate station now operates in another location. The station has no paid employees and costs $600 a month for rent and $20 for a phone, according to Captain Fred. What is broadcast is virtually anything. Berkeley pirate broadcasters have aired a Marxist interpretation of the news, regular readings of articles from the local newspapers, shows on animal rights, parenting, bicycle liberation and the experiences of gay Afro-Americans, articles by adult film actress Nina Hartley, programs by the Peace and Freedom Party and the Libertarian Party, and an on-air appearance by then- Mayor Shirley Dean. A lot of it is for enjoyment, Delacour said. ``It`s a form of therapy. You can sit in a room and talk for a couple of hours without anyone interrupting. You can be the disc jockey you always dreamed of since you were a kid.`` Tony McNair, a Berkeley homeless activist, was alone in the one-room station at 11 a.m., broadcasting the tape of a San Francisco anti-war rally. He said about a dozen men in blue jackets with FCC or U.S. Marshall written on them, came in carrying sledge hammers and a battering ram. ``They yanked me out by the shirt and slammed me up against the wall and held guns pointed at my head,`` McNair said. ``They kept saying, `Who are the leaders? Who are the leaders?``` McNair said the raiding party turned off the station and removed all the equipment, including a computer and its records. He was let go an hour later, after an Oakland policeman ran a warrant check on him, he said. The station, though, was back on the air in four days and continues to broadcast. It now costs about $1,000 to fully equip a micropower station and the cost is about to plunge again, according to Free Radio Berkeley founder Stephen Dunifer. Barred by federal court order from broadcasting, Dunifer is collaborating with other transmitter engineers throughout the country to find ways to reduce equipment costs. ``We`re ready to introduce a $100 kit that, with other equipment you can get at a hardware store, will let you broadcast four to six miles, which is really all you need, for $500,`` he said. ``As long as equipment costs can be kept low, these raids are really not that effective. They cost a lot and there is the indirect cost that storm troopers coming in and stealing a microphone is not the best image the FCC wants to project in terms of free speech issues,`` Dunifer said. Dunifer advocates flooding the country with so many micropower stations the government will be powerless. ``If it becomes popular enough, mainstream enough, the FCC could face having to go into a rest home to stop an 80-year-old woman from broadcasting Glenn Miller,`` he said. Because they come and go so often, it`s hard to estimate how many unlicensed stations operate in the country. Dunifer estimates hundreds. One Web site lists 21 by name in California, including six in the Bay Area. The FCC regularly reports shutting down about 200 a year. Broadcaster Suzan Rodríguez, using her real name --- ``I don`t care who knows who I am`` --- said prior to her regular Friday morning show on Berkeley Liberation Radio, ``We`re not going to just roll over.`` ``Micro-radio is the last platform for the people to have a voice in a country where the government is bent on gagging our voices. Dissent is the American way. Our country was founded on dissent,`` she said. Meanwhile, it`s not certain the FCC has rid itself of Delacour. ``Actually, I made a bad decision,`` he said about quitting the station. ``I had other things going on, like fighting an eviction, but I wish I`d stayed with it and not chickened out.`` http://www.berkeleydaily.org/text/article.cfm?issue=07-15-03&storyID=16999 (via Mike Terry, July 25, DXLD) ** U S A. Most North American pirate DXers have heard at least one show from Alan Maxwell at KIPM. His complex ``Illuminati`` drama presentations are probably the best produced pirate radio shows on the air today. The station signal often generates loggings on both the east and west coasts of North America, proving that the station`s transmitter is well above average in its coverage area. But, many pirate listeners who are accustomed to the light comedy, satire, and music formats on the shortwave bands have misconstrued the format used by KIPM on shortwave, and on some licensed FM stations that occasionally relay the station`s productions. Monitoring Times has previously joined this parade of misinformation about Alan`s intent with these shows. We often point out that the subject matter of the drama productions on this station often includes characters who go insane. Sometimes insanity itself appears to be the main focus of these dramas. But, this characterization misses the mark to a degree. Maxwell points out to MT that the literary themes of his programs are existentialism, not promotions of mental illness. Perhaps it is time for many pirate listeners and DX publication editors to go back to school, where we can take some existentialism literary classes. Then, we might be able to recognize this genre when we hear it (George Zeller, Outer Limits, August MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) And you should see the nightmarish KIPM QSL card, ``Maxwell High- Security Sanitarium`` reproduced in full color in the high-resolution pdf version of MT! See PUBLICATIONS below for subscription info (gh) ** U S A. HOMELAND SECURITY: RADIO SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT Another announcement has been made regarding the Federal Government`s radio spectrum management study. This is a subject we`ve covered several times this year as the story has unfolded. In June, the White House announced a new effort to ``better manage`` the radio spectrum. A new White House Interagency Task Force will be composed of the Departments of Defense, Transportation and Homeland Security, plus the FAA and NASA. Wireless Week Magazine reports the Task Force will conduct ``the first comprehensive study of federal government radio spectrum policy in the modern era and will build on previous administration efforts to improve spectrum management.`` Public meetings with industry representatives and local government officials will help steer the Task Force toward their final recommendations, to be released in about a year. Almost daily news about this ongoing story can be found at Wireless Week Magazine, http://www.wirelessweek.com National Telecommunications and Information Administration, http://www.ntia.doc.gov and at http://www.fcc.gov (Robert Wyman, The World Above 30 MHz, Scanning Report, August MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) A BAD LAW NARROWLY AVERTED By Rachel Baughn, editor, MONITORING TIMES At the eleventh hour radio hobbyists in Nevada and around the country learned of wording included in Nevada Assembly Bill 441 which could have made public safety frequency lists against the law if the Governor deemed them to be sensitive because of terrorist activity, whether real or anticipated. The Bill on Homeland Security was proposed by Assembly member Richard Perkins and had already passed the Assembly. Perkins is or was a member of the Henderson Police Department in Nevada. The alarm was raised by Nevada Senator Bob Coffin, who wrote W6OLD, ``Please get the word out to everyone that they need to email and call all legislators and their own senators and assemblymen. I can`t believe this got out of the Assembly and came here to me in the Senate without a bit of noise --- Check it out at our website and forward the address to others after you read the bill. Address is http://www.leg.state.nv.us/72nd/bills/AB/AB441_R2.html (Section 21 (f)specifically) --- and it can be either a misdemeanor or felony, depending on how a court determines a defendant`s `intent`.`` Although it was questionable how much influence opinions from outside the state would bear, MT staffers Jorge Rodríguez and Larry Van Horn wrote to the Bill`s author and to senate finance committee members, the last stop before final approval. Both letters pointed out the folly of criminalizing federal public domain information. Jorge Rodríguez wrote: ``We`ve just learned of the provision in your bill to outlaw published frequency lists and would like to learn more about its intent and purpose and recommend against it. ``We`re opposed to the provision in sec. 21 (f) of the bill AB441 prohibiting published frequency lists. The current state of the art in programmable radios and computer controlled radios makes such a provision ineffective. It would merely criminalize the conduct of well intentioned Nevada citizens without enhancing homeland security. ``Such lists are even published by the Federal Communications Commission and AB441`s radio frequency publishing prohibition would be in conflict with the Federal government`s practice; it would make the Federal government a law violator. ``On a fundamental basis, it would also violate the free speech and freedom of the press provisions of the Nevada State constitution and Federal constitution which all Americans cherish. ``Thank you for your well intentioned concern.`` Larry Van Horn received the following reply on June 12th, from William J. Raggio, Senate Majority Leader: ``I write in response to your e-mail regarding your opposition to the section of Assembly Bill (A.B.) 441 that refers to radio frequencies. ``Section 21, subsection 2, paragraph f, was deleted from the bill by amendment. The Senate Finance Committee, of which I am chairman, recommended this amendment. Thank you for contacting me on this important issue, and I am glad we were able to address your concerns.`` Dick Flanagan, a Nevada amateur radio operator, reported on the final compromise: ``As originally written, Nevada Assembly Bill 441 would have made the publication, sale and possession of `emergency response` frequencies against the law if the Governor determined it was necessary because of real or potential terrorist activity. Because of the wide public availability of this information, such a restriction would have been unenforceable and simply not in the best interests of both amateur radio and public safety interests. ``Because of a concentrated effort by the amateur community, this section of AB-441 has been rewritten! ``According to the Nevada Legislature web site, AB-441 passed the State Senate with the following replacement for Section 21 Subsection 2 Paragraph (f): (f) Documents, records or other items of information regarding the infrastructure and security of frequencies for radio transmissions used by response agencies, including, without limitation: (1) Access codes, passwords or programs used to ensure the security of frequencies for radio transmissions used by response agencies; (2) Procedures and processes used to ensure the security of frequencies for radio transmissions used by response agencies; and (3) Plans used to reestablish security and service with respect to frequencies for radio transmissions used by response agencies after security has been breached or service has been interrupted.`` ``The amended bill now goes back to the Assembly where passage is expected.`` We don`t know all the players in defeating this misguided legislation, but thanks are definitely due to Senator Bob Coffin, who raised the alarm, and to Harry Marnell and others who spread the word. Those who deserve the most credit are the ones who picked up pen, phone, or computer keyboard and contacted the decision-makers. Their efforts paid off even though the time for action was very short, and it shows what can be done when citizens get involved. As Larry points out, ``I think we have been very fortunate over the last few years to get both federal and state antiscanner laws defeated or amended. I believe the internet has really revolutionized this process.`` It makes one wonder, if we had had the Internet back in 1986, might the language in the Electronic Communications Privacy Act have come out differently...? (Rachel Baughn, Closing Comments, August MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) ** U S A. NEW IBOC STATIONS AND COMPLAINTS Forwarded from another list: Recently a few more NYC stations have signed on with IBOC. WPAT 930 (which is actually licensed to Patterson NJ) and WZRC 1480. The most interesting is WZRC. Greenwich CT`s 1490 WGCH is a VERY strong ``local`` signal in western Nassau County LI (every seek or scan I have seen has always stopped on this signal). With IBOC fired up on WZRC, WGCH is now virtually non-existent in an area it served with a strong signal prior to IBOC. The signal is barely audible under a sea of noise from WZRC`s IBOC transmissions. If WGCH were my station, annoyed would be putting it VERY lightly. This is the first of many graveyard channel deaths we will see if IBOC continues to be allowed on the AM band. How certain members of the engineering community can hang their hats on such a poor system is beyond me (via Charles Hutton, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** VENEZUELA [non]. Aló Presidente ha cambiado sus señas en 25 metros. Los 11875 kHz han sustituido a los 11670. Muchos 73`s y buen DX (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, July 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VENEZUELA. VENEZUELAN ARMY This month, with the help of fellow digital listener Ron Perón, we take a detailed look at the extensive Venezuelan Army network audible throughout the HF spectrum. As most regular DD readers will know, most parts of the Venezuelan Forces are well-equipped radio-wise and have been using ALE [Automatic Link Establishment] for linking military networks across their large country for some time. The Army is no different and we were very pleased when Ron passed on a very useful breakdown of the likely networks and the meaning behind the ALE identifiers. Let`s begin by looking at the structure of the Venezuelan Army, which is broken down into six zones or regions. According to a profile available via web search engine Google`s cache of defunct web pages the structure of the Army is as follows: Area Militar 1 (HQ San Cristóbal) covers Táchira, Mérida, Barinas and Apure Area Militar 2 (HQ Maracaibo) covers Falcón, Zulia and western Trujillo Area Militar 3 (HQ Barquisimeto) covers Lara, Yaracuy, Portuguesa, Cojedes, Guárico and eastern Trujillo Area Militar 4 (HQ Maracay) covers Caracas, Carabobo, Aragua, Miranda, Sucre, Nueva Esparta and northern Anzoátegui Area Militar 5 (HQ Maturín) covers Monagas, southern Anzoátegui and the Delta Amacuro Territory Area Militar 6 (HQ Ciudad Bolívar) covers Bolívar and the Amazonas Territory Prior to the country`s ``Plan Ejército 2000,`` each military zone had its own Infantry Division, each of which was further sub-divided into one or two brigades. Under the new plan, the Army combined the 1st and 2nd Infantry Divisions into a new 1st Infantry Division, with its HQ at Maracaibo. With their HQ at Maracay, the 3rd and 4th Infantry Divisions merged to become the new 4th Infantry Division. Lastly, a new 5th Jungle Infantry Division, headquartered at Ciudad Bolívar was formed to cover the old regions 5 and 6 in the south of the country. So let`s look at ALE identifiers which have been collected thus far: CGE CLC CLC13, 22, 32, 321, 41, 43, 44, 51, 52 CLM CLM21, 31, 32, 41, 42, 46, 52 CRC CRC1, 2, 3, 4, 5 CRM CRM2, 4, 5 PCRC5 PCRM5 SCLC211, 222, 224, 431, 432, 442, 50, 501, 51, 511, 513, 514, 521 SCLM34, 340, 341, 342, 344, 347, 349 SCM02, 04 As we might expect from the Army`s five division organization, we never see ALE identifiers having numeric portions with a starting digit higher than 5. Using a number of Spanish translation guides, Ron was also able to piece together the following possible meanings for each identifier prefix: CLC= Communications Logistics Center (Centro Logístico Comunicaciones) SCLC= Communications Logistics Service Center (Servicio Centro Logístico de Comunicaciones) CRC= Regional Communications Center (Centro Regional de Comunicaciones) PCRC= Rear Command Post (Communications) (Puesto de Commanda Retrasado Comunicaciones) CLM= Maintenance Logistics Center (Centro Logístico Mantenimiento) SCLM= Maintenance Logistics Service Center (Servicio Centro Logístico Mantenimiento) CGE= Army HQ (Cuartel General de Ejército), Caracas The digits themselves appear to correspond closely to the various unit numbers of the battalions into which the lower hierarchies of each division are structured. For example, SCLC512 is likely to be the communications facilities of the 512th (Jungle) Infantry Battalion based at Fort Tarabay. Identifiers with a single digit are most probably the central (HQ) facilities of each division. When Ron checked the frequencies used by each identifier, he was able to determine the following net structure, too: 2nd Infantry Division: 5760, 9232, 10156, and 11610 kHz USB 3rd Infantry Division: 7597, 8050, 9232, 9259, 12192, 13464, 13506 USB 5th Infantry Division: 9233, 12191, 14569 kHz USB There are likely to be many more frequencies that we have yet to find in this large and interesting network. Perhaps you will come across them some day...? Resources --- Venezuelan Army: http://www.ejercito.mil.ve Spanish Military Glossary: http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usamhi/usarsa/main.htm (Mike Chace, Digital Digest, Utility World, August MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. Just now (25-7-2003, 1735 UT) I hear on 5134 kHz USB an eastern European broadcasting station. This one is reported here from time to time since many years. The language sounds Czech? As it was also on in German daytime some years ago I think not about a Belarus` MIL station, which often relays local FM broadcasting stations. Also the regular use of the same frequency looks not like Belarus`. Some years ago the WUN mailing list reported daytime Czech voice ``official styled`` traffic on 5135 or 5134 kHz. Now it sounds more like a Russian related language, maybe the Belarus` also use this channel? Sorry, I typed this message online via telnet. Anybody is able to identify the BC station which is relayed?? Any further info about this channel (former? Czech users) or about the Belarus` relays in general? Only the Belarus` MIL is doing these relays? Means the catch of such a relay is a positive ID for Belarus` MIL ???? [Later:] now I`m sure that this was a Belarus` BC relay; it was a chat program moderated by a woman (in Russian/Belarus`) with BLR and international hits. It went QRT exactly on the hour (1800 UT), they often the term ``Kasern`` (sounds like), which sounds like the German word military barracks/camps, maybe the same in belarus`? Maybe the Belarus` MIL produce special MIL BC programs, like the German Radio Andernach operated by the Bundeswehr??? For the WUN logging team: 5134.0 Belarus MIL: 1745-1800 SSB (LSB and USB) relay of a Belarus` broadcasting station. 1800 s/off. (25/7/02) (DL8AAM) 73, (Tom - DL8AAM, hard-core-dx via DXLD) {More: 3-134} UNIDENTIFIED. Does anyone know the station from Brazil on 6020 at 0700 UT? http://jill.jazzkeyboard.com/radio/brazil.mp3 Their ID mentioned São Paulo. Thanks (Jilly Dybka, KF4ZEO, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Altho I couldn`t make much out of Jilly`s recording, I think this is most likely R. Victoria, Peru: Mark Mohrmann`s list http://www.sover.net/~hackmohr/sw.htm shows it does run all night: 6020.29 PERU * R Victoria, Lima [0035-1240](.08-.4) Jul 03 C //9720.39 (r)AM780 It does carry evangelical programs, and this could well have been the one in `Portunyol`, a mixture of Spanish and Portuguese, or rather Spanish spoken with a heavy Brazilian accent, ``La Voz de la Liberacion``. It`s actually around 6020.3, and parallel 9720.4v. Of the two Brazilians listed elsewhere on 6020, the only current Brazilian he has is: 6020.04 BRAZIL * R Gaúcha, Porto Alegre [*0900-1001/2022-0335](19.8- 20.05)Jun 02 C (r)R Tupi //6060//9565//11915 (skd Mar02)0900-0400 0755 Another try at monitoring with this in mind might resolve the question, especially if the mystery one is off-frequency. O, I meant to add that the music in the middle of Jilly`s recording reminded me of ``How Great Thou Art``, adding to the impression that this is evangelical, and the show referred to does come from São Paulo, I think. And, altho he could not hear it as late as 0700, see Karel Honzik`s log under PERU in DXLD 3-111 (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. 6215.05, unID LA, 0058 July 26, Fairly weak, but definite Spanish speaking announcer. Moderate static crashes at the time. I heard no ID, but Radio Baluarte from Pto. Iguazú, Argentina has been logged on this frequency at this time within the last few weeks. I guess this is the best time of year to DX Argentina on 6 MHz (David Hodgson, TN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. Q. What are the unstable shortwave carriers that slowly drift upward in frequency consistent spacings? I have heard them on various receivers and at several locations (Frank Tangel, email) A. Without a doubt, these gurgling frequency drifts are generated locally by harmonic-rich switching power supplies and other free- running oscillators found in modern electronic appliances, telephones, and even utilities like telephone company accessories, and radiated from power lines, telephone lines, and your own appliances. One way to determine whether or not they are in your house is to turn off the circuit breakers, one at a time, as you are listening to the interference; if one of the breakers kills the interference (but not your receiver!), you`re getting closer! I had such a problem several years ago with our telephone system. The provider had installed a device called a ``Circuit Maker`` which multiplexed several lines together; their power supply produced harmonics all over the shortwave spectrum. I finally had to file a complaint with our public utility commission to force them to remove the devices. You can sometimes home in on them walking around with a portable radio tuned to one of the offending signals to see where it gets loudest (Bob Grove, W8JHD, Ask Bob, Getting Started, August MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ MONITORING TIMES EXPRESS The monthly magazine costs $26.95 a year in USA for hard copy, but only $19.95 for PDF. This may be downloaded either in low- or high- resolution, the latter running some 22 MB, but no problem with a cable modem or better. Only a few pages of the print magazine are slick, suitable for color, but some illustrations printed only in B&W show up in color on the PDF: see our remarks above under USA --- KIPM. MC, Visa, Discover accepted: 1-800-438-8155 toll free in US and Canada; elsewhere 1-828-837-9200; fax 828-837-2216; 7540 Hwy 64 W, Brasstown NC 28902. Or see http://www.monitoringtimes.com/html/mtexpress.html for info about a free sample. MT uses a lot of abbrs. without explaining them, like ALE, other than at: http://www.monitoringtimes.com/html/mtglossary.html http://www.monitoringtimes.com/html/mtrfglossary.html (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) CQ SHORTWAVE NEWS MAGAZINE There is a shortwave radio magazine published monthly by Tony Smith in Australia. It`s called ``CQ Shortwave News Magazine`` and covers pretty much all aspects of the DXing hobby. You can check out the July 2003 issue #24 at http://www.kn4lf.com/CQSW24.PDF I have no financial ties to the publication and am just passing along info on it as I think it`s a very worthwhile publication. You can email Tony at swler@dodo.com.au for subscription info. 73, (Thomas F. Giella, KN4LF Plant City, FL, USA, NRC-AM via DXLD) CQSWN includes snippets from DXLD as filler. When not fascist-bashing RFPI, Giella also has written propagation articles for this ezine, as I recall (gh, DXLD) CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ MADISON DX GET-TOGETHER The 10th annual Madison Get-together for DXers and Radio Enthusiasts is a little over three weeks away. This year`s event will take place on Saturday, August 16, beginning at 1 PM CDT. This year`s hosts are the NRC`s Bill and Nina Dvorak, 501 Algoma Street, Madison WI 53704- 4812. The Madison get-together has been growing every year. Last year, 26 DXers attended, including six from the NRC. Come and meet your fellow NRC members and share in the DX camaraderie. If you plan to attend, please let us know by responding to this e- mail. If you need more information, please request our e-mail fact sheet. We hope to see you in Madison on August 16! 73 (Bill and Nina Dvorak, Madison WI DXERak@aol.com July 24 via NRC-AM via DXLD) NRC CONVENTION A MONTH AWAY As all of you know, the annual NRC Convention will be held in Dallas/ Fort Worth August 29 through August 31. The link below has all the details. http://www.nrcdxas.org/convention/03nrccon/ While tours are not finalized just yet, you can expect several interesting ones, including the recording studios of TM Century, Inc (who graciously donated jingles for the club`s WNRC and DX Audio service last year) and WFAA-TV. Of course there will be some radio facility tours. John Callarman is also trying to put together some informal seminars about the hobby. Since the banquet/guest speaker/auction are important parts of the event I`ll mention that briefly. We`re meeting in Texas, so barbeque will be on the menu, with the traditional fixins. The guest speakers --- there are two --- should prove entertaining. First is George Gimarc who hosts the Lost Tapes program heard on KRLD- 1080 and the Texas State Network on Saturday nights (he`s not heard on KRLD if there`s a baseball conflict, but is still on TSN). George will talk about his show (which is quite unique) and his two books, Hollywood HiFi Vol. 1 and 2. After George, Steve Eberhart, who is responsible for the ``History of KLIF`` website http://www.historyofklif.com will talk about KLIF, the legacy of its founder Gordon McLendon, and the incredible influence the Mighty 1190 had on not only Dallas/Fort Worth but as a pioneer of ``top 40`` radio in the United States. The auction: if you received the July DXAS then you know about the personalized TM Century jingle that will be auctioned to the highest bidder (they really will sing your name `here`). I`ve been stockpiling some stuff and next week every radio promotion manager in town will get their arm twisted by me, but if you have anything to donate --- we need it! Quickly!! Send your auction items to: Wally Wawro, WFAA-TV, 606 Young Street, Dallas, TX 75202 Please include your phone number or e-mail address so I can let you know that the package arrived. Also, write NRC Auction somewhere on the box or package. No junk but anything of interest to our members will be welcome. So get your registration to Bill Hale and your reservation made with the hotel. Can we get 70 members together for the club`s 70th anniversary? I`m optimistic enough to think we can! Bill, John and I are looking forward to meeting you next month. Thank you! (Wally Wawro, WFAA-TV, Dallas, TX, NRC 2003 Big D, NRC-AM July 26 via DXLD) IRCA CONVENTION RADIO TOUR PHOTOS I finally found enough time in my day to upload photos from the IRCA 2003 Convention tour of Saga Communications` Portland Radio Group. Check it out on BAMLog. A report and photos will be published in the October edition of Popular Communications magazine (Bruce Conti - Nashua NH http://members.aol.com/baconti/bamlog.htm via DXLD) POWERLINE COMMUNICATIONS ++++++++++++++++++++++++ AN EDITORIAL COMMENT As you all well know by now I`ve been around amateur radio long enough to qualify as a member of the Quarter Century Wireless Association. (One of these days I may even join.) Throughout those years, both as a ham and as a generalist in all the other aspects of the radio hobby, I have encountered dozens of things that have been raised up as ``a threat to the hobby,`` and gets everyone excited. This is not such a bad thing, because usually it brings about an increase in activity on the repeaters and that is always good. Just such a subject is currently causing long-winded folks to time out their local machines. These days a lot of comments, opinions and technical positions (and, sadly, a certain amount of unsubstantiated folderol) have been going back and forth in the amateur radio community, in the press, online, and on the air, about Power Line Communications, also known a PLC or Broadband over Power Lines (BPL). I have been a bit surprised at how many e-mails have come my way asking me my opinion on the subject. Certainly enough to make me dig a bit deeper into the good sources of information to try to come up with some thoughts that might at least further the discussion. In other words, I guess it looks like time for Old Uncle Skip to get into some controversy. Well, duck and cover, here it comes. Good, Bad, or Indifferent? On the surface of it, the concept of PLC/BPL is intriguing --- using existing power lines to carry high speed broadband Internet signals. You`ve got an existing infrastructure and supportive services (including billing and administration). Why isn`t everybody smiling? Well, for one thing, at its existing level of technology and with the current theories on deployment, it has the potential to cause serious noise and interference problems in the HF spectrum. Where I come from, HF means Ham Frequencies, so we should all be keeping at least one eye on this technology. Life is hard enough trying to dig out an S2 signal under a solar flare. Nobody needs more interference than we already encounter. But notice the phrasing I used in the last paragraph… PLC has the *potential* to cause interference at this stage of the game. While all hams are right to be concerned and should make a point of filing comments on any FCC Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (NPR) in these areas, let`s be careful here. Last time I checked, the amateur radio community was supposed to be made up of folks who embraced advances in technology and, more importantly, worked to make existing and potential technologies better. If you don`t believe me, reach into your pocket and pull out your cell phone. Who do you think figured out how to bring this technology to a place where it was made marketable? As I recall, hams were repeating and networking radio (cell phones are radios remember?) long before anyone used a pocket phone to order a pizza. Through our comments (and hopefully our experiments) we may find ways to make this technology coexist with ham radio. I expect that if PLC becomes a reality it will be in an advanced form that takes into account spectrum use for HF services (including ham radio). I also count on the vast technological base of dedicated and tenacious hams to find new ways of getting around this problem and, in so doing, improve the radio art even further. I can hardly wait to see the advances in notch filter design. Now to really go out on a limb, let me give you my thoughts on why this technology may not be a threat at all. How many times have we heard in the past about a ``promising new technology that will change our world forever``? See where I am going with this? Even if the basics of the technology are sound and the power companies have dollar signs in their eyes, that doesn`t mean this dog is gonna` hunt. That power juice that leaks out of your plugs at home comes by way of a relatively lossy system when you start to talk about higher and higher frequencies. There are miles of uninsulated (and corroded) wire out there running from pole to pole. You can get away with all kinds of things when you`re down below 500 kHz. You may not know that even today your local utility company is probably sending control signals via their overhead wires at very low frequencies. But when you start moving that signal up into the legitimate HF range or higher, a lot of other factors are going to come into play --- everything from the quality of the cabling to the connectors and the power generating equipment itself. Even cable TV companies and telephone companies currently scrambling for their piece of the broadband Internet pie, and whose systems were more or less initially designed to manage data transmissions, are encountering infrastructure and deployment problems. Power utilities were only designed to deliver electrical power at some very specific (and very low) frequencies. Sure, it might work just fine in a lab or a short range test. But I`ll bet long runs will create a whole new set of problems that may make the whole project less than cost efficient for the power companies. Utilities are highly regulated industries and they have to work very hard to preserve what they perceive to be a reasonable profit margin. They simply can`t afford to go off on a technological tangent. Their R&D budgets are as tight as a drum. And if you poke around a bit on the Internet and in a few books, you are likely to find that a form of PLC already exists in many places and it is having zero negative effect on amateur radio operations. What I am referring to is the ``HomePlug`` specification. HomePlug is a technology used for powerline computer and control system networking within a building or complex of buildings. This specification requires filtering to prevent interference with all types of over-the-air radio communication. A great deal more information and study from reliable resources can be found at the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) Technical Information Service site: http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/HTML/plc/ My good friend Ed Hare, W1RFI, ARRL Laboratory Manager (and QRP Sensei) has gone to great pains to assure that the facts of this technology and its potential impact on amateur and other radio services is available to hams everywhere. So the bottom line from Old Uncle Skip`s end of the universe is: Will we see PLC deployed? Maybe. When will we see it? On a small scale, in a couple of years, but unless some of those bigger issues are worked out I wouldn`t expect it to be widespread within the next 5 years or even more. Technologies of all shapes and sizes will continue to advance during that 5 year period as well. Any one of these technologies might prove more practical (and profitable) than PLC. Will PLC have a negative impact on Ham Radio? Yes, but only if we do not work on our own behalf to protect our spectrum from this and any other potential source of interference. While PLC might have a negative impact at some point in the future, at the present time more hams are probably affected by interference from improperly managed VHF/UHF paging transmitters. When was the last time you contacted the FCC to get them to improve enforcement in this area? The key here is to remain informed. Any ham that doesn`t log onto the FCC http://www.fcc.gov and ARRL http://www.arrl.org Web sites daily and act on the news and information provided there gets what they deserve. Things move fairly fast in this regulation/deregulation game and windows of opportunity to provide comments to the FCC and government officials can be fairly narrow. Making Your Voice Heard The good news is that the FCC usually accepts public comments on any of their Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (NPR). They have even developed an excellent Web site that makes filing comments a fairly simple procedure. Their site can be found at: http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/ecfs/ All you need to provide comment is the docket number for the NPR in question. These are usually easy to find with a search on the topic either at the FCC main Web site or at the ARRL Web Site. Most any subject of particular interest to the amateur radio community will be well covered in the hobby press, as will references to the various NPR`s docket numbers and their filing deadlines. Knowing the docket number is important, because that is how you reference the topic you plan to comment on at the FCC site. Even a brief comment of just a few lines is valuable to the process. Let`s go over a couple of points that will help you be heard. You are filing a comment not a complaint. Even if you are very excited about a matter and have very strong feelings, try your best to make your comments in a way that is informative and critical without being confrontational. Take some time to develop your position off line. How many times in the past have you sent someone an e-mail message only to regret that you hit the Send key. A little planning will give even a brief comment plenty of power. Another important thing to remember is that, unless you are very well versed in the engineering and or legal aspects of any matter in a NPR, you may want to try to refrain from talking about the subject beyond your personal level of expertise. Stick to honest expressions of your concern for the rule`s effect on your ability to continue to enjoy your use of the radio spectrum. This has just as much value during the comments stage of the FCC process. While I am sure it comes across in almost any comment posted by a ham on the FCC site, never forget to remind folks of the service that amateur radio provides. It is our history of service to the community that has been responsible for our ability to have our comments count in past matters before the FCC and Congress. The FCC could [not] care less if you can`t have your regular Saturday morning roundtable, nor do they care what your score was in last month`s DX contest. What continues to ``pay the rent`` for the ham community is our public service in times of emergencies. While the FCC comments page allows for the sending of attached files, don`t complicate matters by duplicating efforts. For example, sending a copy of an article from a magazine such as QST is redundant. The League will have already seen that all relevant material has been entered into the process. Unless the information you are providing is likely to be something new to the matter, save the bandwidth. As an example of a comment, please look at the sidebar to this month`s column. There you will see my brief comment filed in relation to NPR Docket #03-104, a recent NPR related to PLC. In a few short lines I let the folks in Gettysburg and Washington know my position on Power Line Communication. Keep an ear to the ground and your eyes on the Web for future opportunities to add your comments to matters that could change the way we enjoy our hobby in the future. Hang in there. I`ll still see everyone at the bottom end of forty meters for many years to come, as long as we all stick together. Uncle Skip`s Comments sent to the FCC concerning PLC/BPL ``As an active amateur radio operator, I am most concerned that BPL communication might have a negative and interfering effect on my ability to serve my community and my country. Unless the potential for serious interference to the amateur and other radio services are addressed, BPL should not go forward in its present form. In times of national and local emergencies, `hams` have always been ready willing and able to answer the call to duty. I guess the real question is, if BPL is allowed in its present form, will hams be able to hear that call under all the noise?`` (Rev. T. J. `Skip` Arey, On the Ham Bands, August MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ QST DE W1AW PROPAGATION FORECAST BULLETIN 30 ARLP030 From Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, WA July 25, 2003 To all radio amateurs Geomagnetic activity settled down over the past week. The average daily planetary A index dropped by nearly half from the previous week, from 29.1 to 16.1. Average daily sunspot numbers went up from 140 to 195.3 and average daily solar flux rose from 125.6 to 147.7. Solar flux declined from Wednesday to Thursday, July 23 to 24, from 144.1 to 129.2. Predicted solar flux for Friday through Monday, July 25 to 28 is 120, 125, 125 and 130. Planetary A indices for those same days is predicted at 12, 15, 12 and 15, but is expected to rise next week to between 20 and 25. The sunspot count rose last week because of rapid growth of sunspot groups 409 and 410 about a week ago. Sunspot 410 began to decay around July 22. The predicted rise next week in geomagnetic indices is due to a solar wind that earth will enter around July 27. More news of VHF openings is in. Pat Rose, W5OZI said on July 24, from 0046 to 0052z (which was Wednesday night in North America) he worked five Japanese stations on 6-meters. Pat said that in 18 years on 6-meters he has never had E-layer propagation to Japan from his home in Junction, Texas, about 120 miles west of Austin. Pat says the approximate distance to the Japanese stations is over 10,300 km, or 6,400 miles, and believes it took six hops off the ionosphere. Sunspot numbers for July 17 through 23 were 189, 193, 178, 224, 219, 200, and 164, with a mean of 195.3. 10.7 cm flux was 138.7, 139.7, 146, 157.3, 155.6, 152.5, and 144.1, with a mean of 147.7. Estimated planetary A indices were 22, 14, 26, 19, 12, 9, and 11, with a mean of 16.1. Copyright © 2003, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved (via John Norfolk) ARNIE CORO`S EXCLUSIVE AND NOT COPYRIGHTED PROPAGATION FORECAST A geomagnetic storm was expected to start early UT Sunday, due to a coronal hole (Arnie Coro, RHC DXers Unlimited July 27 0146, notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-132, July 25, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1192: WWCR: Sat 1030, Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 9475 RFPI: Sat 0130, 0800, 1400, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 7445 and/or 15039 WRMI: Sat & Sun 1800+ 15725 WINB: Sun 0030 12160 WBCQ: Mon 0445 7415 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1192.html ** AUSTRIA. Re: Clandestines. Yep, you're right. I have told Wolf I was wrong. I don't know why he is upset about the misspelt Austrian pollie`s name. Here they are down the bottom of the list on a par with used car salesmen (Robin L. HARWOOD, Tasmania, July 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRIA. Message reçu de Radio Afrika Internationale : "Nous avons le regret de vous annoncer que nous avons arrêté nos émissions de la journée vers l'Afrique depuis juin 2003 faute de moyens. (Il nous faut au moins 100 euros par jour). Nous sommes en train de chercher les donnateurs ou/et partenaires pour redémarrer les émissions. Vous continuerez à nous recevoir en France en ondes moyennes et sur internet chaque soir de 21.30 à 23.00 (NDR de 1930 à 2100 TU). Les programmes en francais commencent à partir de 22.15 (NDR: 2015) avec nos nouvelles d'Afrique." (Alexis Neuberg, Radio Afrika Internationale - 16 juillet 2003; les informations sont issues de http://perso.wanadoo.fr/jm.aubier via DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. 4734.8, 0930 July 25, Radio San Miguel, lively pops and IDs, then at 0932 program called "Ciencia y ???". Maybe this is the same station reported recently on 6536v from Huancabamba??? Needs more work. Good signal though some audio distortion. [Later:] 4734.8, presume this to be Radio San Miguel, Riberalta, ex 4930v, although the programming isn't what I would expect, i.e. no religion so far. Between 0932 and 0958, they carried a science transcription program from Radio Nederland (Paul Ormandy, ZL4TFX, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Today, I heard this station with very good signal from Buenos Aires, between 0950-1005 UT, time and ID by male at 1003. 73's 55's (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentina, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Hello Paul! The station is most likely Radio San Miguel, Riberalta that has moved from 4930.37 kHz. I noted the station the 23rd of july with good strength but distorted audio announcing 4730 kHz. The station on 4930.37 is off air. ID as "Radio San Miguel" - "LV del Norte" could be a name of a program. 73s from (Bjorn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, dxing.info via DXLD) ** BOUGAINVILLE. PNG, 3850.00, Radio Independent Mekamui, presumed;. hearing music July 24 from 0915 tune in, getting better by 0930 with male announcer and time check, pidgin sounding talk thru severe static - local lightning buildups killed things past 0935. During lulls in static, signal was building quite nicely by 0950. More male pidgin talk and tentative ID, time check near 1000 (Don Moman, Lamont, Alberta, CANADA, 53 44N 112 50W, Ant: 4 el 80m yagi, Receiver: ICOM 756 pro, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. Rádio Clube de Marília (SP), em 3235 kHz Em 25 de julho, a partir de 0130 UT, estava monitorando a faixa de 90 metros quando deparei com bom sinal na freqüência de 3235 kHz. Foram levadas ao ar várias músicas, de autores como Tavito, Roberto Carlos, Djavan e Tim Maia num espaço intitulado "no programa de tudo um pouco, com TJ, o clube dos tempos dourados". Às 0200, TJ apresentou uma série de anúncios comerciais, que iniciou com o Sindicato dos Aposentados de Marília (SP) e finalizou com a Auto Elétrica Renascer. Adiante, o apresentador levou ao ar a identificação da emissora: Rádio Clube de Marília! Também anunciou os telefones do departamento comercial e do estúdio. Fui conferir. Liguei para o estúdio e fui entrevistado por uns 3 minutos. Segundo ele, "fui o primeiro a responder o chamamento feito aos ouvintes distantes". Não entrei em detalhes sobre o fato de a emissora ser nova ou reativada em ondas curtas! Após um bloco de músicas, às 0248, TJ voltou ao ar e agradeceu a minha ligação e pediu "aos ouvintes do Brasil e do exterior que escrevam para a emissora". Deu o endereço: Rádio Clube de Marília, Caixa Postal 326, CEP: 17500- 970, Marília (SP). (Célio Romais, Porto Alegre (RS), Brasil, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** CANADA. Re CJRS: Glenn, I listened to this (station) this morning. Yesterday when I tried it the streaming wasn't working but this morning it worked fine on Real Player here. This is definitely an on- line only operation. (Call letters) CJRS were the old calls for a 1510 kHz. AM operation in Sherbrooke, Quebec, several years ago. It disappeared with the merger of Radio Mutuel and Telemedia stations in Quebec. Seeing as the CRTC in Canada has basically said that they will stay as far away from Internet radio as possible, I guess they wouldn't be too concerned about the call letters being used (Sheldon Harvey, July 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. CFAN, Miramichi-Newcastle, NB will be staying on AM a few months longer than planned. Although the Maritimes Broadcasting System station has had its new 99.3 FM transmitter on the air for several months now, it's having problems with the stereo generator. "The River" expects to keep its 790 AM signal alive through the summer. That facility is running non-directionally, since one of its towers had already been taken out of the directional array in preparation for the move to FM (Robert Wien?, IRCA Soft DX Monitor July 22 via DXLD) {see 3-141} ** CANADA. Norman Spector --- By NORMAN SPECTOR From Wednesday's Globe and Mail POSTED AT 7:15 AM EDT Jul. 23, 2003 There was a time when banning the importation of Al-Jazeera, the Arabic news channel, would have been consistent with Canadian values. Indeed, in the early 1930s, a principal rationale for regulating radio was to protect our sovereignty. ''Britannia rules the waves,'' Graham Spry, the leading lobbyist for public broadcasting quipped, ''Shall Columbia (CBS) rule the airwaves?'' Since he and others believed that the choice was between the ''State or the United States,'' CBS and other networks were not permitted to establish Canadian affiliates, and we set up the CBC instead. However, "defensive expansionism" was long ago abandoned as an adequate basis for Canadian broadcasting policy. Soon after its inception, the public broadcaster got permission to carry popular U.S. radio programs -- the rationale being that advertiser revenues would support the production of Canadian programs. Cross-subsidization is now the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission's raison d'etre. Internationally, the Zeitgeist favours the free flow of information. Still, the post-9/11 context should not be ignored, and we must distinguish between friend and foe here (as, too, in our visa and immigration policies). The Americans are at war against "terrorism," and we are their neighbour and ally. Included in Al-Jazeera's target audience are the young, Western passport holders that al-Qaeda is assiduously trying to recruit. It would be disastrous for Canada's well-being if we were ever used as a staging ground for an attack on the United States. The Canadian Jewish Congress and B'nai Brith Canada have labelled Al-Jazeera "virulently anti-Semitic," and they provide some chilling examples. The Canadian Arab Federation counters with the assertion that "the views of the people who make the news should not be confused as the views of the station that airs it" -- though it has never proffered that distinction with respect to Canadian media, and rightly so. Unfortunately, the Al-Jazeera controversy is turning into one of those classic Canadian debates in which one does not so much weigh arguments as choose sides. It need not descend to this level, however. Aside from our experience with similar broadcasting issues, Canadians have a set of values, and a panoply of laws to rely on, including the understanding that the freedom to express ourselves with a picket sign stops one centimetre short of someone else's nose. Media critics have also waded into this debate. Not one of them knows any Arabic. But, understanding what's on the screen seems not to be a qualification for the job. Perhaps that explains why the Toronto Star's Antonia Zerbisias, while conceding that "some of what is said on Al-Jazeera is objectionable," still asks whether it is "any more hateful, say, than what is often uttered on American TV?" And why, though she has always sworn by the objectivity of the CBC's Middle East coverage, she's suddenly discovered a gap in what's available to Canadians on TV that only Al-Jazeera can fill. In these pages, Rick Salutin minimizes the potential impact of Islamic extremists referring to Jews as "apes and pigs." I'm not surprised: His Mideast analyses have always stood on the conceit that growing up Jewish equips one to understand the Palestinian side of the conflict. (Believe me, it does not.) On the other hand, and, as usual, The Globe's television critic, John Doyle, provides some useful perspective, arguing that "a principal Canadian value is the right to judge and decide for ourselves, and use our own laws and courts to determine the response." Unfortunately, there's a huge gap in our law that places Al-Jazeera beyond the reach of Canadian courts. The Broadcasting Act prohibits "any false or misleading news," or "any abusive comment or abusive pictorial representation that . . . is likely to expose . . . an individual or group . . . to hatred or contempt on the basis of race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion. . . ." However, this only applies to programming services originated by licensees. As carriers, cable operators would not be covered, and it is arguable whether Criminal Code sections that prohibit the "advocacy of genocide," or any communication that "willfully promotes hatred," would apply. What, then, is to be done with the applications to import Al-Jazeera? The model for a solution, I believe, is the "Category 2" licence the CRTC issued to authorize the importation of MSNBC from the United States. Cable operators are required to repackage the American news channel's programs with some local content, and it is then offered to subscribers as MSNBC Canada. (Since the cable companies are applying for permission to provide 15 other ethnic channels, there is no content shortage.) Moreover, as part owner of the service, Rogers Cable is legally liable for the content -- as it or any other successful applicant should be if granted permission to import Al-Jazeera. (c) 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** COSTA RICA. 7/23/03 - RADIO FOR PEACE INTERNATIONAL UNDER SIEGE http://www.diymedia.net/archive/0703.htm#072303 Radio For Peace International, an independent shortwave radio station broadcasting from El Rodeo, Costa Rica, has been surrounded by security guards and its doors chained shut. The reason for the siege is unknown, as is the status of RFPI staff. Radio For Peace International got its start in 1987 with the help of progressives from around the world and has been volunteer-driven and listener-supported ever since. It's seen some fame for its extensive research and reporting on right-wing hate groups, and especially their prolific use of shortwave broadcasting as a propaganda outlet. There have been recent concerns that the violence of Colombia's civil war may be spilling over into Costa Rica, including the possibility of paramilitary groups from Colombia operating in-country. While details remain very sketchy, it doesn't seem they are involved in the RFPI siege; the initial report cites "guards from the University of Peace," where RFPI has its studios. Relations between the University and station are less than peaceful: UPeace Council President Maurice Strong has been trying to evict RFPI from campus for reasons undetermined. However, the station built its own studios, offices and transmitter facilities and the matter is reportedly still wending its way through the Costa Rican courts. The siege is likely connected to this, but disturbing nonetheless. As of this writing an MP3 stream of a receiver tuned to RFPI's shortwave frequency is unintelligible (via Harry Helms, W7HLH, Las Vegas, NV DM26, DXLD) For Immediate Release: For More Information contact: RFPI at email: info@rfpi.org James Latham, General Manager, RFPI: 011 (506) 249-1821 Naomi Fowler, Program Director, RFPI: 011 (506) 249-1821 Emily Morales, Operations, RFPI: 011 (506) 249-1821 US Contact: Jean Parker, Board of Directors: (303) 355-9935 On Monday, July 21, 2003 a University for Peace representative delivered an eviction notice to Radio For Peace International (RFPI) which has been operating since 1987 by mutual agreement on the University campus in El Rodeo, Costa Rica. The Radio station`s access gate was locked with chains and patrolled by armed guards employed by the University for Peace. In addition, the radio station was advised to vacate its facilities in two weeks. Radio For Peace employees made a plea to the armed guards to allow them to leave the locked premises on Monday night, although some have not left the premises since the eviction notice. According to Latham, the unexplained, and legally questionable decision to evict RFPI endangers the livelihood of the station`s employees, and also threatens to silence the voice of peace on international airwaves. ``This is more than an eviction, this is about the right to free speech,`` says James Latham, Chief Executive Officer of Radio for Peace International. ``What is most shocking and sad is that this action comes from an international peace organization.`` University for Peace cofounder, former Costa Rican President Rodrigo Carazo Odio, invited RFPI in 1985 to build and manage its own office and studios on the university`s Costa Rica campus. Consequently RFPI constructed studios and transmitters, and has been broadcasting messages of peace and social justice as well as daily United Nations programming. RFPI is the only listener supported shortwave radio station. Latham says that Monday`s eviction notice represents poor judgment on behalf of the new administration at the University for Peace, a United Nations mandated university established in 1980. ``RFPI has always shown goodwill toward the University for Peace and has worked harmoniously with the previous four administrations. Our shared goals to work toward ending war is what brought our two organizations together, and in the world today there is still much work to be done. Instead of focusing on how to eliminate a fellow peace organization, we need to channel our energy toward eliminating war, poverty and hunger.`` To prevent the silencing of this important voice, we the Committee for the Defense of Radio For Peace International encourages you to write Kofi Annan in support of the radio station at: annan@un.org (via James Latham, CR, DXLD) What a shame it has come to this. For now, RFPI is still heard, on 15039 July 25 at 1510, 1945 checks. The above release plus photos now appears at http://www.rfpi.org (gh, DXLD) RFPI's situation is part of a bureaucratic and personality squabble between the University for Peace and RFPI itself. RFPI has operated out of the UFP facilities since its inception. The founder of the UFP and James Latham of RFPI have long been friends; the new guy running the UFP apparently has ideas of his own. Methinks the Lathams have to come with some $$ and quickly in order to restore their use of the UFP facility. I believe it frankly boils down to money, nothing more (Richard Cuff / Allentown, PA USA, July 25, swprograms via DXLD) PEACE UNIVERSITY OUSTS RADIO SHORTWAVE STATION GETS EVICTION NOTICE By Suzanna Starcevic, Tico Times Staff http://www.ticotimes.net/newsbriefs.htm [I suspect this may not be a permanent URL, but valid for week of July 25-31? Illustrated --- gh] With this week's padlocking of its parking lot and a notice to evacuate the building within two weeks, Radio for Peace International (RFPI) has found itself bracing for, rather than broadcasting, political struggle. The radio has promoted international peace, news and information programs, including many from the United Nations, from the University for Peace (UPaz) campus in Ciudad Colón, 25 km west of San José, since 1987, using the land rent-free as an independent, joint project with the UN-backed university. Although the station continues to broadcast, the padlock went on around noon Monday, trapping staffers' cars inside the parking lot until the armed UPaz guard who put it there relented and let them out. [Caption:] HAPPY with Radio for Peace? University for Peace President Maurice Strong (left) met recently with President Abel Pacheco to discuss University's plans. Tico Times/Julio Laínez "The university is just defending its rights to its property," said Luís Alberto Varela, the university's lawyer. "It didn't just give them two weeks to leave; they've had a year and a half." As early as April 12, 2002, past RFPI director Debra Latham received a letter from Rector Martin Lees saying the university would be terminating the 1992 International Cooperation Agreement with RFPI's Oregon-based umbrella organization, World Peace University, Inc. The notice gave the station until July 10, 2002 to leave, amounting to a 90-day informal eviction notice - recourse provided for. While no one contests the university's ownership of the land, RFPI CEO James Latham says a cloud of confusion is still swirling around the station as to why the university is trying to remove the station from its two-story building and adjacent transmitter, built through RFPI fundraising. "When [University for Peace President] Maurice Strong first came in 1999, he said he was very happy with Radio for Peace, one of the only independently funded joint projects," said Latham. "The last time I asked them why they were doing this, they said only they did not want us to be here, weren't able to give us the land and wanted us to leave." UPAZ has been criticized since its creation in 1980 by the UN General Assembly as being unproductive, an image the current administration has worked to revise; it recently graduated 24 students from a 10- month Master's program (TT, June 27). The agreement doesn't require reasons for termination, but Varela says there should be no confusion. He cites an outstanding $14,000 debt owed by Radio for Peace to the university for installation of telephone and Internet structure and illegal use of radio frequencies as reasons that have been communicated. "It has fallen on deaf ears," he claims. Latham says an arrangement was in place to repay the debt, incurred in 2001, in the form of cash or radio time for UPaz, but that the radio wasn't given time to provide the services in kind. All attempts to contact other University for Peace representatives were refused and directed to Varela. Although an inquiry into the Radio for Peace use of frequencies listed past unauthorized use of FM frequencies, the report lists no complaints after Strong's review of the university's relationship with RFPI began. Also, UPaz initially arranged the broadcasting frequencies, some of which did not require permits at the time. According to Latham, the shortwave bands the radio is using, 7445 and 15040, are international, registered with the High Frequency Coordination Committee (HFCC), which coordinates frequencies over the world, and open to broadcasters as long as they test for 90 days to make sure they are not interfering. The bands are used by several other broadcasters as well. The National Radio Control disagrees, maintaining the two bands are registered for sole use by mobile aeronautic and mo-bile land communications. Melvin Murillo, director of National Radio Control, agreed that Radio for Peace had taken the steps necessary to register its frequencies with the HFCC, and the mistake was made in the go- ahead. However, he says that upon receipt of a UPAZ letter "revoking" the station's protection (the university holds mission status and is considered international territory), he considers the radio to be under Costa Rican jurisdiction. To get "legal," the station would have to pay Radio Control ¢2,500 ($6.25) per year to test and then use a frequency. He says he has been trying to notify the radio of this for a year and a half, but that it was impossible to find the phone number (which is listed on the RFPI Web site and also in local directory assistance.) Varela says the university had offered to negotiate compensation for the buildings, and keep open future joint projects once the radio had resettled, but that Radio for Peace would negotiate only to stay. Latham's response is that the RFPI board, which consists of members who live around the world, meets only once a year, and it was impossible to negotiate compensation terms without consultation. Arcelio Hernández, lawyer for RFPI, says principles are going to be the radio's defense in future legal action. "The radio entered the premises under an agreement," he says, noting that former Costa Rican President Rodrigo Carazo was one of the founding members of the University for Peace who extended the invitation to the radio in 1985 and is still active on the station's board, as well as President Emeritus of UPAZ. "And it remains that its most recent actions, sending an armed guard to lock the gates so people can't get their cars out, are hostile acts, and don't coincide with the ideas of peace." He says there are legal eviction procedures, and that the university has not used them. Also, RFPI has invested roughly up to $725,000 in the infrastructure, far less than half of which would be transferable to another location, he says. He plans to meet with board members Saturday to plan the defense carefully, and accompany it with a campaign for policy change in the university. Ex-President Carazo will also be at this meeting, and says he couldn't make detailed comments until speaking with the Board. He did forcefully say he was in "utter disagreement" with the university's actions. "They haven't given real reasons for eviction," Hernández says. "We could be looking at repression of freedom of the press." Varela says that's nonsense, and that a letter from the university to Foreign Minister Roberto Tovar stating that the "current activities of RFPI are inconsistent with the international emphasis currently being developed by the university" wasn't a reference to programming, but to the irregularities in frequency operation. "These things came up in other administrations," he said. "They just decided to focus attention elsewhere." Robert Muller, a UPAZ co-founder and the university's Chancellor Emeritus, said he was saddened by the actions. "My ideal was that the University for Peace, Earth Council and Radio for Peace would be the beginning of a new Athens on the hills there, and together be able to give hope to new generations," he said. At 80, Muller is still active in promoting peace, but acknowledges he no longer has influence in decisions made at the university. "I have heard that people at the university have said radio doesn't have a place," he said. "I think it's very important for a developing country." A tired Latham emphasized Tuesday night that the radio bears no ill will towards the university. "We would just like to see this resolved in a win-win situation," he said. "We're all supposed to be working for peace; there's more than enough to do, and enough room for all of us to do it." On Saturday morning Radio for Peace will hold an information event outside the locked gates at 9:30 a.m. For more info, call 249-1821. RFPI members and volunteers are urging people to writing to Kofi Annan, Secretary General of the United Nations (annan@un.org) or contribute with checks marked for Legal Defense Fund, sent to Radio For Peace International, P.O. Box 3165, Newberg, Oregon, 97132 (Tico Times via Glenn Hauser, DXLD) ** CUBA. 18090: The Havana Gurgler, 8 July at 0100. No one knows what it's jamming (Liz Cameron, MI, MARE via DXLD) (I will bet they know .... :o) (MARE ed. Ken Zichi) I know: it`s the third harmonic of the jammer against R. Martí on 6030 (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. 4960.03, 1020-1025, R. Cima, July 25. S8 signal level but a bit over modulated. Male announcer heard at 1020 in Spanish with program information. Music did not appear to be over modulated. Excellent music selections as usual. This station plays some of the better music heard. Slight fades noted. This usually ends my morning DXing when I find clear reception of this station. The music program is very good (Bob Montgomery, PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) {Any ID heard? A different station in the group is also relayed here, at least in evenings} ** EASTER ISLAND [non]. SOUTH AMERICAN PIRATE -- Times UTC RADIO COCHIGUAZ will be active hoisting the pirate flag, today night on its NEW frequency of 11430 kHz USB, relaying RADIO MAHUTE, a PHB (Polynesian Heritage Broadcasting) group production, with its antennas beamed to Pacific & Oceania zone (New Zealand & Australia) [UT] Sat, 26 July 2003, 0400-0500 For reports write to: (Pls add return postage) Radio Mahute, Casilla 159, Santiago 14, CHILE. email: mahuteradio@yahoo.fr V= QSL Radio Cochiguaz, Box 159, Santiago 14, CHILE. email: Radio_Cochiguaz@yahoo.com (via HCDX via Gayle Van Horn, MT Messageboard July 25 via DXLD) ** GREECE. Glenn, Voice of Greece has a questionnaire on their web site for listeners to fill out and submit. If you would like, fill it out and submit it; here is the link: http://www.ert.gr/radio/era5/english/questionary.html (Christos Rigas, Wood Dale, Illinois, July 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GUAM. On 24 July at 1900 on 5765U with nice signal noted AFN program. Haven't heard this one (Guam it used to be) for some time. They were off the air due to damages by a hurricane. Active again (maybe have been for some time, just went unnoticed by me). (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Reported also by Roland Schulze, Mangaldan, the Philippines, today around 1500 (Wolfgang Bueschel, Germany, July 24, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** ICELAND. Hi Glenn, I was just listening to AFRTS Keflavik on 13855 kHz in USB mode. Reception is quite readable 1140 UT with "ID": "This is the Morning Edition of NPR News". Really strong and good reception even with my portable Sony ICF- SW7600G. Antenna is simply a five meter reel hanging on an apple tree. It`s still 25 degrees in shade. 73 (Jouko Huuskonen, Turku FINLAND, July 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDIA. 4775, AIR Imphal, Jul 13 1231 - Presumed this with gospel choir music in English. Song 'Blessed Assurance' at 1238. Local sunset in Imphal is 1240, nearly perfect grayline conditions with Grayland. Fair-good until 1254 when it had deteriorated into the noise. No other possibilities on 4775 that I can think of, and I've heard Christian programming on a few Indian outlets before (Guy Atkins, Grayland WA DXpedition, IRCA Soft DX Monitor July 22 via DXLD) ** INDIA. AIR Chennai noted with External Service to Sri Lanka now on 7270 (100 kW). Earlier it was Home Service. The new sked on 7270 is: 1000-1100 English, 1115-1215 Tamil, 1300-1500 Sinhala 73 (Jose Jacob, VU2JOS/AT0J, July 25, dx_india via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. TEHRAN, HAVANA DENY INTERFERING WITH U.S.- BASED SATELLITE BROADCASTS. Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Assefi said during a 21 July press conference that Tehran and Havana have not held talks on jamming satellite-television broadcasts originating in the United States, dpa reported, citing IRNA. Cuba's Foreign Ministry denied in a 19 July statement that it is blocking broadcasts from the United States meant for a third country, RFE/RL reported. . . (RFE/RL Media Matters July 25 via DXLD) ** IRAN. Message reçu de la rédaction française : "Nous vous écrivons depuis Téhéran. Les techniciens du secteur technique du service extérieur de la Voix de la République Islamique d'Iran décident d'arrêter la diffusion de nos programmes radiophoniques en diverses langues sur les ondes courtes. Qu'en pensez-vous? Dans l'attente de lire votre réponse, veuillez agréer, cher ami, l'expression de nos sentiments les plus respectueux." (Voix de la République Islamique d'Iran - 17 juillet 2003) NDR : que penser? Procédé plus que maladroit pour "doper" le nombre de lettres ? Voilà maintenant que des techniciens décident eux-mêmes d'arrêter certaines transmissions en ondes courtes! Soyons sérieux! Depuis quelques temps, la station nous envoie régulièrement des courriers électroniques en nous demandant ce que nous pensons de tel événement. Espérons que nous ayons un jour l'explication de ce message des plus curieux que j'aurais tendance à considérer comme un sondage sur les ondes courtes.... (les informations sont issues de http://perso.wanadoo.fr/jm.aubier via DXLD) This echoes a previous report in Spanish. Has VOIRI said anything about deleting shortwave broadcasts in English? (gh, DXLD) ** IRAQ. Iraq back on the Net: The telephone system in Iraq is still in a mess after the coalition takeover, but Iraqis are able to communicate with each other via E-mail. Internet access is one of the few aspects of daily life which have actually improved since the fall of Saddam. In the absence of working landlines, Internet providers use satellites to hook up to the outside world. Although home access is now available, many Iraqis use the rapidly increasing number of Internet cafés to send E-mails, use chatrooms and surf the Web... http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/features/html/iraq-internet020725.html (Media Network newsletter July 25 via DXLD) ** ITALY [non]. ``Studio DX`` new web page On http://www.studiodx.webport.it or http://www.studiodx.mannelli.com there is the new web page of Studio DX, the weekly program devoted to BCL, SWL and Hams broadcast every Sunday at 0900 UT on 11880 kHz, during the Italian language transmission of AWR. You will find the contents of Studio DX, the program in Real Audio and MP3, some news about AWR in Italian and our guestbook. Good listening, Stefano Mannelli IZ5ENH (KC9AJF) (rec.radio.shortwave July 24 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH. Glenn, I noticed you included my post to sw programs in DXLD, so I thought you might want to the satellite information explaining. Taicom as written on the letter turns out to be Thaicom. The following page indicates where to find the Voice of Korea on the satellite: http://www.lyngsat.com/thai3.shtml I assume by 'ohm' VoK meant MHz? (Daniel Atkinson, England, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Compare that version of English schedule, sent by the station but omitting the lower `feeders` 3560 and 4405, to this one: (gh) V. of Korea, P`yongyang in English effective May 6th (one hour duration): 0100 3560, 6195, 7140, 11735, 13760, 15180 0200 4405, 11845, 15230 0300 3560, 6195, 7140, 9345 1000 3560, 9335, 11710, 11735, 13650 1300 and 1500 4405, 9335, 11710, 13760, 15245 1600 3560, 9975, 11710 1900 and 2100 4405, 13760, 15245 (Rumen Pankov, Bulgaria, BC-DX July 22 via DXLD) ** LAOS [non]. UZBEKISTAN [to LAO P.D.R.] Hmong Lao Radio (St. Paul, MN, USA) opened its own website: http://www.laohmongradio.org (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, BC-DX July 25 via DXLD) ** LIBERIA. 1,000 LIBERIAN REFUGEES FIND SHELTER AT RADIO STATION ELWA Posted by: newsdesk on Wednesday, July 23, 2003 - 01:12 PM More than 1,000 Liberian refugees are now seeking shelter at Radio Station ELWA`s facilities in Monrovia as fighting continues to intensify in the capital city. This number has doubled since the weekend when rebel fighters reached Monrovia. Despite the growing crisis, ELWA General Manager James Kesselly says the situation remains calm at the station which is within hearing range of some of the larger shell explosions. ``There are now more than 1,000 displaced people on the ELWA campus, staying in the gym, the youth camp, and some of the office and school buildings that were not being fully utilized,`` says Kesselly. ``ELWA is still on the air, although on a slightly reduced schedule in order to conserve fuel -- 2½ hours every morning and three hours each evening. They only have enough diesel fuel [to operate the generators] to carry them for about another week on this schedule. ``The ELWA hospital also continues to serve sick patients in the area with 24-hour emergency room service, and the clinic remains open, though few patients are coming in these turbulent days,`` Kesselly adds. ``Transportation is also difficult -- very few taxis on the road -- but people are traveling the roads on the east side of Monrovia where ELWA is located. He urges believers everywhere to pray that many Liberians would respond to the gospel during these turbulent days.`` HCJB World Radio works in partnership with ELWA, a ministry founded by SIM in Monrovia in 1954, to air the gospel across the country and West Africa. The radio station was destroyed twice by civil war, first in 1990 and again in 1996. ELWA went back on the air in 1997 with a small FM transmitter. Then in 2000 HCJB World Radio provided a low-power shortwave transmitter, again enabling the station to cover the region. ELWA broadcasts the gospel in 10 languages and plans to add more as resources become available. Boakai Yamah, chairman of the SIM-related church, Evangelical Church Union of Liberia (ECUL) said Tuesday morning that many pastors and church leaders have been forced to leave their homes. ``Some are sheltering at the Samuel K. Doe Sports Complex -- the large local soccer stadium which is only about a mile from ELWA -- along with perhaps 30,000 or more other displaced people,`` he says. ``Pray that God would use our ECUL pastors to comfort and encourage hurting and fearful people and that their faith would remain strong. Also pray as we assist our partners in ministering to the many needs, especially for food and medical care among the displaced people around Monrovia.`` In recent developments, rebels took control of a key bridge in Monrovia Wednesday in fighting that shattered a day-old cease-fire pledge, sending thousands of families fleeing in a city desperately short of food, water and shelter, reported Associated Press. Separately, West African foreign ministers meeting in Dakar, Senegal, promised to deploy two Nigerian battalions to Liberia within days -- vanguard of what ministers said should be a 3,250-strong international force to bring peace to the devastated nation. Explosions boomed in Monrovia on Wednesday, one day after rebel leaders announced a unilateral cease-fire. ``This morning we`re still under attack,`` Defense Minister Daniel Chea said on Wednesday after a night of shelling and gunfire. ``It`s still raining round after round of mortars.`` Three U.S. ships with 2,000 Marines and 2,500 sailors aboard were moving toward the Mediterranean Sea and awaiting orders. Liberian President Charles Taylor, a former warlord indicted for war crimes in Sierra Leone, has pledged to accept Nigeria`s offer of asylum -- but only after peacekeepers arrive to ensure an orderly transition. Meanwhile, U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell is seeking U.S. intervention to calm the volatile and violent situation in Liberia, reported AFP. Powell told The Washington Times [Moony] in an interview published Wednesday that history obliges the U.S. to help the troubled country. ``We do have a historic link to Liberia, and we do have some obligation as the most important and powerful nation on the face of the earth not to look away when a problem like this comes to us. We looked away once in Rwanda, with tragic consequences,`` Powell said, referring to a 1994 genocide there (HCJB World Radio/SIM via DXLD) ** MEXICO. Hola, saludos, felicidades, por sus páginas. Sólo para comentar que me parece que hay una radiodifusora católica que trasmite en onda corta en México, dirigida por Jesuitas; se encuentra en la comunidad de Huayacocotla, Veracruz, pertenece a la Diócesis de Tulancingo, trasmite en diferentes idiomas. Sería bueno que pudiera poner esta información en su página; yo estuve allá hace algunos años. Soy sacerdote y creo que sigue funcionando hasta donde sé. Ahora estoy en Mexicali; espero que pueda checar la información, y que todavía exista. Sé que era la única en todo México (P. Edgar Chávez to Mike Dorner, Catholic Radio Update, DXLD) That would be R. Huayacocotla, 2390 kHz. Here`s one page about it: http://www.sjsocial.org/Radio/huarad.html And here`s their program grid. Of course, DX propagation only around sign-on and sign-off, better in winter: http://www.sjsocial.org/Radio/rh_prog.html Escucha algunos ejemplos de música de Radio Huaya including two versions of the national anthem in indigenous languages and two singing IDs, neat: http://www.sjsocial.org/Radio/ejemplos.html (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NEW ZEALAND. Expect some major changes to the RNZI schedule starting September 1. They have a significantly improved budget and will be adding quite a bit more or their own content. Of course, the other side of this is less National Radio content, which we all enjoy. BTW, do you find the program schedule bulletins I put up for RA amd RNZI of any use at all? :-) (John Figliozzi, NY, July 25, swprograms via DXLD) ** SAO TOME E PRINCIPE. IBB transmitting station São Tomé link: http://lea.hamradio.si/~s50u/html/charles_lewis.htm (incl. photos). (via Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Mainly about the station manager`s background, ham S9SS (gh, DXLD) ** SLOVAKIA. Strange change: the DX program in Russian of DW with DX editor Mrs Tina Krasnapolskaya was closed at the end of April 2003. But Tina, starting May 12th is already editor of DX program of Radio Slovakia International in Russian each Sunday! (Rumen Pankov, Bulgaria, BC-DX July 22 via DXLD) ** SOLOMON ISLANDS. KILLER HAM RADIO --- Armed supporters of a militant leader in the Solomon Islands recently attacked and burned two villages, driving hundreds of people from their homes and tearing down a radio station put up by foreign ham radio volunteers. The incident took place on June 20th as fighters loyal to Harold Keke razed the two villages in the remote Marasa district. According to published news reports, this was just the latest in an upsurge of violence on the Solomon`s main island of Guadalcanal that has left dozens dead. Officials said that Keke is wanted for a series of murders. Also that his troops attacked the villages because he believed some residents were using the radio station to inform police about his activities (Published news reports, via Amateur Radio Newsline July 25 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** SRI LANKA [non]. IRAQ: ONE ICRC STAFF MEMBER KILLED AND ONE WOUNDED The RSSL [Radio Society of Sri Lanka?] has heard with deep sadness the news of the death of our member Nadisha, 4S7NR in Baghdad today. Nadisha was known to most of our members and served the RSSL in many capacities including positions of editor and web master. At this moment news is sketchy, other than for what is in the web. We will inform members of developments. In the meantime the RSSL is shocked at this untimely passing away of Nadisha. It comes as a great shock to all of us (Victor Goonetilleke, 4S7VK via Wolfgang Bueschel, DXLD) Deepest QSP 4S7NR- Nadeesha expired in Iraq. For more details visit following site (ICRC) http://www.icrc.org/Web/Eng/siteeng0.nsf/iwpList4/7B9B906FF90688DCC1256D6B004C883B 22-07-2003 Press Release 03/53 Geneva (ICRC) --- The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) is deeply shocked and dismayed by the death of one of its staff members, Nadisha Yasassri Ranmuthu, an IT technician from Sri Lanka, on 22 July near Hilla, south of Baghdad. Mazen Hamed Rashid, an Iraqi ICRC driver, was wounded in the same tragic incident. Mr Ranmuthu and Mr Rashid were travelling on the main road leading north from Hilla to Baghdad at around 11 a.m. (local time) when they were shot at. Mr Ranmuthu was killed on the spot. Mr Rashid was taken to the surgical hospital in Hilla, where he is being treated. At this stage, the ICRC does not know who is responsible for the attack. The Iraqi police and the coalition forces have been informed. The vehicle in which the two men were travelling was clearly marked with highly visible red cross emblems. The ICRC and its staff are deeply distressed by the death of Mr Ranmuthu and extend their heartfelt sympathy to his family and friends. Mr Ranmuthu joined the ICRC in Sri Lanka in 1992. He was 37 years old, married and father to a three-year old child. He was in Iraq to install communications facilities in the ICRC's offices in the country and help train the Iraqi operators. The ICRC is assessing the implications of this attack with a view to deciding its future course of action in Iraq. The ICRC firmly calls on all armed persons and groups to grant safe passage to all vehicles and staff working under the red cross and red crescent emblems and to allow them to perform their live-saving tasks. The ICRC recently expanded the scope of its activities in Iraq, where it has been present without interruption since 1980. Over 850 staff members are now working in the country and a permanent ICRC office was recently set up in Hilla, bringing the number of such offices to eight. Further information: Nada Doumani, ICRC Baghdad: ++88 2165 1109888, ++873 761 845610, ++1 914 360 9473 Antonella Notari, ICRC Geneva: ++41 22 730 22 82, ++41 79 217 32 80 (via Wolfgang Bueschel, DXLD) ** TOGO. Following may help explain why R. Togo Libre arose in early June, disappeared two weeks later (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) JOURNALISTS RELEASED AFTER FOUR-HOUR TRIAL LOME, 23 July (IRIN) --- Two of three Togolese journalists who have been on a month long-detention on charges of disseminating false information and threatening public order, have been released by a judge. The third was however remanded in jail after failing to pay a fine. The journalists, who held a hunger strike last week, were arrested in mid-June in the capital, Lomé, in the aftermath of Togo's disputed presidential elections. Colombo Kpakpabia of the weekly Echo and Philip Evegno of l'Évènement, were cleared of all charges and released on Tuesday. The editor-in- chief of l'Évènement, Dimas Dzikodo, was found guilty and fined US $863. Judge Kouyou ordered that he stay in jail until the fine is paid. They were arrested at a cybercafé. According to the police, Dzikodo was scanning pictures of alleged victims of police brutality when opposition politicians took to the streets to contest results of the 1 June presidential elections. Incumbent President Gnassingbe Eyadema won the polls. Opposition politicians said the elections were fraudulent, but observers from the African Union said it was a fair and free poll. A retired army general, Eyadema has ruled the small west African county since 1967. He had pledged not to seek re-election in 2003, but a constitutional amendment in December 2002 paved way for Africa's longest serving president, to run again. Opposition politicians however say Eyadema has restricted both political and media freedoms in the country. The opposition Patriotic Panafrican Convergence (CPP) party, which was approached to join a post-election government has so far refused to sit in the government, CPP's spokesman Cornelius Aidam told IRIN. The CPP is led by former OAU Secretary General Edem Kodjo. Other opposition parties, including the Union of Forces of Change, the Action Renewal Committee, the African Convergence Democratic Committee have also so far rejected Eyadema's invitation to join a government of national unity. Meanwhile Togolese authorities were still investigating two explosions last week which targeted the French cultural center and the French school. Only minor damages were recorded. The explosion followed another that occurred before the presidential polls. That explosion damaged a French-owned restaurant, drawing condemnation from the French government. [This Item is Delivered to the "Africa-English" Service of the UN's IRIN humanitarian information unit, but may not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations. For further information, free subscriptions, or to change your keywords, http://www.irinnews.org If you re-print, copy, archive or re-post this item, please retain this credit and disclaimer. Reposting by commercial sites requires written IRIN permission.] Copyright (c) UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs 2003 Fuente: U N I T E D N A T I O N S Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) Integrated Regional Information Network (IRIN) (via CLAUDIO MORALES, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** U K. Among the mountain of recent articles about the BBC/David Kelly affair, these seem to be the best of the lot.... [some may already have been linked in DXLD] This BBC row is not about sources - it is about power Downing Street and Rupert Murdoch want revenge on the corporation http://politics.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,9115,1004725,00.html Issues that the Hutton inquiry must attempt to answer http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/archive/23-7-19103-0-27-14.html Britain: BBC's Judgment, Accuracy Being Questioned Amid Kelly Inquiry http://www.rferl.org/nca/features/2003/07/22072003154548.asp Does Promise of Anonymity Apply to Dead Sources? http://www.mediainfo.com/editorandpublisher/headlines/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1938793 Radio show faces online criticism http://www.journalism.co.uk/news/story689.html Gilligan's war (letters to the editor) http://politics.guardian.co.uk/kelly/comment/0,13747,1004885,00.html Why the BBC is not really the story http://www.thescotsman.co.uk/uk.cfm?id=800112003 But Andrew Gilligan got it right... http://www.opinion.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2003/07/24/do2402.xml&sSheet=/opinion/2003/07/24/ixopinion.html BBC admits errors on source http://www.theadvertiser.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5936,6799907%255E401,00.html BBC has been annoying British governments for decades http://www.namibian.com.na/2003/july/world/03E5683B55.html Dyke's Tough Stance http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/opinion/articles/5875466?source=Evening%20Standard The BBC is a world, not a law, unto itself http://www.opinion.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2003/07/23/do2302.xml&sSheet=/opinion/2003/07/23/ixopinion.html Witch Hunt Against the BBC http://www.thenation.com/doc.mhtml?i=20030804&s=scheer20030722 (via Kim Elliott, DXLD) ** U K. BBC REPORTER KATE ADIE WINS LIBEL SETTLEMENT LONDON (AP) -- Publishers of The Sun newspaper said Wednesday they will pay damages to British Broadcasting Corp. journalist Kate Adie for falsely suggesting she had endangered Prime Minister Tony Blair. Adie sued The Sun for a report in October 2001 suggesting she had endangered Blair by breaking an embargo on reporting his travel plans. Natasha Peter, a lawyer counsel for News Group Newspapers, said in court that it was wrong to suggest Adie was responsible for the breach of the embargo. The newspaper apologized and agreed to pay Adie damages and her legal costs, Peter said. (rb-mm) (APws 07/23 0703 via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U K [non]. Re previous jamming discussion under CUBA and IRAN: I heard the ditting on 15420 kHz and we DF'ed [direction finding'ed] it to Moscow, so I doubt if it's deliberate interference (Dave Kernick, UK, BC-DX July 24 via DXLD) I tuned 15420 this morning around 0630 and the fast 'ditting', as Dave Kernick calls it, was well audible. I found that it was using only the USB, as I suspected it might be. I wonder what 'Moscow' is sending this for? The one on 11760 was also audible, but less strong, and using LSB. It's the same type of 'ditting' but these dits have a different tone - due LSB? I heard the BBC via A'Seela [OMAN] with BBC IS notes on 15420 at 0657 and opening at 0700 with their Thursday only Persian - Friday same time it will be Pashto. The ditter was causing QRM, but was eliminated by using the LSB. This service is also on 17870 via CYP [fair] - and 11895 via DHA - weak. I wondered what the buzzing was on 11895 and found it spreading from the Sackville DRM transmission on 11865! Who needs ditters and jamming when we have DRM! (Noel R. Green-UK, BC-DX July 24 via DXLD) ** U K [non]. [Moderator note: Radlon has been sending out the following e-mail in response to reception reports on yesterday's 1008 kHz test transmission] RADLON MEDIA LIMITED, PO BOX 7336, FRINTON-ON-SEA, ESSEX, CO13 0WZ, ENGLAND --- 22th July 2003 "RADIO LONDON TEST TRANSMISSION REPORT" -- A BIG THANK YOU FROM BIG L Radio London today carried out a test transmission on 1008 kHz from Flevoland in the Netherlands. Using 400 kilowatts of transmitter power. We received over 300 reports by e-mail and telephone (mail reports will be delayed, of course). Reports were received from as far away as Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Belgium and France. Plus the Netherlands, of course. Closer to home from Northern Ireland, Scotland and England. These tests and your reception reports will greatly assist us in improving the signal into the UK. From your reports we can now prepare a contour map and compare this with the aerial pattern diagrams we currently have from the transmitter site to confirm and highlight existing black spots in the signal. Early indications show that our signal was good in the East, North and South but the Midlands and West London need to be improved upon. Our engineers will now look at various options available to us. These are likely to include a combination of better processing, higher transmitter modulation and power (note that the channel is cleared for 1000 kilowatts) plus a detailed study of the antenna patterns, which could include a directional beam to the UK. We are hoping to have the engineers report by the end of the first week of August. This report, once implemented will then form the basis of our plans to provide Radio London with the best possible signal into the UK, which is our prime target area. Again, a Big thank you for sending us your reception report and various other comments, which are greatly appreciated. FOR FURTHER COMMENT OR CLARIFICATION PLEASE RING RAY ANDERSON 01255 676252, FAX: 01255 850528 (via BDXC-UK via DXLD) ** U S A. VOA, DX program in Main Street with duration approx. 3 minutes and starting at 50th min at 2, 4 etc. UT (Rumen Pankov, Bulgaria, BC-DX July 22 via DXLD) No, if you wait until :50 you are likely to miss Kim Elliott`s piece, as its position within the 25-minute magazine show UT Sundays varies widely; sometimes it`s only the second item around :37, or anywhere in between. I try to listen on the archive, but that lasts only 24 hours until the Monday show is up and recently I have been thwarted even in doing that since the latest show isn`t always available. VOA`s Talk to America is another sad case, no longer attempting to post in advance the topics, and way behind on their archiving (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. From the GAO report on US International broadcasting, a very brief excerpt from the 56-page document at: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d03772.pdf REDUCING THE NUMBER OF LANGUAGE SERVICES AND BROADCAST OVERLAP HAS BROAD SUPPORT Our survey of senior program managers revealed that the majority supported significantly reducing the total number of language services and the overlap in services between VOA and the surrogate broadcasters. [footnote 16] Eighteen of 24 respondents said that too many language services are offered, and when asked how many countries should have more than one U.S. international broadcaster providing service in the same language, 23 of 28 respondents said this should occur in only a few countries or no countries at all. Finally, when we asked respondents what impact a significant reduction in language services (for the purpose of reprogramming funds to higher priority services) would have, 18 of 28 respondents said that this would have a generally positive to highly positive impact. The BBG's annual language service review process addresses the need to delete or add languages. The process prioritizes individual language services based on such factors as U.S. strategic interests, political freedom, and press freedom data. Such assessments have been used in an attempt to shift the focus of U.S. international broadcasting away from central and eastern Europe to allow greater emphasis on Russia and Eurasia; central and South Asia; China and east Asia; Africa; and selected countries in our hemisphere such as Colombia, Cuba, and Haïti. This system has been used to re-deploy resources within the BBG. For example, the Board has reallocated more than $9 million through the elimination or reduction of language services since its first language service review in January 2000. In total, the Board has eliminated 3 language services [footnote 17] and reduced the scope-of- operations of another 25 services since January 2000. [footnote 18] In terms of the total number of language services, the Board had 91 language services when it concluded its first language service review and 97 language services at the conclusion of this year`s review. Congress has contributed to this situation by authorizing additional language services over the years. However, the Board, through its required annual language service review and strategic plan, is responsible for analyzing, recommending, and implementing a more efficient and economical scope of operations for U.S. international broadcasting. [Footnote 16:] We did not ask program managers for their views on the duplication of roles and target audiences among broadcast entities since this issue surfaced after our survey was released. [Footnote 17:] VOA Portuguese to Brazil was eliminated as a direct result of language service review. VOA Arabic and Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty`s Persian service were eventually eliminated as the result of decisions made during language service review and were replaced by Radio Sawa and Radio Farda, respectively. [Footnote 18:] Cutting language services can be challenging due to congressional concerns that the proposed elimination or reduction of language services is not supported by a clear rationale. For example, at OMB`s direction, the Board`s fiscal year 2004 budget request was reduced by $8.8 million to reflect the proposed elimination of broadcasts in nine foreign languages assessed as low priority/low impact services in connection with the Board`s 2001/2002 language service review. However, Senator Lugar, Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, has expressed the view that the U.S. should not withdraw broadcasting services in certain countries until there is assurance of a free and fair press in those countries. In this regard, that Committee has approved S.925 which contains a provision that would prohibit the BBG from eliminating the foreign language broadcasts proposed for elimination in the BBG`s fiscal year 2004 budget request (via gh, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. R. Caroline via WBCQ 5100 kHz From http://www.earthradio.co.uk/radio_news.htm News report from Tony Christian 23/703 I have been in the driving seat and responsible for programmes and our output to WBCQ in the USA from Radio Caroline for getting on two years now. Our friend out there and main man Allan Weiner who is a lifelong listener and supporter to Radio Caroline and has been from day one kindly allowed us airtime free of charge on one of his Shortwave frequencies, which has been brilliant. There is a brand new frequency for listeners to this service now on Shortwave and on the net, 5.100 MHz. These new programmes from Radio Caroline will commence from July 21st, Mondays thro Fridays 2200-2300 UT. If you have never heard Radio Caroline on Shortwave, you still have the chance by listening on the internet; I can only describe the audio as very close to the sound that relates to the old AM signal, very nostalgic. All you have to do is work out the time difference from the States and log in; I think you will be impressed. I would like to thank at this point the constant support and help of Dave Fox and Paul Douglas, two of our key presenters from Radio Caroline for WBCQ. I have also sent new shows to the USA, so check out WBCQ; it`s a listening experience (via Mike Terry, BDXC-UK via DXLD) 5100 inaudible here that early, e.g. at 2240 UT check July 24. I did notice on Wednesday at 2229 after WOR ended on 17495-CUSB, part of an announcement that R. Caroline would be heard next, but that was cut off for that frequency`s closing. It may have been what followed on 7415 (unseemed that on 9330), but reception was poor. News to me if, like 7415, offair pickup of 5100 (if it is even on now) is being webcast. Why don`t we just look it up at http://wbcq.us ? --- That site has been down over a week for updating. Beats me why at the very least accurate program schedules can`t be available at all times (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. COPPS WILL HOLD TOWN MEETINGS ABOUT BROADCAST, CRITICIZES LICENSE RENEWAL PROCESS FCC Commissioner Michael Copps says he'll hold a series of town meetings to give citizens the opportunity to express their views on whether their local radio and TV stations are serving the public interest and should have their licenses renewed. Speaking at a Senate Commerce Committee hearing, Copps stated: "As part of the license renewal process, I believe it is important to go out and hear from members of the community. But that hasn't happened for years. ... As we begin the next round of license renewals for radio this fall and for television in 2004, I intend to hold a series of town meetings in regions where renewals are due in order to hear from communities how their airwaves are being used." Copps called the broadcast license renewal process minimal, with no public outreach to local communities (Radio World newsbyte July 23 via DXLD) ** U S A. FCC CHAIRMAN'S STAR A LITTLE DIMMER --- Defeat on Capitol Hill Raises Questions About Powell's Political Savvy By Christopher Stern, Washington Post Staff Writer, Friday, July 25 http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A43044-2003Jul24?language=printer When Michael K. Powell took over as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission three years ago he was considered a young star of the Republican Party. His deregulatory agenda was regarded as a breath of fresh air by the nation's biggest media and telecommunications companies. But this week's 400-to-21 vote in the House in favor of a bill that included language to strike down a FCC decision to allow broadcasting companies to buy more television stations is just the latest example of how Powell's fortunes have shifted. In February, fellow Republican Kevin J. Martin joined two Democratic commissioners to deliver a stinging defeat on rules governing the telephone industry. Now key Republicans in the Senate, including Trent Lott (R-Miss.) and Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Tex.), have signed onto a rarely used "Resolution of Disapproval" that would effectively upend the FCC's work to revise several media ownership rules -- not just the broadcast ownership provision rejected by the House. Even lobbyists for the nation's media and telecommunications companies question whether Powell has the political savvy to deliver on his agenda. After all, the Republican-controlled House voted to block the broadcast ownership rule despite the objections of the House leadership and a veto threat from the White House. "Never before have I seen an FCC chairman's decision repudiated by the House of Representatives so quickly and so emphatically," Rep. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) observed after the vote Wednesday. Powell, who was out of town on vacation this week, was unavailable for comment, a senior aide said. From the beginning of his tenure, Powell has said he wanted to rise above politics and put the FCC's rulemaking process on a more judicious course. The agency needed a new strategy, he argued, because many of its policies had been thrown out by courts that often criticized the agency's rules as "arbitrary and capricious." But Powell's lawyerly approach has not served him well at an agency guided by three Republicans and two Democrats. Colleagues at the commission complain that Powell often refuses to consider their points of view or incorporate their ideas into final regulations. The result is a badly divided agency in which Powell has alienated Martin, one of his two Republican colleagues, and has chilly relations with the two Democrats, Jonathan S. Adelstein and Michael J. Copps. "If there is one fault that the chairman has, it is that he comes to this as a lawyer, not a politician," said one source close to Powell. The source disputed complaints that Powell ignores other members of the commission, saying the chairman goes out of his way to consider other opinions. Powell pushed through the media ownership decision despite a request from the two Democrats that he postpone the vote. It is a longstanding FCC tradition to honor such requests, but Powell refused, saying a delay was not likely to result in any changes to long-held views. Finally, Powell also moved forward with the media ownership rule over the protests of a broad coalition of liberal and conservative public- interest groups. Sources said the FCC received more than 2 million e- mails and comments protesting the decision. Conservative groups argued that the largest media companies have a corrupting influence on the nation's moral values and that allowing them to get bigger would only embolden more licentious programming. Liberal groups argued that the nation's largest media companies already have too much control over the flow of ideas in the United States. Powell defended the FCC's action, noting in a prepared statement this week that the new rules take into account the fact that the major broadcasters now face expanded competition from cable, satellite and the Internet, creating alternatives for programming that did not exist when the rules were originally crafted. But while Powell, serving in an appointive post, could afford to make his case on policy grounds, many lawmakers said he failed to take into account populist concerns about the growing influence of big media. Sen. Byron L. Dorgan (D-N.D.) said he has rarely received more letters from constituents than on the media ownership issue. "People are really upset with this, people get it," Dorgan said. Dorgan said he had no trouble finding 35 co-sponsors for the resolution of disapproval to overturn the FCC's media ownership rules, a total that guarantees him 10 hours of debate on the Senate floor. He plans to introduce the resolution in the first week of September. As the son of Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, Michael Powell, 40, is familiar with many members of Congress on a personal basis. One of his biggest supporters is Senate Commerce Committee Chairman John McCain (R-Ariz.). "I think he is an American patriot and I am proud to know him," McCain said. Yet McCain is supporting legislation that would force the FCC to change its rule on radio ownership. He said the FCC should not have allowed large companies to keep stations that exceed new limits set by the agency. It would be impossible in Washington to have so much controversy over a public figure without some raising the possibility that he will soon step down. Some published reports have stated that Powell has discussed the issue with his staff. Marsha McBride, Powell's chief of staff, said Powell was well aware that the agency was heading into controversy. "I think the chairman understood that when we were taking on some difficult decisions, it would be a rough year," McBride said. But she said she has not discussed a resignation internally. "The chairman has no current plans to be leaving the commission, and I don't have the understanding that he will be leaving," she said. © 2003 The Washington Post Company (via Kraig Krist, DXLD) ** U S A. HOUSE ROLLS BACK MEDIA OWNERSHIP CHANGES Wed Jul 23, 4:51 PM ET By ALAN FRAM, Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON - The House voted Wednesday to prevent federal regulators from letting individual broadcast companies own television stations serving nearly half the national TV market, ignoring the preferences of its own Republican leaders and a Bush administration veto threat. By a 400-21 vote, lawmakers approved a spending bill with language blocking a Federal Communications Commission decision to let companies own TV stations serving up to 45 percent of the country's viewers. The current ceiling is 35 percent. Despite GOP control of the White House, Congress and the FCC, the House vote set the stage for what may ultimately be an unraveling of a regulatory policy that the party strongly favors. The fight now moves to the Senate, where several lawmakers of both parties want to include a similar provision in their version of the bill. Top Republicans are hoping that, with leverage from the threat of a first-ever veto by President Bush, the final House-Senate compromise bill later this year will drop the provision thwarting the FCC. In a show of defiance, FCC Chairman Michael Powell issued a written statement before the vote defending the commission's decision. The five-member FCC approved the new rules on a 3-2 party-line vote on June 2. "We are confident in our decision," Powell said. "We created enforceable rules that reflect the realities of today's media marketplace. The rules will benefit Americans by protecting localism, competition and diversity." A statement by NBC lobbyist Bob Okun praised the FCC decision as "a positive and much needed step offering regulatory relief to free, over-the-air television," and called the legislation "extremely disappointing to us." Rep. David Obey, D-Wis., chief sponsor of the provision that would derail the liberalized FCC rules, acknowledged in an interview that a tough fight lay ahead over keeping the language intact in the bill's final version. But he declared victory, for now. "It's extremely rare to be able to reverse a regulatory decision that gives away the store to the big boys," Obey said. With programming power and many billions of dollars at stake, the battle has pitted the big broadcast networks against smaller station owners and an array of groups, from the Christian Coalition to the Consumers Union. "We've been facing a total roadblock on doing anything in the House," said Gene Kimmelman, public policy director for the consumer union. He said the House vote meant "that roadblock will be torn apart." The biggest beneficiaries of the FCC ruling would be Viacom Inc., which owns the CBS and UPN networks, and News Corp., owner of Fox. Due to mergers and acquisitions, both already exceed the 35 percent limit. Opponents of the FCC decision said it would give giant broadcast corporations too much clout, at the expense of communities and a diversity of voices. Supporters of the FCC rule said the older, tighter limits ignore a high-tech era in which cable and satellite TV, plus the Internet, have intensified the competition they face. And they said that with even the largest networks owning less than 3 percent of the nation's 1,300 broadcast stations, the clout of the networks was being exaggerated. Even so, short of support and eager to prevent FCC opponents from using a House roll call to show their strength, GOP leaders didn't even try removing the language from the bill. Instead, they said they would seek to kill it when House-Senate bargainers craft a compromise bill later this year. Hoping to increase their power, some Republicans were seeking House members' signatures for a letter pledging to vote to sustain a veto, GOP aides said. It would take 145 lawmakers, or one-third of the House, to uphold a veto, which would be President Bush's first. Some senators may try including similar language in the Senate version of the bill, which may not be written until the fall. The provision was included last week in a $37.9 billion measure financing the departments of Commerce, State and Justice next year. On Tuesday, a White House budget office statement said the new FCC rules "more accurately reflect the changing media landscape and the current state of network station ownership, while still guarding against undue concentration in the marketplace." The budget office threatened a veto if "this provision or a provision like it with respect to any one of the other FCC rules" is sent to Bush. On a different issue, lawmakers rejected another amendment by 273-152 that would bar the federal government from interfering with 10 states that allow the medical use of marijuana. On Tuesday, the House by 309-118 included another amendment blocking the government from performing "sneak and peek" searches under the USA Patriot Act. That law, enacted after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, allowed such searches without the property owner's or resident's knowledge with warrants that are delivered afterward. The House bill affected only part of the FCC's decision. By 254-174, the chamber rejected an amendment by Rep. Maurice Hinchey, D-N.Y., to kill the entire FCC ruling, which he said would impede local media control. The June 2 ruling also would make it easier for companies to own newspapers and broadcast stations in the same community, and to own more than one broadcast outlet in a market. SOURCE: Yahoo! News --- 73 and good DX (via Eric Amateur Radio Station N0UIH Bueneman, July 23, IRCA via DXLD) ** U S A. HOUSE BUCKS FCC ON MEDIA OWNERSHIP Votes to overturn key part of rules change By Peter J. Howe, Globe Staff, 7/24/2003 The US House of Representatives, by an unexpectedly lopsided 400-21 vote, moved yesterday to overturn a key provision of the Federal Communications Commission's drive to allow further consolidation of ownership of television stations. . . http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/205/business/House_bucks_FCC_on_media_ownershipP.shtml (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. RECOMMENDED: "TUNING OUT THE FCC" Click here to read this story online: http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0725/p10s03-comv.html Byline: Date: 07/25/2003 Wednesday's House vote to roll back a recent FCC decision expanding the number of TV and radio stations that media companies can own was little more than an expression of populist spite toward big broadcasters. It ignores the fact that the Federal Communications Commission is under a court order to expand the ownership rules. It also ignores the existence of alternative media on cable, satellite, and the Internet. The vote is a blow against deregulation, but not quite the blow that has been reported. The 400-21 vote was for a larger bill funding the departments of Commerce, Justice, and State. And the House voted down a proposal to reject a companion FCC rule allowing a company to own a newspaper and a TV station in the same market, or to own several TV stations in the same city. Lawmakers have a personal interest in the matter. They worry that fewer media voices in their districts will make it harder to get their messages out. They would also prefer to deal with local station-owners rather than companies in New York and Los Angeles, over whom they can have less influence, especially at election time. Unfortunately, this micromanagement of media by Congress may well become law. A similar Senate proposal is even harsher. And while President Bush threatens a veto, he may in the end decide it's not worth taking on so many of his own supporters, including social conservatives. But he shouldn't give up. (c) Copyright 2003 The Christian Science Monitor. All rights reserved (via Jim Moats, DXLD) ** U S A. NPR DEBUTS DAY TO DAY ON JULY 28 I heard mention of this on WDIY-FM locally. It's a new midday newsmagazine that will air locally at 1600 UT -- even though it's produced by NPR's west coast shop. The program will be hosted by Alex Chadwick, a longtime host of All Things Considered and frequent guest host of Morning Edition. The program will begin on July 28th. Quoting the press release on WDIY's site, "'Day to Day will give listeners NPR substance with an twist: smart, funny, thoughtful, quirky material - a great break and refresher in the middle of a busy day,' said Alex Chadwick." It looks like this will replace the deceased "The Todd Mundt Show" for several stations. See an NPR press release at http://www.npr.org/about/press/030512.prslate.html NPR has co-developed the program with Slate magazine. A Google search suggests the program will be picked up by many public radio webcasters, including WOSU, KUOW, KBSU and others (Richard Cuff, swprograms via DXLD) TRY SOMETHING NEW FOR LUNCH -- NPR'S DAY TO DAY KCRW introduces something new in news when it debuts a new weekday newsmagazine from NPR. Day to Day begins airing this Monday, July 28th at noon. Award-winning host Alex Chadwick will engage in conversation with NPR reporters on the scene of breaking stories, and speak with figures from the world of entertainment and music. Day to Day is a real first -- a collaboration between NPR and the online magazine Slate.com, which will provide additional talent to the program. Day to Day will air Monday through Friday at noon on KCRW and KCRW.com [1900 UT]. A note from Alex Chadwick: All of us at Day to Day were delighted that KCRW was one of the first stations in the country to sign on to carry the first new daily NPR newsmagazine since Morning Edition. And the fact that NPR West where we all work is in Culver City, a short ride from KCRW's basement studios in Santa Mónica, is frosting on the cake. Aside from news, we're interested in pop culture and the ideas, beliefs, and behaviors that shape American life today, and we're going to explore them -- how to buy a used car, what a dreamy kid thinks about doing on vacation, how one weighs the supposed health benefits of a glass or two of wine against the far too common tendency to make that four or five glasses. NPR's concept for a new newsmagazine was already an exciting opportunity for fresh ideas and approaches. Slate's participation makes this venture even more intriguing. With founder Michael Kinsley and editor Jacob Weisberg, Slate provides about the sharpest collection of reportage and observation in American journalism today. We've been talking for months now about how our partnership will work; to be honest, we don't have all the answers yet. But we are going to bring some of the smartest, best-informed voices today to public radio (KCRW newsletter July 24 via DXLD) ** U S A. CALIFORNIA --- BIDDERS MAKE A PLAY FOR KOCE By Elizabeth Jensen, [Los Angeles] Times Staff Writer, July 24 2003 NEW YORK [sic] --- Financially strapped Orange County public television station KOCE, on the sales block for more than a year, suddenly has become the object of intense interest, raising the possibility that it could be sold to a religious buyer that would end its PBS and educational affiliation. Alternatively, the station could be headed toward a merger with Los Angeles' dominant public TV station, KCET, or with the San Diego public station, KPBS, both of which probably would mean consolidation of administrative functions but not programming. The KOCE Foundation, a separate nonprofit organization that runs the station's programming, also is making a play for the license. The possible change comes at a time when consolidation among commercial media has been hotly debated, with critics charging that recent Federal Communications Commission rulings relaxing media ownership limits would reduce the number of local voices. But public TV, which has cast itself as the last bastion of localism, is grappling with funding issues as state and local governments, schools and corporate underwriters cut back. KOCE license holder Coast Community College District hired an investment banking firm in February to solicit bids, which were due this month. KCET, KPBS and the KOCE Foundation said they bid; people familiar with the situation said several religious broadcasters also put in bids. The school district is set to name the bidders Friday and then begin discussing the price and terms of payment. The district has been searching for a buyer or merger partner for KOCE since May 2002, citing the high costs of a federally mandated conversion to digital broadcasting. Since then, added financial pressures in the district "make it much more difficult now to take resources away from our core mission of education," spokeswoman Erin Cohn said. The district contributes about $2 million of KOCE's $8-million annual budget. The board hired San Francisco investment bank Media Venture Partners because it "felt it was in the best interest of taxpayers to find out what the market value of this license was," Cohn said. Any buyer would be required to maintain the station as a noncommercial entity but not necessarily as a public station. Bob Brown, chairman of the KOCE Foundation, confirmed that his group put in a bid to "maintain KOCE-TV as an Orange County entity dedicated to education, culture, local issues and news and to maintain the PBS affiliation." He said there was "a lot of concern" among foundation board members about KOCE being sold to a religious broadcaster: "Orange County would lose the only TV available to us for Orange County issues." A successful KCET bid would mean a consolidation of public broadcasting in the Los Angeles area. But KCET President Al Jerome said, "We believe that we could enhance the service provided on public television to Orange County." KPBS, owned by San Diego State University, is "very interested in making sure that there's good public television in our community of Southern California," General Manager Doug Myrland said (via Current via DXLD) ** U S A. San Francisco is one step closer to getting a significant new move-in on the AM dial, at 860. The Pappas family now has the FCC's blessing for one of the bigger AM moves of recent years: the relocation of 50-kw KTRB, Modesto (860) to San Francisco. The FCC has now granted Pappas' application to move KTRB to the big city, where it will operate from a new site in the Sacramento River delta near Antioch, running 50-kw day from two towers and 40-kw night (into a much more directional pattern aimed west at San Francisco) from four shorter towers. It wasn't simple: In order to make the move to San Francisco, Pappas will have to replace KTRB's service to Modesto, which it plans to do with a new CP for 840 that was also granted last week. Pappas had originally applied for 25-kw day, 10-kw night on 840 from the existing KTRB 860 site, but interference concerns with KNCO, Grass Valley (830) forced a modification of the app. As granted, the new 840 will run 4-kw day from a new site, 10-kw night from the existing 860 site (Robert Wien?, IRCA Soft DX Monitor July 22 via DXLD) ** U S A. Olympia-based KGHO-AM (920) has switched the 6 a.m.-6 p.m. [1300-0100 UT] portion of its schedule to all comedy -- sketches, stand-up routines and songs from current and past stars including Monty Python, Jerry Clower, Steven Wright, Woody Allen, Bill Cosby, National Lampoon, Jeff Foxworthy and Bill Engvall. Station manager Sandi Shore says she'll stay away from the more abusive material from performers such as the Jerky Boys. The other half of its broadcast day is devoted to oldies (Pat Martin, OR, IRCA Soft DX Monitor July 22 via DXLD) Now doing part comedy/part oldies from 6 AM to 6 PM, vs all comedy; will add Dr Demento show Monday and Friday (Phil Bytheway, WA, ibid.) ** U S A. TV AND RADIO STATIONS OVERCOME STORM DAMAGE TO CONTINUE REPORTS --- By Tom Walter, July 22, 2003 In an emergency, when the power is off, trees are down and the roads are littered with debris, people turn to old friends: the battery- powered or car radios. Whether out of necessity or by preference, radio becomes our eyes, our road map, our best — sometimes only — source of information. And Tuesday morning, Memphis radio returned the loyalty, providing not only news from official sources, but unmediated reports from listeners in the thick of the storm. In fact, news/talk station WREC-AM 600 provided drama of its own, as news and programming director Nate Lundy was on the phone to the station as bricks from the Gibson building destroyed his car. . . http://www.gomemphis.com/mca/screens/article/0,1426,MCA_511_2127464,00.html (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. CUMULUS CUTS JOBS AT WSM-FM, WWTN By JEANNE A. NAUJECK, Staff Writer Cumulus Media cut about a dozen staff positions yesterday morning from local stations WSM-FM 95.5 and WWTN-FM 99.7, which it recently bought from Gaylord Entertainment Co. Mike Dickey, general manager of Cumulus' local operations, confirmed that ''about 10 to 12'' people lost jobs. . . http://tennessean.com/business/archives/03/07/36483915.shtml?Element_ID=36483915 (via Charles Gossett Jr., DXLD) ** U S A. THE INSPIRATION FOR DR. JOHNNY FEVER Interesting 2 minute clip on National Public Radio today -- worth a listen. http://discover.npr.org/features/feature.jhtml?wfId=1355719 (Click on "Morning Edition audio") (via Ray Robinson via Paul David, swprograms via DXLD) ** U S A. KEDU-LP RUIDOSO NM: A DIALOG http://www.ccbroadcasters.com/julystats.htm Startup problems; has been denied membership in NM Broadcasters Association (via DXLD) ** U S A. COMMISSIONERS OK TV TOWER The Denver Business Journal - July 23, 2003 http://denver.bizjournals.com/denver/stories/2003/07/21/daily23.html LATEST NEWS 9:46 AM MDT Wednesday The Jefferson County Commissioners unanimously approved the construction of a high-definition TV tower on Lookout Mountain. Lake Cedar Group, a consortium of local television broadcasters, applied to build one 730-foot tower that will replace three towers used by the ABC, CBS and NBC affiliates. The consortium for the new tower includes those three stations and KTVD, a UPN affiliate, which will move from its existing tower on Mount Morrison. Neighbors in the area were concerned about the radio waves that would be emitted by the tower, but Jefferson County Commission Chairman Richard Sheehan said that the frequency levels are 85 percent below the federal standard and the proposal improves the visual impact by reducing the number of towers. The new tower will be used to transmit federally mandated high- definition television signals that have higher quality sound and digital images. Commissioners will formalize the decision on Aug. 19. © 2003 American City Business Journals Inc. (via Patrick Griffith, N0NNK CBT CBNT CRO Westminster, CO, USA, NRC FMTV via DXLD) DIGITAL TV TOWER APPROVED FOR LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN By Charley Able, Rocky Mountain News July 23, 2003 GOLDEN - A group of Denver-area broadcasters has won approval of a hotly contested plan to broadcast digital television signals from Lookout Mountain. Jefferson County commissioners unanimously endorsed the proposal late Tuesday. It will reduce the number of broadcast towers that stud the mountain. The decision brought a swift rebuke from opponents, who fear that radio frequency radiation from Lookout Mountain's antenna farms poses a severe health risk. . . http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_15_2129328,00.html (via Curtis Sadowski, WTFDA via DXLD) ** U S A. 173.435 MHz, Sound track for Melrose Fireworks and air field announcements for Battle Creek ``field of flight`` balloon fest and Thunderbirds air show. Heard with music announcements and balloon launch info at 2255-2315 July 4, and with the fireworks sound track at 0230-0300 July 5 (UT). The sound track used to be simulcast by commercial FM stations, but they wanted to get more people to pay the $5 gate to get into the field, so they stopped that, but still use NBFM to transmit the audio to their speakers on the field and across the ANG base for military personnel. If you have never seen a fireworks display choreographed to music, you don't appreciate how neat it can be. Definitely worth the trip to BC to see this at least once, but don't forget to bring the scanner! (Kenneth Vito Zichi - visiting Battle Creek, MI, MARE via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. Re 1680 kHz beacons: Olá Rudolf, Agora com a freqüência ficou melhor, pois ZO é realmente uma plataforma petrolífera na bacia de Campos, porém V7B pode ser um navio de apóio na bacia também, mas não tenho plena confirmação, já que o pessoal da DHN da Marinha não tem muito controle sobre estes indicativos como é o caso do ZZ e ZO, que estão operando em caráter experimental "definitivo". A Petrobrás lança mão de muitos navios de bandeiras estrangeiras sem ter que trocar os indicativos das estações; nesta época temos também aqui no hemisfério sul a ativação de alguns auxílios devido a nevoeiros densos e icebergs, como é o caso das estações polares. Devido a época do ano também, não podemos deixar de considerar a possibilidade de ter recebido um NDB da Austrália ou algumas de suas ilhas; a propagação por onda terrestre é algo incrível. 73, (Jorge Jockyman Jr., PY3JJ, July 23, radioescutas via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ MEXICO DX ENCUENTRO. In case you are depending on the agenda in previous issue, there have been a number of changes in the `final` version. Try the AER website (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ ARRL URGES IMPROVED RFI IMMUNITY STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER ELECTRONICS NEWINGTON, CT, Jul 24, 2003--The ARRL has told the FCC that improved interference standards for consumer electronic devices is the most pressing need as the Commission considers the interference immunity performance of receivers. The League filed comments this week in response to an FCC Notice of Inquiry (NOI) Interference Immunity Performance Specifications for Radio Receivers (ET-03-65), released last March to gather input on the issue. While recommending ``either mandatory receiver immunity standards or at least guidelines`` in most other services, the ARRL said no receiver immunity standards are necessary or practical in the ``essentially experimental`` Amateur Service. ``The real need for receiver immunity specifications is in the area of consumer electronics,`` the ARRL said. ``With the current explosion of consumer electronics and unlicensed devices, the Commission must -- concurrently with consideration of receiver immunity standards in licensed radio services -- establish interference rejection standards for unlicensed home electronic equipment and systems as well.`` At the same time, the ARRL said, development of any receiver immunity standards or guidelines ``should not be used as a means of justifying the overlay of otherwise fundamentally incompatible spectrum sharing partners.`` The League said the FCC has had the authority to require improved RF interference immunity of consumer electronics and systems for many years ``and has failed repeatedly to exercise it.`` The result has been ``many thousands of instances of complaints against Amateur Radio operators and, in some cases, civil and criminal actions being filed,`` the League said. In its 21-page reply to the NOI, the ARRL recited the recent history of legislative and regulatory efforts to come to grips with interference from RF sources, including amateur stations, to receivers used in other services, such as TV and radio broadcasting, and to consumer electronics. ``ARRL continues to believe that receiver immunity should be on the order of 3 V/m for receivers that might be in the near field of an Amateur Radio station,`` the League said. At that distance, a receiver would be immune to an approximately 100-W ham radio transmission into a 0 dBd antenna 100 feet away. The League conceded, however, that such a standard would not address the interference immunity of telephones, computers, alarm systems, audio systems and other consumer electronics that ``constitute the bulk of the instances of interference involving Amateur Radio operators.`` The ARRL suggested the FCC mandate a standard for all consumer electronics or adopt a labeling or grading system that allows consumers to make their own choices about the importance of interference immunity and its value in terms of increased product cost. The League also said software-defined radio (SDR) technology offered the best opportunity to deal with receiver immunity. The ARRL advised the FCC against relying exclusively on manufacturers to agree on how to deal with interference immunity. ``Looking at the history of voluntary standards for RF interference rejection,`` the League said, ``the track record of manufacturers is not exemplary.`` The FCC should establish recommended guidelines for receiver immunity, the ARRL said, but added that these should not apply to unlicensed devices ``which are entitled to no interference protection in the first place.`` In its NOI, the FCC had said it had no plans to reverse its ``longstanding practice of allowing the market to determine the performance of broadcast receivers, with the Commission stepping in only where obvious deficiencies appear`` that could disrupt reception. The FCC`s Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau (CGB) Web site ``consumer facts`` page [at] http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/interference.html takes a somewhat different stance by stating that interference from transmitters to broadcast receivers ``is normally caused by the actual design of the (interfered-with) equipment itself.`` The CGB says many manufacturers ``do not protect internal wiring with adequate shielding or sufficient filtering,`` leaving the consumer equipment susceptible. There`s a similar comment regarding RFI to telephone equipment [at] http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/ixphones.html Such RFI ``is not necessarily a sign that the interference is intentional or that the interfering radio transmitter is illegal but that your equipment has no, or inadequate, protection.`` the FCC says. The ARRL also urged the FCC not to make interference susceptibility of unlicensed devices a determining factor in whether a licensed radio service should be given an allocation in bands in where unlicensed -- and unprotected -- devices are deployed. As a recent example, the League cited the FCC`s recent refusal to allocate a sliver band in the vicinity of 136 kHz ``because of the ill-conceived prior deployment of unlicensed power line carrier [PLC] systems.`` The FCC, in effect, ``refused to make an allocation based on interference susceptibility of unlicensed and unprotected RF devices and systems,`` the League said. ``This is improper spectrum management and the policy should be revisited.`` In March, the FCC ask how it could incorporate receiver interference immunity specifications within its overall spectrum policy and invited public comments on possible methods and means of improving receiver performance. The Commission suggested that these could include incentives, guidelines or regulatory requirements -- or a combination -- in particular bands and services or across bands and services. The Commission said it believes incorporating receiver performance specifications could ``promote more efficient utilization of the spectrum and create opportunities for new and additional use of radio communications by the American public.`` The NOI was a follow-up to the work of the FCC Spectrum Policy Task Force, which looked at ways to improve overall radio spectrum management. The ARRL`s comments on the NOI are available on the ARRL Web site [at] http://www2.arrl.org/announce/regulatory/et03-65/ARRL-ET-03-65-cmts.pdf The March FCC Notice of Inquiry in ET Docket 03-65 is available on the FCC Web site [at] http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-03-54A6.doc Copyright © 2003, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved (via John Norfolk, DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ 13 m BAND SCAN 1330-1400 UT Hi Glenn, I noted upper SW-frequencies were nicely open in this sunny afternoon. So I did kind of band scan in the 13 meter band 1330-1400 UT. Here are the results: 21840 DW Nauen in German 21810 RDP Lisbon with ID 1355UT 21790 DW Wertachtal in German 21705 BSKSA Riyadh in Arabic 21695 R Jamahariya via FRANCE in Arabic signed off 14 UTC 21685 RFI Paris in French via FRENCH GUIANA 21675 R Jamahariya via FRANCE 21665 UNID. Maybe DW Wertachtal broadcasting to Africa. Language unknown. 21640 Two stations: DW SRI LANKA and BBC, WS. 21610 REE Noblejas 21605 UAE Radio in English 21600 BSKSA Riyadh in Arabic 21580 R France International, Issoudun-Allouis in French 21570 REE Madrid (Noblejas) in Spanish // 21540 kHz 21530 R Farda in Farsi or is it Persian. QTH?! 21505 BSKSA Riyadh in Arabic to N. Africa 21500 Voz Cristiana from Chile with programme in Portuguese. Nice surprise to hear this outlet this early. 21480 R Netherlands via Madagascar in Dutch 21470 BBC WS via Ascension to S. Africa. I really enjoy these upper band stations in summer time. It`s daylight DX-ing for me. When the day is shortest in Northern Hemisphere and even earlier, these bands are almost totally empty for us, DX-ers living 60 degrees north. PS. Thanks to Passport 2003 for valuable information. I do love those blue pages! 73 (Jouko Huuskonen, Turku FINLAND, July 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) It so happens I was checking 13m about the same time, but hardly anything was audible here (Glenn Hauser, Enid OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) CUMBRE PROPAGATION REPORT Flare activity has been just about non existent over the past 7 days. A coronal hole wind stream kept the geomagnetic field disturbed for the first half of the week, with sometimes storm levels noted last weekend. High latitude paths were poor at times. A shock in the solar wind around 1400 on Jul 23 caused minor to major storm levels for a few hours at high latitudes only. MUFs are expected to remain near normal early in the week. Periods of minor to mild depressions are possible during the second half of the week due to possible activity by a returning region that produced M-class activity during its last cycle of appearance on the disk. It is to be noted that this region had shown signs of decay at the time of passing behind the limb last time and, therefore, it may not be effective or as effective this time. Prepared with data from http://www.ips.gov.au (Richard Jary, SA, July 25, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-131, July 23, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1192: WWCR: Thu 2030 15825, Sat 1030, Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 9475 RFPI: Fri 1930, Sat 0130, 0800, 1400, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 7445 and/or 15039 WRMI: Sat & Sun 1800+ 15725 WINB: Sun 0030 12160 WBCQ: Mon 0445 7415 WRN ONDEMAND [from Fri]: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1192h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1192.html [from Thu] ** AUSTRALIA. `AM` FOUND TO BE UNBIASED BY THE ABC'S COMPLAINTS REVIEW EXECUTIVE The ABC has responded to the 68 complaints lodged by Communications Minister Richard Alston about alleged bias in the AM program by upholding only two out of the 68 concerns . . . http://www.abc.net.au/pm/content/2003/s906924.htm (transcript and audio links, via Bill Westenhaver, QC, DXLD) ABC 'BIAS' LARGELY IN ALSTON'S MIND --- 24 July 2003 THE irony of those well-publicised complaints from the Communications Minister, Richard Alston, that ABC Iraq war coverage contained "numerous examples of one-sided and tendentious commentary" is that Alston -- who claims the one-sidedness took the form of anti-US bias -- emerges from the latest round of the argument accused of being at least equally one-sided and tendentious. Full story is available at: http://theaustralian.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,6793565%255E7582,00.html (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) BY ANY MEASURE, ALSTON BOMBS OUT -- 24 July 2003 THANK goodness Richard Alston is Australia's communications minister and not the bloke who programs the smart bombs for the US military. The strike rate for his hit list of complaints against alleged ABC bias during the war on Iraq was a mere 2.9 per cent. Full story: http://theaustralian.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,6793462%255E12280,00.html (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) In light of recent government criticisms involving the BBC and (perhaps unknown to most) ABC Australia, here's a Radio Australia/ Radio National program that intends to address the issues: THE MEDIA REPORT with Mick O'Regan - "Public Broadcasting in the Spotlight". In Australia the Communications Minister, Senator Alston, remains unsatisfied by the ABC's response to his criticisms of bias, and in the UK, the BBC is at the centre of the controversy over sources and reporting. How should public broadcasters deal with politically sensitive news, and is the line between reportage and analysis too often blurred? Available beginning Thursday on demand from http://www.abc.net.au/rn/talks/8.30/mediarpt/ Also broadcast by Radio Australia Thu 0130, 1030, 1530 on shortwave and online, on WRN-NA and Sirius stream 115 1130, and by Radio National online Wed 2230, Thu 1005. There are also these RA-broadcast programs with a focus on radio: BUSH TELEGRAPH with Alicia Brown - "Radio in Rural Afghanistan". Rural Afghanistan is home to 80% of the population. Only one quarter of the people have access to mostly state-owned local radio. Up to twenty new stations will be launched within the next year to help Afghanistan's reconstruction. What kind of information will they broadcast, and how will they actually help rural people get back on their feet? Available on Thursday on demand from http://www.abc.net.au/rn/telegraph/ Also broadcast by Radio Australia Thu 1130 and 1605 on shortwave and online, on WRN-NA and Sirius stream 115 1505, and by Radio National online Thu 0105. FEEDBACK with Roger Broadbent - For the past two weeks on Radio Australia`s Feedback the focus has been on digital radio in Australia - the available technologies and what lies ahead as this country considers its options. This weekend we find out what it all means for the broadcasters. A complete mindset change it appears and we'll need to become multi-media specialists. Steve Ahearn, Head of Radio at the Australian Film, Television and Radio School, has spent the past two years teaching his students about digital radio broadcasting - the technical, the creative and the marketing side of this new technology. Broadcast by Radio Australia on shortwave and online Fri 2105, Sat 0605, Sun 0305, on WRN and Sirius stream 115 Sun 0705. Available on demand from early next week (John Figliozzi, NY, July 23, swprograms via DXLD) ** AUSTRIA [non?]. Dear Robin, you tell your readers, in RA, May 2003, that the external service from Austria relays a.o. "sundry Ethiopian clandestine broadcasters." This is not only untrue, it is insulting. We provide some air space to broadcasters of a humanitarian nature, programmes sponsored by the United Nations, the European Union etc. to provide unbiased and uncensored information for countries where the local regimes do not allow freedom of expression. We would never give access to "sundry clandestines." Please inform your readers accordingly. BTW it seems to me you have bad luck whenever you report from Austria. Last time you discriminated an Austrian politician whose name you could not even spell, hi. 73 de Wolf Harranth OE1WHC, DX Editor ex-Radio Austria International http://www.qsl.at --- a site you might want to check (via Harwood, DXLD) Am I in trouble or not? Wolf seems to think I goofed in saying that Austria relays "sundry Clandestine Ethiopian Broadcasters". Now I have seen references to these in Clandestine Radio Watch. They classify them as clandestine. As for the reference to an Austrian politician, I don't have any idea what he is on about (Robin L. HARWOOD, Norwood, Tasmania, "Spotlight on SWLing-Amateur Radio" DX LISTENING DIGEST) It`s GERMANY, DTK i.a. that relays `Sundry Ethiopian clandestines`; I can`t think of any via Austria. Which ones exactly do you think are transmitted by Austria? And CRW will be quick to disclaim that everything they cover is really clandestine (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRIA. OE1M - QSLS - INTERNATIONAL MARCONI DAY Ich habe heute die letzten OE1M-QSLs zum Internationalen Marconi-Tag zur Post gebracht. Wer in angemessener Zeit also noch immer auf seine QSL wartet, sollte sich direkt bei mir melden. Es war ein grosses Stueck Trauerarbeit mit viel Abschiedsschmerz. So viele bekannte Namen - und mit vielen verbinden sich Erinnerungen: An wertvollen Hinweisen fuer unsere Sendungen, an persoenliche Begegnungen... So viele unbekannte Namen - und alles Stammhoerer, die sich erst jetzt melden: Man sendet ins Nichts und ahnt nicht, wie gross die Familie ist. Allerdings gibt's da auch die Schattenseiten: Da hat uns einer stundenlang auf einer Frequenz gehoert, auf der wir nie gesendet hatten. Kein Wunder, dass er kein einziges Programmdetail nennen konnte. Da weiss jemand genau, dass wir 0.45 kHz nenben der Nominalfrequenz gesendet haben. Sein Empfaenger ist geeicht (unser Sender ist es offenbar nicht). Da hat wieder jemand flott alle Berichtsdetails erfunden... Am aergerlichsten: Bei gut einem Drittel der Berichte fehlten der Adressaufkleber/das Rpckkuvert und/oder der Portoersatz. Das hat dann auf dem Postamt 100 Euro gekostet. Ich erwaehne das nicht, um mich zu ruehmen, sondern zu erinnern: Nicht in jeder Rundfunkanstalt wird die QSL-Post aus der Portokasse bezahlt. Wenn die QSL-Politik Frucht des Idealismus eines Mitarbeiters, einer Mitarbeiterin ist, diese(r) aber immer tief in die eigene Tasche greifen muss, darf man sich nicht wundern, wenn der Ruf der Hoerer nicht der beste ist und die QSLs eines Tages ausbleiben. 73 de Wolf Harranth OE1WHC (via A-DX July 22 via Wolfgang Büschel, DXLD) ** CANADA. CJRS Radio Montreal -- http://www.cjrsradio.com Nouveau sur le webb demande special accepté (July 23 via DXLD) Web-only station? Can`t find it in FM Atlas or M-Street 2000y Directory. Non-commercial? (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) {see 3-132} ** CUBA. I came across few different jamming transmissions this morning, July 23, in 0400-0500 UT time slot 2 - 11760 around 0435 UT. 3 - 9805 against Radio Martí around 0440 UT. as .MP3 file. Different jamming of the Cuban type heard at same time on 11760 and 9805 kHz. I think, 11760 jamming is an AUDIO mixup at the la Habana Bauta site --- heard on co-channel RHC Spanish service. 9805 kHz is both, a US Radio Farda Kavalla channel earlier in the morning, as well as a US Radio Martí channel (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, July 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) See also IRAN ** ** CZECH REPUBLIC. CZECH MINISTER SAYS HOSTING RFE/RL RADIO FREEZES CZECH TRADE WITH IRAN | Excerpt from report in English by Czech news agency CTK Prague, 23 July: The Czech Republic will somehow contribute to the removal of the Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) from the Prague centre, Foreign Minister Cyril Svoboda told BBC today. "The form is yet to be debated," Svoboda said. [passage omitted] The RFE/RL cannot interrupt broadcasts and it would have to function at two places simultaneously. The moving's costs are estimated at more than 500m Czech korunas. [passage omitted] "It can be just a contribution. We contribute to the USA just by having it here. All our trade relations with Iran are frozen," Svoboda said. [passage omitted] [One dollar equals 28.39 Czech korunas.] Source: CTK news agency, Prague, in English 1722 gmt 23 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** EGYPT. Queridos Radioescuchas, les enviamos nuestra hoja de programación; esperamos les ayude a seguir más facilmente nuestras emisiones. Un abrazo. RADIO EL CAIRO, EMISIONES EN LENGUA CASTELLANA HOJA DE PROGRAMACION CORRESPONDIENTE AL SEGUNDO SEMESTRE DEL ANO 2003 HORARIO 0045-0200 TUC Horario de Verano Tiempo local de el Cairo: 3:45-5:00 am ***** Horario de Invierno Tiempo local de el Cairo: 2:45-4:00 am Onda corta: 25 ms. 11755 y 11790 KHZ Transmisión Via Satelite: NileSat programa 7, Frecuencia 11766 GHz, Polaridad Horizontal, Simpo 27500, 7 grados oeste. E/mail: radioelcairoespa@y... [truncated] Dirección Correo Postal: Radio El Cairo, Programas en Español, Apartado Postal 566, El Cairo, Egipto. Programas Fijos (tiempo local de El Cairo): [UT + 3!!!] 3:47 Musica Oriental, 3:48 Resumen Noticioso, 4:00 Noticiario a Detalle, 4:50 Noticias de Última Hora Programas Diarios (tiempo local de el Cairo): Lunes Martes Miércoles 3:50 Mensaje del Islam, Tarjeta Postal, Compañeros P[ara?] Mohámed 4:10 Comentario Político, Luces Sobre Oriente Medio, Comentario Político 4:15 Tema Semanal, Cancionero Egipcio 4:20 Panorama Egipcio 4:30 Amplie sus Conoc[imientos?]. Jerusalén, Deporte en una Semana 4:35 Papel y Lápiz 4:40 Rincón Filatélico, Preguntas y Respuestas 4:45 Charla Variada Jueves Viernes Sábado 3:50 Crónica Literaria, Exégesis del Corán, La Mujer Egipcia 4:10 Comentario Político, Comentario Político, Semanario de Prensa 4:15 Canción Árabe 4:20 Micrófono en la calle, Patrimonio Cultural, Música de América Latina 4:35 Perspectiva Latinoamericana, El Cairo Contesta 4:40 Historia de la Civilización Árabe 4:45 Capitales Históricas de Egipto Domingo 3:50 Luces Sobre Nuestra Vida Cotidiana 4:10 Comentario Político 4:15 El Cairo Contesta 4:35 Egipto al Vuelo 4:45 De aquí y de allá /////////////////FIN////////////////////// RADIO EL CAIRO EN ESPANOL --- DIR. SANAA MAKLED; LOCUCION: VERONICA BALDERAS, ASSIA LAMARTY; SUPLENTES: MAHMOUD, MOHAMED; SUPERVISION: IMAN, NAGLAA; REDACCION: NANCY, RANA. -------------------------------------------------- (via Pedro Sedano, Madrid, España, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** GERMANY. Tiere --- WALROSS-DAME "ANTJE" IST TOT [illustrated!] Die berühmte Walross-Dame "Antje" ist im Hamburger Tierpark Hagenbeck gestorben. "Antje ist in der Nacht sanft entschlafen", sagte Zoodirektor Claus Hagenbeck am Donnerstagmorgen. . . http://www.ndr.de/ndr/regional/hh/20030716/antje.html Click to the VIDEO on the rightmost corner BELOW: http://stream.ndr.de/bb/redirect.lsc?stream=ndr/media//vs/20030716_155446_tv_trailer_antje_walross.rm&content=content&media=rm and you will get the video stream of the mascot interval signal (video+audio signals on Real Player). 73 wolfy (via Wolfgang Büschel, WORLD OF RADIO 1192, DXLD) ** GERMANY. Re: DXLD 3-130 GERMANY. The Kiel-based Power Radio Here in Copenhagen I still hear Power Radio today, July 23, around noon LT, on 612 kHz (Erik Køie, Copenhagen, DX LISTENING DIGEST) While reading the above story I tuned into 612 kHz here in Central Denmark and found the usual strong signal (9+20dB) from Power Radio and the usual dance-music format here at 0830. The distance from my QTH to Kiel is 250 km (155 miles). (Stig Hartvig Nielsen, Denmark, July 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Power Radio on 612 is again on air; reportedly they stated that an excavator tore apart a cable to the transmitter. If so this would be the STL circuit rather than the main power supply, considering the reported open carrier. This brings up some nostalgia: Back in 1992/1993 also an excavator cut the cable with the audio circuits to the Wilsdruff transmitter (this cable was placed along the highway from Leipzig to Dresden; it is meanwhile retired in favour of a digital STL via either microwave link or fibre optic cable). As a result the MDR Life network was transmitted on 1044 by means of Ballempfang (FM pick-up) while the DT64 studio signal vanished into nowhere. But they continued to, let's say narrowcast, and the results were so amusing that some excerpts from the aircheck tape were later broadcast for real (Kai Ludwig, Germany, July 23 2112 UT, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GREENLAND [non]. Re: DXLD 3-128 + a geography lesson: The three programs are now available as ONE 30 min. 45 seconds program at: http://www1.dr.dk/pubs/nyheder/html/programmer/kortboelge/meta/haagensen.ram But please note that the interview is entirely in DANISH, with some recordings of e.g. US Stations + air communication. His first experiences in Greenland were in 1949 in Peary Land (the Northernmost part of Greenland which is a peninsula with Cape Morris Jesup, at 83 39 North, as Greenland's northernmost point). Later at Station Nord (=North) from it was built in 1952. See a map of Greenland at: http://www.dmi.dk/vejr/gron/index.html - then click left on 'Observationer'. (Erik Køie, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Erik, tnx for availablizing this. I listened to the entire show, altho I don`t understand Danish! There were several non-English clips included at 07:31, 08:19, 10:19; Nord Radio in English, 2-way weather info, at 17:03 and again in the next minute; and also at 22:37. Brief KFAB clip at 21:36; KING at 21:50 (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HAWAII. Glenn, Letter from Joseph Bras{h}ier states: "The frequency change is for KWHR Angel 3 in Naalehu, Hawaii. We were signing off at 1630 UT on 9.930 MHz at 285 degrees. As of Friday July 11, 2003, we began signing off at 1700 on 9.930 MHz. We are also changing directions from 285 to 300 degrees at 1600 until sign off at 1700. This change will be effective all 76 days". (via Gayle Van Horn, Monitoring Times Frequency Manager, DX LISTENING DIGEST) To accommodate a new clandestine client??? (gh, DXLD) {Yes! Falun Dafa as in subsequent issues, and a LeSea Mandarin production at 1630} ** INDONESIA. 4869.97, RRI Wamena, 1035-1102 July 23. Noted simply typical music with man in comments between tunes. At tune in the signal was poor, but by 1100 with a beautiful sunrise in progress here in Florida, the signal of Wamena was at a good level (Bolland, Chuck, Clewiston, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL. The letters and numbers in my logs such as (E3, E4, E10, V2a) are ENIGMA assigned station identifiers; they are used to help identify what spy numbers station you are listening to. Here is a link to a website explaining this and a list of ENIGMA station identifiers and their names: http://www.spynumbers.com/enigma.html Here is another website that give information about some of the stations: http://www.spynumbers.com/profiles/enigma.html ENIGMA is the European Numbers Information Gathering and Monitoring Association, a non-profit making association of listeners who monitor and gather information on 'Numbers Stations' and other related radio transmissions. If you are intrested in being a member of ENIGMA, you can find the Yahoo groups' ENIGMA 2000 Website at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/enigma2000/ 73, (Chris Acuff, shortwavelistening yahoogroup via DXLD) ** IRAN. I came across few different jamming transmissions this morning, July 23, in 0400-0500 UT time slot. Attached three examples 1 - 15420 around 0425 UT. [see also CUBA] Usual strong Iranian jamming against 15290 US Radio Farda Kavala in Persian. DIFFERENT fast machine 'ditting' oscillating jamming also on 15185 and 15420 kHz, most likely also Iranian type, seemingly a 24 hrs operation like against Mojahed broadcasts. On 15185 kHz co-channel is another US Radio Farda Kavala operation in Persian. But the 15420 kHz channel is used widely by BBC Oman in Persian and Pashto during daytime, and extended transmission time on Thursdays and Fridays; 0700-1300 UT. 15420 kHz BBC Seychelles from 1400-1630 in Somali and Swahili (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, July 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRAQ. A leading press watchdog called on July 22 for U.S. and British authorities to ease media restrictions in Iraq quickly and draw up liberal media laws to replace the straitjacket that Saddam Hussein imposed. The country's new freedoms could be at risk if resistance to U.S. and British forces grew, Paris-based Reporters Without Borders warned in a report entitled "The Iraqi media three months after the war: a new but fragile freedom". Saddam's fall in April has spawned boisterous new media, including at least 85 newspapers and magazines, dozens of internet cafes as well as radio stations and satellite television channels, the group said. "Reporters Without Borders calls for work to begin very soon on drafting liberal and democratic media regulations and laws to fill the present void and replace the harsh legislation of Saddam Hussein's era," the report said. It criticised rules imposed by Paul Bremer, the U.S. civilian administrator in Iraq, that ban incitement to violence against U.S. and British forces and empower their commander to decide what constitutes incitement. Bremer's order also bans incitement to ethnic and religious hatred, but the media group said the wording was vague enough to allow the U.S.-led authorities to crack down on local media. The authorities have nine grounds for closing media outlets, powers already used to suspend the Voice of Baghdad radio station and a Shi'ite Muslim newspaper in the holy city of Najaf, the seven-page report said. It said the powers of the Iraqi Media Network, acting as an interim body to replace the former Iraqi information ministry, were ill-defined and should be quickly spelled out. Journalists needed better legal protection, while the recent deaths of two journalists underlined security problems, it said (Reuters via SCDX/MediaScan July 23 via DXLD) ** IRAQ. THE IRAQI MEDIA THREE MONTHS AFTER THE WAR : A NEW BUT FRAGILE FREEDOM A wind of freedom has gusted through the Iraqi media for the past three months. For nearly 30 years, it was assigned the single task of glorifying the regime and its leader, President Saddam Hussein. Today, newspapers are springing up in Baghdad and all over the country. Radio and TV are not as prolific and lively, but genuine diversity and openness is now possible. But daily lawlessness and instability, the large amount of weaponry in people's hands, squabbles between political groups and the US and British occupation mean complete freedom is not guaranteed for journalists, who are practising self-censorship. Criticism and different opinions can now be voiced however. The future of the Iraqi media is largely in the hands of the US-British Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) and, to some extent, the Iraqi Transitional Governing Council appointed on 13 July. . . http://www.rsf.fr/article.php3?id_article=7583 (long, illustrated, Reporters Without Borders article, via Kim Elliott, WORLD OF RADIO 1192, DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH. An envelope of goodies arrived today from the Voice of Korea, replying to my 5th of June request for information on a project I'm working on. They sent no less than: a personally typed letter, the 50 year history of North Korean broadcasting leaflet (circa 1995), broadcast schedules for all 8 foreign language services, 2 copies of the English language "Pyongyang times" newspaper, a Radio Pyongyang pennant and a Voice of Korea pin badge (obviously a new addition due to the recent name change.) Sadly no programme guide, but then you can't have everything! Interestingly, in the letter from them, they mention that since April 11 2003, Voice of Korea has been available 24 hours a day on the Taicom 3 satellite, 3424.5 "ohm". [?] {Thaicom: see 3-132} As uptodate schedules for the station are hard to find, I've scanned each of the 8 schedules and put them on a quickly thrown together webpage. I'll add scans of the newspapers and other information shortly. Judging by my monitoring this evening, the English schedule to Europe at least is accurate. http://www.eurobahn.co.uk/~media/vok/ (My correspondence with the DPRK may have blown my chances of ever being recruited by MI6, but there's nevertheless still something special about receiving post from distant lands, which these days is quite a rarity!) (Daniel Atkinson, England, July 22, swprograms via DXLD) And gh herewith transcribes and rearranges into time order the English portion, shown as one hour each, frequencies in the order given; looks like carbon copy on old manual typewriter: 0100 CAm 15180 11735 13760 0100 NE China 7140 9345 6195 0200 SEAs 11845 15230 0300 NE China 7140 9345 6195 1000 CAm 9335 11710 1000 SEAs 11735 13650 1300 NAm 11710 9335 1300 WEu 15245 13760 1500 WEu 15245 13760 1500 NAm 11710 9335 1600 ME/NAf 11735 9975 1900 WEu 15245 13760 2100 WEu 15245 13760 (via Glenn Hauser, WORLD OF RADIO 1192, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** LIBERIA. HUNDREDS OF LIBERIANS SEEK REFUGE AT ELWA AS FIGHTING ESCALATES --- Posted by: newsdesk on Monday, July 21, 2003 - 12:41 PM Hundreds of refugees have sought shelter at Radio Station ELWA in the Liberian capital of Monrovia as the political situation in the country continues to deteriorate. ``We are again calling upon you to join us in prayer for Liberia,`` wrote SIM-Liberia Director Rick Sacra in an e-mail report sent Sunday afternoon. ``The news from the last few days has not been good. Lurd rebels have again attacked from the North and West, starting on Friday, again reaching the Freeport area on Saturday and coming close to the city center. Mortar shells are again being dropped in heavily populated areas. Reports indicate that the rebels are also moving toward Paynesville from the Freeport area. This could bring fighting closer to ELWA.`` Despite the unrest, ``things are still quiet at the ELWA campus,`` he wrote. However, more than 500 persons have arrived at the facility as the fighting spreads. The ministry`s radio station and hospital continue to operate as long as diesel fuel is available to run the generators. The spokesman urged prayer for safety and a permanent resolution to the conflict. HCJB World Radio works in partnership with ELWA, a ministry founded by SIM in Monrovia in 1954, to air the gospel across the country and West Africa. The radio station was destroyed twice by civil war, first in 1990 and again in 1996. ELWA went back on the air in 1997 with a small FM transmitter. Then in 2000 HCJB World Radio provided a low-power shortwave transmitter, again enabling the station to cover the region. ELWA broadcasts the gospel in 10 languages and plans to add more as resources become available. . . http://www.hcjb.org/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=593&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0 (HCJB Press via WORLD OF RADIO 1192, DXLD) ** MYANMAR. 5985, Radio Myanmar: No data form letter QSL from v/s Ko Ko Htway stating, "We are pleased to verify your reception of Radio Myanmar". Also enclosed was a program schedule and Media Index. I have been pursuing this one for over 5 years, with numerous follow-up letters, faxes, and fresh reports. Really glad to finally have this one in the collection (George Maroti, NY, July 23, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. MEDIA: CROSBIE TO LEAVE RADIO NZ Radio New Zealand chief executive Sharon Crosbie has confirmed she will step down at the end of the year. . . http://www.nbr.co.nz/home/column_article.asp?id=6580&cid=1&cname=Media (via Jill Dybka, DXLD) RADIO NEW ZEALAND HEAD TO STEP DOWN --- 23.07.2003 5.30pm From: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay.cfm?storyID=3514250&thesection=news&thesubsection=general Radio New Zealand chief executive Sharon Crosbie will step down at the end of the year. RNZ board chairman Brian Corban said today Crosbie had advised him she would leave her position as chief executive and editor in chief at the end of December. Mr Corban said Crosbie would leave the company in good heart at a time when there was a revival in government support for public broadcasting, a new funding agreement, and a positive conclusion to recent pay negotiations. RNZ would immediately begin an international search to fill Crosbie's role, he said. "The company will undertake a normal search and recruitment exercise for a senior appointment of this nature." Mr Corban said Crosbie had made a significant contribution to public broadcasting during her eight-year tenure in the positions. "There have been outstanding contributions from many fine broadcasters over the years and Sharon Crosbie stands with the best of them... she has made a significant contribution to the heritage of public broadcasting in this country." In recent times Crosbie has made news due to a prolonged employment dispute with RNZ's head of news Lynne Snowdon. Snowdon has been absent from work for seven months after a falling out with Crosbie over budget and staffing issues. She has been on sick leave since January after her doctor diagnosed she was suffering from depression triggered by a stressful work environment. In June, the Employment Relations Authority ordered RNZ to take Ms Snowdon back and pay her $3000 in compensation. RNZ appealed, arguing Ms Snowdon should first undergo a psychiatric assessment. This month the Employment Court ordered the parties to negotiate over the assessment (via Ulis Fleming, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** OMAN. Radio Sultanate of Oman: I got a folder QSL with full data, (except there was no date) veried by Director of frequency, Radio. it was for my report on 15355. Ironically, I just sent a follow-up, before this one arrived. Two beautiful stamps on the envelope have since gone to my stamp collections. Return address on the folder was given as Sultanate of Oman, Ministry of Information, P.O. Box 600, postal code 113. Muscat. Kindest regards, (Emmanuel Ezeani, P.O. Box 1633, Sokoto, Sokoto State, Nigeria, July 23, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** PERU. 4855 kHz, Radio La Hora, full data "Radio La Hora" card, v/s Carlos Gamarra Moscoso, Director De Frecuencias, in 1 month after assistance from a Peruvian friend, 3 months total, received pennant. Address on envelope: Av, Gercilaso No 411, Wanchaq-Cusco, Peru. Thanks to my Peruvian friend for making this, my first Peruvian QSL, possible! (Joe Talbot, Red Deer, Alberta, Canada, July 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SWEDEN. RADIO SWEDEN--Coming up on Radio Sweden: Thursday: S-Files Friday: Our weekly review Saturday: Studio 49 Sunday: Sounds Nordic We're changing one of our frequencies to East Asia and New Zealand for the broadcast at 1230 UT. Beginning this Sunday July 27, the frequency of 17505 kHz will be replaced by 13580. However, 17505 will continue from another transmitter to South Asia and Australia, and we'll continue to use 17840 for the 1230 broadcast to North America (Anders Backlin, Radio Sweden, SCDX/MediaScan July 23 via WORLD OF RADIO 1192, DXLD) ** UGANDA. DEFENCE MINISTER SAYS ARMY TO START RADIO SOON | Text of report by Ugandan newspaper The New Vision web site on 23 July The UPDF [Uganda People's Defence Forces] is to open a 200m shilling radio station this financial year, Defence Minister Amama Mbabazi said in a policy statement to parliament. The army spokesman Maj Shaban Bantariza yesterday said, "Certainly we will start up a radio this financial year. It will be located centrally, but will be reaching all our forces wherever they are." He said: "The radio will do what all the other radios are doing, inform, entertain, and the rest." Bantariza said: "There isn't adequate information concerning the army. By the time the information reaches the public, it is third or forth hand. Currently, the facts are misrepresented." He said they could not use Radio Uganda for their purpose because "Radio Uganda collapsed, it is ineffective like most of government departments." He said he started Radio Freedom in northern Uganda, but was taken over by Radio Uganda and "it fell victim to their problems". Bantariza said the radio would reinforce the UPDF web site which is currently operational, adding 0.6bn Ugandan shillings had been budgeted by the Ministry of Training for selected soldiers in IT applications. The Defence Ministry has also budgeted 500m Ugandan shillings for the re-establishment of the army shop and 1.2bn shillings for an assurance scheme for soldiers, Bantariza said. Source: The New Vision web site, Kampala, in English 23 Jul 03 (via BBCM via WORLD OF RADIO 1192, DXLD) WTFK? FM? Possibly SW for the wide coverage envisaged (gh, DXLD) ** U K. THE BBC MUST NOT BE A CASUALTY OF WAR By Chris Smith, Financial Times, 23 July 2003 Published: July 22 2003 19:26 | Last Updated: July 22 2003 19:26 All of us in the Westminster village - politicians, government officials, journalists - ought to be ashamed of ourselves. All too often we treat the political debate as a game: who's up, who's down, who said what to whom, who can be tripped up with what. Then reality intrudes, in this case in horribly tragic fashion. It ought to bring us up short, to remind us of what truly matters, to concentrate our minds on the big questions. Yet within hours we are at it again, with a parade of apologists for one side or the other being dismissive or triumphalist in turns. For what it is worth, I suspect that Andrew Gilligan did amplify what he had been told by David Kelly, in order to make it sound more dramatic - though the concerns Mr Kelly had about the government's published statements were real enough. I suspect that Alastair Campbell, the prime minister's director of communications, did indeed put added emphasis and gloss on to the raw intelligence material presented to the government - although I do not believe he inserted anything that was not there in the first place. I suspect that the Ministry of Defence did put Mr Kelly's name into the public domain, believing that this would help the government's "case" against the BBC. I suspect that Greg Dyke, the BBC's director-general, and Gavyn Davies, the chairman, were delighted to have a chance to show their independence from a Labour government - though they also wanted to stand firm in not revealing journalistic sources. And I suspect that the board of governors of the BBC accepted a little too readily the version of events set before them by their executives. It is something they are wont to do and they always need to remember their responsibilities as regulators, not just as managers. I hope that Lord Hutton will search diligently through all of this undergrowth and establish clearly where the truth lies. It is important, of course, that he does not artificially limit the scope of his inquiry. If the logic of his investigation takes him into broader issues, unravelling exactly why we went to war and the validity of the stated reasons given at the time, that is what he should examine. He should realise that he is in an impregnable position. The government cannot place artificial barriers on his work, however much it may want to. He must have a look at whatever he thinks is necessary to get at the truth. In all of this, however, there is one thing of which I am sure. Public service broadcasting itself must not become a casualty of the conflict. The BBC is the most important of our public service broadcasters. It is a fundamentally important part of the life of the nation. It is of greater value than any individual politician. It also has great responsibilities. And it does not always get everything right. But it cannot and should not become a victim to be threatened, scapegoated and kicked around by whoever wants to gain a momentary upper hand in the media war that - sadly - has now restarted. I have been particularly alarmed in the past few days to hear some of my parliamentary colleagues talking about the future of the BBC's status and licence fee income, in the light of the 2006 review of its charter. This is little short of blackmail; and to make an explicit link between the events of the recent past and the BBC's overall future would be outrageous. Any decisions about how the BBC is funded and governed, and what the shape of our public service broadcasting landscape should be, must be taken at the appropriate time on their merits. They should not be influenced by any pique about a particular argument or spat, however controversial. Of course the BBC is going to be robustly independent. Of course it is going to "defy" the sitting government from time to time. Even if it sometimes gets that defiance slightly wrong, it must continue to criticise. That is what it is there for. I remember when I was talking with China's minister for broadcasting, a few years ago, and he complained about the BBC's critical reporting about Tibet, I told him that - as minister in charge of broadcasting in Britain - I myself was regularly criticised by the BBC. He could not believe we would allow such a state of affairs. But I am proud to live in a country that not only allows such things to happen but also insists on it. There are entirely legitimate issues to be discussed, as we approach the charter review, about the way the BBC is governed and regulated. I for one have been arguing for some time that the back-stop regulatory power over the BBC governors should rest with Ofcom rather than with the secretary of state: it is important to take it out of the realm of politics. But that point should not get mixed up in a general assault on the BBC, its decisions, its journalism and its ability to be awkward, just so that one side of a current argument can gain ground over another. A period of reflection is certainly needed, not just about the events that led up to Mr Kelly's tragic death but about the decisions that led to war, the political judgments made since and the importance of independent public service broadcasting in a democracy. Bashing the BBC's fulfilment of this role may be an easy option for some. But in reality it serves the nation ill. --- The writer was secretary of state for culture, media and sport 1997-2001 (via Kim Elliott, DXLD) THE BBC IS A WORLD, NOT A LAW, UNTO ITSELF By Janet Daley (Filed: 23/07/2003) I work for the BBC. There - I've said it. In spite of everything I have written in the past and am about to write now, you should know that a proportion of my income comes from the very news and current affairs operation that is taking a deserved hammering in the print media. . . http://www.opinion.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2003/07/23/do2302.xml&sSheet=/opinion/2003/07/23/ixopinion.html (via Jill Dybka, DXLD) WITCH HUNT AGAINST THE BBC - COLUMN LEFT by Robert Scheer, The Nation In England, they shot the messenger. True, the death of British biological weapons expert David Kelly was a suicide. But if the reserved scientist took his own life, it was in response to the British Ministry of Defense outing and reprimanding him as the alleged whistle-blower behind the BBC's controversial report that the government "sexed up" its intelligence information to make the case for war. The BBC charge against the government in this instance was quite mild, because what Tony Blair did was not merely hype the case for preemptively invading Iraq. Rather, he deliberately lied to his public about the certainty of his claims to frighten the people into sending their children off to war. . . http://www.thenation.com/doc.mhtml?i=20030804&s=scheer20030722 (via Kim Elliott, DXLD) ** U S A [and non]. VOA Director David Jackson in India: http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/181_314823,000600010001.htm (via Jilly Dybka, Kim Elliott, DXLD) ** U S A. US STATE DEPARTMENT SAYS `HI` TO ARAB YOUTH Monthly Arabic magazine aims to counter anti-Americanism, win hearts and minds of region`s largest demographic group. . . George S. Hishmeh special to The Daily Star http://www.dailystar.com.lb/features/22_07_03_c.asp 73 (via Kim Elliott, DXLD) ** U S A. On 13720 WSHB in French produced a heavy buzzy noise underneath, not filtered from their main power unit, at 0400-0457 UT. 73 de wolfy (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, July 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Re "Beer for the Homeless" in July 17 report You added a comment saying there was no mention of the charity on WGOW's website. Well, that's because they created their own website, you guessed it, http://www.beerforthehomeless.com/ Secularly yours, (Tom Flynn, Editor, FREE INQUIRY Magazine, Published by the Council for Secular Humanism http://www.secularhumanism.org DX LISTENING DIGEST) Features beer babes. Why not give the homeless radios fix-tuned to public station? ** U S A. A new report discusses the future of WNCW-FM in Spindale, N.C., according to the Asheville Citizen-Times. http://cgi.citizen-times.com/cgi-bin/story/news/38744 In the report, administrators at Isothermal Community College, the station's owner, tell their board that other broadcasters want to buy or manage WNCW. They also suggest changes to the station if the board decides not to sell. Earlier coverage of WNCW in Current: http://www.current.org/cm/cm0202fest.html (Current July 22 via DXLD) ** U S A. REBUILDING UPN: NOT IN A DAY, NOT IN A YEAR By Lisa de Moraes, Wednesday, July 23, 2003; Page C07 HOLLYWOOD, July 22 "Rome wasn't built in a day," CBS and UPN chief Leslie Moonves informed TV critics today at Summer TV Press Tour 2003, giving them another valuable cliché for the next round of Press Tour Bingo... http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A31835-2003Jul22.html (via Kraig Krist, DXLD) ** U S A. WBBM-DT - From Bob Ross at CBS: "When WBBM [-DT] started operating from their new permanent DTV antenna, we learned we were causing interference to many Comcast Cable subscribers. WBBM was operating in accordance with FCC rules but decided to return DTV operations to the old antenna. This will give Comcast time to modify their cable systems. We expect to return operations to our new broadcast antenna later this summer." (Bob Cooper in NZ, WTFDA via DXLD) Y'know, I'm not really fond of the phrasing "...we were causing interference..." It implies WBBM was doing something wrong, that their transmitter was somehow operating outside authorized parameters in such a way as to cause interference. In fact, Comcast's (and their subscribers') equipment is what's deficient. They're allowed to use channel 3 to send programming from the cable box to the subscriber's TV *provided* they don't interfere with any licensed channel 3 station and *provided* they accept any interference they may receive from a licensed channel 3 station. WBBM-DT is licensed to operate on channel 3 - Comcast isn't. —(Doug Smith W9WI, Pleasant View (Nashville), TN EM66, ibid.) Doug as usual is correct. Alas, Comcast is a "biggy" and their system delivers WBBM analog and they certainly hope one day it will (with the APPROVAL of Comcast management) also deliver WBBM-DT. And for the moment it is up to NEGOTIATIONS between the TV broadcaster and the cable company to work that out. An UNCOOPERATIVE TV station (WBBM) in this matter would make their NEGOTIATING position with Comcast a dead end. So WBBM-DT caved in and did what management thought best for their long term interest. A sad commentary on which end of the dog is now wagging (Bob Cooper in NZ, July 19, WTFDA via DXLD) This isn't the first time CBS-owned WBBM-DT and the cable outlet have clashed. The first time WBBM-DT's original Channel 3 antenna (the one being used again, and itself a retuned spare for analog Channel 2) was switched on, it knocked out every cable box within six miles of the Hancock Center, as I recall. AT&T owned the system then. WBBM, having already coaxed AT&T (and its various previous owners) into putting its analog signal on cable 3 to avoid ghosting on cable 2, first cranked down the power, then shut the antenna off completely. Of course, the digital transmitter didn't just knock out the carriage of its analog channel on 3, but every channel. While legally WBBM was in the right, tell that to potentially angry viewers who can't get your and other channels via cable. The prudent thing was to shut down. Meanwhile, unknown to lawyers and other executives for both sides, the engineers huddled and put WBBM-DT's signal on cable in every AT&T- cable system. No digital cable box was needed, just the cable hooked up to the DTV box. There was no publicity - PR people for the station and cable outlet had no clue and no answer when told about it - but the signal was there if you lived in the right town. Meanwhile still, the cable company went about shielding and/or replacing boxes, connections, coax, you name it, within the affected area so it could feed on cable 3 when WBBM-DT went back on the air. Meanwhile besides, CBS' lawyers tried to trade DTV channels with the City Colleges of Chicago, swapping their 3 for WYCC's 21 (I think; it's been a while since I was tod the story). WYCC, its digital facility only a rumor, would have gained millions to build one, and WBBM-DT could go on the air on UHF, where every other Chicago DTV is. No dice. Finally, AT&T was ready, and WBBM turned its old antenna back on last year, first at one-quarter power, then one-half, and so on, all the while working closely with AT&T / Comcast. Out here, 20.6 miles from the transmitter, and shielded by forested terrain, the signal was intermittent. Great some days, hash or the dreaded "no signal" indicator the next. Or the next hour. You never knew. (It probably didn't help me that I'm essentially aligned with Kalamazoo's analog 3 as well, and any kind of enhancement will probably interfere with WBBM-DT, especially at lower power.) While all this was going on, WBBM was also rebuilding its antenna facility on the Hancock. The new analog on the top of the east tower went on the air last year, to applause from fringe viewers (and a big ad campaign on Channel 2 and WBBM-AM). The new digital, higher than the old digital, where the old analog was on the tower, finally was switched on. (I hadn't noticed myself, sorry to say, so can't say if I get 100 percent reception.) And the boxes went blooey once more. So here we go again. And with the reception of CBS affiliare WCIA impaired - is it in WCIA's "protected" coverage area or outside it? - the price of poker may have gone up again. I just hope the latest problem is solved by football season. FYI: Comcast already offers WBBM-DT (plus the digital NBC, ABC, Fox and PBS affiliates, along with HBO and Showtime's HD feeds) on virtually all of its cable systems. For more, check various threads, old and new, on AVS Forum. (Tim Cronin, Worth, IL, ibid.) Hi Tim, The complaints were centered in Iroquois, Livingston and Ford counties. I assume part of this should be in the protected area. Chicago television ignores nearly everything happening outside the city and the collar counties, so folks in the country, starting at about 65 miles out, have their antennas (both on home and cable systems) turned to receive the stations in Champaign, Decatur, Bloomington, etc. When I drive up Route 45 to visit my mother in suburban Chicago, I have an ongoing game with the kids: the first one to find an antenna on a farmhouse turned towards Chicago wins. Usually, this doesn't happen until within twenty miles of Kankakee. WBBM-DT does regularly impinge on my WCIA reception, but not to any great degree. The whole thing will be moot eventually anyway, once stations re-align after the big switchover. The funny thing about this DT business is WBBM-TV is seldom seen this way. Supposedly, according to local lore, a ridge in Ford county blocks Chicago television this way. I haven't seen anything that should block it, but that's the story. I'm more inclined to think that for the most part, I live in a zone Chicago skip bounces over, except for that DT signal on 3. When the first televisions were brought Downstate in 1948 (according to newspaper stories), they wholly relied on DX from Chicago stations, which could be received 50-70% of the time. The story was about conditions in Champaign-Urbana, 25 miles South of me, apparently, some intrepid folks there wanted television and didn't want to wait until it eventually reached there locally in 1953 (after a considerable delay occasioned by the Korean War). Those DX reception percentages sound about right, from Rantoul, I can get VHF Saint Louis stations in at about that percentage, and they're even further away than Chicago. (Curtis Sadowski, Paxton, Illinois, ibid.) Protection, for TV, is based on the table of allocations - it's pretty much what the FCC says it is |grin|. The 47dBu Grade B service contour of WCIA extends 102.4 km (a bit over 60 miles) from the transmitter. I've not run the numbers but I would expect the Grade B contour of WBBM analog to be just a bit greater. The 28dBu "noise-limited service area" of WBBM-DT extends 105.7 km. (maybe a bit less in some directions as WBBM-DT is directional. It isn't very directional though: [is this actually an URL? Paste it together] http://www.fcc.gov/cgi- bin/polarplot?temp=41634&rotate=0.00&p0=****&p10=.980&p20=.933&p30=.88 0&p40=.846&p50=.846&p60=.880&p70=.933&p80=.980&p90=****&p100=.980&p110 =.933&p120=.880&p130=.846&p140=.846&p150=.880&p160=.933&p170=.980&p180 =****&p190=.980&p200=.933&p210=.880&p220=.846&p230=.846&p240=.880&p250 =.933&p260=.980&p270=****&p280=.980&p290=.933&p300=.880&p310=.846&p320 =.846&p330=.880&p340=.933&p350=.980) I might guess WBBM's analog service contour is the same as the digital. (WCIA's antenna is 13m lower than the maximum. WBBM's is well above the maximum, so its power is reduced below 100kw to compensate. One would presume they're running the maximum power available for their antenna height.) The Korean War was a small (really non-existent) part of the TV freeze. Basically the FCC learned in the late 1940s that VHF TV signals propagated considerably better than believed (understandable as there had been no widespread use of VHF until 1947). They faced several issues when deciding what to do about it. They'd hoped to stick more VHF stations onto the dial to provide coverage to smaller cities, but the problems of the 1940s proved that wasn't going to work. It was going to be necessary to use UHF. Should *ALL* television be UHF? What about color? The CBS system was incompatible with black-and-white; should stations run B&W on VHF and color on UHF? Or should they just obsolete all existing TVs and run CBS color on VHF? How far apart do we have to keep stations on the same channel? It took a few years to resolve the issues. As for DX, in one of the TV service trade magazines in the early 1950s, there was a story of a radio/appliance store owner in Colorado who bought a TV and put up an antenna in 1950. Denver was late to get on the TV bandwagon (kinda like DTV today) so at the time the nearest TV station was in Kansas City! His goal was to use Es openings to learn how to operate a TV set, so he'd be ahead of the game when a station came to Denver. In the long term interference from WWMT (and in the NW suburbs, WISC) is going to be a big issue. I don't think they're *ever* going to fix that problem. Because much of the problem isn't the boxes. It's subscribers' TV sets and VCRs and the cabling between them. IMHO the only way to fix it is to switch the cable boxes to output on channel 4. (Doug Smith W9WI, Pleasant View (Nashville), TN EM66, ibid.) Anyone who has ever had to switch VCR RF output between 3 and 4 should have anticipated this problem (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. IBIQUITY ON DIFFERENT IBOC CODECS Will they or won't they? They're not saying: http://www.radioworld.com/dailynews/one.php?id=3623 (Harry Helms W7HLH, Las Vegas, NV DM26, July 23, NRC-AM via DXLD) For some reason I smell a shell game coming. BTW, did anyone see the article in Radio World about CAM-D. It said that KKDS will start testing with it. It will be interesting to see how well these tests work out (Fred Vobbe, OH, ibid.) Fred, I'm shocked! Sure we differ from Ibiquity's position on IBOC, but that's no reason to be so suspicious of their motives! (Harry Helms W7HLH, Las Vegas, NV DM26, ibid.) Jeezz, Harry. I'm appalled that you find question with my suspicions. It's not like any testing was misrepresented, or that someone said a station was not testing when folks in the list heard/reported the signal. Giving the benefit of doubt, the noise could have been generated by the right-wing performed Sonata in A major by alien listeners to Coast to Coast that were urged by disgruntled Canadian Postal workers to use a Mr. Microphone to transmit on superheterodyned 9-kilohertz split channels at various PSSA levels in order to simulate a faulty photocell buzzing in our neighborhoods. Then again, I just think the modulation scheme was like a Hoover vacuum. It just _____ed. Got to go. Got to take my boy over to train club in my safety approved Ford Pinto (Fred Vobbe, ibid.) ** U S A. I'm sure the current FCC "Deregulation" will be one of the topics when Terry Gross and guests discuss CC's ownership of 1200 stations on tomorrow`s "Fresh Air" on NPR. Check your local listings. I catch it on WNYC-FM at 3PM EDT or WNYC 820 at 7PM. (Steve Coletti, July 22, swprograms via DXLD) It should also be available at http://www.waer.org at 7 P.M. EDT (2300 UTC); 88.3 FM for those in the Syracuse/Central New York area. If that doesn't do it, try http://freshair.npr.org which has the current show and many archived shows. 73, (Marie Lamb, NY, ibid.) i.e. the Wed July 23 FA; first airing is at 1600 UT: http://freshair.npr.org/day_fa.jhtml?display=day&todayDate=07/23/2003 (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. 'BIG' ISN'T 'BAD' -- By BOB WRIGHT The Wall Street Journal July 23, 2003 COMMENTARY Unfortunately, public discourse on important issues sometimes becomes untethered from fact and reason. Such is the case with the response to the Federal Communications Commission's expansion of the national television station ownership cap, which would allow a single entity to own stations that have a potential reach of 45% rather than 35% of the national TV audience. Rep. David Obey (D., Wis.) expressed the sentiments of many recently when he said: "I don't want ownership factors to get in the way of districts like mine from being able to have their own cultural attitudes." But the FCC's modest adjustment of ownership rules does not mean the silencing of local voices under the weight of monolithic media companies. On the contrary, the record shows that local voices, as measured by the amount and quality of local news and public-affairs programming, increase when networks such as NBC take operating control of television stations. * * * Views such as Rep. Obey's reflect a politically convenient populism that equates "big" with "bad." There are a number of mistaken assumptions at work here: 1) that the corporate parent of a broadcast station dictates its point of view or "cultural attitude"; 2) that the alternative to a station's being owned by a broadcast network is ownership by a mom-and-pop enterprise with offices above the five-and-dime on Main Street; 3) that such a small owner is better able to present a distinctive "voice" in the community than is a large media company. In fact, the location of a media company's home offices has nothing to do with its "voice." Station owners are in the business of appealing to their local audiences. They do that by serving their communities the best way they know how. In NBC's case, this means providing a local station with superior newsgathering and technical resources that enable it to enhance and extend its local programming. This is good for the community, and it is good business. A smaller owner, with more limited resources, is all too often forced to jettison expensive local news coverage in favor of less expensive programming imported from national syndicators. Moreover, if a broadcast network is prohibited from owning a station in a desirable market, the owner is unlikely to be a small, locally based company. It will instead be a large, diversified media company like Belo, Gannett, Hearst-Argyle, Scripps, or the Washington Post. It defies logic to claim that, in the name of "localism," the $6 billion Gannett Co., the Arlington-based owner of 100 daily newspapers and 22 television stations, should have freedom to expand its TV stations business but NBC, ABC, CBS, and Fox should not. One more point that is lost in this debate: The FCC's rules are based on theoretical audience reach -- measured by each station's antennal signal coverage -- not actual viewership. This is like measuring Ford's market share by the percentage of Americans within driving distance of a dealership -- regardless of how many cars Ford actually sells! According to the FCC, NBC has a theoretical national reach of 34% of the nation's households. But our actual national viewership, during prime time, when we have the largest audience, is less than 3% -- nowhere near the 40% market share that is the normal threshold to trigger market-concentration worries. An expansion of the national cap to the FCC's 45% limit would, at best, allow us to increase that by a point or two. This is hardly a big move. But it is significant, particularly for viewers. Because one thing it would allow us to do is purchase additional stations for our Telemundo network, thus adding many hours of Spanish-language newscasts in key markets that currently underserve their Hispanic residents. The be-all, end-all of local broadcasting is forging a connection with a particular community's distinctive audience. The general managers in charge of our stations wake up every day committed to that mission. To us, it's the only way to run a television station -- and the feedback we get in the form of ratings tells us that the public thinks we do a good job. Nonetheless, big media makes an attractive target. Unable to resist, some members of Congress are jumping on a populist bandwagon and seeking to keep the FCC's new rules from taking effect. However, it would be a disservice to their constituents for Congress to restrict business activity that has such demonstrable public benefits. Who controls the public airwaves is a legitimate area of congressional interest. But as with any important issue, Congress should base its actions on fact, not fiction. Mr. Wright is vice chairman of GE, and chairman and CEO of NBC. Copyright 2003 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. HOUSE MAY BLOCK PART OF FCC'S MEDIA PLAN CAP ON TV STATION OWNERSHIP WOULD REMAIN UNCHANGED By Jonathan Krim and Christopher Stern Washington Post Staff Writers, Wednesday, July 23, 2003; Page E01 The House moved closer last night to blocking the Federal Communications Commission from allowing television station ownership to be concentrated in fewer corporate hands. The vote, expected today, would be a slap at the House leadership, which had struggled to keep its members in line and support the FCC. But the Republican majority, with help from many Democrats, thwarted an effort to derail the FCC's plan to allow more newspapers and television stations in the same locale to be owned by the same company. The result is that the most dramatic and controversial changes in media-ownership rules in a generation are likely to be scaled back, though probably not as much as an array of citizen groups and several Democrats had sought. Still, an outcome that scraps any part of the new FCC rules would be a rare defeat for the disciplined GOP and the White House, which had hoped the new rules pushed by the Republican FCC chairman, Michael K. Powell, would sail through.. . http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A31469-2003Jul22.html (via Kraig Krist, WORLD OF RADIO 1192, DXLD) ** U S A. "Marketplace" on Monday had some comments from Marty Kaplan, dean of the Annenberg School of Communications at California's USC. Marty's angle was all about the loss of public accountability for the airwaves since the early 1980s. Worth a listen -- talks about the steps stations used to have to go through in order to renew their licenses. See http://www.marketplace.org (Richard Cuff / Allentown, PA, July 22, swprograms via DXLD) ** U S A. FCC OPINION BOLSTERS FEDERAL PREEMPTION OVER RF INTERFERENCE MATTERS An FCC Memorandum Opinion and Order (MO&O) released earlier this month bolsters the doctrine of federal preëmption over local efforts to regulate radio frequency interference (RFI). The ARRL had commented in the proceeding, WT Docket 02-100, which could have implications for Amateur Radio. The proceeding stemmed from efforts by Anne Arundel County, Maryland, to require telecommunication service providers to certify their facilities would not interfere with the county's public safety communication system. "We find that federal law preempts provisions of the Anne Arundel County, Maryland, zoning ordinances involving radio frequency interference," the FCC declared in granting Cingular Wireless' Petition for a declaratory ruling and denying the county's motion to dismiss. ARRL had supported Cingular's position in the proceeding. Cingular asserted in its petition that Congress had established a "pervasive regulatory scheme" that grants the FCC exclusive jurisdiction to regulate RFI, and that the Anne Arundel zoning amendments conflicted with the Commission's rules regarding resolution of RFI cases. The FCC also said it expected all parties to continue cooperating to resolve remaining RFI issues. Anne Arundel County in January 2002 adopted zoning amendments requiring commercial telecommunication providers to demonstrate that their facilities would not degrade or interfere with the public safety radio system. The amended ordinance gave the county the authority to revoke a zoning certificate if such interference or degradation occurred or if telecommunication service providers did not certify their systems to be in compliance with FCC standards and guidelines. The FCC said it found that the county's zoning provisions went beyond traditional zoning functions and attempted to regulate RFI. The FCC Memorandum Opinion and Order is available on the FCC Website http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-03-2196A1.doc (ARRL Letter July 18 via David Hodgson, TN, DXLD) ** U S A [and non]. When a call sign is used in another service (television or AM for example) doesn't the FM have to use the "-FM" suffix in the legal top of hour ID? Example I'm hearing... WHOG 1120 Hobson City, AL. Actual call in use. WHOG 95.7 Ormond-by-the-sea, FL (Daytona) would be required to use "WHOG-FM, Ormond-by-the-sea..." or did that requirement get dropped. I heard on a message board that it did, but will take that with a grain of salt... Just wondering. WHOG-FM got WHOG's consent to use the call. Hog as in Harley, in Daytona, fitting for a classic rocker. The AM is an Urban formatted station. I know the owner. Formerly owned 1570 in Fernandina Beach, FL, and that used to be WHOG in the 80s (Ron Gitschier, Palm Coast, FL, NRC-AM via DXLD) Calls cannot be duplicated in the FCC's database, and AM calls never take a suffix. So 1120 in Hobson City is just plain "WHOG." 95.7 thus has to be "WHOGFM," which in common use is represented with a hyphen and becomes "WHOG-FM." On top of that, you could also have a WHOG-TV, WHOG-DT, WHOG-CA and WHOG-LP (which could be either an LPTV or an LPFM; the FCC stupidly decided to allow the "-LP" suffix to be used for either.) The rules for adding suffixes to base calls are pleasantly arcane, and they go like this: Until the mid-eighties, any given base call could be used by only one owner in only one area. So if CBS owned KCBS 740 in San Francisco (common convention is to append the type of service in parentheses to the base call if it's not otherwise suffixed, so we can call this KCBS(AM), even though the FCC would recognize it only as "KCBS"), it could also own a KCBS-FM and a KCBS-TV *in* San Francisco, but no other station anywhere else could use those calls. The rule was liberalized around 1984 to allow CBS to change the calls of what was then KNXT (again, convention would allow us to call it KNXT(TV), though its official FCC call was simply "KNXT") in Los Angeles to KCBS-TV; eventually, KNX-FM in LA would become KCBS-FM as well. By a similar token, Gannett could have a WUSA-FM in Tampa and a WUSA-TV in Washington. At that point, though, calls still couldn't cross between owners, so if CBS sold KMOX-TV in St. Louis, which it did, and kept KMOX(AM), which it did, then one or the other had to change calls (KMOX-TV became KMOV(TV), as it happened.) By the late eighties, that rule too had been liberalized, and calls could be shared among owners as well, as long as they weren't duplicated within a service. Who decides whether a base call can be duplicated? The rule here is even more arcane - whoever's had the call in use on a single service the longest. So if someone DOES want to do a WHOG-TV or a WHOG-LP, they'd have to get permission from WHOG 1120 to use the call, since it's used "WHOG" as a base call longer than WHOG-FM in Ormond Beach. If Hobson City ever changed calls, the "rights" to the WHOG base call would then go to Ormond Beach, which would have first say about anyone wanting to use WHOG on AM or LPFM or TV. (Often, in that case, Wxxx-FM will pay the $55 to drop the suffix from its calls, just to make it absolutely impossible for anyone to then use them on AM without the FM's permission, since the AM can't be suffixed and calls can't be duplicated.) Many stations don't get this right at ID time. It's not uncommon (especially, for some reason, among public radio stations) to hear an ID of "WXXI-AM Rochester," which can't be correct because the call is "WXXI," not "WXXIAM." It's equally common to hear an ID of "WHOG Ormond-by-the-Sea," when it should be "WHOG-FM." And I've driven myself insane trying to explain to the local paper that our channel 13 here in town is NOT "WOKR-TV" but simply "WOKR" (or "WOKR(TV)" if you insist...) It really didn't help my cause that the station itself now IDs as "WOKR-TV/DT Rochester" at the top of the hour! The FCC has traditionally turned a blind eye to "WXXX AM and FM, Somewhere City," or the variant, "WXXX, WXXX-FM, Somewhere City" for some reason - even back in the day when it enforced such rules at all. I don't know why...I guess it's a relic of the days when there were so very many AM/FM simulcasts. Canada is much more sensible in this regard; EVERY FM there carries a "-FM" suffix as a matter of course, and every TV is "-TV." This causes confusion only on rare occasions, such as the existence of both a CJBC-2-FM (an FM relay of CJBC 860 Toronto) and a CJBC-FM-2 (an FM relay of CJBC-FM 90.3 Toronto) in different spots in Ontario. And of course Mexico uses XE- calls for AM (and a handful of grandfathered FM and TV calls) and XH- calls for FM and TV only. s (Scott Fybush, NY, ibid.) The FM suffix is required only if the callsign was already in use by another service when the FM call was assigned. For example, if there's a WGSR (AM), and someone applied for an FM with the same callsign, then the assigned callsign would be WGSR-FM. If you look at the list of FCC callsign changes that I compile for Pop' Comm, you'll see that some FM stations are listed with, some without, the FM suffix. Furthermore, when searching the FCC CDBS, if the FM suffix is part of the callsign, then it is required in the search by callsign. It will come up empty without the suffix. AM does not use a suffix (Bruce Conti - Nashua NH, ibid.) ** U S A [and non]. WHAT TO DO ABOUT MORSE? CODE REQUIREMENT REMAINS ON THE BOOKS IN US, CANADA NEWINGTON, CT, Jul 22, 2003 --- World Radiocommunication Conference 2003 (WRC-03) made optional the requirement to prove the ability to send and receive Morse signals to operate below 30 MHz. While a Morse code exam element remains on the books in the US, Canada and elsewhere, some countries already have moved to drop their Morse requirements. In the US, however, Morse will not go away that easily, since the FCC appears unlikely to act on its own motion to make that happen. ``There isn`t an exception in the Administrative Procedures Act that I am aware of that would permit the Commission to issue an administrative fiat changing the license structure or exam-requirement rules,`` said an FCC staffer who`s closely involved with Amateur Service rules. Other countries can do this because they have different laws and procedures, the FCC staff member observed, adding that even if it could be done here, ``that still leave unanswered the fundamental question: What do you want the new rules to be?`` As for where the FCC stands, the Commission itself may have tipped its hand slightly in its December 1999 Report and Order restructuring the Amateur Radio licensing system. ``We believe that an individual`s ability to demonstrate increased Morse code proficiency is not necessarily indicative of that individual`s ability to contribute to the advancement of the radio art,`` the FCC said in dropping the 20 and 13-WPM Morse code elements from the testing regime. While the FCC in 1999 minimized radiotelegraphy as ``just one of numerous diverse modes of radiocommunication,`` it stopped short of revising the Amateur Service rules to sunset the Morse examination requirement automatically if WRC-03 deleted Morse proficiency from the international Radio Regulations. At the same time, the FCC acknowledged ``a clear dichotomy of viewpoints`` on the Morse code issue within the amateur community. Switzerland apparently has become the first country to delete its Morse requirement for HF operation. The Swiss Federal Office of Communications (OFCOM) recently granted all Swiss ``no-code`` licensees access--albeit provisional--to the HF bands using their current call signs. Citing the recent WRC-03 decision, OFCOM said the temporary permission to use the HF bands would suffice until the rule could be changed. USKA--the Swiss International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) member-society--wished ``good DX`` to present no-code licensees on HF. The First Step in a Potentially Long Journey The first move on the Morse code question in the US would be for someone in the amateur community to file a Petition for Rule Making with the FCC seeking the change. That apparently has not happened yet. No Code International (NCI) http://www.nocode.org has long spearheaded the battle to eliminate the Morse requirement and is the most likely organization to file such a petition. As of late last week, NCI was still studying the matter. ``NCI has not yet made a final decision on a plan of action, though we are discussing it amongst the Board of Directors and have sought the advice of acquaintances at several well-regarded Washington communications law firms on how to best approach the matter,`` said NCI Executive Director Carl Stevenson, WK3C. Stevenson --- an ARRL member --- says it`s his personal hope that the League would join NCI in actively encouraging the FCC to eliminate the Morse test element as soon as possible. ``I think the League will do itself a great disservice if it continues to seek to impose Morse testing in the US rules as other countries around the world drop Morse testing en masse,`` he said. Stevenson said the League ``does many, many things that are very valuable to the US amateur community,`` and he believes the ARRL`s stance on the Morse issue has diluted or even negated some of the goodwill it`s established. NCI`s and Stevenson`s hopes for a quick resolution to the Morse question could be wishful thinking, however. Once a petition to drop Morse is filed, the FCC will put it on ``public notice`` by assigning an RM number and soliciting comments. If more than one such petition is filed, the FCC is obliged to put each on public notice and invite comments. When that process is completed, the FCC may determine that a Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) is in order. The Commission at that point could incorporate all Morse-related rule making petitions into a single proceeding. The NPRM would get a docket number, and the comment process would begin anew. Further complicating and extending the process, the FCC most likely would incorporate other pending Amateur Radio-related issues into the same NPRM. That`s how it`s tended to handle amateur regulatory matters in recent years. At the end of the comment and reply comment periods, the FCC would issue a Report and Order (R&O) that includes its decision on the Morse code requirement and the other issues it may have incorporated into the proceeding. The whole process could take a couple of years, perhaps longer. US Senate Ratification? Some believe that because the Morse code requirement was, in effect, a treaty obligation, its deletion requires ratification by the US Senate before the FCC can act. This is not the case. According to a footnote in a Government Accounting Office (GAO) report, ``Telecommunications: Better Coordination and Enhanced Accountability Needed to Improve Spectrum Management,`` released last September, the US Department of State has yet to submit the Final Acts of the World Radiocommunication Conferences of 1992, 1995, 1997 or 2000 to the US Senate for ratification. ``Department of State officials said that the agency is preparing to send all of these Final Acts to the Senate as one package,`` the GAO report said, ``and that ratification is not necessary for the United States to implement the agreements.`` Ahead of the Curve The United Kingdom`s Radiocommunications Agency (RA) http://www.radio.gov.uk recently proposed dropping the 5 WPM Morse requirement for access to amateur bands below 30 MHz and merging the Class A and B license classes. The Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) says it`s learned from the RA that a Gazette Notice -- the equivalent of an FCC Report and Order -- will be published shortly to announce the end of the Morse requirement for access to the HF bands by UK amateurs. ``From the date of the Gazette Notice all Full and Intermediate Class B amateurs will automatically have Class A privileges,`` the RSGB said this week, ``and will be allowed to operate on the HF bands with their existing call signs.`` The RSGB has been ahead of the curve in the effort to oust Morse as a requirement. Last year, the society convinced the RA to adopt the new Foundation license in Great Britain`s to further the RSGB`s campaign -- begun in 1998 -- to have the IARU reconsider its support at that time for mandatory Morse code testing for HF access. The Foundation ticket requires a simplified Morse code ``assessment`` instead of an exam. In 2001, the IARU announced that it was setting aside ``any previous relevant decisions`` and henceforth would ``support the removal of Morse code testing as an ITU requirement for an amateur license to operate on frequencies below 30 MHz.`` That same year, the ARRL Board of Directors reiterated the League`s policy that Morse ``should be retained as a testing element in the US.`` That policy continues. Following its January 2001 Board meeting, the League said Morse code was ``deserving of continued support as an important operating mode including providing for the protection and maintenance of sufficient spectrum in band planning.`` At its July 19- 20 meeting in Connecticut, the Board affirmed its interest in reviewing input from members on this and other possible revisions to Part 97 that arose from WRC-03. Morse North of the Border The Industry Canada Amateur Radio Service Centre http://strategis.ic.gc.ca/SSG/sf01862e.html#servicecentre and Radio Amateurs of Canada (RAC) http://www.rac.ca have received numerous inquiries about the status of Morse examinations north of the border and the qualifications required for HF operation. ``Canadian radio amateurs are advised that Basic and Morse Qualifications are still required for operation below 30 MHz,`` the RAC said, ``and that this requirement will remain pending a review by Industry Canada of the impact of the WRC-2003 regulatory changes on the Canadian radio regulations, policies and procedures.`` RAC said it would work with Industry Canada to review the impact of the WRC-03 decisions. It advised Canadian amateurs to send comments on the topic of Morse code as a licensing requirement to their RAC regional directors. Copyright © 2003, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved (via John Norfolk, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** URUGUAY [and non]. Re TIN's "Certificados de Visita", 3-130 PERU Dear Glenn, Estimado Glenn, I think that these "certificados de visita" that TIN collects from those stations are more than souvenirs! Think that they well could be useful as a sort of safe-conduct in case of eventual trouble or annoying interrogatory with/by police or other administrative body, who knows! The excellent DX job that wellknown friend TIN has performed in searching deep Latin America radio may have its risks in so troubled zones like Perú or Central America. It should be remembered that that kind of research could be useful to guerrillas and spies, too; or at least, may awake some kind of suspicion: a stranger so interested by radio technical issues, collecting and annotating addresses, transmitter and even cassette recorders and decks data. The word "Diexista" (DXer in Spanish) rhymes with Comunista (commie) :). All of us who know of TIN's excellence as a DXer and person do not need major explanation, but for unaware people... Once when I was visiting ANDEBU's headquarters (one of the private broadcaster associations in Montevideo) searching for updated station data for WRTH, I presented myself to the young officers explaining that I was making an investigative report. They didn't take very well that term, and had to explain further what I was trying to get! I once also had problems at RAMI (another Uruguayan association) where my queries were not very well received by the Secretary's assistant. Only later, when mentioned that I was member of the staff helping Antonio Tormo's vintage radio museum, they agreed to supply the info. Sometimes you have to be "somebody" to collect info from radio stations! If you don't believe here is a final anecdote: once I got a solid contact with an officer inside the Uruguayan broadcasting bureau at old Dirección Nacional de Comunicaciones (now URSEC and, at that time, belonging to the Ministry of Defense, imagine that in times of dictatorship), in order to avoid bureaucratic relationship in favor of direct chat by telephone, or non-delayed face-to-face meeting, always searching for some station data for our hobby. This worked fine, but once I felt obliged myself to gratify the officer with a box of assorted chocolates!! :)) That person still works there, but was unfortunately was moved to another section, some time ago. I`ve seen those "Certificados de Visita" personally, when I met TIN visiting Uruguay in 1996 or so. Cheers TIN if you are reading this, too! and congrats for the fine work all these years at Relámpago DX!!!! 73 (Horacio A. Nigro, Uruguay, Jul 22) UNIDENTIFIED. Amigos, pediria auxilio na identificação de 2 estações que transmitem em 1680 KHz AM, em CW, e que foram ouvidas em São Bernardo do Campo, São Paulo, Brasil (à beira da represa Billings) com sinais muitissimos fracos, mas audiveis, que identificavam-se como V7B, e uma outra que se identificava como ZO (também em CW). Gostaria de ouvir a opinião dos colegas das listas. Poderia ser algum beacon em base australiana na Antártida? (Mera pergunta, dado que V7 é inicial de indicativo australiano). Poderia ser alguma plataforma petrolífera 'emprestada' de outro país que estivesse instalada em algum local das águas brasileiras? E ZO? Poderia ser alguma co-irmã de ZZ que é ouvida em 1645 AM? Ou de algum outro país? Realmente, muito curioso, entrando em 1680 o V7B e alternando o fading com ZO, ambos sinais extremamente fracos, mas perfeitamente audiveis com o 'fone grudado no cérebro' (via ouvidos!!!). Ambas sintonizadas no Riacho Grande, São Bernardo, à beira da represa Billings. Um belo espelho d'água. Alguém teria alguma lista atualizada de beacons? Ou algum contato com dexistas estrangeiros que ouvem sinais deste tipo? Muito curioso. (Rudolf W. Grimm, São Bernardo, SP - B, http://www.radioways.cjb.net via DXLD) {see 3-132} ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ 9º ENCUENTRO DE CLUBES DIEXISTAS MEXICANOS Y OYENTES DE LA ONDA CORTA TIZAYUCA 2003 (31 de julio, 1, 2 y 3 de agosto de 2003) Hola amigos de México y el mundo: Muchos ya nos conocemos, sin embargo estas son épocas en que nos reunimos quienes tenemos un buen hobby y que más que eso creo que es la forma de aprovechar el tiempo en adquirir mas conocimientos que atesora la cultura individual y por supuesto que esta no será la excepción, por tal motivo me es grato hacerles una "CORDIAL INVITACIÓN" a que asistan y participen con temas relacionados con la escucha de emisoras internacionales y otros medios de comunicación a largas distancias (Diexismo). Este evento tendrá por nombre: "9º Encuentro de Radioescuchas y Diexistas en Onda Corta" Tizayuca 2003; como algunos saben han sido ocho etapas transcurridos mismas que han tenido lugar en diferentes partes de México y en consecuencia ya estamos con los preparativos por lo que agradeceré que sus opiniones y participaciones sean dadas a conocer al suscrito a la dirección electrónica: mnhajz@p... [truncated], además un numero telefónico 779 79 60200 de las 1600 horas a las 2300 México centro (22:00-05:00 utc [sic, no DST??]) ó bien a la dirección postal: Zempazuchitl 69, fraccionamiento Nuevo Tizayuca, Tizayuca, Hidalgo 43800, México. Sin más por el momento estoy a la espera de sus comentarios y sugerencias. Atentamente. Martín Herrera Jiménez INFORMACIÓN BÁSICA El 9º encuentro se celebrará en la ciudad de Tizayuca, situada en el estado de Hidalgo, que se encuentra localizado a unos 60 km al norte de la Ciudad de Méjico y a unos 40 km de Pachuca, también en Hidalgo. PROGRAMACIÓN {quickly outdated; see AER website} JUEVES 31 DE JULIO 2003 16:30 a las ..:00 horas: Registro de asistentes y bienvenida al evento (se ofrecerá bocadillos típicos de la región), se aprovechara para que las personas que asistan de otros lugares se hospeden en la localidad o bien se trasladen a la ciudad de Pachuca por ser más segura que para el Distrito Federal se contara con transporte cortesía de una empresa de transporte local. Este evento estará amenizado por la "RANDALLA MAGISTRAL DEL ESTADO DE MÉXICO". VIERNES 1º DE AGOSTO 2003 10:00 horas: Inauguración del ENCUENTRO por personalidades locales y estatales. 10:30 horas Intervención del ballet folklórico de la casa de la cultura de Tizayuca en este espacio se presentara un pequeño espectáculo de danzas y bailes regionales de diferentes partes de México así como la presentación de grupos corales de la institución universitaria. 12:30 horas visita a la empresa ILUSION, SA DE CV con una duración aproximada de 2 horas 14:30 horas Receso. 16:30 horas Introducción al tema de la escucha de emisoras internacionales, Dxismo, frecuencias, forma de propagación, presentado por MARTÍN HERRERA JIMÉNEZ 17:30 horas HISTORIA DE LA RADIO EN ONDA CORTA EN MÉXICO (1920-1940) tema presentado por PEPE GONZÁLEZ. 18:30 horas Presentación del video sobre la DXPEDITION a la "ISLA DE ENMEDIO" misma que fue realizada del 20 al 27 de Marzo de este año en dicho lugar del estado de Veracruz, México editada por ENRIQUE GARCÍA MUNIVE, XE1LWY, con duración de 90 minutos que incluye tiempo para preguntas y respuestas. SABADO 2 DE AGOSTO DE 2003. 10:00 horas Presentación del video del congreso de la HFCC organismo mundial el uso de las frecuencias de onda corta que tuvo lugar en JOHANNESBURGO, SUDÁFRICA presentado por JEFF WHITE director general de RADIO MIAMI INTERNACIONAL. 11:00 horas. "LA RADIO UN MEDIO PARA APRENDER IDIOMAS" tema presentado por JOHN KILLIAN. 12:00 horas RADIO DIGITAL MUNDIAL "DRM" tema presentado por el ING. CESAR FERNÁNDEZ DE LARA (sociedad de ingenieros radioescuchas del puerto de Veracruz) 13:00 horas Intervención del ING. RAFAEL GRAGEDA (sociedad de ingenieros radioescuchas del puerto de Veracruz) con el tema: estaciones utilitarias. En estas emisoras de radio se agrupan radio faros, estaciones horarias, satelitales, etc. Siendo su finalidad emitir a un sector especifico siendo diferentes los modos de transmisión-Recepción. 14:00 horas Receso. 16:00 horas. Presentación de RADIO HABANA CUBA, Historia y programación de la emisora, presentación del programa "EN CONTACTO" por Manolo de la Rosa. 17:00 horas. Rifas, premios, regalos y reconocimientos a los diexistas que por cantidad de tarjetas QSL presenten del año 2002-2003, habrá tres primeros lugares. 18:00 horas elaboración de antenas receptoras y filtros de acoplamiento para lograr mayor calidad de recepción, presentado por MARTÍN HERRERA JIMÉNEZ. 21:00 Horas. Noche Dxista pendiente por confirmar el lugar. DOMINGO 3 DE AGOSTO DE 2003 7:00 horas Se recomienda una visita a la zona arqueológica de Teotihuacán que esta a 30 minutos de Tizayuca y el tiempo de visita es de aproximadamente de 90 minutos y los domingos la entrada es gratuita para los mexicanos con credencial oficial mexicana por lo que los que no la presententen o sean extranjeros el costo es de $ 37 pesos ($ 4 dólares) 12:00 Horas. Foro de emisoras en esta espacio participaran representantes de radio difusoras que transmiten en Onda Corta en el que de manera general informan su fin, cambios de programación entre otros asuntos, se dispondrá de tiempos para preguntas y respuestas. 13:30 horas Clausura del 9º Encuentro y propuesta para el próximo encuentro Dx. De igual forma se confirma la asistencia de RADIO SHACK del distrito federal en donde estarán a la venta receptores de onda corta CONFIRMADO Asistencia por primer ocasión de RADIO UNAM pendiente por confirmar el tema que expondrán. Se tendrá la asistencia de un distribuidor de RadioShack en donde podrán adquirir radios con recepción de ONDA CORTA a la medida de todos los bolsillos, asimismo para los coleccionistas de radios antiguos habrá exposición de receptores antiguos. PENDIENTE POR CONFIRMAR También se tendrá asistencia de un vendedor de antigüedades quien exhibirá radios de onda corta. Pendiente de confirmar participación de la familia Mauleón Tolentino con algún tema. DATOS PRÁCTICOS Transporte: De la ciudad de México se aborda en la central del norte los autobuses flecha roja pidiendo en la taquilla con destino a Tizayuca siendo el tiempo de trayecto de aproximadamente una hora teniendo un costo de $ 18.00 pesos, solicite al operador de la unidad que los deje en el centro de la ciudad; Si viene de Pachuca en la misma línea de transporte o también sale de la central de Pachuca los autobuses ómnibus de Tizayuca igual solicitan al operador que los deje en el centro el costo de boleto es de $16.00 Pesos y el trayecto es de 45 minutos, en ambas direcciones la salida de los autobuses es cada 10 minutos. Para los extranjeros considere que para esta fecha el tipo de cambio de dólar es de $ 10.50 (diez pesos 50/100) Clima estacional Templado / seco. Temperatura media de 28º C. Lugar: Salón de eventos "La Cascada" Ubicación: Plaza Himno Nacional en el centro de esta localidad a unos pasos de la avenida principal lugar en donde hace parada el bus (transporte de pasaje que sale de la central de autobuses del norte. Temas: Los relacionados a la escucha de la onda corta, radioafición, satélites, etc. Más info en http://www.aer-dx.org/encuentro/ -------------------------------------------------- Pedro Sedano, Madrid, España, COORDINADOR GENERAL (via Conexión Digital via WORLD OF RADIO 1192, DXLD) INVITATION FOR EUROPEAN DX CONFERENCE 2003 Invitation to all DX Clubs --- Hello DX friends, we invite to the European DX Conference 2003 in Germany, the conference for far distance listening 15-17.8.2003 in Königstein near Frankfurt. Information, program and registration at http://www.edxc-konferenz2003.org (engl./dt) EDXC Conference 2003 will be held at Königstein near Frankfurt (Germany) at the Dresdner Bank Communication Center. The Rhein-Main- Radio-Club is organizing this meeting with friendly support of Bosch, Rohde & Schwarz and WRTH. We expect radio stations and Far distance Listeners from all over europe and abroad. The Rhein-Main-Radio-Club (RMRC) is one of the leading DX-Clubs in germany using drm, digital FM, worldspace and Internetradio. One of the major themes of this conference will be DRM (digital radio mondiale), and the future of shortwave listening. Lessons will be held by Wolf Harranth (ROI), Adrian Peterson (AWR), St. H. Nielsen (WMR) and many more interesting lessons about shortwave, FM reception, private radio, tropical band reception. Everybody can listen to DRM drm and analog SW reception at different receivers. There will be a Quiz, a tombola and a flea market for all things DXers need. Everybody can bring and offer something with for the flea market. But the best is to meet the DX friends from all over Europa, sitting over a glass of beer or wine and talking with friend about there experience with DXing. Come and see and take part at this DX meeting! There will be also a special broadcast on SW analog and DRM for this event from ADDX over Jülich with special QSL-cards. 1900-1929 UTC analog on 3965 kHz, 1930-1959 UTC digital (DRM) also on 3965 kHz Additionally, the Rhein-Main-Radio-Club started a ``Who is Who`` of the DXers worldwide with pictures from the Dxer and many details. Whoever will take part in the ``DX Who is Who`` can win each month one of three World Radio and Television Handbooks, sent free of charge to the winner. You will find it at http://www.dx-who-is-who.org or at the conference homepage. Good luck, hope to see you and greetings from Germany (Harald Gabler, RMRC Vorstand, EDXC Conference 2003 DrGabler@t-online.de DX LISTENING DIGEST) RECEIVER NEWS ++++++++++++ MPR DUMPS RDS I notice that MPR has dropped the RDS from their stations all over the state. Most of the new SUVs and fancy pickup trucks being sold have receivers that are RDS capable. I hope that MPR will re-instate the RDS soon. It is great. Wisconsin Public Radio is running RDS on all their stations, and now has added RDS to their translators, too. Thanks for your attention (Paul LaFreniere, Grand Marais, MN, July 22, to MPR, cc to WTFDA via DXLD) Thank you for contacting Minnesota Public Radio. We have tested the various RDS systems and have found them all to be lacking in performance. All of them will produce a deterioration of the audio quality of the main channel, despite what the manufacturers say about this equipment. When they are operated to manufacturer's specs, they all produce whining noises in the audio, and will often interfere with our Radio Talking Book Service (RTBS) for the blind. When they are adjusted so that they no longer interfere with normal programming, and the RTBS, then the useful range of the RDS is very small, and not really worth the effort to maintain. Operated under any conditions, the RDS signal will make the effects of multipath worse, something that we try to eliminate as much as possible. With respect, Robin Johnson, Member Listener Service, Minnesota Public Radio, 800-228-7123 (via La Freniere, ibid.) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ ANOTHER TRANS-ATLANTIC FM DX CATCH BY MULTIPLE SPORADIC E Hi guys, last night I had a station in French on 88.5 at 0215 local time while TA TV carriers were present up to A5. I wonder can anyone tell me --- maybe Charles in Quebec, does SRC have a classical music programme Sunday nights at 10;15 pm in the Maritimes, 9:15 EST?? I heard a classical show with a male announcer in French. Signal was up for a good ten minutes but all the speech I heard was about 10 seconds. Fading always knows when to strike! Nothing else coming in except Iceland on 92.4 (my first signal from there) and strong Icelandic TV on 62.25. Today TA TV up to A6 but no FM logged. Any help would be very helpful. Location: 54 15 N, 7 27 W in IO64GF Low VHF Skip and Scanner page http://www.geocities.com/yogi540 Regards (Paul Logan, Lisnaskea, N. Ireland, July 21, WTFDA via DXLD) Congratulations, Paul (again)! What you got was CBAF-FM 88.5 Moncton NB, the only one possible. CBAF 88.5 is part of "La Première Chaîne", Programming on this network consists of both classical and popular music. And the show on Sunday night is hosted by a man, Serge Bouchard. CBAF-FM is 50 kW and located: 46:08:41N 64:54:14W. CBAF is the only French one on 88.5 in the entire country! At 23:00 EDT was getting Newfoundland on TV. Did I miss possible TA by a couple of hours???!!! Darn! 73, (Charles Gauthier, St-Lambert, Québec, ibid.) FORECAST OF SOLAR AND GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY 23 JULY - 18 AUGUST 2003 Solar activity is expected to be at low to moderate levels, with the possibility of some high intervals. Regions 410 and 412 have the potential for M-class events until they rotate beyond the west limb on 26 July. There is a slight chance of a major event from Region 410. Old Region 397 (N12, L=032) is due to return to the visible disk on 24 July and is expected to have M-class potential. This block of active longitudes currently on the visible disk (L = 190 – 205) will return by mid August and may produce moderate solar activity levels. There is a slight chance of a greater than 10 MeV proton event at geosynchronous orbit early in the period. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux is expected to reach high levels on 30 July – 04 August, 09 - 11 August, and again on 12 –17 August, due to recurrent coronal hole high speed streams. The geomagnetic field is expected to range from quiet to major storm levels during the period. A large, recurrent coronal hole high speed stream in expected to become geoeffective on 28 July - 03 August, and produce active to minor storm levels. Coronal hole effects are expected again on 7 - 9 August and again on 11 - 17 August and occasional minor storm periods are possible. Isolated major storm periods are possible with these high speed steams, but will be mostly confined to high latitudes in local nighttime hours. :Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt :Issued: 2003 Jul 22 2211 UTC # Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Environment Center # Product description and SEC contact on the Web # http://www.sec.noaa.gov/wwire.html # # 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table # Issued 2003 Jul 22 # # UTC Radio Flux Planetary Largest # Date 10.7 cm A Index Kp Index 2003 Jul 23 150 12 3 2003 Jul 24 150 12 3 2003 Jul 25 145 12 3 2003 Jul 26 135 15 3 2003 Jul 27 130 15 3 2003 Jul 28 130 15 3 2003 Jul 29 130 15 3 2003 Jul 30 135 15 3 2003 Jul 31 140 20 4 2003 Aug 01 140 20 4 2003 Aug 02 130 25 5 2003 Aug 03 135 25 5 2003 Aug 04 135 15 3 2003 Aug 05 125 10 3 2003 Aug 06 120 10 3 2003 Aug 07 120 25 5 2003 Aug 08 120 20 4 2003 Aug 09 125 15 3 2003 Aug 10 125 15 3 2003 Aug 11 125 25 5 2003 Aug 12 130 25 5 2003 Aug 13 135 20 4 2003 Aug 14 140 15 3 2003 Aug 15 145 15 3 2003 Aug 16 150 15 3 2003 Aug 17 150 15 3 2003 Aug 18 145 15 3 (http://www.sec.noaa.gov/radio via WORLD OF RADIO 1192, DXLD) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-130, July 22, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1191: RFPI: Wed 0100, 0730, 1330, 7445 15039 WWCR: Wed 0930 on 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1191.html First airings of WORLD OF RADIO 1192: Wed 2200 on WBCQ 7415, 17495-CUSB Thu 2030 on WWCR 15825 Fri 1930 on RFPI 15039 Sun 0030 on WINB 12160 JULY DXLD HTML ARCHIVE is now available thru 3-129, incorporating correxions, cross-references, hotlinx: http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIALS You might be interested to see the latest newsletter from the Association of Independents in Radio (AIR) at http://www.airmedia.org Click through on the links to AIRSPACE. I was one of several people queried about their favorite on-line listening posts. Your site was on my list. All the best, (Sue Schardt) viz: Glenn Hauser's World of Radio -- Legendary in short-wave radio circles. A place of extreme obscurity with mostly snoozy listening where I occasionally hear, among other things, tape recorded and sent in by Glenn's members holding microphones up to their shortwave radios to demonstrate the strength of the local SW signal (Sue Schardt, Airspace, Summer 2003) SOLICITED TESTIMONIALS Glenn, I've been listening to WOR since it first came on WRNO. For quite a few years, I've been listening to WOR on WWCR Sun 0230. Other than a couple of weeks ago, when I listened on WINB Sun 0030, I can't think of another broadcast I've listened to except Sun 0230. (If I miss a week, I listen on WRN's On-Demand service.) I've always enjoyed WOR, and really appreciate all the work you put into DXLD (Joel Hermann, KKIA/KAYL AM-FM, Storm Lake, IA) Dear Mr. Hauser: I am Bruce Weiss, a 40 year old blind "WOR" listener for many years primarily on SW on WWCR UT Sunday at 0230. Here in Richmond VA, the broadcast provides the best reception. Your show is excellent. I use a Grundig Yachtboy 400 receiver with the wire antenna included (Bruce Weiss, Richmond VA) Dear Glenn, I do listen to you every week on Saturday morning on WRN via WorldSpace Afristar satellite system. Keep up the good work. I find this program very informative. Regards, (Richard Prinsloo, Johannesburg, South Africa) Here`s a cool way to start the issue from the editor`s oven at 43C: ** ANTARCTICA. Antarctica (Argentine Territory), 15476 kHz, LRA Radio Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel, full data "LRA 36" card, in 7 weeks via Gabriel Iván Barrera, 15 months total, no v/s, station stamp, received booklet on (2002) 50th anniversary of Base Esperanza Argentine Antarctica, sticker from 870 MW LRA1 Radio Nacional Buenos Aires and personal note from Gabriel in part explaining the economic crisis in Argentina and how that is impacting QSLing Argentine stations. Booklet in part depicts two very nice Argentine commemorative stamps of Argentine Antarctica/Base Esperanza (one of each on envelope). I would like to personally thank Gabriel Iván Barrera for his intervention; without his kind assistance, this QSL would not have been possible. 5 kw into Rhombic antenna (Joe Talbot, AB, July 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 15476 kHz, LRA36 Radio Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel, Mon-Fri *1800- 2100*, probably will have a special transmission on night Aug 27 2003 (Aug 28 acc UT around 0100) during the night. In this transmission, they will talk about radio and DX according to my request to my contact friend there. This transmission will be concreted with informations supplied by mine and with the special collaboration of my friend Arnaldo Slaen. I am waiting for a final confirmation of this requirement (Gabriel Iván Barrera, Argentina, July 20, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** ANTARCTICA [and non]. [A thread started by NRC`s Question of the Week] Best vacation; we've had a bunch of great ones since we retired but the most outstanding one is the trip we took to Chile, the Falkland Islands and Antarctica several years ago. In Chile, managed to visit the Atacama desert in the north and Patagonia in the far south before the Antarctica portion. We were able to land at a number of places in Antarctica and saw lots of interesting wildlife. AM DXing was most interesting from there, too. We were there in the middle of their summer and not a station was to be heard day or (the short) night (John Sampson, July 19, NRC-AM via DXLD) I've always wanted to spend some time in Antarctica, interested in assisting with scientific work, backpacking, and MW DXing using full- size Beverages (Bruce Conti, NH, ibid.) When we were there, we visited Palmer Station (a US research station) for a couple of hours. They had several long antennas, but not long enough for a Beverage, strung at various places. I asked about them but no one we talked to knew any specifics, other than they were for some sort of long range communications test. I've also seen (but don't remember details) where the US researchers have something like internships available for extended stays down there (John Sampson, ibid.) If anyone is REALLY serious, the U.S. staffing for Antarctica is handled by Antarctic Support Associates (a private firm) on behalf of the National Science Foundation. Commitments start at just 6 months (over winter) and they have quite a communications infrastructure. Be the first on your block to use an Antarctic Beverage antenna (Chuck Hutton, ibid.) I spent some time at McMurdo in the southern hemisphere summer of 1979 while I was in the U.S. Coast Guard. We conducted space and atmospheric weather research, plus some iceberg surveys. The whole time I was there the MW broadcast band was dead and a lot of the time so were HF frequencies, thanks to the radio aurora oval. To winter over you have to pass a rigorous psychological test similar to the U.S. Navy submariner service, due to the isolation, boredom and cramped living quarters. A bright spot mentally for hams is the HF station. 73, (Thomas F. Giella, KN4LF, Plant City, FL, USA, EL87WX, ibid.) Florida Space & Atmospheric Weather Institute: http://www.kn4lf.com/fsawi.htm KN4LF Daily Solar Space Weather & Geomagnetic Data Archive: http://www.kn4lf.com/kn4lf5.htm I wonder if any MW signals would make it during winter? Perhaps a Beverage would catch any low angle signals that sneak under the auroral dome. I'm sure that I could survive the six months isolation, especially if I could bring my DX cats. However I'm probably too old at this point to meet the physical and psychological standards, even though I'm not crazy, just insane (and a mediumwave DXer)... (Bruce Conti, Nashua NH, http://members.aol.com/baconti/bamlog.htm ibid.) Yes, some MF signals would make it under the auroral oval due to low arrival angle. Of course it would vary from hour to hour (Thomas Giella, KN4LF, ibid.) ** AUSTRALIA. HCJB changes via Kunnunura (KNX) effective from July 21: SPac 0800-1200 English NF 11750* 050 kW/120 deg, ex 0700-1200 on 11770 1800-2030 English NF 11765# 050 kW/120 deg, new additional txion SoAs 0100-0130 Urdu NF 15420 075 kW/307 deg, new txion in new lang 0130-0330 English NF 15420 075 kW/307 deg, new additional txion 1230-1700 English NF 15390@ 075 kW/307 deg, ex 1230-1730 on 15480 1700-1730 Urdu NF 15405 075 kW/307 deg, new txion in new lang * co-ch 0800-0855 Voice of Turkey in Turkish # co-ch 1800-1827 VOIROI/IRIB in German @ co-ch 1230-1256 RRI in Romanian (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, July 21 via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. ABC SAYS IRAQ COVERAGE "VINDICATED" AFTER PROBE | Text of report by Radio Australia on 21 July Radio Australia's parent body, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, has delivered its response to Communications Minister Richard Alston's complaints alleging biased and anti-American coverage during the Iraq war. Stephanie Kennedy reports the ABC upheld two of Senator Alston's complaints and rejected 66 others. [Kennedy] Last month, Senator Alston made 68 complaints about the ABC's current affairs programme "AM". The minister believed the programme's coverage of the Iraq war had been biased and anti- American. The 68 cases were referred to the ABC's Complaints Review Executive, an independent office. It upheld two of Senator's Alston's complaints and rejected 66, and it also rejected the inference contained in the minister's complaint that the ABC's coverage was biased. The ABC's managing director, Russell Balding, says he is satisfied with both the process and outcome of the investigation, adding the "AM" programme and its staff have been vindicated. Mr Balding says the ABC's war coverage was second to none and he stands firmly behind the ABC's programmes. The minister's office says Senator Alston will now examine the findings before commenting. Source: Radio Australia, Melbourne, in English 0300 gmt 21 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) AUSTRALIAN RADIO ADMITS TO SARCASM BUT DENIES BIAS IN IRAQ WAR COVERAGE http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/afp/20030721/wl_mideast_afp/australia_iraq_media_030721043105 (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ABC SENDS ALSTON PACKING ON BIAS By Matt Price July 22, 2003 THE ABC has delivered a humiliating rebuff to Communications Minister Richard Alston, with an internal inquiry clearing the broadcaster of bias while claiming he lacks understanding of news reporting and the ABC charter. . . http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,6790952%255E2702,00.html (via Jill Dybka, DXLD) ** BENIN. 7210, R. Diff. du Benin (presumed) 2250-2255* July 19. Pop vocal music in French. Abrupt disappearance at 2255. Very tentative reception, but follows their usual habit of an abrupt non-signoff at the end of their transmission. Poor signal with much QRN and QSB (SINPO 24222). (Jim Evans, TN, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) Hi Jim, Cotonou on 7210.3 is coming fairly good here in Italy right now at 2140 UT. The reception is slightly clearer on USB, although 7210 is free. No T/S at TOH, but just a short ID at 2210 after a long interview over the origins and the effects of the colonial system in Africa. Then back to back both western-style music and afropops. It was gone at recheck at 2303. Too many statics, alas, to afford a good recording. Thanks for the tip, I always overlook those few Africans in the 41 mb. Ciao (Renato Bruni, http://www.faiallo.splinder.it ibid.) ** BRAZIL. A Rádio Verdes Florestas é emissora brasileira que emite, pela freqüência de 4865 kHz, entre 1030 e 1400 e, após breve intervalo, entre 2100 e 0300. Os estúdios estão situados no seguinte endereço: Rua Mário Lobão, 81, CEP: 69980-000, Cruzeiro do Sul (AC). Os transmissores estão situados na Estrada do Aeroporto, no quilômetro 2, no bairro Nossa Senhora das Graças, naquele Município. Os telefones da emissora são os seguintes: +55 68 322 3309 e +55 68 322 2634. E- mail: florestas@nauanet.com.br. As informações são do biólogo Paulo Roberto e Souza, de Tefé (AM), em mais um trabalho voluntário em prol do dexismo brasileiro! A Rádio Clube do Pará transmite, em ondas curtas, pela freqüência de 4885 kHz. Desde Tefé (AM), Paulo Roberto e Souza indica sítio com resumo da história da emissora: http://www.radioclubedopara.com.br/i_historia.htm. A Rádio Difusora Acreana, que transmite pela freqüência de 4885 kHz, enviou farto material de divulgação ao colega Oséias Fantinelli, de Jacutinga (RS). Além de convidar Fantinelli para visitar Rio Branco, o apresentador Antônio Fiori disse que "nasceu no estado do Rio Grande do Sul e reside há 30 anos na Amazônia". Entre o material enviado, destaque para revista com a história da emissora (all: Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX July 20 via DXLD) See also SAO TOME ** CANADA. Federal Cabinet ministers have upheld a broadcast licence issued to a new multicultural radio station in Toronto despite allegations it has ties to the Tamil Tigers terrorist group. http://www.nationalpost.com/national/story.html?id=B21E5D01-3C9F-45E7-BDF0-3FF1B65E92C7 (via Jill Dybka, DXLD) ** CHINA. O Departamento de Espanhol da Rádio Internacional da China enviou mensagem a todos seus ouvintes pedindo comentários a respeito de um possível aumento em suas transmissões. Deixaria de emitir apenas 30 minutos e passaria a levar ao ar uma hora de programação, em cada emissão que faz (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX July 20 via DXLD) ** CONGO DR. RADIO CANDIP IN BUNIA HEARD ON SHORTWAVE 21 JULY Radio Candip, broadcasting from the town of Bunia in northeastern DRCongo, was heard on its usual shortwave frequency (5066.3 kHz) on 21 July. This is the first time the station has been heard since 8 July. The French news agency AFP reported on 9 July that the station had been closed down by the UN Mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUC) because of a dispute over airtime access. Source: BBC Monitoring research 21 Jul 03 (via DXLD) ** COSTA RICA. 11815, REE, 2019-2021 July 13, SINPO=55544. Programa en español. Fortísima señal, entrevistando a un músico español, tocando música del entrevistado. Los "bigotes" de ésta emisión se perciben aún sobre los 11825 kHz (¡!)(Elmer Escoto, Honduras, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. 2000 UT, Radio Havana, Cuba, 11760 kHz in English with news, sports, etc. and ongoing (Robert Thompson, TX, swl at qth.net via DXLD) What now? English not supposed to be until 2030-2130, and indeed when I checked July 22 at 2017 it was in French (gh, DXLD) ** CUBA. CUBAN JAMMING DEMANDS A FIRM RESPONSE By Stephen Johnson, WebMemo #319 July 22, 2003 For nearly four decades, Cuba has maintained sophisticated electronic intelligence-gathering and offensive capabilities, which range from tapping U.S. phone conversations to jamming radio communications signals and launching computer viruses. To date, U.S. decision-makers have done little more than work around them, since they were never considered serious threats. Washington should reconsider that stance in light of the following events: . . . http://www.heritage.org/Research/LatinAmerica/wm319.cfm (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** ECUADOR. 4781.4, Radio Oriental, Tena, 1040+, July 20, Spanish. Music program conducted by female. TC: "son las 5 de la mañana con 40 minutos en el territorio continental", Announcement and ID as: "al mundo entero les cantamos con amor desde Oriental", 35443. Past weekend I was in General Lavalle, 259 km south-east from Buenos Aires, with my dear friends Nicolás Eramo and his son: Nicolás Jr., Marcelo Cornachioni and Norberto Pugliese. General Lavalle is a very small town over Ria de Ajo, near the Argentina Sea ("Mar Argentino"). We were in two rooms for fisherman but we could make two antennas in the hotel`s garden. 73's & 55's (Arnaldo Slaen, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** ETHIOPIA. 6210, Radio Fana full data card received in 5 months for a compact disc of my reception and $1. Address on QSL card "Near Black Lion Hospital in front of Sweden Embassy." (Jill Dybka TN, NASWA Flashsheet July 20 via DXLD) ** FIJI [and non]. ZJV, Fiji Broadcasting Co. QSL, from 1937, nicely illustrated, so one hardly needs to buy the original: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2940962052&category=697 And VPD, when it was run by AWA: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2941170517&category=697 And this week`s RVi Radio World has some old recordings of Fiji, plus multilingual IDs from KATB-570 Guam, KMTH Radio 92, Midway, which Frans admits he had never heard of before, and KLEI, K-Lei, Kailua, Island Radio Magic, Hawaii, via http://www.rvi.be/rvi_master/uk/radio_world/index.html Next week: more Pacific islands to visit. The files should only be up for one week at a time (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. If you ever had a sticker from NDR, you probably saw Antje; she was there in various poses and formats. 73- (Bill Westenhaver, DX LISTENING DIGEST) http://www.faz.com/IN/INtemplates/efaz/docmain.asp?doc={CAE20BEF-937D-4F4D-B5D5-D3CEE2B9FF7D}&rub={F1B72E86-3783-11D4-A3AA-009027BA22E4}# ANTJE THE WALRUS DIES [unfortunately, not illustrated] After 20 years as the nationally recognized mascot of NDR, the regional broadcaster in northern Germany, Antje the walrus died in her sleep on Thursday morning. Officials said the cause of death was old age: Antje, 27, was one of the oldest known walruses in the world and the star attraction at Hagenbeck's Tierpark zoo in Hamburg, where she had lived since 1976. Adults and kids gathered at the zoo to pay homage to Antje, who will be stuffed and placed in the city's Zoological Museum. ak July 18 (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** GERMANY. The Kiel-based Power Radio has been probably closed down. Both URLs http://www.power-radio.de and http://www.power612.de only contain a "this website is not available at present" message and some vague reports indicate that the Kiel-Kronshagen transmitter (612 daytimer, 0400-1700 only) was yesterday on but with an open carrier only. No more recent observations available so far (Kai Ludwig, July 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. Since July 19 all foreign language programming of Deutsche Welle originates from their new headquarters at Bonn. Only the German service still broadcasts from the skyscraper at Cologne already abandoned by the majority of the staff by now. The previous live studio of the German service was already dismantled; at present the programming originates from one of the small studios with only one announcer booth previously used by the foreign language sections. The final switch-over to Bonn is still scheduled for August 4 at 0900 UT as previously reported. It is understood that the skyscraper will be handed over to the municipal authorities of Cologne; any decisions about the fate of the building will be in their responsibility. Some measures against the asbestos contamination were already taken, so it appears that there is a chance for this impressive landmark to remain, contrary to the belief of some jokers who already say that Deutschlandfunk programming should be taped when the Deutsche Welle building will be blown up. (Deutschlandfunk broadcasts from another skyscraper beneath the Deutsche Welle building, so ...) (Kai Ludwig, Germany, July 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GREENLAND [non]. Re DXLD 3-128, DXing from Greenland: He is Borge Haagensen, VE7VB, and at the end of 2000 I made 3 programs in Danish about his experiences at a.o. places Station Nord, and with many more audio clips than heard on CBC, which also resulted in a web site with his extraordinary photos --- unfortunately, in Danish only. The first photo is Borge in the short wave studio (click to enlarge): http://www1.dr.dk/pubs/nyheder/html/programmer/kortboelge/peary.jhtml 73, (Erik Køie, Copenhagen, July 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GUATEMALA. 4052, R. Verdad, 0313-0340 July 9, SINPO=55444. Música de órgano, himnos. Excelente señal y audio. 0326 invitación en español e inglés a los oyentes para enviar sus informes de recepción, ofreciendo verificarlos. Dirección: Apartado Postal 5, Chiquimula, Guatemala. 1210 July 20 AUSENTE, la frecuencia está libre (Elmer Escoto, Honduras, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HONDURAS. Hello there, Glenn. I have checked both 1430 and 2860 kHz several times during the past week, regarding the Radio Cultura affair, but I couldn't hear anything there. Sorry, can't help here! 2200, HRVA Radio Tiempo, San Pedro Sula, 1821- July 13, SINPO=45554. Frecuencia harmónica (2 x 1100 kHz) con programación local, anuncios comerciales, música popular. 4820 Voz Evangélica 1222 July 20 AUSENTE 4832 R. Litoral 1223 July 20 AUSENTE (Elmer Escoto, Honduras, July 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HONDURAS. R. Litoral, 4832.0, partial data card, 3 page letter in Spanish, progrma schedule in 10 months. Verie signer: Mario Eduardo Bonifacio Castillo, Gerente. They broadcast daily 1100-1600, 2200-0500 UT. Mainly in Spanish; other languages are: Miskito 2200-2400 daily, Garifuna 0000-0200 daily, English 0400-0500 weekends (Takeshi Sejimo, Komoro city, Nagano, Japan, Radio Nuevo Mundo July 8 via DXLD) Reproduced letterhead/card says: Radio Litoral, HRLW, 4830 kHz, Un Ministerio de la Misión Comunión Cristiana de Honduras, Apdo. 888, La Ceiba, Atlántida; radiolitoral@psinet.hn Tel.: 504-441 5973. The program schedule shows the English hour consists of: 10:00 pm Música en Inglés; 10:30 pm Searchlight. In Spanish, there is nothing resembling a newscast or anything to do with current events; but then this is another station absolutely preoccupied with an imaginary afterworld (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HONG KONG. HONG KONG RADIO STATION'S LICENCE RENEWAL IN DOUBT | Text of report by Radio TV Hong Kong audio web site on 22 July The Executive Council has held talks on the renewal of a licence for Commercial Radio. The commerce secretary, Henry Tang, will brief the media on the outcome this afternoon. Executive councillor Tsang Yok- sing said the government would handle the licence renewal in a reasonable manner. The issue has raised concerns after the Broadcasting Authority warned the station's outspoken programme host Albert Cheng about unfair treatment of two officials during his shows. Pro-democracy politicians said the warnings amounted to censorship and feared the government might link them to the station's licence renewal. Source: RTHK Radio 3 audio web site, Hong Kong, in English 0600 gmt 22 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) HONG KONG STATION TO REMAIN ON AIR DESPITE CONTROVERSIAL TALK SHOW HOST | Text of report by Radio TV Hong Kong audio web site on 22 July The Executive Council has agreed to renew the licence of Commercial Radio for another 12 years. But there will be a mid-term review in six years. There was speculation that the radio station would only get between three and five years, after the Broadcasting Authority received complaints about the station's controversial talk show host, Albert Cheng. Source: RTHK Radio 3 audio web site, Hong Kong, in English 0800 gmt 22 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** ICELAND. Our Dutch friend's DX report reminded me about Iceland being a DX possibility. Here is a link to a staton list: http://www.tvradioworld.com/region3/isl/Radio_TV_On_Internet.asp If we can't get TA FM DX, maybe MA (Mid-Atlantic) FM DX is a better shot (Curtis Sadowski, July 20, WTFDA via DXLD This is an incomplete list... FM 95.7 and Blygjan 98.9 are missing for Reykjavík (two you can listen to on line). (Matt Sittel, NE, ibid.) ** KOREA NORTH. To prepare for U.S. psychological warfare through Radio Free Asia, the communist North is strengthening education for its people by mobilizing Korean War veterans as instructors, the report said. . . http://times.hankooki.com/lpage/nation/200307/kt2003072215232611990.htm (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) Since everyone in NK has been brainwashed since infancy, what more preparation could they possibly need? (Glenn Hauser, DXLD) ** LIBERIA. SHELLING KILLS 20 IN SINGLE EXPLOSION; PRIVATE RADIO STATION DAMAGED | Text of report by Italian-based Missionary Service News Agency (Misna) web site on 21 July With the rebels from LURD (Liberians United for Reconciliation and Democracy) pursuing their relentless offensive on the Liberian capital Monrovia, the Mamba Point neighbourhood was the target of shelling last night. The building which houses Radio Veritas, the Catholic radio station, was partially destroyed by two heavy artillery shells. Ecclesiastical sources told Misna that this happened on Saturday [19 July]. The neighbourhood, in which embassies and humanitarian organizations are located, was shelled heavily. A massive explosion in a Freemasons hall in which people were taking refuge killed 20. "The number of victims is certainly great in the Mamba Point neighbourhood. Bodies litter the streets," a local priest who spoke on condition of anonymity told Misna. With the rebels trying to take the presidential palace which is being defended by loyalist forces, the head of state, Charles Taylor, clearly affirmed his position: "To all our men and women under arms: I say that I will not leave the country - that I will not move a millimetre - until an international peacekeeping force arrives. I am not doing this for the sake of power, which I intend to relinquish ... [ellipsis as received] I am doing this because the rebels have no respect for human life." Source: Misna news agency web site, Rome, in French 21 Jul 03(via BBCM via DXLD) I was afraid that this would happen again. I think it is the third time that RV was destroyed (Mike Dorner, LA, of Catholic Radio Update, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NETHERLANDS. Los colegas de Radio Canadá Internacional y Radio Nederland estamos ofreciendo una QSL especial por haber grabado y difundido de forma conjunta un programa único de contacto con el oyente: "Contestación a la Correspondencia" de RCI y "Cartas@RNW.nl". Si bien los programas vía Canadá ya se difundieron (el domingo 6), los oyentes tienen una última oportunidad de escuchar uno de los programas especiales a través de Radio Nederland y ganarse una QSL especial. Más info: http://www.rnw.nl/sp/toolbar/cartas@r... [truncated]. El programa de "Contestación a la Correspondencia y Cartas@RNW.nl" se difunde este miércoles 23 de julio, por onda corta hacia Sudamérica a eso de las 0000 UT por 15315, 11720 y 9895 kHz. Hacia Norte y Centroamérica a las 0200 UT por 6165 y 9845 kHz (Jaime Báguena, RN, July 22 via Arnaldo Slaen, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. The RadLon test via 1008: see UK [non] ** OKLAHOMA. DTV TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, OKLAHOMA CITY, OK. Proposed Amendment of the DTV Table of Allotments for this community. (Dkt No. 00-104). Action by: Chief, Video Division, Media Bureau. Comments Due: 09/08/2003. Reply Comments Due: 09/23/2003. Adopted: 07/11/2003 by FNPRM. (DA No. 03-2283). MB http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-03-2283A1.doc http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-03-2283A1.pdf http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-03-2283A1.txt (via Fred Vobbe, NRC FMTV via DXLD) KAUT-43 wants its DT channel to be changed from 42 to 40 with 1000 kW at 475 m. Why??? (Glenn Hauser, Enid, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. En El Comercio, de Lima se informa que Panamericana suspendió sus transmisiones a las 12:05 p.m. Administración Delgado Parker presentó acción de amparo y denunció a funcionarios del MTC. Hubo lágrimas al momento de desconectar la señal. . . http://www.elcomercioperu.com.pe/Noticias/html/2003-07-18/Lima0030829.html (via Arnaldo Slaen, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** PERU. 5020, NO IDENTIFICADA, 0042+ July 13, SINPO=22422. Cumbias, anuncios de la hora "7 de la noche con 46 minutos", anuncios comerciales, varias menciones de Chachapoyas. Se escucha un poco mejor por 5019 kHz. Al regresar a ésta frecuencia a las 0110 UT estaban transmitiendo un rezo del rosario: "Cuarto misterio, presentación de Jesús en el templo" y los incesantes "Dios te Salve María" y "Padre Nuestro". El QRM proviene de 5025 kHz donde emite la cubana Radio Rebelde. ¿Qué emisora es ésta peruana? (Elmer Escoto, Honduras, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Radio Horizonte, Chachapoyas (gh, DXLD) ** PERU. Re: `Reyna` de la Selva: No comenté el dato anterior en su momento (DXLD #2171, Nov. 2/02), pero hace exactamente un año recibí un correo electrónico del señor José David Reina, Gerente General de la empresa `Radio y TV Reina de la Selva`. Al firmar no indica su segundo apellido pero creo que es Noriega. En algún momento mandaron imprimir una tarjeta QSL muy escasa en donde se lee `Reina de la Selva`. Una reproducción de la misma apareció hace varios años en una revista diexista española. Allí un colega español relató las impresiones de su visita a la emisora, la cual la describía un tanto despectivamente como ``cutre`` (Henrik Klemetz, Suecia, July 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Entonces parece no deletrearse REYNA como dije, sino es un apellido, no sólo la palabra que significa Queen. En 2-171 fue Alfredo Cañote que deletrea el nombre Reyna, sin discutirlo (gh, DXLD) ** PERU. Proud of some of your QSLs? Those must pale in comparison to the CERTIFICADO DE VISITA that Takayuki Inoue Nozaki displays, issued January 6, 1995 [sic] by Radio ``Nor Andina``, Jr. José Gálvez 602, Celendín, which I here retype: ``Hacemos constar que el día domingo 7 de octubre del año 2001 [sic], fuimos honrados con la presencia de nuestro amigo oyente de Tokio, Japón, TAKAYUKI INOUE NOZAKI, quien en forma heróica y placentera viene recorriendo diferentes lugares de la República del Perú, con el propósito de estudiadr diferentes medios de comunicación. Como muestra de gran reconocimiento y agradecimiento a la vez nos permitió elogiar la buena labor en esta estación radial, RADIO NOR ANDINA Empresa Individual de Responsibilidad Limitada Agradecemos infinitamente su gentil visita, deseándole siempre éxitos en sus labores y asimismo mantener su sintonía en onda corta de los 4460 kHz en la banda tropical de 65 metros. Desde Celendín, el cielo azul del Edén, en la Provincia del mismo nombre, Departamento de Cajamarca en la República del Perú, le emitimos el presente certificado como un gran recuerdo para usted, nuestro amigo oyente de Japón, a quien siempre lo recordaremos con el mayor deseo de manterer nuestra amistad international. Muy atentatmente, Miguel Alcántara Guevara, Gerente-Proprietario`` This accompanies a lengthy article by TIN about the station, which in fact he visited twice, in 1995 and 2001, accounting for the mixup in dates. Next time I drop in on a radio station, I think I shall ask for just such a certificate. The wording could hardly be improved upon (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PHILIPPINES. Glenn, Transmissions from Poro on MW are from the Harris DX-1000 on 1143, and from the Continental ("CEMCO") on 1170, running about 700+ kW last time I heard. Lots of spare parts from Rasom (Thailand) were sent to Poro to help keep it running until the site change takes place. According to my lists of CEMCO transmitters (I have them dated 7/10/72, 3/77, 1/79, 8/90, and 11/90 and I think they stopped at that point, after acquiring Collins' transmitter product line from Rockwell), the model 105B and (1/2)105B transmitters all went to VOA, so the one at Poro is the last one still operating. It is shown as having been delivered in 1954. So when it finally goes out of service (probably next year when the new Poro site is commissioned) it will have been in operation for 50 years (Ben Dawson, WA, July 20-21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) More exactly the IBB online schedule says that the 1143 transmissions were shifted from PHP B to PHP A from 11 July and then PHP B started on 1170 on 19 July. This seems to mean that the still fully operational CEMCO transmitter from 1953 has been brought back in full service on 1143, while the Harris DX1000 unit from 1995 is now serving on 1170 (Olle Alm, Sweden, 21 July, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Glenn, thanks that Bernd Trutenau discovered the unID station on 1170 kHz --- as from Poro-PHL, given in the latest IBB frequency and language online list. 1170 kHz which came on air on July 9th, test at approx 1200-1700 UT. First, I thought coming from well known Udorn Thani Shortwave site in Thailand. Olle Alm in an e-mail of July 11: The long range BBG plans included a second high power MW transmitter in Thailand. Is that what they are now preparing for? "1000 kW for the Thailand (Udorn) Transmitting Station". (Olle Alm, Sweden, BC-DX July 11) On July 11, I asked also Alan Davies to monitor this new service, but he was away, travelling on Indian subcontinent ... What do you mean? What's your opinion? How is the 1170 kHz channel occupied in SE Asia, like in INS or THA ? (wb) "In the IBB sched, 1143 kHz is still listed 1100-1230 and 1330-1800 at 332 deg and 1300-1330 at 262 deg towards VTN. 1143 kHz is listed for PHP transmitter A and 1170 for PHP transmitter B, but I'm not sure of the significance of that. The two are not scheduled to be on air simultaneously (Alan Davies, Delhi-IND, July 21)" Hi, here are some more links with background material: http://home.att.net/~philsite/wallace-1b.htm (note: text "U.S and RP sign $3.3 Million Land Lease Deal" refers to 2002) for comprehensive reconstruction projects (incl. new transmitter building) at the site in connection with the handing-over of the IBB ground to the Philippine state some years ago and subsequent lease by IBB: http://www.fbodaily.com/archive/2002/08-August/09-Aug-2002/FBO-00134923.htm and another one: http://www.hatdaw.com/papers/dawson.pdf 73s, (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Base Turnover To The Philippines United States turned over the Voice of America facilities to RP The Voice of America (VOA) facilities in La Union and Baguio City was recently turned over to the Philippine government through the Bases Conversion Development Authority (BCDA), the lead agency spearheading the conversion of former baselands. US Ambassador Thomas Hubbard and BCDA Chairman Rogelio L. Singson signed an agreement during the turnover ceremonies held in Poro Point, San Fernando City, La Union on October 15. The VOA facilities in Poro Point covers 102 hectares, and the turnover will facilitate and enhance its development as a freeport and special economic zone complete with tourism and commercial facilities. The VOA property in John Hay, Baguio City, which covers 30 hectares, has also been turned over to BCDA. John Hay's development as a world- class eco-tourism destination, complementing Poro Point's tourism and commercial facilities is envisioned to make Northern Luzon the ideal tourist and business location. In a lease back agreement between BCDA and the US Embassy, the International Broadcasting Bureau, which runs the VOA broadcast, will leave its remaining facilities, including the powerplant, for use by BCDA as payment for three years' stay in a 13- hectare area to continue its operations in China and Vietnam. The bureau also has the option to lease some ten hectares as permanent site in Poro Point if they wish to continue to operate in the area. The turnover closes the 1963 agreement that allowed the US to set up and operate radio broadcasting facilities in the former Wallace Air Station, now known as Poro Point, and the former Camp John Hay (from the Wallace site linked above, via gh, DXLD; not sure what year this refers to) International Broadcasting Bureau (Philippines Station) Tinang: Barangay Tinang, Concepcion, Tarlac Tel: (045) 982-0254 / 982-0255 / 982-3442 / 982-3443 Fax: (045) 982-1402 Poro: Poro Point, San Fernando, La Union Tel: (072) 888-2747 / 888-2773 / 888-5003 / 888- 5121 Fax: (072) 888-51 33 The Philippines Transmitting Station (PTS) is a large and complex International Broadcasting Bureau (IBB) overseas facility. The mission of this Station is to transmit Voice of America (VOA) programs. Philippine Broadcasting Service (PBS), and Radio Liberty (RL) to selected target areas. These programs are fed from the main IBB studios in Washington D.C. via satellite. No programs other than PBS are originated in-country. The transmitted programs are broadcast to listening audiences in China, the USSR, East Asia, Southwest Pacific, Africa, and South Asia in as many as 13 languages using both short and medium wave frequency bands. The Philippines Transmitting Station has long been a part of the Philippine scene--having begun broadcasting from a transmitting station located at Malolos, Bulacan shortly after World War II. That facility was subsequently granted to the Government of the Philippines in 1969 after the construction of the Tinang facility. The Station is staffed by six (6) American Foreign Service and one (1) PIT personnel, assigned on a rotational basis. PTS is also a significant contributor to the local economy, employing 100 direct hire and 8 contract technical and administrative personnel. In addition, a significant number of personnel of numerous diverse skills derive their employment from various services and maintenance contracts throughout our two facilities. The Management and Administrative offices are located at the 2,400 acre Tinang Transmitter facility located 85 miles north of Manila near Concepcion, Tarlac. The Tinang Transmitter Plant includes twelve 250,000-watt and three 50,000-watt transmitters with 31 large, high-gain curtain antennas suspended between towers 400 to 500 feet high. Commercial power is used to run all equipment and is obtained from a 230,000-volt highline through our own 20-megawett power substation. Construction of a standby 8,000,000-watt power generating plant was completed in 1995. The Poro Transmitter Plant in La Union Province, 180 miles north of Manila, has a one million-watt medium wave transmitter, and one (1) MW 3-pattern array antenna. Power can be generated at the Poro Power Plant with an installed capacity of 6,000 kilowatts, however commercial power is currently utilized. All of the Station facilities are linked via satellite circuits for program distribution. Telephone, satellite, and VHF radio form the communications network. A small business office is manned at least once a month at the US Embassy's Manila Annex Building on Roxas Boulevard. Last Update :: 05/21/2003 (from http://usembassy.state.gov/posts/rp1/wwwh3027.html via Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, DXLD) 1170 has apparently been tested occasionally from Poro since a longer time, see e.g. http://www.hatdaw.com/papers/lockwood.pdf (February 2003): HF and MW (AM Radio) Experience: International Broadcasting Bureau, Poro Point, Philippines: MW Antenna Frequency Change: For this project, Mr. Lockwood performed all of the antenna computer modeling analyses in the field that were used in the tuneup of the revised antenna pattern. This project, with the operation of one antenna pattern of the Poro site on 1170 kHz rather than the 1143 kHz normal operation of the station required substantial analytical activity at the site. This efficient design and adjustment activity took place in a few days. He also assisted the Poro station staff in re-tuning the antenna monitor equipment, and in putting the station's former MW transmitter back into operation on the revised frequency for the tests. Bruce Portzer's Pacific Asian Log http://www.qsl.net/n7ecj lists 1170 from Poro with occasional tests at 800 kWd already in the March 2003 edition (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, July 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) The other link above leads to a 9-page CV for Ben Dawson, who has been involved in lots of fascinating projects, including:- Hatfield & Dawson Consulting Engineers Benjamin F. Dawson, P.E., Electrical Engineer / President Poro MW Antenna Frequency Change: Prepared preliminary design, made all field changes, and supervised measurements to implement frequency change for antenna pattern to allow tests on 1170 kHz. Poro Allocation Studies for Operation on 1170 kHz and Udorn Medium Wave Radiation Study (Allocation Analysis): Prepared analysis of the allocation conditions based on both national and ITU frequency allotment regulations (Geneva '75 Agreement standards), and prepared report showing allowable radiation for each site on this frequency. (via gh) [Transmitter swap on 1143 and 1170 suggested by Alm] That seems indeed the case, and it was this old transmitter that was used for the tests on 1170 in earlier months: [as in Lockwood above] (Bernd Trutenau, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Glenn, Since I am still providing design data to IBB for the new antenna/transmitter site down the road from the existing one, I'll ask somebody which transmitter is now on which frequency. I'll be surprised if they have swapped them this soon, however (Ben Dawson, July 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) BTW, 1143 used to shift unpredictably to 1147.5, presumably to avoid Chicom jamming and\or the Taiwan station, tho this is not likely to appear in IBB schedules. Does this still happen? (gh, DXLD) ** RUSSIA. UKRAINE. 7434.64 (drifting), R. Krishna Loka, 0132-0200 July 9, frequency was drifting steadily: 7434.90 at 0147, 7435.00 at 0157. Initially programing was as Anker described some time ago, English talk about meditation with translation into Russian (I presume); then at 0133 was Indian-style Hari Krishna music interspersed with serene talks, ID at 0158. This is supposed to be a 150-watt station, but it seemed a lot stronger. At times it was very clear. Does anyone know more precisely where this station is located? (Jean Burnell-NL [sic], DXplorer via DXLD) Recent reports in DXLD have it in Orël, Russia; I thought Burnell moved to NS, or was he back in NL on a DXpedition? (gh, DXLD) ** SAO TOME. Heard VOA "Daybreak Africa" program from São Tomé relay at 0530Z July 19 on 7290 kHz with SIO 333 reception (Grundig Sat. 800, 40M dipole). (Ben Loveless WB9FJO, Michigan, DX LISTENING DIGEST) O clima de instabilidade política em São Tomé e Príncipe também foi pauta na Rádio Nacional, de Brasília (DF). Nesta semana, a emissora conversou com um locutor de emissora daquele país. A informação é do sítio Comunique-se e foi publicada em http://www.radiobase.blogger.com.br/ (Célio Romais, @tividade DX July 20 via DXLD) Glenn, I didn't see this piece when it first appeared in The New Yorker last October, but it could be interesting to you as a backgrounder on US relations with São Tomé. From the Archives: http://www.newyorker.com/archive/content/?030728fr_archive02 (73- Bill Westenhaver, QC, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SAUDI ARABIA. 15170, BSKSA, 0302-0305 July 20, SINPO=45444 en Árabe. Hombre habla y luego de una pausa comienzan los cantos coránicos. Buena señal y audio fuerte y claro (Elmer Escoto, Honduras, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Yes, a nice soporific in UT-4, -5 (gh) ** SAUDI ARABIA. SAUDI RADIO AND TV GO GLOBAL Molouk Y. Ba-Isa -- Arab News Staff If you`re abroad this summer and feeling homesick, download Saudi TV and radio over the Internet. Minister of Culture and Information, Dr. Fouad Ibn Abdul-Salam Al-Farsi, announced that Saudi radio has started an experimental transmission over the world wide web. Dr. Al-Farsi said the Kingdom`s Internet offerings will include the general radio program, the second-channel radio program, the Holy Qur`an radio program, the European radio program in English and French, the music radio program, Urdu radio program and other radio programs in various languages. The transmission of these programs can be downloaded through http://saudiradio.net For computers using browsers displaying English language only, go directly to http://saudiradio.net/indexen.php At the same website, beta transmission of Saudi television has also begun. In tests by Arab News, the radio programs were clearly audible even using a dial-up Internet connection. However, over dial-up, video streaming of the TV channels was disappointing. A broadband connection is highly advised to watch the TV programs. Even then, don't expect much. The image that appears on the screen is small --- really only suitable for close up, one-on-one viewing (Arab News Compunet 22 July 2003 via Jill Dybka, DXLD) ** SEYCHELLES [non]: Freq changes for FEBA Radio: 1200-1230 Daily TIBETAN 15355 DHA 250 085 deg, ex 15525 DHA, re-ex 15605 SAM 1515-1530 Daily NUER 12125 MEY 250 007 deg, ex 12070 MEY, re-ex 11885 MEY 1530-1545 Daily DINKA 12125 MEY 250 007 deg, ex 12070 MEY, re-ex 11885 MEY 1545-1600 Daily MAKONDE 12125 MEY 250 032 deg, ex 12070 MEY, re-ex 11885 MEY 1600-1630 Thu-Sun AMHARIC 12125 MEY 250 019 deg, ex 12070 MEY, re-ex 11885 MEY 1600-1630 Mon-Wed GURAGENA 12125 MEY 250 019 deg, ex 12070 MEY, re-ex 11885 MEY 1630-1700 Daily AMHARIC 12125 MEY 250 019 deg, ex 12070 MEY, re-ex 11885 MEY 1700-1730 Daily OROMO 6180 DHA 250 230 deg, ex 9590 DHA Fri/Sun (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, July 21 via DXLD) ** SINGAPORE. 9600, R. Singapore Int`l, 1300-1332 July 20. Five-minute news summary at 1300, then YL hosting a program of sultry Latin tunes, including "Babalu" by Desi Arnaz; no Celia Cruz tunes noted; news again at 1330. Checked back at 1359 to hear closing announcement for 9600; guy also said "You can continue to listen to programs from Mediacorp Radio on 6150 kHz". Good signal on 9600; 6150 had faded out (John Wilkins, Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Drake R-8, 100-foot randomwire, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** UGANDA [non]. EXILES IN GERMANY REPORTEDLY TO LAUNCH SHORTWAVE STATION | Text of report by Ugandan newspaper The Monitor web site on 18 July Ugandan exiles living in Germany plan to launch a radio station. Mr Godfrey Elum Ayoo said in a statement on Wednesday [16 July] that Radio Rhino International-Africa (RRIA) would help overcome the [ruling National Resistance] Movement's control of the free and independent press in Uganda. "RRIA is a declaration of an airwave campaign in the liberation, protection and promotion of the freedoms of _expression and the rights to information by the press, mass media and the people of Uganda," Ayoo said in an e-mailed statement. Ayoo said that the shortwave radio station would be based in Köln, Germany. The radio would broadcast in English on daily events throughout Africa. The station would go on air next month, Ayoo said. Ayoo has been living in exile since 1986 when the Movement captured state power. Source: The Monitor web site, Kampala, in English 18 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** U K. The early BBC Prom on Monday July 21 provided a better webcast (with video) than previously, running at 75.0 kbps, which allowed somewhat less jerky video and acceptable audio. During the interval, Charles Hazelwood was back, but only wearing a plain light-blue denim shirt! Perhaps my bringing it up first thing upon turning on the computer, when plenty of memory was available, had something to do with the faster SureStream? And the playbacks at 1300 UT --- at least on Tue July 22, the repeat of Saturday night was the original tape complete with ambiance, not re-announced in the studio as last year. On July 22, Hazelwood was wearing a light blue checked shirt, even tho his interval interwiewee violin soloist was in white tie (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. BBC VERSUS BRITISH GOVERNMENT -- 21/07/2003 20:27 - (SA) London --- For all its carefully-won reputation around the world as a model of probity and fairness, over the decades the BBC has managed to annoy British governments of pretty much every political persuasion... http://www.news24.com/News24/World/News/0,,2-10-1462_1390672,00.html (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) AS BLAIR'S SUPPORT FALLS, BACKERS BLAME BBC --- By Glenn Frankel, Washington Post Foreign Service, Tuesday, July 22, 2003; Page A11 LONDON, July 21 -- Supporters of Prime Minister Tony Blair, who is facing the worst political crisis of his six years in office following the apparent suicide of a senior government weapons expert, today sought to shift the blame for the controversy to the BBC. . . http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A25249-2003Jul21?language=printer (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) Comment --- DON'T ATTACK THE BBC - YOU CAN'T WIN The British public won't forgive such shameless scapegoating John Tusa, Tuesday July 22, 2003, The Guardian You can always tell how big a hole a prime minister or government is in by the vehemence of their onslaught on the BBC. Judging by the passion now being aimed at the corporation, from the chairman, Gavyn Davies, downwards, the government feels it is in a bigger hole than it dares to admit even to itself. As a displacement activity, a diversion from finding weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, it can't be beaten. But a quick look back at similar instances of attacking the usual scapegoats suggests that the policy doesn't work and the public doesn't believe that the BBC is responsible for whatever situation the government has put the country in. Scapegoating the BBC did not work when the then head of BBC current affairs, Dick Francis, observed that Argentinian mothers grieved over lost sons as much as their counterparts in Plymouth. Nor did it work when Peter Snow, on Newsnight, noting that the late-breaking account of fighting in the Falklands was often more accurately reported from Buenos Aires sources, uttered the immortal caveat: "Now, the British - if they are to be believed..." Both Snow and Francis were assaulted under the general banner of "Whose side are you on?" As was Kate Adie in her reporting of the US air strikes on Libya, savagely attacked by Norman Tebbit. During the first Gulf war, the Saudi government regularly lobbied the Foreign Office to curb the broadcasts of the BBC Arabic Service -which they alleged was biased towards Saddam Hussein, and staffed overwhelmingly by Palestinians, who carried a nasty sneering innuendo in their voices to indicate the broadcasters did not accept the "impartial" BBC line. I commissioned independent research, seen only by myself and senior colleagues, which comprehensively disproved every allegation of bias. We were backed by the director general, Michael Checkland, and the governors. Similarly, Gavyn Davies and the current director general, Greg Dyke, have rightly stood fast and supported their journalists. What must be infuriating for Downing Street news manipulators, for that is what they are, is that they still expect the BBC to be different after all these years. "We appointed Gavyn Davies! Isn't his wife Gordon Brown's political aide? Isn't Greg a party supporter? Don't these people know we can snuff out the BBC charter next time round?" What Downing Street seems incapable of realising is that independence is so bred in the bone at the BBC that capitulating to governmental pressure would not only be impossible, but it would be wrong for everyone at the BBC, and for the national culture too, and ultimately for governments of every stripe. What is so transparent is Downing Street's opportunistic assault on Today's Andrew Gilligan. The veteran Gavin Hewitt and the academic Susan Watts of Newsnight are out of the firing line. As journalists they are held to be beyond reproach. Gilligan is more controversial, or some say more risky - and the sound of colleagues running to volunteer unattributable doubts about his qualities is not a pretty sight. Because the point is that if Gilligan were wholly wrong, it would not alter the substantive charge against the government in the slightest - though it would leave his career in tatters. Nor would it undermine BBC journalism as a whole one jot. Gilligan might consider saying: "OK, as Kelly's friend Tom Mangold has said, my source thought the government dossier was a bit 'hyperbolic'. I changed 'hyperbolic' to 'sexier'. My choice, and my responsibility. But does it alter the story? And is using more lurid language a hanging matter?" Of course, the Campbell/Gilligan row is far more than a "Whose side are you on?" row. It is a "Did the government mislead the country?" question, one where reputations and careers can be lost, and no doubt will be. But even if Gilligan were to be found seriously at fault, it would not prove the government was right about going to war on its endlessly repeated claims that Saddam Hussein had ready-to-use weapons of mass destruction. Pursuing Gilligan, and the BBC, deals with none of the real issues still waiting to be answered. It's as if Tony Blair and Alastair Campbell know that some political heads will roll after Lord Hutton reports. To preserve their self- esteem, they will continue their BBC quarrel to ensure that BBC heads roll too as part of the general carnage. But the public may wonder whether such wilful damage to one of the country's main independent sources of news and culture isn't too high a price to pay to salve some politicians' hurt feelings. John Tusa is managing director of the Barbican centre and was MD of the BBC World Service from 1986-92. Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003 (via Daniel Say, DXLD) ** UK [non]. Updated schedule for BVBN via VT Merlin Comm. and DTK T- systems: ME 13710 WER 250 kW / 120 deg 1900-1930 Thu Arabic 1900-2000 Fri-Sun English 15680 JUL 100 kW / 115 deg 1515-1800 Sat/Sun English 1530-1700 Mon/Tue English 1530-1730 Thu English 1530-1800 Wed/Fri English 1700-1745 Tue Russian 15750 JUL 100 kW / 115 deg 1615-1730 Mon-Fri Arabic 1700-1800 Sat/Sun English 17595 JUL 100 kW / 135 deg 0845-1015 Fri Arabic EaAf 13810 JUL 100 kW / 115 deg 1630-1700 Fri-Tue Amharic 1630-1730 Wed/Thu Amharic CeAf 13725 JUL 100 kW / 175 deg 1900-1915 Mon-Thu English 1900-1930 Fri/Sun English 1900-2000 Sat English EaEu 5970 JUL 100 kW / 060 deg 1800-1815 Mon/Wed-Fri English 1815-1830 Mon/Wed-Fri Russian 1830-1845 Mon/Wed-Fri English 1800-1815 Tue English 1815-1830 Tue English or French 1830-1845 Tue English 5970 WER 125 kW / 060 deg 1800-1845 Sat Russian 1845-1900 Sat English 1800-1830 Sun English 1830-1900 Sun Russian 1900-1930 Sun English WeEu 5975 JUL 100 kW / 290 deg 0700-0750 Mon-Fri English 0700-0815 Sat/Sun English SoAs 7210 DHA 250 kW / 085 deg 0030-0100 Daily Bengali 9610 DHA 250 kW / 090 deg 0200-0230 Daily Hindi 11805 ??? ??? kW / ??? deg 0200-0230 Sat/Sun English 15600 WER 250 kW / 090 deg 0130-0200 Mon-Sat Hindi 17540 TAC 200 kW / 131 deg 0200-0230 Sat English 0230-0245 Sat Hindi 0245-0300 Sat English or French 0230-0330 Sun English/Hindi 17655 JUL 100 kW / 090 deg 1530-1600 Mon/Thu/Fri English 1600-1615 Mon/Thu/Fri Hindi 1530-1600 Tue Urdu 1600-1615 Tue Hindi 1530-1615 Wed Hindi/English/Hindi 73 from (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, July 21 via DXLD) ** U K [non]. Re Radio London tests on Flevo 1008 kHz: Radlon Media testing 1008 kHz --- A test transmission from Flevo on 1008 kHz was observed here in Hilversum as of 0900 UT this morning. The transmission ended abruptly at 0925. Officially, the next test is scheduled for Tuesday 22 July at 1100 in preparation for the transmissions of commercial broadcaster Radlon Media, which plans to broadcast to the UK. The test will be made using the directional pattern previously used for Dutch public network Radio 1, but will be made at the full power of 400 kW (Radio 1 used 180 kW). A low power test was already conducted on Friday afternoon, according to radio.nl. Listen to the test: http://www.omroep.nl/cgi-bin/streams?/rnw/medianetwork/radlon030721.rm The address for reception reports is Radlon Media Limited, PO Box 7336, Frinton-on-Sea, CO13 0WZ, UK. Tel: +44 1255 67622. For listeners in Europe the address is Radlon Media, PO Box 11122, 3505 BC Utrecht, The Netherlands. Quality Radio, the Dutch partner of Radlon, is also busy preparing the other mediumwave frequencies it won in May. Radio 10 FM is currently using 1395 kHz with reduced power. Transmission provider Nozema is carrying out maintenance on the antenna for 828 kHz, while a new radio ship has to be found for 1224 kHz, since the Communicator has been sold to a new owner in the UK and is now undergoing repairs in Ijmuiden (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 21 July 2003 via DXLD) I hope the programmes --- if they ever start --- are better than the rubbish on their test CD. It's full of very dated American drop-ins that may have been funny 30 years ago, but haven't stood the test of time. These all came off the various jingle collections that Ray Anderson produced in years gone by. I hope this isn't the sort of stuff they're planning to broadcast. Or, as John McEnroe would put it, "you can't be serious!" Andy Sennitt • 7/22/03; 3:59:08 AM It's about 35dB over S9 here on my NRD-525 here in Hilversum :-) Actually the part of the test I'm listening to at the moment has better music, and they just played an original Big L jingle! But they are ruining the effect by playing totally inappropriate drop-ins that had no place in the original Big L programmes and, IMHO, should have no place on this one! It sounds very self-indulgent. Andy Sennitt • 7/22/03; 4:32:28 AM I'm sorry to say that today's test confirmed my worst fears. When they issued a press release that spells the name of the transmitter site two different ways, both of them wrong, and gives incorrect technical information (claiming the direction pattern is NE/SW), I was not optimistic. Andy Sennitt • 7/22/03; 7:42:46 AM BTW there's a lot of misinformation floating around on some UK media forums. 747 kHz is *not* Radio 1, which is now only on FM, but Radio 747 (formerly Radio 5), a network with an audience share of 0.8%. And since 1 July it has been moved from Flevo to Lopik, from where it transmits omnidirectionally with a power of 60 kW. The permitted transmitter power was reduced from the original 120 kW because a lot of new homes have been built near the Lopik transmitter site in recent years. The fact that some people in the UK report that 747 was actually stronger than 1008 today is down to the lower frequency used, but mainly I suspect because most of the power on 1008 was being directed back into The Netherlands. Why they didn't use a single vertical mast for this test is beyond my comprehension: it's what we expected them to do. The words foot and shooting spring to mind :-) (Andy Sennitt • 7/22/03; 8:58:50 AM, all from Media Network blog via DXLD; last item also via Kai Ludwig) 1008 khz not well received in most of UK Initial reports from the UK on today's tests by Radlon via Flevo 1008 kHz are not encouraging. The tests, which were carried out with a power of 400 kW, were heard with poor signal strength in the London area, and not at all in major cities further north such as Sheffield. This may have something to do with the antenna pattern used, which was actually directional away from the UK! Media Network expects further tests to be carried out using different configurations in the coming weeks (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 22 July 2003 via DXLD) The 1008 KHz tests from Flevo are a cracking signal over East Yorkshire. Second strongest signal on the MW in Scarborough, and about 3 mV/M in Hull, though the audio is not as strong as I would have set it! (Paul Rusling, July 22, BDXC-UK via DXLD) Radio London tests received well here in Bedford on communications receiver and also on domestic radios. Good choice of music. Look forward to full time broadcasts (Colin Ferris, ibid.) Here in Caversham (45 miles west of London) reception of the Radlon test was very good on communications receiver with external aerials, but unfortunately it was very weak or non-existent on reasonably sensitive hifi tuner, domestic portables and car radio. Even at full power, 1008 kHz is very much weaker in the daytime than 747 or 675 kHz from Holland here. Don't forget reports (on domestic receivers, hifi tuners etc) are wanted by Radlon at this email address: bigl@r... [truncated] (Alan Pennington, Caversham UK, BDXC-UK July 22 via DXLD) ** U S A. IBB stuff: PHILIPPINES, SAO TOME ** U S A. Note in the Spanish item in 3-129 about WRMI being jammed by Cuba: CONIC is calling for the US government to increase the power of WRMI (an unlikely scenario, unless WRMI itself wants to pay for a 500 kW transmitter) (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Re question posed in DXLD 3-129, "Can anyone explain how Pennsylvania Dutch relates to the Low German, or Plautdietsch, dialect currently broadcast over HCJB to Mennonite groups around the world? (Michael W. Enos, Tallmadge, OH, July 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST)"... The term currently used, "Pennsylvania Dutch", is not accurate and that is the key to understanding. As per the website of the Pennsylvania Dutch Welcome Center http://www.800padutch.com/amish.shtml "Although Lancaster Amish are Pennsylvania Dutch, all Pennsylvania Dutch are not Amish. The Pennsylvania Dutch are natives of Central Pennsylvania, particularly Lancaster and its surrounding counties. Unlike the Amish, they are not all one religion. Instead, their common bond is a mainly German background (Pennsylvania Dutch is actually Pennsylvania Deutsch, or German)." However, they speak High German, not Low German, and that is a major difference. You'll see from the website why broadcasts would be aired to Mennonite groups per se, but not why the switch in languages/ dialects. For more information on the acceptance of the term 'Pennsylvania Dutch' versus the long forgotten 'Pennsylvania Deutsch', see Charles F. Kerchner, Jr.'s web page at http://www.kerchner.com/padutch.htm (Bill Matthews, OH, July 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Re: WMLK plans ** U S A. Sept. 16 is the application deadline for rural public TV stations to apply for aid to put their digital signals on the air. The Agriculture Department is making $15 million available, according to a press release. http://www.usda.gov/news/releases/2003/07/0258.htm APTS sought the aid as part of a strategy to find federal money beyond the CPB appropriation, as President John Lawson wrote in a commentary http://www.current.org/funding/funding0309federal.html this spring. (Current, posted at 9:48 AM EST July 22, via DXLD) ** U S A. INTERESTING CENTRAL ILLINOIS TV HISTORY SITE Hi Folks, Doug Quick, the newscaster at WICD ch. 15 Champaign IL is the local historian for Central Illinois broadcasting. He has a detailed TV history page at: http://www.soltec.net/~rdmlq/CentralIllinoisTVHistory.html I thought those few history buffs in the group might find this of interest (Curtis Sadowski, WTFDA via DXLD) ** U S A. About 1 AM today Tuesday (OK last night) I noticed TV atation WIFR Ch 23 Rockford back on the air. A few hours before (when I turned on the TV at about 11PM) I seen color bars with CBS audio (letterman). Then shortly after before 1 Am the video appeared as well (with a blasted info-merical). I'm on cable here and the picture is OK but a bit of snow (but not bad), so as can be expected it appears that a alternative site / tower is in use ?? (Dave Zantow, Janesville WI to Tim Noonan, via DXLD) This was the station whose tower was felled by storm Yes, It's indeed low power. I wonder what tower height they are using....? http://www.wifr.com/home/headlines/399307.html more pictures: http://www.wifr.com/home/headlines/379652.html (Tim Noonan? Via Dave Zantow, DXLD) Viz.: Low Power Signal Established from WIFR --- Rockford --- Andy Gannon It's been over two weeks since powerful winds leveled 23 WIFR's 731- foot tower. we are happy to report we are now able to transmit our signal over the air to many of our viewers who are not subscribers to Insight Communications Cable. Depending on where you live in the stateline area, that signal may be a little fuzzier than what you are accustomed to. We ask that you email 23 WIFR at talkto23@wifr.com and describe your picture and tell us where you live. Our engineers will do whatever they can to try to enhance the signal. The construction of a permanent tower is still a few months away. We thank you for your patience while we were not able to transmit an over-the-air signal (via Dave Zantow, WI, DXLD) ** U S A. WTOP'S NEWS/TRAFFIC MAKES RATINGS MUSIC By Paul Farhi, Washington Post Staff Writer, Tuesday, July 22 All-news radio station WTOP likes to tweak its Washington area rivals by promoting itself as the station that "doesn't play songs." Annoying? Maybe. But not playing songs just paid off handsomely for WTOP. . . http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A25807-2003Jul21?language=printer (via Tom McNiff, Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. NEW RADIO STATION SEEKS SEED MONEY --- By Michael Keating PORTSMOUTH --- Tom Bergeron is known to millions as the host of "Hollywood Squares" and "America's Funniest Home Videos." But to thousands of Seacoast residents, he is also known as one of the great former disc jockeys at WHEB-FM 100.3, where he spun records from 1980 to 1983. Bergeron, who lives part of the year in Lee, was one of about 25 people who attended a "Coming Out" party/news conference at The Press Room on Friday morning, where board members of WSCA-FM discussed their plans to raise funds so that the new low-power 100-watt community radio station can begin broadcasting . . . http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/07192003/news/40216.htm (Portsmouth NH Herald July 19 via Arite Bigley, DXLD) Also see DXLD 3- 124 ** U S A. In VERMONT, the Radio Free Brattleboro gang are back in the studio --- but not on the airwaves, just yet. After being silenced by the FCC a few weeks back, RFB has resumed broadcasting some of its shows on its Web site, http://www.rfb.fm while it seeks a new way to get its signals out to the locals (Scott Fybush, NE Radio Watch July 21 via DXLD) ** U S A. THE FCC UNDER FIRE --- THE COMMISSION'S CONTROVERSIAL LOOSENING OF MEDIA OWNERSHIP RULES MEETS STEADILY RISING OPPOSITION By VIVECA NOVAK, Sunday, Jul. 20, 2003 Populist outrage is threatening to undo a controversial effort by the FCC to loosen restraints on media megaliths. In the Senate last week, seven Republicans joined 28 Democrats to schedule a rare "resolution of disapproval" to overturn new FCC rules that would let companies like News Corp. and Viacom expand their media holdings in local markets. Then in the House, defecting Republicans fueled a 40-to-25 committee vote to reverse part of the FCC's action. Now it appears that the chief architect of those rules, FCC chairman Michael Powell, may not stick around for the fight. According to industry sources, the son of Secretary of State Colin Powell has told confidants he'd like to leave by fall, and three of his four top staff members are putting out job feelers. (Powell has denied he's leaving soon.) His most likely replacement, sources say, is either Rebecca Klein, who is head of the Texas public-utility commission and was on the staff of Governor George W. Bush, or FCC commissioner Kevin Martin, who helped the Bush team count votes in Florida in 2000. Powell rammed through the new rules --- allowing a single company to own TV stations that reach up to 45% of the national market, an increase from the old 35% cap, and lifting the ban on a company's owning both a newspaper and a TV station in the same market --- on a party-line vote in June. But groups as disparate as the National Organization for Women and the National Rifle Association are decrying the move. In a new Pew Research poll, respondents most familiar with the FCC's action opposed it by roughly 10 to 1. Still, it has the support of key g.o.p. leaders, and President Bush has threatened to veto any bill overturning it. Republicans who are breaking ranks on the issue face growing party pressure. On the morning of the vote, Congressman Zach Wamp, a Republican from Tennessee who voted to kill the FCC plan, spotted House Energy and Commerce Committee chairman Billy Tauzin, who backs it. "I kind of ducked to the left," he said, "went around a column and down three flights of stairs." --- With reporting by Eric Roston From the Jul. 28, 2003 issue of TIME magazine (via Joe Buch, swprograms via DXLD) ** U S A. REVISITING LOW POWER FINALLY, A BAD WEEK FOR BIG MEDIA IN WASHINGTON Geov Parrish, WorkingForChange.com, 07.21.03 http://www.workingforchange.com/article.cfm?ItemID=15320 For the first time in memory, this past week has been a bad one in Washington, D.C. for enormous broadcast conglomerates. The massive media ownership deregulation pushed through the FCC last month by Republican chairman Michael Powell generated a remarkable amount of resistance from a burgeoning, and relatively new, media democracy movement. Deregulation opponents had vowed to override the FCC by taking the fight to the Republican-controlled Congress. It seemed like a futile notion, but Wednesday, the powerful, Republican- run House Appropriations Committee panel took the first step toward doing exactly that, voting 40-25 to block the portion of the FCC's decision that expanded from 35% to 45% the percentage of national TV households one company's stations could reach. The vote wouldn't affect other portions of the FCC decision, and it would still need to be reconciled with a Senate bill; the White House has vowed to veto the House move. Nonetheless, even if it goes no farther -- and it will - - the House vote is an important measure of just how widespread dissatisfaction with corporate control of America's media has become, and that such dissatisfaction transcends usual ideological labels. But beyond the headlines, another development on the media democracy front last week may have far greater long-term implications for the ability of ordinary people to be heard on the airwaves. Before Dubya came to power and Michael Powell assumed the FCC's reins, the media democracy movement that is now bedeviling him cut its teeth on another FCC fight -- Low Power FM (LPFM). A 1999 decision by the FCC, when it was under Democratic control, created a vast new category of non-commercial, low power FM stations. The stations were to be locally run, with a radius of about 2-3 miles, and promised to give access to the airwaves to thousands of community, church, and activist groups across the country. It never happened -- at least, not as originally envisioned by the FCC. The National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) and National Public Radio mobilized Congress to effectively gut the program by passing as law a more stringent set of technical requirements. The NAB/NPR bill eliminated over 80% of the proposed stations, including most of the ones in larger cities and towns. Commercial broadcasters, as well as NPR, claimed (despite the FCC's claims to the contrary) that the FCC's original criteria would create unacceptable interference to existing stations. Congress bought the idea, and as a result, while some Low Power FM stations are now broadcasting, and many others are in the pipeline, only one open frequency for a low power station is available in any of the country's top 50 markets -- as opposed to over a dozen each that would have been available in some cities under the original proposal. That was three years ago. Last week, however, results came back in from a technical study that Congress ordered as part of its legislation, a study intended to determine definitively whether the original, more lax FCC guidelines would in fact pose a threat to existing stations. The verdict: almost never. The study, farmed out by the FCC to Mitre Corp., conducted field research and also asked for listener feedback, using the relatively poor-quality analog receivers common in many households rather than the much higher-quality receivers the FCC had originally used to determine interference levels. The researchers still found almost no problems, either from complaining listeners or from their own field readings. In the mostly rural areas where it's been available, the volume of applications for LPFM facilities has far exceeded the FCC's expectations, proving that there's an enormous demand for such voices. The FCC, of course, is now in different, more business-friendly hands, and is probably disinclined to revisit the previous commission's proposal. And in the intervening three years, big media corporations as well as NPR affiliates have rushed to install new translators that would now block some possible LPFM frequencies in larger cities. But the upshot is that media activists now have the data to go back to the FCC and to Congress demanding both that the LPFM program be expanded to its original scope and that a moratorium be placed on new translator applications until the LPFM question is re-examined. More broadly, for years the NAB, as the lobbying arm of the country's largest media conglomerates, has had free run of Capitol Hill; it has been among the most effective of the trade lobbying groups, with "triumphs" like the appalling Telecommunications Act of 1996 to its credit. Its LPFM reversal in 2000 was another such triumph -- but now, media activists and other broadcast lobby opponents can use the LPFM example to discredit the piteous cries of well-heeled lobbyists. The damage that LPFM would supposedly cause to broadcasters simply didn't exist, and the case for re-instating the original proposal is overwhelming. Now, with any luck, a powerful new form of community and neighborhood broadcasting can be made available to the vast majority of the country's people. For over 70 years, publicly owned airwaves have been leased out essentially at no charge to a broadcast industry increasingly dominated by a handful of homogenous (and often dreadfully idiotic) voices. For the last quarter- century, radio and television have gotten farther and farther away from the notion of local programming, local ownership, and community service. Finally, the trend may be reversing (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) OPENING UP THE AIRWAVES --- By Glenn Harlan Reynolds 7/22/03 A while back, I challenged FCC Chairman Michael Powell to stand up for free expression on the Internet. Now, undeterred by the lack of any visible response, I'm going to go that one better, and challenge him to stand up for free expression on the radio. Because as things stand now, the FCC is a major barrier to free speech, and the only justification for its position has just been exploded. How big a barrier? This big. . . http://www.techcentralstation.com/1051/techwrapper.jsp?PID=1051-250&CID=1051-072203B (via Harry Helms W7HLH Las Vegas, NV DM26, and Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. 7/20/2003 --- 99-25: REC Files Emergency Motion An effort to put the dismissed applications back on the table. REC has filed an "Emergency Motion To Reinstate Applications" in an effort to temporarily reverse the Commission's decision on March 17, 2003 to dismiss hundreds of LPFM applications because they were "deadlocked" and unable to file major changes because they were short spaced on the third-adjacent channel. These applicants filed prior to the rule being changed as a result of congressional action. REC is asking to temporarily reinstate these applications so the outcome of the comments on the MITRE report as well as any subsequent congressional action and eventual rulemaking. On March 24, one week after the dismiisals; REC, along with several other stakeholders filed a Petition for Reconsideration via the FCC's "9-11" e-mail filing process, which has never worked properly since it's inception. REC has also involved the Office of the Inspector General of the FCC in on this proceeding due to the previous issues of trying to use the e-mail filing process. REC's motion should appear in ECFS under MM Docket 99-25 on Monday. 7/21/2003 --- REC releases LPFM rankings by population Where does your LPFM rank? Today, REC Networks has released a listing of 630 LPFM stations and permits and the approximate populations that they serve. Our listing uses the same census tract data that is used on our LPFM search and FM query tools. Tracts are counted if either the service (60dBu) or the fringe (53dBu) contours cross the Census Bureau's designated coordinates for the tract. An LPFM station's population may actually be more than the values shown in this report. A copy of this report can be found at http://www.recnet.com/LPFM_Census_Ranking.xls in Excel spreadsheet format. What if my station does not show up? This will happen if the Census Bureau does not have a designated Census Tract within 8 km of the station. Why do I appear twice? Possibly because you have an amendment that moves your station to another location that affects your population change. The determine which one is your current statistic, check the FM Query. 7/17/2003 --- First LPFM to give way for a full power FM station also some additional FCC housecleaning in SoCal. This week's FCC LPFM activity in the dismissal department includes the first LPFM forced off the air to make way for a full power station and the FCC does a little "housecleaning" while they are at it. In Taylors, SC, the license to cover for WFBP-LP has been denied due to a recent short-spacing by Greenville-Spartanbug broadcaster WGVC. Who originally asked for in MM Docket 01-110 to downgrade WGVC, which was originally licensed to Newberry from a Class C3 to A and then move it to Simpsonville. WGVC later counterproposed their own proposal and made the Simpsonville allotment a higher rated Class C3. WGVC is on the first adjacent channel to WFBP-LP. WFBP is short spaced by 48km to WGVC. There is no other channel that WFBP-LP can move to. More information about this story is at: http://www.ccbroadcasters.com/brandnewstory.htm To see a channel report for this station, see: http://www.recnet.com/cgi-bin/lpfm/lpfm8.cgi?r=chanrpt&input_type=dec&lat_dec=34.911&lon_dec=82.3521&cha=291&sta_class=L1 Unfortunately, the LPFM service is secondary. LPFM stations must give way for full power stations that are new, move their transmitter or increase their power. LP-100 stations are protected from translators on their co-channel and first adjacent channel. In Southern Calfiornia, two "junk" applications in Los Angeles and Lennox that have been sitting for years on KRTH's first adjacent channel have finally been dismissed. There is still one additional application that still needs to be dismissed there. An LPFM application in Banning that is short spaced to a drop-in over in Hemet has also been dismissed this week. We are still waiting for some controversial applications in the Tucson area to be dismissed. These applications are holding up a local tribe from getting their construction permit. (Since this story was published, the FCC did some additional housecleaning on Friday and Monday. Looks like the FCC is trying to clean up the database before the upcoming MX window.) (REC via DXLD) ** U S A. New (?) TIS in Albuquerque I was in ABQ a few days ago, and heard a TIS on 1640 that I hadn`t heard before. It`s IDing with the call sign KOB20. The announcement says it`s operated by the Sandia Labs Emergency Operations Center, and they are giving information about traffic through construction zones on the Lab. I don`t see this one listed on the FCC TIS query page, though (Mike Westfall, Los Álamos NM, July 21, NRC-AM via DXLD) As a station belonging to a branch of the federal government, it may not need a license from the FCC (Doug Smith W9WI, Pleasant View (Nashville), TN EM66 http://www.w9wi.com ibid.) It`s KOP20 1640 kHz, it has been on the air for a number of years. They also give weather and closings due to weather, changes in Kirtland AFB gate closings, changes in base alert status. I have even heard DOE meetings broadcast, including when big shots from Washington are here (Evan WB5HAM Newlon, Albuquerque, ibid.) ** U S A. My first IBOC experience --- I am in the midst of a brief visit to New York, writing from an internet cafe on 42nd St. near Times Square. No attempt to DX, but I heard the incredible IBOC slop on either side of WOR-710. A horrid SWOOOOSHHHHH noise, much worse than the conventional slop from, say, WCBS-880. I'm still convinced IBOC will die a swift, unlamented death. 73 (Mike Brooker, Toronto, ON, July 21, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A [and non]. WHERE TIMING TRULY IS EVERYTHING --- INTERNET, CELL PHONES RELY ON MASTER CLOCK'S PRECISION --- By Monte Reel, Washington Post Staff Writer, Tuesday, July 22, 2003; Page B01 Harold Chadsey spends his days helping determine the official time observed by the U.S. Department of Defense and, as a result, the rest of the country. He is working to develop clocks accurate to a few hundred trillionths of a second. He monitors the temperature around some of his more delicate pieces of timekeeping equipment because he fears even a half-degree swing might throw them out of whack. . . http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A25431-2003Jul21?language=printer (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. Are you aware of any single side band frequencies equivalent to the Air force "MARS" network for the army, navy/marine or the coast guard to 13.927, 7.635.5, and 4.577? I have not been able to find any. I look forward to hearing from you at your earliest convenience. Sincerely yours, (Bruce Weiss, Richmond VA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Who can help, and what is the significance of the frequencies mentioned? (gh, DXLD) ** VENEZUELA. EN VENEZUELA EXISTE PLENA LIBERTAD... Hola Glenn, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA. En Venezuela, como nunca antes en 40 años, el derecho a manifestar y a mostrar oposición está plenamente vigente. Si usted está en desacuerdo con el proceso revolucionario, puede hacer uso de su legítimo derecho a disentir. Lo que sí no está permitido en Venezuela -ni en ningún país del mundo- es la propaganda de guerra en los medios de comunicación masivos, ni la incitación a la rebelión militar, ni la apología a la destrucción o eliminación del gobierno a través de métodos no democráticos. Es precisamente la vía ilegal (la de la propaganda de guerra), la que medios privados de comunicación y oposición --- en gran mayoría --- han utilizado para lograr un cambio drástico en el panorama político venezolano. De allí, los feroces ataques a --- por ejemplo --- la Ley de Responsabilidad Social de Radio y TV (Radio and TV law). Lamentablemente, muchos "opositores" en su delirium trémens, hablan de dictadura y de vía hacia el ¿comunismo?, y claman por la inmediata llegada de los "marines" estadounidenses como fórmula mágica para solucionar los problemas de Venezuela. ¿Qué país quieren este tipo de personas? Es una interrogante que ni los mismos "oposicionistas" saben explicar. Las diferencias en las democracias se confrotan en la discusión seria y en las urnas electorales. Que esperen hasta el término del mandato del presidente Chávez y demuestren esa "so-called" mayoría que afirman tener. 73's y buen DX (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) A medida que se acerca el 19 de Agosto, fecha que según la Constitución (Auspiciada por el mismo Chávez) se deberá el iniciar el proceso del Referedum Revocatorio, el miedo del régimen al mismo se hace cada vez más evidente. Las Declaraciones del mismo Comandante del Ejército Jorge García Carneiro el pasado domingo, donde expresa "que aquí no habrá ningún referendum", demuestra el total desconocimiento de lo firmado en la Mesa de Negociación y Acuerdos (OEA, Gobierno y Oposición) donde se comprometian las partes a realizar el referendum revocatorio como única solución a la actual crisis política que vive Venezuela desde hace más de un año. Chávez no tiene escapatoria y él lo sabe; por ello trata de intimidar a toda costa a los medios que no le son afectos, para así acallar el clamor de nuestro pueblo por salir de este gobierno de manera pacífica y democrática a través de los votos. ¿Cuál es el miedo --- entonces Chávez si cree que tiene la mayoría? Después del 19 de Agosto, si Chávez persiste en no realizar el referendum demostrará ante el mundo su actitud autoritaria y perderá su legetimidad de origen como Presidente de la República. De allí en adelante vale todo! (Jorge García Rangel, Barinas, Venezuela, July 22, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** VIETNAM. A quick check of the morning domestic services of Voice of Vietnam today confirmed that five frequencies are in use at the 2200 sign-on: 9530 7210 5925 6020 and 5975. 9530 is co-channel with the Brazilian 6020 is co-channel with RN-Bonaire 5975 is co-channel with BBC-Antigua and China Nationmal Radio 5925 is clear 7210 is clear The morning Hmong Service is noted at *2200 on 5035 and 6165, but co- channel on 6165 with China National Radio and Chad. Regards! (Bob Padula, Mont Albert, Victoria, Australia. Receivers: DR49, FRG8800, ATS808A. Dipoles: 5 MHz, 12 MHz, July 20, EDXP via DXLD) ** UNIDENTIFIED. 1680: Uma escuta meio intrigante. Um sinal telegráfico que vinha e sumia alternadamente, mas que se identificou por V7B. Alternava-se com sinais telegráficos ZO. Aqui vai um pedido de auxilio aos que leem esta informação para nos informar, se souberem, de que se trata (Rudolf W. Grimm, São Bernardo, SP - Brasil, http://www.radioways.cjb.net @tividade DX July 20 via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. INDIA. 5075, All India Radio (presumed) 0230-0300/ July 20, SINPO=35333. Idioma desconocido. Dos hombres hablando rápidamente, no pude discernir ninguna ID a 0230. Luego de un silencio comienza una mujer quien varias veces menciona "Kaashmer". 0242 música inconfundiblemente hindú. La señal va mejorando: 0243 SINPO=45544. Repetidas menciones de la palabra "Bahârâtâ", "Afgânistâa", "Pakîstann"... aparentemente son titulares de noticias. 0300 Otra mujer habla y el tranmisor sale del aire (Elmer Escoto, Honduras, DX LISTENING DIGEST) HFCC A-03 and SW Guide do not list India or anything else on 5075. Last year we had several reports of V. of Pujiang, Shanghai, China on that frequency, but at that hour would not propagate. For that matter, 0830 local is a bit late for India too (gh, DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ DRM +++ Dear Colleagues, to Mexico, Station Juelich can offer DRM transmissions on 12080 kHz from 0015 to 0100 UT (1915-2000 local time) starting UT July 31 until August 3. Program will be Deutsche Welle English. Feedback would be appreciated. Best regards, Guenter Hirte, Deutsche Telekom, T-Systems, Juelich phone: +49 2461 697310 fax: +49 2461 697372 e-mail: guenter.hirte@t-systems.com (via Jeff White, DXLD) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ TCI --- A DIELECTRIC COMPANY TCI, which became part of Dielectric in 2001, has supplied antennas to many of the US shortwave broadcasters. Dielectric is the largest antenna supplier in the world. They cover the frequency range from MF to UHF. They install and service antennas, as well as manufacturing them. Dielectric started out in 1942. They have provided 70% of all the TV transmitting antennas in the USA. SPX, a Fortune 500 company that began in 1911 as the ``Standard Piston Ring Company,`` acquired Dielectric in 1998. Dielectric consists of five companies with about 800 employees: Dielectric (antennas, transmission lines, switches, combiners/filters, power splitters) Brookstone Telecom (cellsite construction, antenna and line installation, microwave installation, base station installation, equipment rental) Central Tower (manufactures and installs towers in the USA, provides inspection and maintenance services) Flash Technology (aviation obstruction lighting systems, monitoring of tower sites for power outages and lighting outages, repair and preventative maintenance for tower sites) TCI (largest supplier in the world of HF and MF antenna systems) TCI has done projects in 106 countries. In fact, 80% of TCI`s business is outside the USA. By way of contrast, 90% of Dielectric`s business is inside the USA. TCI sells much in the way of HF antenna systems, transmission lines, balanced line and coaxial switches, and baluns to shortwave broadcasters, the military, and to government entities. TCI has made over 60 MF installations at the 600 kw level, and several dozen in the 1-2 megawatt range. TCI also provides surveillance systems that acquire, listen to, and locate most kinds of wireless transmissions. These systems find application in spectrum monitoring and management, and in government and military intelligence. Dielectric features the world`s broadest antenna product line. And they install what they sell. They can design, fabricate, and install antenna systems. Installation services range from technical consulting, to supervision of a local crew, to full turnkey jobs. (Ron Wilenski, summary report of presentation at the NASB 2003 Annual Meeting in Aug NASB Newsletter, July 16 via DXLD) PRIVACY ALERT AS CORDLESS CONVERSATIONS FALL PREY TO GOSSIP SCANNERS By Sue Lowe July 18 2003 Cordless phone users watch out --- your more geeky neighbours may be listening in. Equipment available for $250 from electronic stores is allowing nosey neighbours to eavesdrop on their street's cordless phone conversations. The radio scanners are popular with radio enthusiasts who can legally tap into police and emergency services radio communication, but possibly more fun on a quiet day is to illegally tap into the local gossip. Elizabeth, a Herald reader who asked not to be identified, said she recently had problems picking up her email. She phoned her internet provider's help desk and was asked for her name, date of birth, address, phone number, username and password, all of which she provided over her cordless phone. "When I had finished the call, I received another call from a person who lives close by to tell me that everything I had said he had heard over a radio scanner. He told me that anyone within a fair distance who was on a scanner could have gained all the information necessary to access all of my internet activities," she said. She immediately phoned her provider and changed her passwords using an ordinary phone. Perry Lanham, an avid scanner user and member of the aus.radio.scanner internet newsgroup, said he bought his device to listen to aircraft communications and CB radio. "I believe that there are many people that purchase these radio scanners for listening to their neighbours private phone conversations, simply because they can," he said. "Anyone could do it. They just need to know what frequency, and away they go. Almost every standard scanner is capable of picking up cordless phone transmission." The Australian Communications Authority said the scanners were not covered by existing legislation when used to listen to radio communication. However, all forms of eavesdropping on phone conversations is illegal under the 1979 Telecommunications Interception Act. A spokesman for the Commonwealth Bank said phone banking would not be affected, as all transactions are driven by keypad entries, rather than spoken details. Panasonic, one of the leading cordless phone providers, said it does include a warning in their manuals, saying that "appropriately tuned radio equipment and other cordless phone systems in close proximity may be used to monitor and possibly interrupt conversations". Mr Lanham's advice to cordless phone buyers was to avoid the older analog phones and buy a more secure digital, spread spectrum phone. This story was found at: http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/07/17/1058035138857.html (via Rob Williams, DXLD) Surprise PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ THE SHORTWAVE GUIDE Don't judge a book by its cover. Read Mika Palo's in-depth assessment of the latest edition of this guide to shortwave broadcasts: http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/booklist/html/swguide.html (Media Network . (22-07-03) via DXLD) "BROADBAND RECEIVING ANTENNA MATCHING" New technical article: I have published a new on-line technical article. The PDF version of the article can be accessed at http://www.qsl.net/wa1ion/bev/bb_antenna_matching.pdf Zipped Word DOC version is at http://www.qsl.net/wa1ion/bev/bb_antenna_matching_doc.zip If you have any trouble loading these, use the links on my RF Circuits Page http://www.qsl.net/wa1ion/index.html (Mark Connelly, WA1ION - Billerica, MA, USA, July 18, NRC-AM via DXLD) SURF'S UP: OVER THE AIRWAVES By Kurt Blumenau Sunday, July 20, 2003 Milford (MA) Daily News If the Internet had never been invented, we probably would have gotten big into shortwave radio. One technology is cutting-edge, the other is old-school, but they're not that far apart in some ways. Shortwave radio fans, just like Internet surfers, have a window on the world from the comfort of their own den. And, like Internet users, they can never be entirely sure the person on the other end is who they claim to be (not until they get a station verification card in the mail, anyway.) This week, then, Surf's Up tunes in to shortwave radio. Check out what we dialed up: (mentions shortwave related websites, alas omitting worldofradio.com ) http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/local_regional/colblumenau07202003.htm (via Kim Elliott, Artie Bigley, DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ SPACE WEATHER: THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS ***Now Accepting Submissions*** Bookmark this page... the first journal devoted to the emerging field of space weather begins publication in fall 2003. Whether you are an engineer, systems designer, scientist, or forecaster, Space Weather: The International Journal of Research and Applications will be a valuable source of information. This online publication will contain: peer-reviewed articles presenting the latest engineering and science research in the field; up-to-date news and feature articles on government agency initiatives worldwide and space weather activities of the commercial sector; and an exchange of ideas in letters and opinion articles. About the Editor Louis J. Lanzerotti, consulting physicist at Lucent Technologies' Bell Laboratories and distinguished research professor at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, has been named Editor of the publication. Lanzerotti will work with an international Editorial Advisory Board of distinguished scientists and engineers. More information If you're interested in contributing to Space Weather, see the author guidelines. Manuscripts can be submitted online at http://spaceweather-submit.agu.org/ Read the 8 April 2003 Eos article . [104kb PDF] [hotlinks on site] Subscribe Online access to Space Weather will be FREE for 2003 [but not 2004+]. A quarterly magazine digest will be available free upon request beginning fall 2003. To receive information about subscribing to Space Weather or to receive the FREE print magazine, please send an email to: spaceweather@agu.org. Please include your name, title, organization, and email address. http://www.agu.org/journals/sw/ (via SEC User Notes 41, July 2003 via DXLD) THE HIGH LATITUDE IONOSPHERE AND ITS EFFECTS ON RADIO PROPAGATION by R. D. Hunsucker, J. K. Hargreaves, October 2002, Cambridge University Press, 617 pp. Here`s what the publisher says about this great addition to the Space Weather field: The physical properties of the ionized layer in the Earth`s upper atmosphere enable us to use it to support an increasing range of communications applications. This book presents a modern treatment of the physics and phenomena of the high latitude upper atmosphere and the morphology of radio propagation in the auroral and polar regions. Chapters cover the basics of radio propagation and the use of radio techniques in ionospheric studies. This book includes many examples of the behavior of quiet and disturbed high latitude HF propagation (SEC User Notes 41, July 2003 via DXLD) SAME SUN. DIFFERENT VIEWS Long considered a constant, the sun is under new scrutiny as scientists discover that small changes in solar output may lead to significant changes in Earth's climate patterns. . . [illustrated] http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0717/p12s02-stss.html (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-129, July 20, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1191: RFPI: Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330, 7445 15039 WBCQ: Mon 0445 on 7415, 5100-CUSB? WWCR: Wed 0930 on 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1191.html WORLD OF RADIO ON WRMI --- WOR 1191 confirmed on IBC Radio via WRMI, Sat July 19 on 15725, starting at 1804. Also scheduled Sundays at 1800, started July 20 at 1801, but quite distorted, taking webstream and much worse than I hear it myself (Glenn Hauser, KS, DX LISTENING DIGEST) WORLD OF RADIO ON WJIE --- Reconfirmed Sunday July 20 at 1630 on 13595 -- WOR #1179, now three months old (gh) UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIALS I listen weekly to your program and being a long time {1954} SWL and welcome your info (Sheldon Newman) I enjoy it [DXLD] very, very much. Thanks, (Serafin Pagan, Nicaragua) SOLICITED TESTIMONIALS Re: Time to evaluate WOR affiliates Glen[n] - I listen to WOR on WWCR at 0230 UT Sunday. It comes in very well here in Park Ridge, Illinois (Chicago area). Thanks for all of the great work you do! (Phil Chapleau) Hello Glenn! You want reaction from your listeners. Yes, I was listening in with pleasure to WOR last night on 7445 kHz [RFPI]. Good signal with fast fading (Björn Malm, Ecuador) G'day mate, Glen here from Victoria, BC, Canada. I am listening and have been for years, although I now listen via the internet to your program via World Radio Network. Cheers, mate, (long time short wave listener and amateur radio operator, Call VE7SDX, Glen Tate) Hi Glen[n], I found a picture of you in an old 1968 or 69 WRTH. I wonder what you look like now! Real high school photograph. Anyway I think I have quite possibly been listening to your shows since your No. 1; OK. I haven't sent in any information as I simply haven't had any of interest to forward to you to my point of view. Somebody by the way is putting out your shows a week late on a pirate station in Ireland on shortwave and if I miss getting you on a Saturday morning on World Space Radio I normally get your show the following week from this shortwave pirate; obviously you cannot acknowledge that this is happening but personally I would say the more listeners the better by any means. Keep up the good work. Best wishes PS: What has happened to the trains and their shunting? (Mike Evans, UK) If you are referring to train sounds on WOR tapes, the studio is still not soundproofed against sounds from outside such as trains on sidetracks not far away. That seems not to have been a problem lately, perhaps because of time of day I usually record, although if such sounds, or Vance AFB training jets do intrude, WRN have prevailed upon me not to let them be heard, in the interests of professionalism, so I pause the tape and wait for them to go away (gh) ** AFRICA. Sorry Folks! There were quite many errors in the latest version of Africalist, so I replaced it again today. http://africa.coolfreepage.com/africalist (Thorsten Hallmann, Münster, Germany, July 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA [and non]. Dear Alokesh, Greetings from HCJB, Ecuador. I have been working on getting some webpages created for HCJB Australia on the http://www.hcjb.org website. You may be interested to look at the webpage: http://www.hcjb.org/Sections+index-req-viewarticle-artid-210-page-1.html This page has the HCJB Australia Broadcast Schedule from 21st of July. You can also see the programme schedules by selecting on the links on that page. The current schedule can be found at the end of the "International Shortwave Broadcast Schedule" page: http://www.hcjb.org/Sections+index-req-viewarticle-artid-6-page-1.html Please forgive me if you already have this information, but I trust that knowing where the official broadcast schedule for HCJB Australia is will be helpful to you and many other DXers. 73 Best regards (Dave Yetman, Engineer, HCJB -------------------------------------------------------------- Ing. David G. Yetman (Kiwi in exile) HCJB WORLD RADIO Plantel de las Antenas Av. Interoceánica y Amazonas Pifo, ECUADOR HCJB Australia - The Voice of the Great South Land HCJB Ecuador - The Voice of the Andes .... That all may hear -------------------------------------------------------------- (via Alokesh Gupta, India, DXLD) DXPL airs on the evening releases only, to SAs unchanged Sat 1430, then on 15390, but the Pacific airing moves to Tuesdays! At 0830 on 11750. If I am not mistaken, Allen Graham did not give the new DXPL time on his July 19 show, tho he did give the new frequency schedule. BTW, now than Ken MacHarg is doing it, TFRL seems to be running longer; this week I timed it at 5.5 minutes, plus intro and outro. 11765 and 11750 are 50 kW at 120 degrees; 15420 and 15390 75 kW at 307 degrees from Kununurra. Some of the other semi-secular sounding titles: Regional News, daily 0900 on 11750, 1400 on 15390 followed until 0915, 1415 by Commentary weekdays, Focus weekends Destination Au/As/NZ/Pac, M-F [does this really mean UT Sun-Thu??] 1800-1830 on 11765; M-F 0200-0230 15420 Music of Au/As/NZ/Pac, M-F 0800-0830 11750, 1230-1300 15390 (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOLIVIA. 6036.68, Radiodifusoras Trópico (presumed), 0915-1002 July 17. Noted Spanish comments from a man with some music. Signal faded in and out and was covered at times with splatter. Signal last heard at 1002. Overall the quality was threshhold (Chuck Bolland, Clewiston Florida, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 6037.5, R. Em Trópico 2330 to 0005* on 17/18 July (Bob Wilkner, FL, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Any IDs? ** COSTA RICA. I have had another UT -6 station moving around. 3rd harmonic 4230 (from 1410 kHz) and 4260 (from 1420 kHz). It was Radio Pampa, Costa Rica. Björn Malm, La Prensa 4408 y Vaca de Castro, Quito, Ecuador (+593 2) 2598 470 JRC 535 – HF 150. MFJ 616 – MFJ 1025. 12m LW + 24m LW + Longwire Magnetic Balun 73s from (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA [non]. PROGRAMAS ESPECIALES EN HONOR A CELIA CRUZ Noticias de WRMI Sábado, Julio 19, 2003 En Miami esta tarde, miles de personas están participando en varias misas y celebraciones en honor a la cantante cubanoamericana Celia Cruz, quien murió el pasado miércoles. Casi todos los programas cubanos en Radio Miami Internacional están preparando ediciones especiales para honrar a Celia Cruz este fin de semana. Estos incluyen: 2300-2359 UTC sábado: Foro Militar Cubano 0000-0030 UTC domingo: Conversando entre Cubanos 0030-0045 UTC domingo: La Hora de Chibás 0100-0200 UTC domingo: Radio Revista Lux 1015-1030 UTC domingo: La Hora de Chibás 2300-2359 UTC domingo: Radio Revista Lux 0030-0130 UTC lunes: Radio Oriente Libre 0130-0200 UTC lunes: Conversando entre Cubanos 1030-1130 UTC lunes: Entre Cubanos Todos estos programas se transmiten en 9955 kHz. DENUNCIAN INTERFERENCIA CUBANA A WRMI El siguiente informe del corresponsal cubano Carlos Serpa en la Isla de Pinos/Juventud aparece en la edición de Julio 19/20 del programa Radio Revista Lux en Radio Miami Internacional: "Héctor Pachá García, delegado de la Confederación Obrera Nacional Independiente de Cuba, CONIC, en Isla de Pinos, denunció a la corresponsalía de Lux Info Press que el régimen de Fidel Castro interfiere las transmisiones de Radio Revista Lux, órgano radial de la Federación Sindical de Plantas Eléctricas, Gas y Agua de Cuba en el Exilio. El programa que sale todos los sábados a las 9 de la noche [hora de Cuba] y domingos a las 7 de la noche por la frecuencia de Radio Miami Internacional en 9955 kilohertz, banda de 31 metros, en emisión especial a Cuba y el mundo de habla castellana, está acompañado de un ruido que impide captar con calidad la emisión. En Nueva Gerona, capital municipal de Isla de Pinos, la CONIC ha hecho un monitoreo de las transmisiones radiales, captándose la señal, pero con mucha dificultad. La corresponsalía Lux Info Press, efectuó un sondeo en la localidad rural de La Majagua, donde confirmó que la señal, a pesar de sufrir una interferencia, es escuchada por los vecinos del lugar. "El régimen de Castro le preocupa el mensaje que envía Radio Lux. Por eso, hoy mas que nunca, es necesario que su mensaje sea escuchado. Es propósito nuestro enviar una carta al Gobierno de los Estados Unidos solicitándole potenciar las transmisiones de Radio Miami Internacional," precisó Pachá. La Confederación Obrera Nacional Independiente de Cuba realiza actualmente una campaña de divulgación entre los habitantes de Isla de Pinos sobre la labor informativa que realiza Radio Revista Lux como tribuna de denuncias a los abusos y desmanes que realiza la dictadura castro-comunista contra los trabajadores y la población en general." Jeff White, Gerente General, WRMI Radio Miami International 175 Fontainebleau Blvd., Suite 1N4, Miami, Florida 33172 USA Tel +1-305-559-9764 Fax +1-305-559-8186 E-mail: radiomiami9@cs.com http://www.wrmi.net (via DXLD) ** CUBA. U.S. THINKS CUBA JAMS RADIO WAVES TO IRAN By HARRY DUNPHY, Associated Press Writer July 18 http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20030718/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/us_cuba_jamming_4 WASHINGTON --- The United States has called in Cuban representatives and asked them to investigate whether jamming of broadcasts to Iran originates on or near the island, State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said Friday. He said the meeting took place in Washington on Thursday. A senior State Department official, who spoke on condition of anonymity said, "We are giving them the chance to find it and close it down." Boucher said, "We raised the jamming with the government of Cuba. The interference with Loral Skynet commercial satellite transmissions appears to emanate from the vicinity of Cuba and does appear to be intentional." Iran's Islamic government has accused U.S.-based satellite stations of stoking pro-democracy protests by providing unfiltered information in the country. While Cuban authorities have long jammed U.S. government broadcasts to their own country just off the coast of Florida, blocking transmissions to a third country in a distant hemisphere would be unprecedented, a U.S. official said earlier this week. In Ciego de Ávila, Cuba, Ricardo Alarcón, president of the Cuban National Assembly, denied the accusations as an anti-Cuban ploy of the United States. "You never know what they'll come up with to justify aggression against the island," said Alarcón, a top adviser to President Fidel Castro on U.S. affairs. Alarcón's comments were distributed by the Cuban news agency, Prensa Latina. Kenneth Tómlinson, who oversees the Voice of America, as chairman of the Broadcasting Board of Governors, said Wednesday "this has ominous implications for the future of international satellite broadcasting." Iran itself can't block the programming because the signals must be jammed over the Atlantic Ocean where the satellites are positioned. U.S. officials believe Iran contracted with Cuba to do the job this month, on the eve of the four-year anniversary of large-scale student protests, "to block the flow of news in a time when they obviously thought they were going to loose control of their own people," Tomlinson said. He said an interference signal jamming the satellites has been tracked to a facility near Havana --- a claim based on information provided by the satellite service providers (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) The LA Times jamming story also (via Sydney Morning Herald via Rob Williams, DXLD) CUBA RECIBE UNA QUEJA DE ESTADOS UNIDOS POR INTERFERIR EN LAS SEÑALES DE SATÉLITE El departamento de Estado estadounidense pidió formalmente al gobierno cubano que investigue acerca de las interferencias de la señal de satélites estadounidenses que difunden en dirección de Irán, ya que dichas interferencias provienen de Cuba. El portavoz del Departamento de Estado, Richard Boucher, indicó asimismo, que solicitó al gobierno cubano poner fin a estas prácticas. El martes, la BBC indicó que el origen de estas interferencias se localizaba cerca de La Habana y que estas obstrucciones de la señal impiden a los iraníes, quienes poseen un satélite de televisión, recibir programas estadounidenses en Irán. RCI CyberJournal 18/Jul/2003 (via Elmer Escoto, Honduras, DXLD) ** CUBA. CUBA DENIES JAMMING BROADCAST The Cuban Government has denied that it is intentionally jamming an American satellite TV broadcast to Iran. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/3080891.stm "Cuba has never undertaken nor will it ever undertake these types of interruptions in US television satellite transmissions," a Cuban Foreign Ministry statement said. However, officials promised to bow to US requests that they investigate whether signals originating in Cuba could be unintentionally interfering with the broadcasts. Last week the US said it was investigating a rogue signal detected from Cuba. Click here to see how jamming works http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/3080891.stm#al The jamming was first discovered on 6 July when the government-funded station Voice of America launched a daily Persian-language programme aimed at Iran's domestic audience. The Los Angeles-based Iranian television network National Iranian TV (NITV) - which promotes reform in Iran - has also had its signal blocked. The foreign ministry statement did admit that Cuba routinely does block some broadcasts - notably the US-funded Radio and Television Marti, beamed to Cuba itself. "Cuba, within its rights, has interfered, interferes and will continue to interfere only the illegal transmissions of radio and television that the government of the United States makes to our country," the statement said. "We do so with the sovereign right to defend our broadcast air space from the subversive radio and television aggression that, violating international law from the first years of the revolution, have been carried out by the American government," it added. Iranian crackdown On Friday US State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said that the interference appeared to be intentional. The signal is thought to come from a monitoring complex outside Havana set up by the Soviets during the Cold War to eavesdrop on the US. Iran saw widespread demonstrations last month against the conservative clerical establishment. Hundreds of reformers have been arrested and there has been a crackdown on the free press. US officials say Cuban President Fidel Castro could be in league with the Iranian government to stop Iranians from receiving satellite television. President of NITV Zia Atabay told the BBC that when Iranian students and writers come out of jail, the first thing they do is grab the phone to do an interview with the station, and invariably criticise their government (via Kim Elliott, DXLD) Loral SpaceNet just filed for bankruptcy. I talk to those guys every day doing news uplinks back to the network (CBS). Friday (7/18) I talked to one of their operators and he said he got paid but he wasn't sure if the check was good (LOU KF4EON Johnson, July 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CZECH REPUBLIC. RFE/RL RADIO WAITS FOR US MONEY TO MOVE FROM PRAGUE CENTRE - RADIO SPOKESWOMAN | Excerpt from report in English by Czech news agency CTK Prague, 17 July: The planned moving of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL) from the Prague centre cannot be carried out in haste, RFE/RL spokeswoman Sonia Winterova told CTK today. [passage omitted] Winterova said that the transfer of RFE/RL is an expensive matter and, in addition, the money for it must be first approved by the US Congress. "Concerning the time, one cannot push the US Congress to hurry up - they (the congressmen) have their own pace, their rhythm, and this is not under our control," she added. [passage omitted] On Tuesday [15 July], [Czech Foreign Minister Cyril] Svoboda also explained that the contract on the lease of the building of the former Czechoslovak Federal Assembly expires in December 2004 so there is a time pressure for an action. Winterova, however, said she did not consider this an obstacle as, in her opinion, there was no problem to ask for the contract extension. [passage omitted] The US-funded RFE/RL was established in 1949 in order to spread news to and support democratic values in countries behind the Iron Curtain, including the then communist Czechoslovakia. Originally seated in Munich, it moved to Prague in 1995. [passage omitted] Source: CTK news agency, Prague, in English 1709 gmt 17 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) RADIO FREE EUROPE FINALLY PICKS NEW SITE Foreign Minister Cyril Svoboda has confirmed the relocation of Radio Free Europe from the center of Prague. The move was agreed during Svoboda's meeting with his U.S. counterpart Colin Powell. The U.S. party has not disclosed the new address. (HN 4) . . . From http://www.pbj.cz/user/article.asp?ArticleID=182424 (Prague Business Journal 18 July via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** EASTER ISLAND [non]. SOUTH AMERICAN PIRATES --- Times UT RADIO COCHIGUAZ will be active hoisting the pirate flag, on its NEW frequency of 11430 kHz USB, relaying on this opportunity to RADIO MAHUTE, a PHB (Polynesian Heritage Broadcasting) group production, in charge of Motu He, which has the function of being the general producer and dj. All vernacular IDs are and will be, in Rapa Nui language. Sat, 19 July 2003, 2100-2200 Radio Mahute Sun, 20 July 2003, 0230-0330 Radio Mahute For reports write to: (Please add return postage) Radio Mahute, Casilla 159, Santiago 14, CHILE. email: mahuteradio@yahoo.fr V= QSL Radio Cochiguaz, Box 159, Santiago 14, CHILE. FFFR, ;-) Cachito, Radio Cochiguaz op. http://www.geocities.com/rcochiguaz (via hardcore dx via DXLD) Now at 2115 UT surprisingly good readable signal of Radio Cochiguaz with its Rapa Nui program on 11430 USB vy73 (Harald Kuhl, Alemania July 19, ibid.) Amigos de la lista, Estoy escuchando ahora com muy buena señal la Radio Mahute via R. Cochiguaz en los 11430 kHz modo USB con muy bonitas músicas polinesias. La condición de recepcion es local. Un gran saludo, (Samuel Cassio Martins, São Carlos, Brasil, July 19, Conexión Digital via DXLD) PIRATE (South American) 11430U, Radio Mahute via Radio Cochiguaz, 0228 tune-in with Interval Signal (Flute) with the Condor Pasa and IDs in English, Spanish and Quechua. Radio Mahute sign-on at 0230 with Polynesian and up-beat South Pacific flare. Between songs managed to catch IDs as "Radio Mahute" and "Ici Radio Mahute". Initially the signal was quite good, but gradually deteriorated to poor after 0305 hours (Edward Kusalik, VE6EFK, Alberta, July 20, DX'er since 1965, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** ETHIOPIA. Hei Glenn, Voice of Tigray Revolution noted this Friday evening 1805 UT only 6350 kHz. 5500 kHz kept silent, no signal at all. Radio Fana excellent on 6940 kHz, very poor copy on 6210 kHz. Question is: how to hear the External Service of Radio Ethiopia?! I´ve heard them only once on 9560 kHz, 16 UT in English. Voice of Turkey had problems with their transmitter, I suppose. Really nothing to do with reception conditions. 73 (Jouko Huuskonen, Turku, FINLAND, July 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) El Servicio Nacional de Radio Ethiopia (100 kW), posee el siguiente esquema de emisiones en Amárico, Oromo y otras lenguas locales: HORA UTC KHZ 0300-1100* 5990, 7110, 9704.2 1100-1400 5990, 7110, 9704.2 (Sáb y Dom) 1500-2000 5990, 7110, 9704.2 Nota: (*) Un segmento de noticias locales en inglés se irradia de Lunes a Viernes de 1030 a 1045 UT. Buena recepción en Argetina a partir de las 0400 UT en 7110 KHz. QTH: Audience Relations, Radio Ethiopia, P. O. Box 654, Addis Ababa, Etiopia (Marcelo A. Cornachioni, Argentina, Conexión Digital July 19 via DXLD) ** GABON [and non]. Hi Glenn, Africa No. 1 was heard today with strong signal on 15475 kHz, 18 UT with programme in French in parallel with 9580 kHz. This frequency is poor for Finland. The outlet of 15475 kHz is really interesting, used at least by three international broadcasters: Africa Numéro 1, LRA36 from Antarctica and Voz Cristiana from Chile. I can enjoy all of them in lovely light summer evenings like this around 18-21 UT. It has been pretty hot here in former capital of Finland, today 31 degrees. The highest temperature ever in Finland dates back to 1914. It was 35,9 degrees and it was in Turku! 73´s (Jouko Huuskonen, Turku, FINLAND, July 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) We are hitting 40+ routinely past fortnight daily (gh, Enid, DXLD) ** GUYANA. 3291.12 GBC / VOG 0843-0920 subcontinental music mixed with country and western, "Good morning the time in Georgetown is... Congratulations to Mr and Mrs ....on the ...anniversary.. Good morning to all of our wonderful listeners ..very happy Birthday to ... and his family in Orlando Florida..... (Robert Wilkner, FL, July 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 3291.2, 19/07 0255, Voice of Guyana, Georgetown, E, talk OM, music instrumental, talk OM, mx pop 24432 RFA (Rogildo Fontenelle Aragão, Cochabamba, Bolivia, radioescutas via DXLD) ** HONDURAS. Quito 19/07/2003 10:57:31 a.m. 2859.98, unID Radio Cultura (Radio Futura??), unknown QTH. Mark Mohrmann had an unID on 2860 kHz. Checked the channel, 2859.98 kHz, at 0230 UT and there it was: Radio Cultura-IDs by female, sometimes just ``Cultura`` or ``La nueva cultura``. I`m not 100% sure it is ``Cultura``, could also be ``Futura``. Close down 0300 UT with ``14-30 amplitud modulada`` and TCs UT –6. ``Radio Cultura (Futura?) número uno en el valle de....`` Not very strong signal. Later: 19/07/2003 11:03:54 p.m. Hello again Amigo Glenn! 2859.98H, HRSJ Radio Futura, Tocoa (Honduras). 19th of July 2003 - 0200 UT. I have just finished listening to Mark Mohrmann`s (and others in USA) unID on 2860 kHz Saturday evening. 3 hours with quite bad reception with moments of fair to good signal. 3 hours with mostly latinamerican "funk" and "rap" music, a phone-in program with telephone number 4 46 21 21. After 0230 UTC "Música de recuerdos". Close down 0300 UT with prefix. It is my opinion that the name of the station is "Futura" not "Cultura". ID 0200 UT: "...oyentes. Muy buenas noches, Radio Futura HRSJ que transmite en su frecuencia ...de 1430 amplitud modulada... haya sido [de su] más completo agrado. Hemos oferecido a Ustedes la más... programación musical, educativa, cultural, deportiva e informativa. ...gracias a nuestro fuerzo, a la voluntad de dios y a la confianza del comercio, a la industria... Radio Futura... muy buenas noches". Ex-Radio Mundial. Harmonic from 1430 kHz 73s from (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador. ARC-SWB América Latina bjornmalm2003@yahoo.com Björn Malm, La Prensa 4408 y Vaca de Castro, Quito, Ecuador (+593 2) 2598 470 JRC 535 – HF 150. MFJ 616 – MFJ 1025. 12m LW + 24m LW + Longwire Magnetic Balun DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDONESIA. Voice of Indonesia can be reached via voi@rri-online.com email ID. URL http://www.rri-online.com 73s, (Swopan Chakroborty, Kolkata, India, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM [non]. ESA TO BUILD A DEEP SPACE GROUND STATION IN CEBREROS (Spain) http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=12120 (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** IRAN. NEWSPAPER ACCUSES STATE RADIO OF GIVING RADIO BANDS TO PRIVATE COMPANY | Text of report by Iranian newspaper Iran web site on 16 July; ellipses as received throughout: The Voice and Vision [radio and television] has given one of its radio bands to a private company offering pager services. According to the Iran correspondent, the Ministry of Post, Telegraph and Telephone handed the supply of pager services to the private sector in accordance with the implementation of item 124 of the Third Development Plan. Along the same lines Estiman San'at, Setareh Tala'i based on Kish Island and Ertebatat-e Sayyar started setting up a national pager network. Sorush Computer, Faramin San'at and Sima Rasana started a network in Khorasan, Gilan and Kerman provinces. The above-mentioned companies went through the legal process and obtained permits from the Ministry and have invested a great deal of capital into the venture. Last year a so-called private company called ... in Mashhad printed advertisements in the newspapers in an effort to sell pager services. This company did not have a permit for this activity. Investigations by the Ministry of Post, Telegraph and Telephone indicated that the Voice and Vision had undertaken an illegal act handing over its 88-108 megahertz band, which is solely for radio broadcasts, to ... company for the purposes of providing pager services alongside radio usage. Permits to allow usage of radio frequencies are issued to companies by the Ministry of Post, Telegraph and Telephone by specifying the kind of service to be provided. As part of this process the Voice and Vision has obtained this Ministry's permission to use some bands for radio frequencies. The Voice and Vision's illegal activity has caused the Ministry of Post, Telegraph and Telephone and the Khorasan Communications Office to lodge a complaint against the Voice and Vision. A court has issued an order halting .. company's activities. . Despite this verdict and court order ... company has printed another advertisement in one of Khorasan province's newspapers. This time it is trying to sell pager services as part of a joint venture with the Voice and Vision. One informed source told the Iran correspondent: "The Voice and Vision has a huge budget and is illegally competing with private companies, which has put in danger investment in those private firms." Source: Iran web site, Tehran, in Persian 16 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) {this could be a case of SCA -- use of FM subcarriers for paging, as is common in USA, where it is a viable side market to broadcasting without disrupting broadcasting} ** IRAN [and non]. LUGAR: IRAN DEMOCRACY ACT NOT SUPPORTED BY WHITE HOUSE --- An Eye for Iran --- Not all lawmakers are quiet about the protests in Tehran. By Jim Geraghty, National Review Online June 18, 2003 http://www.nationalreview.com/geraghty/geraghty061803.asp (via Nick Grace, CRW via DXLD) more on satellite jamming: see CUBA ** IRAQ. IRAQ MEDIA NETWORK BROADCAST FROM ARBIL | Text of report by Monitoring research on 19 July Iraq Media Network broadcasts from Arbil, northern Iraq, for one hour (1500-1600 gmt) daily on 11137 MHz, horizontal polarity, via Hotbird satellite - same frequency as Kurdistan Satellite TV of the Kurdistan Democratic Party. The programme is repeated the following day at 0800 gmt. The broadcast is carried by Kurdistan Satellite, still using the old logo which consists of a circle around the map of Iraq with "Iraq Media Network" outside the circumference of the circle. The IMN broadcast begins with information on broadcast information as detailed above, and gives the following contact numbers: 0088 216 7744 3275 and 0044 702 864 6132. The programmes include local news, music and national news in brief (teletext), mostly on coalition activities, including news from Basra and other southern governorates. Source: BBC Monitoring research in Arabic 19 Jul 03 (via DXLD) ** KOREAS. SOUTH KOREAN BROADCASTER TO HOLD AMATEUR SINGING CONTEST IN PYONGYANG | Text of report in English by South Korean news agency Yonhap Seoul, 16 July: South Korea's state-run KBS television will hold an amateur singing contest in Pyongyang next month jointly with North Korea's Korea Central Television, KBS said Wednesday [16 July]. KBS said 20 residents in the North Korean capital and singers from both Koreas will take part in the two-hour programme on 11 August to be emceed by South Korean entertainer Song Hae and a North Korean female broadcaster. The South Korean broadcaster said the event will testify a real inter- Korean broadcasting exchange as about 70 North Korean entertainers and technical staff are expected to support the event while the North will mobilize broadcasting equipment for it. KBS and the North Korean broadcaster have agreed to air the programme simultaneously in the afternoon of 15 August, the anniversary of Korean liberation from the Japanese colonial rule in 1945. The amateur singers are expected to show off their singing ability with Korean folk songs and other song titles on inter-Korean reunification. KBS plans to dispatch a 20-member staff and two singers to Pyongyang on 5 August to prepare for the event. The upcoming singing contest will likely pave the way for broadcasters of the two Koreas to resume inter-Korean broadcasting exchanges, which have stalled amid the North's standoff against the United States over its nuclear weapons programme. Last year, KBS and the North Korean broadcaster aired live a performance of the KBS Orchestra and the North's state-run orchestra from Pyongyang and the South Korean MBC television held a performance of South Korean singers in Pyongyang. Source: Yonhap news agency, Seoul, in English 0029 gmt 16 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** KURDISTAN [non]. Radio Mesopotamia, émission du 11-07-2003: L`écoute a été effectué de 0850 à 0905 UTc sur 11530 kHz, jusqu`à 0900 que de la music Kurde qui ressemble étrangement à la musique Turque. A 0900 UTc annonce du nom de la station avec adresse et une émission commence (Mohamed Kallel, July 17, France?, Tunisia? DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO. 6045, XEXQ Radio Universidad (tentative). Been trying for this station for weeks during the 1200 hour, which is just after sunrise. There is usually a strong carrier on the frequency and sometimes I can hear a Chinese language station, although it is weak. Got a bit closer today. Classical music at 1215-1230, then the Chinese faded in. I thought at first it might have been the Chinese with the classical music, but I heard what I thought were the two of them mixing at 1240. The music was a bit weaker by this time. Just bits of pieces of classical fading in by 1247, nothing like the weak, but steady, reception I had had at 1215. I had a look at their website http://www.uaslp.mx/rtu/ which gives the contact address published elsewhere. They did have a bit on the MW which gives an idea of the programs they run on shortwave: Radio Universisdad XEXQ 1460 kHz. Esta estación se encarga de difundir diversos programas educativos y cultruales, entre los cuales destacan programas de la RAI italiana, La Voz de Alemania, En Concierto, Titanes de la Música, Actualización Magisterial, etc.... Esta estación también transmite por Onda Corta, en 6.045 MHz, Banda internacional de 49.62mts. The studio number is listed as 4 (8) 26-13-48 and their fax number is 4 (8) 26-13-88 (Hans Johnson, WY, Jul 19, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) Me too, trying for it, that is. July 19 at 1238 a quick check of 6045 had some classical(?) music, but atmospheric noise level too high. Should make it with quiet conditions, and later sunrises, China permitting (Glenn Hauser, Enid OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Heard here also this morning (7/19), with XE anthem right at 1200 UT, then YL talk until 1210, then into classical music. Fair/poor with a noisy band at 1200, but improved nicely to peak around 1225. QSL'ed this one in 1989 (John Wilkins, Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Drake R-8, 100- foot randomwire, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** MEXICO. 690, XEN was blasting in loud and alone Monday morning at about 3:57 AM Central time [0857 UT]. Full call ID, "La 69" several times, phone number, website, more. Interesting in that Fresnillo is the usual Mexican on this frequency for me. XEN had never been this loud before, and the only other audible Mexican at this time was XEX - -- power increase or odd atmospherics? (Eric Loy, Champaign IL, July 15, Corazón DX via DXLD) XEN is advertising new 100 kW power. True or hype, I don't know (David Gleason, CA, July 16, ibid.) ** NETHERLANDS. R. London to test from Flevo 1008 kHz: see UK [non] ** NETHERLANDS. ANOTHER FINE MESS Dutch Minister of Economic Affairs, Laurens-Jan Brinkhorst, has announced the setting up of a task force to find solutions to the reception problems affecting public broadcasters since the introduction of the Zerobase FM frequency plan. The task force - comprising representatives from the Ministry, the broadcasters and the transmitter operators - has been given until 1 October 2003 to come up with solutions. But how did we get into this situation? http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/features/html/ned030718.html (Andy Sennitt, Media Network newsletter July 18 via DXLD) THAT RADIO SONG Dutch radio went through a shake-up recently. Now that the dust has settled, we identify the changes and take a look at the new and some of the old players in the industry. Aaron Gray-Block writes. http://www.expatica.com/index.asp?pad=34,35,&item_id=32844 Good overview of the complicated Dutch broadcasting scene. 73 (Kim Elliott, DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. RADIO BOSS AND RNZ TOLD TO TALK --- 18 July 2003 Radio New Zealand and its head of news Lynne Snowdon have been ordered back to the negotiating table over her ongoing employment dispute. Ms Snowdon has been absent from work for seven months after a falling out with RNZ chief executive Sharon Crosbie over budget and staffing issues. She has been on sick leave since January after her doctor diagnosed she was suffering from depression triggered by a very stressful work environment. In June, the Employment Relations Authority ordered RNZ to take Ms Snowdon back and pay her $3000 in compensation. RNZ then appealed, arguing Ms Snowdon should first undergo a psychiatric assessment. . . http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,2572551a11,00.html (Dominion Post via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** PAPUA NEW GUINEA. PNG Updates and Journals On June 5th 2003, Life Radio Ministries, Inc. President Joe Emert, began his trip to Papua New Guinea to meet with EBM President Gerald Bustin and HCJB Engineer Sam Rowley and his wife Grace. Together they are to meet with the official of the PNG government to finalize plans to put a short wave station on the air. In addition to meeting with the government officials, this team will meet with Ron Cline, CEO of HCJB and President of HCJB, Dave Johnson. Rev. Bustin and Ron Cline will hold two Radio Rallies to thousands at the coliseum in Port Moresby. here are some of Joe's thought's and pictures from that trip. http://www.wmvv.com/png%20updates.htm Links to 8 journals follow, the last of which including: Journal # 8, Wantok Radio Light, Papua New Guinea Trip Journal of Joe Emert, President, Life Radio Ministries, Inc. Wednesday, June 18, 2003 Dear Friends, This will be my final Journal from this trip to Papua New Guinea. My e-mail capability was down for a few days but I`m back on-line now. I`m in Honolulu, working my way back home, and will arrive Thursday afternoon. Our final workday in PNG was Monday. We had an excellent final meeting with the `Pangtel` officers. You may recall that `Pangtel` is the government regulatory agency for broadcasting. They reconfirmed two very important items for the PNG Christian Broadcasting Network… 1. They reconfirmed that they are granting a short-wave license with which we can broadcast to the entire Nation. Because it is short-wave, governments around the world share information and the nearby countries to Papua New Guinea must `sign-off` on the frequency we have been granted so as to insure we will not interfere with a station in another country. This could take another month. 2. They indicated that they wish to assist us by immediately reserving all 26 (or more) of the FM stations around the country! This will effectively `lock-in` these frequencies for our use. Other broadcasters are rapidly learning the power of radio in this country and are rushing to seek licenses. Just like in the United States, listeners prefer to listen on FM due to its high quality. However, the short-wave will fill in where FM cannot reach. . . (Joe Emert, Wantok Radio Light via DXLD) Elsewhere the SW is specified as tropical band From a previous journal, #6 of June 14: There is so much to do yet to finish the job of bringing Christian radio to 5.3 million people. Unbelievably, M-TV, the USA based sexy, raunchy, music video service is offered here in Port Moresby and at other locations in the country. The cataclysmic media changes forced on these shy, private, precious people, (whose Pidgin word for `kissing` is `no no` and is only between husband and wife behind closed doors) is damaging their family structures, lifestyles, and very health. Is the Christian radio alternative needed here? Yes! A thousand times yes! If we can enjoy it in the United States then we must share it with others who so desperately desire it (ibid.) ** PERU. 5486.69, La Reina de la Selva, 1016-1045, Julio 15, música peruana, muchos anuncios de la hora por OM. Se repite en numerosas identificaciones la expresión: "La Reina", se indica una lista de números telefónicos. Llega con excelente señal (Roberto Wilkner, Estados Unidos, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Como ya se ha informado en DXLD, la palabra es un apellido deletreado REYNA (gh) ** PERU. Hola amigos, aquí algunas noticias sobre las emisoras peruanas en onda corta. Escuchas del día 17 de julio del 2003. Radio SAN MIGUEL desde Sondor en Piura al norte del Perú. Escuché por los 6538 kHz con buena señal a las 0110 hasta las 0230 con música folklórica, ID a las 0130 ``disfrutan RADIO SAN MIGUEL DESDE SONDOR,`` anuncios, ``estamos en la onda corta.`` Tengo entendido que Radio difusora Huancabamba transmitía por los 6535.9 pero ya no está en aire. Radio VIRGEN DEL CARMEN desde Huancavelica. Escuché por los 4885 a las 1130 UT con señal de débil a buena, su programa de 6to aniversario; coincide con la fiesta de la Virgen del Carmen. Llamé por teléfono y mi saludo salió al aire y me prometieron verificar mi reporte de recepción por medio de carta. Noticias, ID Radio VIRGEN DEL CARMEN en sus tres frecuencias desde Huancavelica, Perú. Radio PERU desde San Ignacio --- Cajamarca. En los 5637. Programa musical a las 0100 con saludos de cumpleaños y anuncios varios, ID a las 0120 ``Saludos a los que están en sintonía de Radio Perú desde san Ignacio``. Radio SANTA MONICA desde el Cuzco --- Perú. Transmite por los 4965 khz con mejor señal que Radio La hora en 4855 khz, programa musical a las 0030 ut. ID entre temas musicales, "Santa Monica". (CESAR PEREZ DIOSES, CHIMBOTE, PERU, July 18, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** PERU. PANAMERICANA TV TAKEN OFF THE AIR BY THE GOVERNMENT | Text of report by Radio Programas del Peru web site on 18 July Panamericana, the country's main television station, went off the air at exactly 1200 (1700 gmt), after the government decided to temporarily suspend its transmission license. The signal was suspended after Gunter Rave, host and journalist of the television station ended an interview with Francisco Diez Canseco, president of the Peace Council. It must be said that the government decision went into effect today after the management`s disputing control of the television station were duly notified. Television viewers who were watching the Panamericana programming first saw the channel's logo and then heard a sound that indicated that the order had been finally obeyed and that it was going off the air. Source: Radio Programas del Peru web site, Lima, in Spanish 18 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** PHILIPPINES [and non]. Changes at the IBB site in Poro: new frequency since 19 July is 1170 kHz with VOA in English at 1900-2200, beamed at 332 degrees. (Source: IBB online schedule) (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, July 20, MW-DX via DXLD) And 1143 remains in use at earlier hours, 1100-1800; Strangely enough, IBB is now using both 1143 and 1170 from more than one site: Philippines 1143: 1143 1100 1200 VOA R CHIN PHP A 332 1143 1200 1230 VOA P ENGL PHP A 332 1143 1300 1330 VOA S VIET PHP A 262 1143 1330 1500 VOA T1 CANT PHP A 332 1143 1600 1700 VOA P ENGL PHP A 332 1143 1700 1800 VOA P ENGL PHP A 332 12345 [M-F] Dushanbe 1143: 1143 1200 1230 VOA AFG DARI DB B 999 1143 1230 1300 VOA G UZBE DB B 999 1143 1300 1400 RFE RL13 UZ DB B 999 UAE 1170: 1170 0000 2400 FRD FRD PE DHB A 000 Philippines 1170: 1170 1900 2200 VOA P ENGL PHP B 332 Note that Philippines 1143 is the A transmitter, and 1170 is the B transmitter --- even tho the times do not overlap; is B not the megawatt? (IBB online schedule July 20 via Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) {1143 used to shift to 1147.5, to avoid jamming? Still?} ** SAO TOME. VoA at Pinheira is still kicking. Dear Wolfgang, Thanks for your long message re the various reports on STP, which, of course, have been on our TV stations too, mainly on RTP of course. As I write, 2210, 1530 kHz is putting a very strong signal with some QSB and occasional stronger QRM de CVA, but the K9AY is "taking care" of the situation! I tried 4950 yesterday at around dinner time, and it was working too, so suppose it was on today. Some 45 tourists are reported to be "stuck" in the islands, and the Portuguese government is considering the evacuation of Portuguese nationals, if necessary. I suppose Anker Petersen of the DSWCI is happy for having planned his trip back in March, hi! Best 73, (Carlos Gonçalves, Portugal, BC-DX via DXLD) 1530 STP is fine --- as is the rest of the station and staff. The 'coup' was relatively 'peaceful' and occurred a couple of days ago. If you want a 'hoot', take a listen to the RA cuts at this URL: http://africa.ibb.his.com/RMSPlayer/cgi-bin/PlayerCGI.acgi?brd=VOA&loc=LUAN&lng=ENGL&frq=1530&day=1&btm=0000&etm=2400&sound_da=yes [make sure you get ALL of the URL -- it's long and it'll probably 'wrap' in most email clients] It's a bunch of 20 seconds samples taken from our Luanda, Angola remote monitoring system -- propagation across the seawater path between STP and Luanda is pretty good! (Bill Whitacre, IBB Monitoring, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** SPAIN. Spanish DX club AER inform you that the new update of "Spain on MW" list ("España en onda media") was uploaded at http://www.aer-dx.org/listas/eaenom.htm This list is 3 free PDF files sorted by frequency, location and station name and is updated by our member Martín Estévez, ee@aer- dx.org The data of every station are: kHz, station name, network, KW, transmitter location, postal address, QSL info, phone and fax, local programs New in this update: RNE-R1 San Sebastián with 25 kW, RNE-R5 San Sebastián with 10 kW Address of both stations: Paseo de los Fueros 2, 20006 San Sebastián, Guipúzcoa. Spain. phone of both stations: 943427305, fax of both stations: 943428128; e-mail of both stations: emisora.ss.rne@rtve.es. Till next one! -------------------------------------------------- Pedro Sedano, Madrid, España, COORDINADOR GENERAL -------------------------------------------------- AER http://www.aer-dx.org info@aer-dx.org (via hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** SWITZERLAND. Please check your satellite feed for the 11905 transmission. The audio is being broadcast twice due to a satellite delay. It is difficult to listen to (Bill Harms, Maryland, July 16, to swissinfo, cc to DXLD) Glenn, this is in response to a reception problem on Swiss Radio International's transmission at 2200. I heard an echo (Bill Harms, Elkridge, MD, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Dear Mr Harms, Thank you for your email and bringing this to our attention. Our technical department has checked the studio output and satellite link and found no irregularities. The cause of this delay might be because the signal is sent out from both Sottens and Montsinéry at the same time. As the signal must first be sent to Montsinéry (2 x 36,000 km) this causes a delay of several milliseconds, which makes listening to a programme very difficult. This can also happen at one station, when the distribution of a signal is on several layers, i.e. wave lengths, thus creating a second signal similar to an echo. As these signals are not intended for North America, it is difficult to say how this can be improved. However, should you notice this on 11905 KHz (Montsinery relay) again, please give us the date and time (in UT). We will have someone look into this problem. Sincerely, (swissinfo/Swiss Radio International English Department, Nancy Hartmann, July 18 via Harms, DXLD) Hi Glenn: SRI was absent from 9885 2330-0000 7/19. They were good with a little flutter on 11905. I wonder if there is a connection between their being off of 9885 and the earlier "echo" problem (Bill Harms, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** TAIWAN. R Taiwan Int's Mailbag Time's Global Exchange segment is a fun and interesting way to exchange ideas and experiences from various cultures. Every month, we pose a new question to listeners, and every week we choose a few listener's answers to read in Mailbag Time. These listeners will receive souvenirs from RTI and some answers will be shared in Taipeiwave, the English Service newsletter. So join our global exchange and write us at natalie@cbs.org.tw Here is our topic for August: Share your hottest memory! Where, when and what were you doing during that ultra hot experience? Broadcast Time: Mailbag Time can be heard every Saturday in Hour Two and on Sunday in Hour One. (RTI web site via Swopan Chakroborty Kolkata, India, DXLD) ** TAIWAN. CBS BOARD PICKS NEW CHAIRMAN The Taipei Times Tuesday, July 15, 2003 Lin Fung-cheng beat out incumbent Chou Tian-rey, whose term finished last month following a stormy three years in the radio station's hot seat . . . http://www.asiamedia.ucla.edu/Weekly2003/07.15.2003/Taiwan4.htm (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** U K. Another year to develop it has brought little improvement in BBC Proms (video) webcasting. For the first night of the Proms, July 18, the video feed finally came alive at 1830, at 45 kbps, but the audio portion sounded like about 8, unlistenable --- so we had The option of seeing some jerky pictures and awful audio, or no pix and decent 44.1 kbps audio on the BBC Radio 3 stream. The choice was made even easier by the loss of video after the first selexion, replaced by a permanent slide, so we never got to see the pianist in action. Back to the video for the interval interviews and features, which were mainly talk. Video kept working for Ivan the Terrible music, and it would have been nice to stay with it for the subtitles, not to mention all the action by the narrator, in the choruses and orchestra, but to get anything out of the music, it was back to audio-only. Last year`s host with the loud shirts, Charles Hazelwood, was not to be seen, so there was less of a loss there. As I switched back and forth, it appeared that radio and TV versions had the same host, Stephanie Hughes, instead of different ones as last year. And the two feeds were more or less simultaneous instead of half an hour offset. I missed the Saturday live cast, and a quick check of the video for the early Sunday once again found the Proms slide up --- does this mean no one is getting it, or just those of us too late to get in on the available capacity at the moment? (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. TRUST ME, I'M BRITISH --- By Tim Burt Published: July 17 2003 16:41 The reception area at White City, the BBC's sprawling television complex in west London, is eerily silent and almost deserted. At this time of night, there is only one other visitor: Ben Bradshaw, the government minister. The Labour politician has cycled from Westminster for a grilling on Newsnight, the BBC's current affairs flagship. He removes his bicycle clips and helmet, collects his security pass and sits in the corner, eyes closed, preparing for the ordeal ahead. Bradshaw, a former BBC presenter, has spent the past few weeks lambasting his one-time employer. The young minister --- perfectly groomed for the studio --- has emerged as a government rottweiler: condemning the BBC's coverage of the war in Iraq, attacking presenters for lack of impartiality, demanding abject apologies over the "dodgy dossier". As a result some BBC executives would prefer Bradshaw to keep out of the studios. But the assistant producer smiles when she arrives to collect him, ensuring his safe passage along the maze of corridors, up stairs, past empty cafeterias to the studio. If Bradshaw took a wrong turning he would miss Newsnight altogether, ending up in BBC World's cramped newsroom. There, BBC World journalists and editors are still digesting the government's criticism of its war coverage. Before the furore, the international newsroom was basking in plaudits from around the world - particularly from the US. Ratings in America have soared. BBC presenters such as Mishal Husain have a cult following. Whatever Downing Street's view, the BBC has become a valued news source for liberal America. . . http://news.ft.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=FT.com/StoryFT/FullStory&c=StoryFT&cid=1057562483416&p=1012571727132 (via Larry, DXLD) ** U K [non]. Glenn, Here's some exciting news for us in the UK (Mike Terry, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RADLON MEDIA LIMITED, PO BOX 7336, FRINTON-ON-SEA, ESSEX, CO13 0WZ ENGLAND -- PRESS RELEASE 002 Embargoed until 12.01 - 20th July 2003 "RADIO LONDON TEST BROADCAST" Radio London will conduct further engineering tests at 12.00 (UK Time) [1100 UT, 1300 CEDT] on [Tuesday] 22nd July, 2003 for approximately two hours on 1008 kHz from the Flovoland [sic] transmitting site in the Netherlands. The transmitter will be operated at 400 kilowatts with 95% peak modulation using an Optimod 9200 processing. This will enable our engineers to ascertain coverage in the UK. The current aerial pattern produces a figure eight pattern pointing NE - SW and our study will enable us to work on plans to alter the antenna pattern to produce a better signal into our target areas. Radlon Media Limited would welcome reception reports from anywhere in Europe. We are mainly interested in reports from listeners using standard domestic equipment, i.e. Hi-fi units, portable radio's and car radio's rather than full sinpo reports using communications equipment and long wire aerials. Please either post them to the address at the top of this press release of e-mail them to bigl@radiofab.com All reports will be acknowledged. PROGRESS REPORT We have received an enormous amount of correspondence, mainly by e- mail, many questions have been asked, and at your request, we are happy to give the following progress report:- FUND RAISING Our fund raising has been rather slow. This time of year many people are away on vacation and we have lost a few weeks because of this. However, response has been very encouraging, despite what are difficult times for the radio industry. We now need to start closing deals and this is what our team are currently focusing on. Opportunities to invest in this project are still available with investments starting at £10,000. Anyone interested should contact us ASAP. ENGINEERING On Thursday 17th July, 2003, our engineers made a full appraisal of the transmitter site at Flavoland on the Netherlands. The site also transmits the Dutch public broadcaster Radio 1 on 747 kHz so any changes that we may wish to make have to be compatible with their requirements. From our findings we can now evaluate the aerial patterns and work on commissioning a full report on the antenna and recommend changes. We also evaluated the suitability of the AEG Telefunken 600 kilowatt transmitter, which is 20 years old and may not be capable of producing positive peak modulations now used by many commercial broadcasters in Europe. So we need to await the full report in order to make our final deliberations. The tests next Tuesday will also give our backers an indication of our signal strength, when engineering adjustments are made at a later date, our engineers are confident that a further 6db of signal will reach the UK. It is also our plan to broadcast in AM stereo (although not on our current tests) and we will watch the progress of DRM, which looks set to revolutionize the AM dial. PROGRAMMING The Radio London & Big L brands will be used to launch our Gold format. Much in attitude has changed since Radio London last attracted a significant audience and the station sound needs to be tuned to current market trends. Commercially, it is important to attract and please an audience, of hopefully 1 or 2 million listeners and not a minority group, so emphasis will be on the music and presenters whilst retaining some of the magic and fun that the original station produced. WEBSITE There is no official Radio London website at the moment, although we are working on this at the moment. In order to avoid confusion, please ensure that all correspondence regarding the re-launch of Radio London is addressed to the contact phone numbers, fax and e-mail in this press release. FOR FURTHER COMMENT OR CLARIFICATION PLEASE RING RAY ANDERSON 01255 676252, FAX: 01255 850528, E-mail: bigl@radiofab.com (via Mike Terry, DXLD) Next Tuesday UK time 12 (midday) to 3.00 pm is the planned time for tests, from a source at the station. Not sure what power though. Will 400 kW propagate well over the UK? It`s a clear channel here in Bournemouth so I live in hope (but with some doubt about the project for reasons probably best kept to myself). I shall miss it as I have to be at work (work gets in the way of a lot of things I would like to do - but is necessary to pay for most of them!). [Later:] I now have seen definite reports of tests last Thursday afternoon; the signal was on and off and weak in London, playing oldies music for about an hour only. I am starting to feel more optimistic about the project from seeing other postings. I wish it success as it may be a breath of fresh air (Mike Terry, UK, BDXC-UK via DXLD) RADLON MEDIA TO TEST 1008 KHZ ON TUESDAY Dutch media site http://radio.nl reports that a test transmission on 1008 kHz is scheduled for Tuesday 22 July at 1100 UT in preparation for the transmissions of commercial broadcaster Radlon Media, which plans to broadcast to the UK. Media Network understands that the duration of the transmission may be about one hour. The test will be made using the directional pattern previously used for Dutch public network Radio 1, but will be made at the full power of 400 kW (Radio 1 used 180 kW). A low power test was already conducted on Friday afternoon, according to radio.nl. Quality Radio, the Dutch partner of Radlon, is also busy preparing the other mediumwave frequencies it won in May. Radio 10 FM is currently using 1395 kHz with reduced power. Transmission provider Nozema is carrying out maintenance on the antenna for 828 kHz, while a new radio ship has to be found for 1224 kHz, since the Communicator has been sold to a new owner in the UK and is now undergoing repairs in Ijmuiden (Media Network blog July 20 via DXLD) I thought they'd re-engineered Flevo MF to make it omni directional? Seems a little strange to run a service targetting a UK audience if you're pointing the signal *away* from the target area (as Flevo MF was in its Radio 1 days as I understand it) ... Still, I'll have a listen. Radio 1 was audible here in N.W. England during daytime, albeit weakly (Ray Woodward, 7/20/03; 3:33:48 AM, ibid.) MONEY THE STUMBLING BLOCK FOR "RADIO LONDON" A press release issued today by Radlon, the company which plans to launch the commercial station Radio London broadcasting to the UK from Flevo on 1008 kHz, suggests to me that it could be a very long time before we hear any regular programmes. Confirming the upcoming test transmission on Tuesday, Radlon concedes that: "Our fund raising has been rather slow. This time of year many people are away on vacation and we have lost a few weeks because of this. However, response has been very encouraging, despite what are difficult times for the radio industry. We now need to start closing deals and this is what our team are currently focusing on. Opportunities to invest in this project are still available with investments starting at £10,000. Anyone interested should contact us ASAP." Note the complete absence of any information about firm commitments to invest so far. The language is deliberately vague. When I was involved in the past with two attempts to get commercial radio stations on the air --- albeit shortwave ones --- there was lots of "encouraging response" but very little hard cash. A small group of us invested, and lost, our own money while most "supporters" were content with buying a T-shirt. Call me cynical, but I've been there. At the moment, the minimum figure of £10,000 suggests that Radlon is looking beyond the anorak community for investment, and that's a wise move. As has been shown by the experience of Radio Caroline over the years, these people are often prepared to help in a practical way --- many of them are frustrated would-be broadcasters who hope to make useful contacts --- but they tend to be tight-fisted when it comes to parting with their money. Indeed, Radlon realises that it needs to look beyond the anoraks for its audience if it's going to be commercially viable: "Commercially, it is important to attract and please an audience, of hopefully 1 or 2 million listeners and not a minority group." The problem is that now is not the time to be launching new media projects from scratch in Europe, especially if you're a small company. The media industry is consolidating: recent deals have strengthened the position of the European media giants like Sky and SBS. Economies of scale help to sustain the industry through tough times. A newcomer with no proven track record is not going to be seen as a wise investment by many people. I'd love to be proved wrong, and for Radio London to be a success --- if only because there's something inherently unsatisfactory in good Dutch broadcasters being unable to secure frequency space while a high power transmitter capable of national coverage sits idle (Andy Sennitt, Media Network blog July 20 via DXLD) ** U K. The [former Radio Caroline ship] Ross Revenge has moved to Rochester, not a stone's throw from the historic Castle and Cathedral, and is open for visitors in her new location on August 2nd and 3rd. The point of embarkation is Strood Pier, in the centre of Rochester just by the road / rail bridges over the river. Trips start from 11am. The boarding charge, including the short boat trip, is £5.00, and merchandise will be available on the ship. If you would like to visit the Ross Revenge, please call the trip organiser, Vaughan on 07890 279049. Please only call during evenings or at the weekend. We need advance bookings so we know how many people we must accommodate. (announced on air by Roger Day, also on Radio Caroline website: http://www.radiocaroline.co.uk/news.htm (via Alan Pennington, BDXC-UK via DXLD) ** U K. HF BANDS FOR CLASS B LICENSEES SOON The RSGB has learned from the RA that a Gazette Notice will be published shortly which will announce the end of the Morse requirement for access to the HF bands in the UK. From the date of the Gazette Notice all Full and Intermediate Class B amateurs will automatically have Class A privileges and will be allowed to operate on the HF bands with their existing callsigns. Watch the RSGB website at http://www.rsgb.org for the latest news (Radio Society of Great Britain GB2RS News Script for July 20 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. US CONGRESS APPROVES MIDDLE EAST TV NETWORK The US House of Representatives has approved the creation of a US- funded Middle East TV network. House International Relations Committee Chairman Henry Hyde said that the new network will "greatly contribute to an enhancement of our efforts to combat the misinformation and propaganda that contribute to the rising anti-American sentiment in the region." Funding for the network will come out of the $1.3bn allocated to international broadcasting. Congressional officials said it would broadcast 24 hours a day, delivering a mix of news and entertainment. However, there could be delays in getting the green light as the proposal forms part of a $30 billion foreign aid bill which still has to pass Senate. That's by no means a foregone conclusion due as Senate disagrees with the Bush administration's decision to drop a measure supporting the UN Population Fund, and may block the passage of the bill (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 18 July 2003 via DXLD) ** U S A. Glenn, Regarding the DX Programs list problems mentioned in the latest DXLD just posted. The Real Amateur Radio Show on WBCQ is only on every other week, alternating with the Piss and Moan Net, another of TimTron's shows. I have no way of getting in touch with the author of the query or I would contact him directly. Can't help you with the DXing With Cumbre problems as I don't know when it's on either! Hope this helps (John H. Carver Jr., Mid-North Indiana, July 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [and non]. I heard WBCQ this morning (19 JULY) between 0400- 0500 UT on 9330 kHz (exactly 9329.74) in LSB relaying Christian Media Network in English, being accompanied by jammers. After a final announcement at 0459 the station closed down one minute later. Also the jammer closed down at the same time but resumed and closed several times after that. WBCQ is no more heard on 5100 kHz after short appearance on this frequency around 14 JULY. GOOD DX, (Karel Honzik, the Czech Republic (Czechia), hard-core-dx via DXLD) Hard to believe someone would be deliberately jamming CMN/WBCQ (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. WMLK PLANS TO BROADCAST IN PENNSYLVANIA DUTCH Hi Glenn: I thought you might be interested in the following item: I noticed that in the June 2003 issue of the Assemblies of Yahweh publication, The Sacred Name Broadcaster, Elder Jacob O. Meyer mentions the following in his Radio Message article titled, "Yahweh's Created Beings - Part 5", concerning future short wave broadcasts in the Pennsylvania Dutch tongue over WMLK: "I already have one or two other volumes of Pennsylvania Dutch New Testaments, but I wanted this particular volume because I will soon be speaking in this dialect (or language, if you please) over our newly enlarged WMLK shortwave radio transmitter." Can anyone explain how Pennsylvania Dutch relates to the Low German, or Plautdietsch, dialect currently broadcast over HCJB to Mennonite groups around the world? Thanks (Michael W. Enos, Tallmadge, OH, July 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. PIRATE, United Patriot Militia Radio, 6925. 7/19/03 0209- 0229. Most fair signal with lots of thunderstorm cracks. Request for donations for a Bingo Ball machine, Bingo numbers read, winner on on- line, parody? of Steve Anderson, parody of militias, and mention of a "last chance Bingo." (Bill Harms, MD, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** U S A. A long letter from manager Deborah S. Proctor on WCPE`s 25- year struggle as The Classical Station: http://wcpe.org/news.shtml (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Hello All -- a quick check of my "bellwether" frequencies on the commute this morning turned up someone on 99.7 playing a cover version of the Stylistics "Stone in Love With You", IDing as "Jukebox Radio". My first thought was "Oh crap, the old folks home near me put in a closed-circuit FM system and it's leaking like a sieve -- -there goes 99.7." There is a satellite delivered old-time programming service that some rest homes subscribe to that features about 4 different channels of programming, including nostalgia, old radio programs, and a couple of other formats, then they rebroadcast it on open FM channels, supposedly in the building, but I know of one in Havre de Grace MD that leaks so bad you can hear it from one end of town to the other --- they're on 99.9, 107.1, 102.3, and one other channel, and darn near drove me nuts trying to ID, until I finally looked up the slogan in Yahoo and found this service. Drove up to the nursing home building, and sure enough, signal was wall to wall! I've found one in NE Baltimore, too. But, after an internet search, I now believe I caught "Jukebox Radio" WJUX 99.7 from Monticello, NY. Format seems right on. Was in mono. NEW ONE! Heard in York, PA on Sony XR- C6100 car radio. 6,000 watts ERP---Nothing else unusual on other channels, and after a few minutes, it was gone. Will check the freq again when I go home tonight past the nursing home, just to be sure. Hope it's empty! 73 and good DX, (Bruce WB3HVV Collier, York, PA, amfmtvdx at qth.net via DXLD) ** U S A. LIGHTNING KNOCKS OUT 3 RADIO STATIONS BY PHILLIP CASTON Of The Post and Courier Staff Story last updated at 7:18 a.m. Saturday, July 19, 2003 Three local radio stations have shut down temporarily after a lightning bolt destroyed 95 percent of the broadcasting company's equipment Friday afternoon, the program director said. At about 2:15 p.m., a bolt of lightning struck Kirkman's Broadcasting Inc. radio tower at 60 Markfield Drive, Program Director Stew Williams said. Williams said he was in a meeting during the thunderstorm when he heard a loud snap, then felt the charge moving across the roof of the building. The bolt fried many of the electrical wires in the building, and small electrical charges were coming out of employees' keyboards, Williams said. "I heard all three radio stations go off the air, and I thought, 'This can't be good,' " Williams said. The following radio stations, according to Williams, will be off the air for one to two weeks as a result of the blast: WJK 950 AM, WQNT 1450 AM and ESPN Radio WQSC 1340 AM. A rough estimate of the total damage is $100,000 to $150,000, Williams said. No one was injured, and there was no fire in the building, he said. "It's scary to think that in a blink of an eye, Mother Nature can do so much damage," Williams said (Charleston SC Post & Courier, via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. IBIQUITY FIRES GLYNN WALDEN --- Supposedly for cost reasons, and I'm certain it has absolutely, positively nothing to do with IBOC's technical problems: http://www.radioworld.com/dailynews/one.php?id=3589 (Harry Helms, W7HLH Las Vegas, NV DM26 NRC-AM via DXLD) This is quite surprising, as Glynn Walden has been a central figure in IBOC development since day one. He is, or was, basically "Mr. IBOC". He was also the one who was preparing Ibiquity's long-delayed report to the FCC on the AM IBOC nighttime tests. Maybe he couldn't figure out a way to put a positive spin on the results, and that was the last straw? Interesting times in IBOCLand (Barry McLarnon, Ont., ibid.) That's why I found the news of his abrupt departure so remarkable and a strong indication that IBOC still has big, perhaps unsolvable problems. IBOC = DOA??? (Harry Helms, W7HLH, Las Vegas, NV, idid.) ** U S A. Center for Public Integrity has a searchable database to find out who really owns your local media outlets: http://www.openairwaves.org/telecom/analysis/default.aspx (via Wisconsin Public Radio, DXLD) ** U S A. FCC'S MEDIA RULING TARGETED --- THE WASHINGTON TIMES [Moony] A bipartisan group of 35 U.S. senators introduced legislation Tuesday to override a decision last month by the Federal Communications Commission to loosen restrictions on media ownership. The FCC last month voted to ease ownership restrictions that some called outdated in an era of fast-changing technology - despite complaints that the action would concentrate media power in a few hands. The changes would lift the national broadcast "cap" - or reach of any single company - to 45 percent of the national market from 35 percent, and let TV, radio and newspaper companies buy each other more freely. The Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee voted last month to overturn the FCC decision, and to reinstitute the 35 percent cap and limit cross-ownership deals in all but the smallest markets. Feeling the need for a more emphatic expression of their displeasure and hoping to force a speedy Senate vote on the matter, the senators agreed to sponsor the one-paragraph resolution. It says that "Congress disapproves the rule submitted by the Federal Communications Commission relating to broadcast media ownership." Lawmakers said at a press conference they hoped to bring the matter to a vote by the end of the month. "I think that the FCC in this case clearly made a decision that's going to lead to more concentration, less diversity, fewer choices in the opportunity for people to view or hear or read ... the news," said Sen. Trent Lott, Mississippi Republican, one sponsor of the resolution. The relatively unusual tactic of introducing a resolution means that the FCC-rules changes will come up for a quicker-than-usual vote before the full Senate, possibly as early as the end of the month. "It'll force the FCC to redo it. It doesn't leave you without any rules, it just says ... we disapprove of these rules, and the FCC has to do it again and get it right," said Sen. Byron L. Dorgan, North Dakota Democrat. "We are moving to roll back one of the most complete cave-ins to corporate interests I've ever seen by what is supposed to be a federal regulatory agency," Mr. Dorgan said. Twenty-eight Democrats and seven Republicans, including Mr. Lott of Mississippi and Kay Bailey Hutchison of Texas, signed the petition. Under the rarely used 1996 Congressional Review Act, which was pushed by then-House Speaker Newt Gingrich, only 30 senators' signatures are needed to force a full Senate vote, Mr. Dorgan said. The FCC, led by Chairman Michael Powell, approved rules June 2 that make it easier for companies such as Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. to acquire newspapers and TV stations. The rules, which were opposed by groups as disparate as the Consumers Union and National Rifle Association, got more than 1 million letters of criticism from individuals. An FCC spokesman declined to comment. Mr. Powell has said the new rules adapt to a media landscape that now includes competition from the Internet, hundreds of cable operators and satellite broadcasters. "The sponsors have a good chance of getting it passed in the Senate," said former Rep. Thomas Bliley, Virginia Republican, who was House Commerce panel chairman from 1995 to 2001. "But I don't see anything passing the House because of opposition from the leadership and the fact it's not that much of a hot-button issue out there." Sen. John McCain, Arizona Republican, is leading the other Senate push to roll back the FCC media-ownership proposal. The Senate Majority Leader, Tennessee Republican Bill Frist, has not said when the full Senate would consider the panel's bill, if at all. "The McCain committee legislation could sit on the calendar forever, if Frist didn't want to bring it to a vote," said Mr. Dorgan's spokesman, Barry Piatt. "But the full Senate has to consider our congressional veto." The Senate is likely to consider the resolution by September, Mr. Piatt said. If the Senate passes the veto, it automatically goes to the full House for a vote, he said. President Bush, whose administration has endorsed the FCC rules, would have to sign the congressional veto for it to become law (via Fred Vobbe, July 17, NRC- AM via DXLD) HOUSE PANEL OKS OWNERSHIP CAP ROLLBACK In a major defeat for the TV networks, the House Appropriations Committee voted 40-25 Wednesday to approve a rider to an appropriations bill that would roll back the cap on the national TV ownership to 35 percent. In its controversial June 2 vote, the Federal Communications Commission's GOP majority raised the cap to allow broadcasters to acquire TV stations reaching 45 percent of the nation's TV homes. But the rider, offered by Rep. David Obey, D-Wis., the appropriation's committee's ranking minority member, would knock the cap back by barring the FCC from spending any money to authorize acquisitions that would exceed the old limit. The committee vote crossed party lines, with such leading Republicans as Rep. Frank Wolf, R-Va., voting in favor of the measure. House Appropriations Committee Chairman Bill Young, R-Fla., voted against the amendment, warning that White House officials had threatened to recommend a presidential veto of the appropriations bill if the cap amendment were attached. Before taking its historic roll- call vote on the cap issue, the committee rejected by voice vote an amendment offered by Rep. Anne Northrup, R-Ky., that would have extended the rollback to resurrect an FCC rule that bars broadcasters from acquiring daily newspapers in their markets. Rep. Obey said that while he personally supports the idea of overturning all of the FCC's media ownership deregulation, he believes that widening the rollback beyond the cap at this point would kill the rollback rider altogether. "My head overruled my heart when I found out where the votes were," Rep. Obey said. "The way to win this argument is to take this on a piece at a time." Like several of his committee colleagues, Rep. Obey argued that a rollback is crucial to preserve local media diversity. "We're in danger of shutting off the blood supply to democracy," Rep. Obey said. In their debate on the measure, some committee lawmakers made clear that they had scores to settle with major media companies. Rep. Wolf, for instance, said he was upset that NBC "literally shut us out" when the Peacock Network announced a short-lived initiative to run hard liquor ads a couple of years ago. "I can't believe the level to which commercial television has sunk," added Rep. Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio. "It's literally a garbage pit." Leading the charge for the networks at the session was Rep. Jim Kolbe, R-Ariz., who argued that the regulations were unwarranted in the face of the diversity of sources of information now available to the public on TV and the Internet. "We have almost unlimited sources of information today," Rep. Kolbe said. The committee vote came as a vicious slap to House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Billy Tauzin, R-La., who was reportedly lobbying Appropriations Committee members personally to kill the amendment before the vote, in part on grounds that media ownership issues are under the jurisdiction of the Commerce Committee. Rep. Obey said Rep. Tauzin had made clear that he would block any effort to roll back the FCC's deregulation, even though a majority of his Commerce Committee members have publicly endorsed rollback initiatives. The Appropriations Committee vote was also a blow to the National Association of Broadcasters, which recently announced that it had joined forces with the networks to fight any rollback legislation. NAB, which previously supported a rollback to 35 percent, said it feared that so much sentiment had built up against the ownership deregulation on Capitol Hill that it wouldn't be able to prevent lawmakers from approving rollback legislation that included provisions targeting elements of the FCC's deregulation moves that NAB's members support. Despite NAB's bailout, the Network Affiliated Stations Alliance, representing 600 affiliates of ABC, CBS and NBC, has continued to support legislation to reinstate the 35 percent cap. Rep. Obey cited the group's position while arguing in favor of his rider amendment. In the wake of the vote, Fred Reynolds, president of the Viacom Stations Group, said that because of the way the rider was written, it might not require his company to divest any TV properties-even though Viacom currently holds stations reaching about 40 percent of the nation's TV homes. He also said it appeared clear that the broadcast networks were getting hurt by the grudges that Republican lawmakers harbor against CNN news coverage and Democrats hold against Fox News Channel. "This issue is very confusing because a lot of people don't understand where your cable system ends and TV station begins," Mr. Reynolds said. Before the appropriations bill can become law, it must be approved by the full House and the Senate and signed by the president. The leaders of the Senate Appropriations Committee have already publicly endorsed rollback initiatives. In an alert Wednesday afternoon, Legg Mason Equity Research said the Appropriations Committee vote "markedly increases the chances that some form of the legislation will ultimately be enacted." Added the firm, "We are skeptical the president would veto the spending bill over this amendment, given that support seems to be spreading like a prairie fire." In the wake of the vote, Ken Johnson, a spokesman for Rep. Tauzin, said the lawmaker would continue to fight. "This limits our options but does not eliminate all of them," Mr. Johnson said. "This fight is far from over. Unfortunately to some people this was more about settling old scores than it was on setting a sound telecommunications policy for America. This was their chance to use the networks as a punching bag." Dennis Wharton, a spokesman for the NAB, said, "Given the actions already taken in the Senate, our concern remains that it is unlikely, if not impossible, to limit congressional re-regulation of broadcasting to a 35 percent rollback of national TV ownership rules." (from http://www.tvweek.com via Shoptalk Magazine 7/17/2003 via Fred Vobbe, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. BROADCAST BAND UPDATE, by Greg Hardison This could be the beginning of a new era of Bipartisan Camaraderie up on the Hill, as eleven Republicans (including the infamous wannabe- Klansman Sen. Trent Lott of Mississippi) have joined the Democratic efforts to reverse the June 2 FCC ruling. Sadly interesting that the two main bones of contention seem to be A) Co-ownership of Newspapers, with co-market Broadcast outlets, and B) Television Program Content. Regarding Point A) Such co-ownership situations literally date back to the beginning of Broadcasting, with many such scenarios alive and well in many major U.S. markets. The Chicago Tribune has been under the same corporate roof as WGN Radio and TV since approximately the Mesozoic Era; anyone familiar with the 3rd largest market knows it ain't dominated by NO one company! The Trib owned KTLA(TV)/Channel 5 in Los Angeles for several years prior to it's purchase of The Los Angeles Times; so far the Tribbies have been in no hurry to gobble up electronic media outlets in either burg. For more than fifty years, Cox Enterprises has "dominated" the Atlanta market, owning both daily fishwrappers (The Atlanta Journal & The Atlanta Constitution), along with WSB AM & FM Radio (AM 750 historically ate the Ratings alive all through the 1960's --- and has returned to doing just that, here in the latter-day Millennium), also WSB-TV (the South's first regularly-licensed TV station) --- and nowadays, also owns three other FMs, all having been moved into Atlanta from smaller cities within a 60 mile radius. In recent years, Atlanta has grown into a top-ten market in terms of Broadcast revenues, with strong numbers being raked in by Clear Channel (1 AM and 5 FM- Radio outlets), Infinity/CBS (2 FMs and 1 AM), Jefferson- Pilot (in the market since the late 60's, with one-each, AM & FM, both strong performers), Gannett (30-year owners of WXIA-TV) and Fox (WAGA- TV), with myriad smaller independent broadcasters emphasizing such formats as Gospel/Religion (and Salem's just sort of hanging on there, incidentally, with two AMs and one VERY expensive FM relocated from Athens). All of this accomplished as Cox ADDED to their Atlanta media stable. Remember, the first nails were driven into that stable in the 1940's! Now just to add to the mudlike clarity of the situation, comes this from the July 12 edition of The Los Angeles Times: "Clear Channel must cut stations --- The firm's San Diego setup, which includes outlets in Mexico, exceeds new FCC limits. By Jeff Leeds, Times Staff Writer Radio giant Clear Channel Communications Inc. will have to bid adiós to much of its clout along California's southern border. Under provisions in the fine print of last week's federal order establishing new media ownership rules, the San Antonio-based company must reduce the number of stations it owns or controls in the San Diego listening area over the next two years, either by cutting ties to some of its five affiliated Mexican stations or selling some of its seven U.S.-licensed stations. The Federal Communications Commission's recent regulatory overhaul lets broadcasters keep clusters of radio stations whose reach exceeds the limits of new marketplace boundaries. But regulators didn't extend that protection to Clear Channel's exotic affiliate agreements — in which the company bulked up its San Diego presence by making side deals with Mexican stations that broadcast north of the border. The arrangements created one of the biggest radio powerhouses ever built in a U.S. market. Clear Channel captures an estimated 44% share of San Diego's $165-million radio market. That is the company's biggest slice of any of the nation's 20 biggest cities and roughly triple the share its nearest rival holds in San Diego, according to research firm BIA. Clear Channel probably will have to shed at least four stations to comply with the changes." -- San Diego is another market with strong performers owned by Jefferson- Pilot (KIFM, KSON and an AM brokered to Multicultural Broadcasting Co.), Infinity (KYXY and KPLN), as well as Midwest Television Inc. (who?? think KFMB AM/FM/TV, together for several decades), and relative newcomer Hispanic Broadcasting (proprietors of KLNV & KLQV) - -- not to mention the strong influence of L.A. radio outlets; KFI, KNX, KLAC, KABC and KSPN all slam near-City grade signals into SD. Hmmm... it may appear that NO ONE uniform strategy will adequately apply, as different markets exhibit different strengths and weaknesses, dictated by (among other issues) Geography (what else is seen and heard by market-dwellers?), Demographics (how OLD is the market? Has it been a huge city since the early days of electronic media, such as NYC or Chicago? Is market growth relatively new, as in the case of post-WW2 San Diego --- or, as in Atlanta example, has mega-growth occurred as a product of 1960's prosperity? Or, as a third model, Los Angeles...where urban growth has pretty much chronologically paralleled the rise of airwaves-usage, through the 20th Century?) Which "model" should the FCC cater its policies to? There's evidently an abundance of circular-thought going into the overall issue, not necessarily aided by Congressional mud-heads, or highly paid and produced Corporate Lawyers-who-would-be-Policy-Makers. I don't pretend to have the answers --- perhaps you do? Any and all comments are welcome, and will be duly reprinted unless requested otherwise), obscenities and all. WHILE WE'RE IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD: San Diego market gorilla Clear Channel has come to the res-Q. CC outlet KPOP will soon share its single non-directional broadcast tower with Salem's KCBQ, a market veteran which was faced with the loss of its license due to the sale and upcoming development of the Santee land, on which its multi-towers have been situated for many years. KCBQ has always suffered from an extremely-directional signal, designed to protect co-channel stations in San José (at all times), and Tulsa (at night). The mighty Q will most likely be forced to reduce its daytime 50,000 watts to a lower level, as well as its nighttime 1500 watt allocation, in order to avoid having to use directional transmission patterns. Two ironies jump out of this pile: A) In the "glory" days of Top-40 Rock, these two outlets were intense rivals, with KCBQ/1170 running PAMS jingles and slightly-accelerated turntables (I KNOW I'm not the only one who remembers that!), and the old KGB (now KPOP/1360) doing the SD version of the Drake Format, leached down the coast from KHJ. Clear Channel is generally being lauded for its engineering generosity; no doubt an exchange of Dollars is the primary consideration here --- space rented on the KPOP stick, and bucks saved by Salem's not having to purchase expensive tower-site land in America's Finest City. The other irony is a bit more perplexing: despite the trumpeted Sharing Of The Stick, the FCC files (as of July 18) show KCBQ at its present, ill-fated transmitter site --- and also with a Construction Permit to transmit from a site just a few miles to the West, near San Vicente Reservoir --- with an increased nighttime power of 4500 watts. WANNA BUY A STATION? --- Smith Broadcasting of Santa Barbara has announced that its mostly-syndicated News-Talk outlet KEYT/1250 is on the block. Smith, while retaining KEYT-TV Channel 3 (the Central Coast ABC affiliate for many decades), says it's losing too much moolah in the Radio operation. Also for many decades, 1250 was the parking spot of KTMS, the South Coast's traditional News-Talk facility, formerly associated with ABC Radio News and ABC Talkradio (back when ABC was a real network --- ah, nostalgia!) Smith picked up the Radio facility in the early 1990s; shortly thereafter the KTMS "intellectual property" was nabbed by Clear Channel, which received usage of the venerable call-letters for its 990-AM Santa Barbara outlet. Nowadays, one will hear much of the syndicated Clear Channel/Premiere roster on KTMS/990, while KEYT/1250 features much from the AP News Net, as well as ABC's last credible vestige, Bob Brinker, and his weekend financial show. Innuendo has it that Salem wants 1250 for more Christian/Conservative Talk; another rumour has the facility going Spanish, under one of several possible buyers. This comes on the heels of Clear Channel taking over the marketing for the city's oldest broadcaster, Classical-format KDB (on FM 93.7 only, since about 1990 or so), in lieu of the outright sale of the station to God-knows-who. Something smells fishy from a Management angle, if one observes the long-term: what is preventing these two outlets from being economically viable, in a relatively-affluent market, today versus thirty years ago? Broadcasters' wages have not gone up significantly --- only proportionally --- in Santa Barbara. Competition has come in the form of the aforementioned KTMS/990, and for KDB, only in the guise of USC's Classical relayer, KFAC/88.7 FM. Again, I don't pretend to have the magical solutions --- but basic gut tells me some folks have dropped the Marketing ball, somewhere along Hwy. 101. DIGITITIS RELAPSE: Still no clear direction anywhere regarding Digital Broadcasting --- and its inherent engineering/adjacent-channel reception problems exhibited on both AM and FM. But, an interesting idea has emerged from (of all places) the U.S. International Broadcasting Board, the bureaucratic collective designated to oversee the Voice Of America, and various psy-ops facilities targeting audiences in Cuba, Iraq, Iran and the former Soviet bloc. A number of prominent Shortwave broadcasters worldwide are participating in DRM, which digitizes these transmissions, returning almost FM-quality sound response (as many claim) to listeners thousands of miles away. Of course, most SW broadcasts are in AM mode --- thus leading to many of the same adjacent-channel hash problems noted in domestic broadcasts. But the idea of utilizing a little-used section of the Shortwave band, from 21 to 26 Megahertz, for low-to-medium power domestic Digital broadcasts has been born amongst the discussion-maelstrom. If eventually implemented, the plan would open up an entirely new Broadcast band for high-plus-fidelity Radio service, which would in- turn reduce the controversies surrounding Low Power FM, and its effects on established higher-powered commercial broadcasters. Yeah, it would take some marketing, but the idea would also open up a completely new market for receivers, which could be manufactured in all-Digital mode. No "in-band" combining of Digital and pre-existing Analog signals would be required --- as there ARE no "pre-existing" domestic Analog signals on this band. Currently-strained allocations for Low Power FM stations would be relaxed. Seems like a great idea; I'm sure it'll never happen. Until the next, Peace and Prosperity -- GREG HARDISON (via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. There seems to be a Spanish voice station, broadcasting music and voice (unable to secure ID) that comes in most evenings (local) around 0200 UT till ? on 10 MHz interfering with WWV/WWVH. I can only assume it is a pirate broadcast of some form as I doubt any country would authorize that frequency for a broadcast station (Bob Combs, New Mexico, hard-core-dx July 18 via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ LMEE Te informo en nombre de la AER que la LISTA MUNDIAL DE EMISIONES EN ESPAÑOL que mantiene en su sitio web es actuaziada contínuamente. Como se sabe se ofrece GRATIS en tres listados PDF, ordendos por hora de emisión, por emisora y por radio país. http://www.aer-dx.org/listas/lmee.htm Además, como complemento a esta lista, la AER te ofrece también GRATIS la LISTA DE DIRECCIONES POSTALES DE EMISORAS INTERNACIONALES QUE EMITEN EN ESPAÑOL. http://www.aer-dx.org/listas/direcciones.htm En la sección LISTAS del web de la AER se ofrece GRATIS otras listas de interés para el radioescucha: http://www.aer-dx.org/listas/ Un saludo (Pedro Sedano, Madrid, España, COORDINADOR GENERAL, July 18, Conexión Digital via DXLD) DRM +++ Hi Glenn, In answer to your question in DXLD: We shall be dropping the Media Network version of the DRM schedule ASAP and incorporating Klaus' version, as he is encouraging other Web sites to do also. One definitive version of the schedule should benefit all of us :-) 73, (Andy Sennitt, RN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) For some time now we've been trying to maintain an accurate schedule of DRM transmissions on our Web site. Now Klaus Schneider in Germany has voluntarily taken over the task, and we've slightly reorganised the DRM dossier so you'll find the current schedule on a separate page at http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/html/drm_schedule.html Through a simple piece of Javascript code, what you see on this page actually resides on a Web server in Germany. If you have any observations, corrections or amendments, please send them directly to Klaus using the E-mail link at the top of the schedule page (Media Network newsletter July 18 via DXLD) [drm-se] MEXICAN NATIONAL SHORTWAVE MEETING JULY 31-AUGUST 3 Dear Jeff, As I mentioned before in a previous e-mail, Bonaire doesn't have a "Mexico" antenna connected to the DRM transmitter. But we would like to support your festival and we have decided to perform the following DRM transmission from Bonaire. 31 July - 3 August 2330-0030 UTC 15525 kHz Programme: RNW Spanish We will cancel our regular DRM transmission to the USA during these four days and do this transmission instead. BUT: as Mexico is only in the sidelobe of the USA antenna the signal won't be very strong so you really need a good outdoor antenna to get something useful. Also we will transmit in a robust mode (Mode B, 16QAM, 14 kbps). This will not give the best audio quality but there's a higher chance of success. Alternative AM frequencies with the same Spanish RNW programme can be found on: 9895 kHz from Flevo to the Northern part of South America + Carribean 11720 kHz from Flevo to the Eastern part of South America 15315 kHz from Bonaire to the Southern part of South America So you can compare AM to DRM. We would like to receive some feedback of reception quality preferably via the logfile which can be created with the software receiver. Hope this will do. Kind regards (Jan Peter Werkman, Radio Netherlands, PO Box 222, 1200 JG Hilversum The Netherlands, Tel: +31-35-6724449, Fax: +31-35-6724429, GSM: +31- 653116538, http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/html/drm.html (via Jeff White, DXLD) TRANSMISIONES ESPECIALES EN DRM DE RADIO NEDERLAND-BONAIRE Radio Miami Internacional y la Asociación Nacional de Radiodifusoras de Onda Corta (NASB) de los Estados Unidos están organizando una demostración del nuevo sistema de onda corta digital, DRM, durante el Encuentro Nacional de Diexistas Mexicanos en Tizayuca, Hidalgo, México, del 31 de julio al 3 de agosto. Durante los cuatro días del evento, que será asistido por oyentes de onda corta de todo México, Estados Unidos y otros países, la planta transmisora de Radio Nederland en Bonaire, Antillas Holandesas, transmitirá el programa en español de dicha emisora diariamente de las 2330 a la 0030 UT en 15525 kHz en DRM con 10 kilovatios. Normalmente, se transmite el programa en inglés para los Estados Unidos durante este horario. Se realizarán pruebas con variaciones en la modulación durante estas transmisiones en español para ver cómo llega la señal en el centro de México. El mismo programa en español de Radio Nederland se puede escuchar simultáneamente en forma analógica en 9895 y 11720 kHz desde Holanda, y en 15315 kHz desde Bonaire (Jeff White, Gerente General, WRMI Radio Miami International, 175 Fontainebleau Blvd., Suite 1N4, Miami, Florida 33172 USA, Tel +1-305-559-9764, Fax +1-305-559-8186, E-mail: radiomiami9@cs.com http:/www.wrmi.net (via DXLD) CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ WORLDWIDE TV-FM DX ASSOCIATION For those of you who were able to be part of the WTFDA 2003 experience --- and those who missed it --- I've just finished putting up three pages' worth of pictures and stories from last weekend's convention. Check it out (and send me your pictures, too!), right here: http://www.fybush.com/wtfda2003.html (And thanks again to everyone who helped make the convention a success!) s (Scott Fybush, NRC-AM via DXLD) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ HOBBY BECAME HUGE ENTERPRISE Eimac's tube-building company took off during WWII, grew with advent of TV. HAM radio enthusiasts Bill Eitel and Jack McCullough started out making vacuum tubes for themselves and other hobbyists . . . http://www.sanmateocountytimes.com/Stories/0,1413,87~11268~1519492,00.html (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) PROPAGATION ++++++++++++ CUMBRE PROPAGATION REPORT Flare activity has been quite low over the past week, in the last couple of days there has been only a barely noticeable C class flare. The earth was under the effect of a coronal wind stream until July 14, which with a southward bias to the magnetic field led to storm conditions in the first part of July 13. We entered another wind stream on July 15 with major storm activity noted for a period on July 16. This effect is in the process of easing. Depressions of 15 to 30% are being observed in some of the Southern Australian/NZ sites so far today (UT Day) due to coronal hole high speed solar wind stream effects. Lower than normal MUFs may be observed in these regions for the rest of the day today and after local dawn tomorrow. Note that the Northern Australian region MUFs have remained near normal. MUF forecasts are for slight depressions possible at times for mid-high latitudes otherwise mostly near predicted monthly values. Prepared using data from http://www.ips.gov.au (Richard Jary, SA, July 18, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-128, July 17, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1191: WWCR: Sat 1030, Sun 0230 on 5070, 0630 on 3210, Wed 0930 on 9475 RFPI: Fri 1930, Sat 0130, 0800, 1400, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330, 7445 15039 WINB: Sun 0032 on 12160 WBCQ: Mon 0445 on 7415, 5100-CUSB? WORLD OF RADIO ON WRMI: IBC Radio, which expands its time on WRMI this weekend, plans to carry WORLD OF RADIO, tentatively Sat & Sun 1800 UT on 15725. WRN ONDEMAND [from Fri]: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1191.html ** ALASKA. The foundations for the second transmitter of 100 kW at KNLS, the Gospel shortwave station in Alaska, have been poured and all of the underground electrical work is completed. The transmitter has been completed and it is currently undergoing testing at the factory (Adrian Michael Peterson, IN, AWR Wavescan July 20 via DXLD) See also MADAGASCAR! ** BELARUS` [and non]. Sergei Alekseichik from Hrodna, Belarus`, shared with me some of his MP3 radio recordings. You can access them on http://dxsignal.info/listen_eng.htm. I hope this small page will grow into a good audio archive -- so, if you have a wish to put samples of your recordings there, you are welcome! The page is in the draft version at the moment, I'm planning to change its look in the future. 73! (Dmitry Mezin, Kazan, Russia, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** CANADA. ASIAN RADIO LICENCE OKAY GRAHAM FRASER, NATIONAL AFFAIRS WRITER OTTAWA --- The federal cabinet yesterday upheld the CRTC decision to grant an FM radio licence in Toronto to Canadian Multicultural Radio. CMR will broadcast on frequency 101.3, primarily for the South Asian communities of Greater Toronto. After the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission granted the licence in April, two unsuccessful applicants asked cabinet to overturn the decision, saying CMR had connections to the World Tamil Movement, or the Tamil Tigers. "There were some loose, unsubstantiated allegations of fundraising activities for the Tamil Tigers," Gary Jessop of Blake Cassels & Graydon, CMR's lawyer, said in an interview. CMR promised the CRTC that it would provide the majority of its programs in Tamil, Hindi, Urdu and Punjabi. Also, discussions have been held with the Filipino and Farsi communities and programs are being planned in Malayam, Telugu, Bengali and Sinhalese. (Toronto Star July 17 via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) OTTAWA (CP) --- The federal cabinet has upheld a radio licence granted by the CRTC to a Toronto company with alleged links to a South Asian terrorist organization. The new station, to be launched this fall in Toronto at 101.3 FM, has denied ties to extremists and insists it is the target of a smear campaign by opponents of its plan to broadcast to the city's ethnic communities. Allegations of terrorist ties were brought to the attention of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission last summer by Sri Lankan Canadians, who wrote letters opposing a radio licence application by Canadian Multicultural Radio. The letters claimed the numbered company behind the radio bid was tied to the World Tamil Movement. The letters also claimed movement volunteers had gone door-to-door in Tamil neighbourhoods in Toronto to intimidate Sri Lankans into supporting the radio licence bid. The CRTC approved the licence on April 17. The CRTC said only a few of thousands of responses to the proposed station raised concerns about terrorism and the station responded to all allegations in full. The Privy Council Office subsequently received 47 petitions seeking an appeal of the decision. They were referred to the Department of Canadian Heritage, which made a recommendation to cabinet. Several of the petitions alleged a link to the Tamil Tigers, also known as the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam. Though the organization has not been banned, the federal government has frozen its assets since the fall of 2001 on suspicion of terrorist links. The radio station's chief operating officer has said some of those who complained were supporters of competing bids (via Harry van Vugt, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, DXLD) A follow-up to the item about a new Toronto FM station I posted the other day. The application has been approved. GOVERNMENT DISMISSES ALLEGED TERROR LINKS, UPHOLDS RADIO DECISION http://www.broadcastermagazine.com/article.asp?id=20507 (via Mike Brooker, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** CANADA [and non]. DXing history article Hello fellow NRC members, I have been commissioned by the Canadian Communications Foundation to write a short article for their web site at http://broadcasting-history.ca/index2.html on DXing and its pursuits during the founding days of broadcast radio. It is a site created by and for the broadcasting community so the DX article is being written in more non-technical terms (at seas as it relates to DX, hi hi.). So I'll not be writing about the MWA, the SSS, SRS, SSB at signoff, the K-Index, Vactrols, and Kiwa mods. It'll mostly be a plain English account of the relationship between DXers and broadcasters and how they cooperated to improve the science of radio in the first half of the 20th century. To that end I am seeking any notes, quotes, logs or anecdotes that may have appeared in ancient or more recent bulletins that would help me explain and illustrate our fascination with MW DX. The web site is primarily focused on Canada, of course, so I am mainly looking for submissions by Canadian DXers and/or US/foreign loggings of Canadian stations. If any of you have material that you think may be useful I would certainly appreciate seeing it! Loggings and stories are best, as well as pictures (permission to publish would be required from the owner). I've already scanned in some of my QSL card collection, but it only goes back to the early-1970s. I'm placing full credit in footnotes for all sources that I am able to use. Anyway, if any of you have images, scans, old logs, bulletins etc. that may shed some light on the early years of DXing as it relates to Canada, I would much appreciate it! Thanks, (Brent Taylor, Doaktown, NB, July 15, NRC-AM via DXLD) Brent, The article sounds as if it will be very interesting! I'm looking forward to reading it! If you haven't looked at it already, I might suggest checking the history page of CFRB's website. It gives a lot of info on that station`s history, including how they came to become the first station in the British Empire to be allowed to go to 50,000 watts (as "payment" for them having to vacate 860 for 1010 back in the late 1940's (CBC took 860 over for CJBC, now Toronto's French station, but back then, the flagship of their "Trans Canada network-- CBL 740 already headed the Dominion network). Also, it should be noted that some Canadian stations were aligned with the American Networks (I think CFRB was tied in with CBS at one point). Anyway, good luck with the article, and let us know when it is posted! Feel free to look at my logbook at http://ontarioamdxer.tripod.com/ (Eric Conchie, Tweed, ON, ibid.) Thanks for the tips, Eric! I've looked at CFRB's history and the rest of the Canadian broadcast history articles at the Foundations's web site. It's interesting stuff indeed! In fact the Rogers company is a part of the group funding and promoting the foundation, so I don't think they'll mind the promo, hi hi. I'm quite well along and I have already had the first 50% or so submitted to the foundation and approved. So I'm quite happy about getting phase two completed and seeing what they think of it. Of course I'm particularly interested in what my fellow DXers think! I've also managed to find a very nice image of a CFRB EKKO stamp which I am quite anxious to use. I'm having fun at it. I'll let you know when it's up. Thanks again (and nice logbook on your site, I gave it a look). :-) (Brent Taylor http://www3/nbnet/nb/ca/btaylor ibid.) Brent, I can't add anything re Canadian stations, but perhaps you should mention a program that once was broadcast over Pittsburgh's KDKA and their SW station W8XK. This was "Messages to the Far North" and went on the air on Saturday nights, I think once a month. These messages were sent out mainly to Canada's northern outposts like the North woods, NWT, Hudson Bay area, etc. I presume they were being sent by friends and families who lived in the U.S.A. and southern Canada. It was a most interesting program and I often listened. And of course, DXers all over North America listened in and sent letters to KDKA along with reception reports (Ben Dangerfield, Wallingford, PA, ibid.) Fascinating! I had never heard of that program, Ben. Thank you very much for the head's up on it! I'll do some digging and see if there is anything else I can find out. What you have told me is sufficient for mention by itself. Thanks again! (Brent, ibid.) Brent, I really appreciated the info on KDKA's Far North broadcasts following my bringing this up. I particularly appreciate the reference to KDKA's Bill Beal who announced many of these programs. I personally knew Bill Beal when I lived in Pittsburgh and have been to his house. His wife, Cynthis [sic], was a friend of my sister's. I am sorry to hear of his death. And I now know that these were weekly Saturday night broadcasts. If anything else on your subject comes to mind I'll send it (Ben Dangerfield, Wallingford, Pa., ibid.) Wow, Ben, it is a small world. There are four paragraphs below from the middle of my piece, and your quote appears in the third one: While DXers were proud of their accomplishments, Broadcasters too prided themselves in their ability to send their signals to far flung listeners. The broadcasters and the DX listeners enjoyed a symbiotic relationship, as they communicated and cooperated with one another. Pittsburgh's KDKA, the first commercial station in North America, specifically directed programming to distant listeners. Ben Dangerfield of Wallingford, PA, reminisces about those broadcasts, called "Messages to the Far North." "These messages were sent out mainly to Canada's northern outposts like the North woods, NWT, Hudson Bay area, etc. I presume they were being sent by friends and families who lived in the U.S.A. and southern Canada. It was a most interesting program and I often listened. And of course, DXers all over North America listened in and sent letters to KDKA along with reception reports." These reception reports Ben Dangerfield speaks of were usually answered by stations with special post cards, which ham radio operators were already calling "QSLs" - their abbreviated code for a confirmation of reception (Brent, ibid.) ** CHINA [non]. MOLDOVA --- On 15 July, China Radio International started to use 1467 kHz (Pridnestrovskiy radiotsentr in Maiac) for transmissions towards Russia and Ukraine. According to Vadim Alexeev, Russia in open_dx on 16 July, these transmissions are carried out with a new antenna arrangement for 80 degrees. The transmissions on 1548 kHz are beamed at 245 degrees towards Balkan. For more info, see Glenn Hauser's DX LISTENING DIGEST http://www.worldofradio.com/dxld3127.txt (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, MW-DX via DXLD) ** CONGO DR. 7435.0, RTNC, Lubumbashi, 1755-1810 (fade out), Jul 13, Vernacular talk, Congolese instrumental music and pop song by choir. Best before 1800 when Voice of Russia signed on with German on 7440. Until then: 13232 (Anker Petersen, Denmark, DSWCI DX Window July 16 via DXLD) ** CUBA. Glenn, Now this is interesting! The notion that the Soviets would have installed satellite jamming equipment in Cuba certainly makes sense. 73, (Harry Helms, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: CUBA JAMS BROADCASTS TO IRAN, U.S. SAYS --- Officials say TV signals from several L.A.-based stations and the Voice of America are blocked. By Monte Morin and Joel Rubin, Times Staff Writers http://www.latimes.com/la-me-irantv17jul17,0,16810.story American officials say Cuba is jamming international television broadcasts from several Los Angeles-based stations and the Voice of America, knocking out all programming critical of the Iranian government and supportive of pro-democracy demonstrations raging there. Although the Caribbean nation has long blocked television broadcasts from the U.S. into Cuba, authorities and satellite operators said Tuesday that they are convinced that the island nation is now interfering with Iran-bound broadcasts. "Cuba's jamming of satellite transmissions is illegal and interferes with the free and open flow of international communications," said Kenneth Y. Tomlinson, chairman of the Broadcasting Board of Governors, the federal agency that oversees all U.S. non-military broadcasting. "This action is illegal, represents a major threat to satellite communication and must be stopped." Calls seeking comment from the Cuban Consulate in New York City were not returned Wednesday. Signals from Iranian TV programmers in Los Angeles and the Voice of America turned to static July 6, the day the Voice of America launched a daily, 30-minute, Persian-language television news program. Government sources and correspondence between broadcasters and the company that owns the affected satellite, Loral Skynet, said the source of the jamming is an old Soviet listening post "in the vicinity of Havana." The reported jamming followed several weeks of pro-democracy protests in Iran, public disturbances that Iranian officials blamed on television programs broadcast from Los Angeles. On Wednesday, owners of those stations said that they believed Cuba was probably promised money and oil for the act and that they have appealed to the federal government for help. "This is like an act of terrorism," said Zia Atabay, who operates the National Iranian Television network in Los Angeles. "It's like someone going into a newspaper and shutting down the presses and burning all of the paper." Atabay's station produces a 24-hour-a-day broadcast of news, politics, cooking programs, pop music videos, comedy and pre-revolutionary romance films. Several other area stations beam political programming into Iran as well and say they have encountered interference. Kayvan Abbassi, whose family opened Azadi Television six months ago, said operators have tried several times to avoid the jamming by changing their signal, but have still lost their connection. "The first time it took them five hours to jam it," Abbassi said. The next day, "It took them minutes." Loran, the company that owns and operates Telstar 12, the affected satellite, released a brief statement on the problem Wednesday: "Engineers at Loral Skynet have identified the source of the interference, which was coming from outside the United States. We have reported the situation to the FCC and State Department, who are now pursuing the matter. As of midday Monday, the interference has stopped." Despite Loral's statement, Atabay and others insisted that the jamming continued Wednesday. "It's still happening; two junk governments are doing whatever they want to this superpower," Atabay said. "It's sad." The broadcasting board urged satellite communication providers to stop giving service to countries that jam transmissions into Iran. "The BBG calls upon the international community to censure the states that have caused the interference," the nine-member board said in a unanimous resolution. Times staff writer Robin Wright in Washington contributed to this report (via Harry Helms, DXLD) see also INTERNATIONAL VACUUM ** CZECH REPUBLIC. Radio Prague 11600: In response to a QSL request to http://www.radio.cz/en/report Radio Prague send seven blank QSL cards from their 1997 set in 4 days. You can see the cards at http://archiv.radio.cz/qsl/1997.html The only one from that year that the did not sent is the Olomouc card. I asked for a QSL from there 1997 set and this is what I got (Bill Harms, MD-USA, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** EQUATORIAL GUINEA. EQUATORIAL GUINEAN MINISTER, CHINESE ENGINEERS DISCUSS RADIO STATION MAINTENANCE | Text of report by Equatorial Guinea radio on 15 July Three main themes featured in the discussion between Minister of Information, Tourism, and Culture Agustin Nze Nfumu and the group of Chinese engineers in charge of maintaining the infrastructure of Radio Bata during an audience that the information chief granted the engineers from that Asian country on 14 July. There was the need to coordinate and draw up the number of Equatorial Guinea technicians who will take part in an intensive maintenance course in respect of the new equipment from 29 September to 11 November 2003 in China, given that the Malabo and Beijing governments have signed a new cooperation agreement on the maintenance of the new radio transmission equipment recently acquired by the government. Another issue discussed during the audience was that ensuring regular electricity supply for the normal functioning of this equipment. The meeting saw the presence of the manager of Radio Bata, Sebastien Elo Seko, and the regional delegate for information and tourism. In the course of the discussion, the Chinese engineers, after congratulating the government on the climate of peace reigning in the country, further expressed their satisfaction at government's project to set up rural radios in all provincial headquarters of the country. Minister Agustin Nze Nfumu thanked the engineers for successfully installing the new radio equipment at the short wave transmission centre, after disclosing that the government had bought an electric generator to keep the radio regularly supplied with energy. This did not prevent the ministry from engaging in the procedure for the signing of an agreement for the imminent arrival of engineers for the maintenance of the equipment of Radio Bata equipment on the mainland. Source: Radio Nacional de Guinea Ecuatorial, Malabo, in Spanish 0600 gmt 15 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** ERITREA. INFORMATION MINISTER DENIES ARREST OF VOA REPORTER | Text of report in English by Eritrean Ministry of Information's Shabait web site on 16 July There have been reports indicating that a local Eritrean reporter for the VOA, Aklilu Solomon, has been arrested in Asmara. Upon Shabait.com's inquiry on the incident, acting minister of information, Mr Ali Abdu, said "Youths in the tens of thousands have gone to Sawa [Military] Training Camp in the past years in compliance with the government of Eritrea's proclamation on the National Service Programme. Many dodgers who tried to avoid fulfilling their national obligations were also reminded and made to follow in the footsteps of their predecessors. Therefore, we do not see any reason for giving briefings on why nationals are made to fulfil their duties. We cannot entertain addressing the issues of individuals when the core of the matter remains to be nothing but the realization of what they need to carry out as nationals. It is only natural to say that an Eritrean has to observe the laws of Eritrea." Source: Shabait web site, Asmara, in English 16 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) So he was conscripted by force? ** GERMANY. From August 15 to August 17, 2003 the conference of the European DX Council (EDXC) will take place in Königstein (near Frankfurt), Germany. The event is organized by the Rhein Main Radio Club (RMRC). On this occasion a special broadcast of the ADDX-Media magazine will be transmitted on Sunday, August 17, 2003, hosted by Hans Werner Lange and Markus Weidner. Schedule: 1900-1929 UTC analogue on 3965 kHz 1930-1959 UT, digital (DRM) also on 3965 kHz. The magazine will be transmitted via Jülich, analogue with 100 kW, digital with 40 kW. The antenna will be non directional. From about 2000 UT that day the program will be available as an audio file also: http://www.addx.de Reception reports will be confirmed with a special QSL card. Please enclose return postage (German 55 Cent stamp or 1 IRC from abroad). Please direct your letters to the following address: ADDX, Medienprogramm, Postfach 130124, D-40551 Düsseldorf, Germany. Michael Schmitz, ADDX Regards, (Willi Passmann (Editor), July 16, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** GUAM. The third replacement transmitter at KSDA AWR on the island of Guam entered regular service at 1000 UT on Thursday May 15. This unit was previously installed at Langefontein in South Africa though that station was never commissioned for regular broadcasting. This third unit on Guam is now on the air as KSDA2 and it replaces the older Thomson unit that was procured by High Adventure Ministries for installation at their station on the island of Palau. The two remaining transmitters from South Africa are scheduled to commence regular service on Guam in September this year and January next year (Adrian Michael Peterson, IN, AWR Wavescan July 20 via DXLD) ** GREENLAND [non]. DXing from Greenland --- You might want to check out this story on the CBC's web page. It's a feature they did a couple of years ago on one of their radio shows. http://radio.cbc.ca/programs/thismorning/lfnsound/sound_collectors/sound_collectors_121799.html You can hear the whole show by clicking on the little speaker icon beneath the writeup. It's an interview with a man who DXed and taped AM stations in Greenland in the early 1950's. It includes recordings of KING Seattle and KFAB Omaha. The gentleman now lives in Victoria BC (Bruce Portzer, WA, IRCA via DXLD) ** GUATEMALA. During a holiday in Roatán, Honduras, on Jul 08-10 I found these SW stations active: 3325, R Maya, Barillas, difficult to understand, strong noise. 3360, La Voz de Nahualá, Nahualá, difficult to understand, strong noise. 3370, R Tezulutlán, Cobán, difficult to understand, strong noise (Massimo Cerveglieri, DSWCI DX Window July 16 via DXLD) Not reported since Dec 1999! (DSWCI Ed., ibid.) ** HONDURAS. During a holiday in Roatán, Honduras, on Jul 08-10 I found these SW stations active: 3249.4, R. Luz y Vida, San Luís, with very bad modulation AM, difficult to understand. 4819, La Voz Evangélica, Tegucigalpa. 4832, R. Litoral, La Ceiba. 4960, R. Buenas Nuevas with very bad modulation AM, difficult to understand (Massimo Cerveglieri, DSWCI DX Window July 16 via DXLD) I wonder if this is R. HRET, Puerto Lempira which used to be heard on 4960.1? R. Buenas Nuevas is also the name of the Guatemalan station heard as late as Jun 2003 on 4799.8 (DSWCI Ed., ibid.) ** HONDURAS. unID 2859.9, weak or absent 0850-1030, strong 0100, "Radio Cutltural..." IDs (Bob Wilkner, R75 NRD 535 R7 ~ Pompano Beach, Florida, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. More WorldSpace channels disappear --- The two Arabic music channels Haneen and Killa Musika seem to have disappeared from Afristar West beam. Killa Musica was there yesterday, but gone today. I'm not sure when Haneen was last on. Radio Congo has also vanished. I have written to the London office to ask what has happened to them, but not received a reply yet. There seems to be less and less to listen to on WordSpace these days (Dave Kenny UK, worldspace-radio yahoogroup via Daniel Say, DXLD) As I've said before, I'm very new to Worldspace, but one of the things which disappoints me is the lack of stations/imput from northern Europe. The only BBC station is the World Service for west Africa. Europe is not catered for at all. It seems the assumption is made that no one either in northern Europe or from northern Europe is interested in what's going on when they are away from home. WRN 2 carries some European station, but not the BBC and, as far as I can make out from their schedule published on the WS web site, no other news station from Britain. RTE, from Ireland, is on it 3 times a day. Radio bloody New Zealand is on it, but no Radio 4 (David Mixwell, July 15, ibid.) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM [and non]. Glenn: The company that determined that VOA and other Persian-language satellite broadcasts were being jammed via Cuba is Transmitter Location Systems of Chantilly VA http://www.tls2000.com 73 (Kim Elliott, DC, July 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRAN. Satellite jamming: see CUBA, and INTERNATIONAL VACUUM just above ** LITHUANIA. Conflict over 1386 kHz: see RUSSIA ** MADAGASCAR. The organization known as "World Christian Broadcasting Foundation" owns and operates the Alaskan shortwave station, KNLS, at Anchor Point. This same organizaton, WCBF, has been granted approval by the president of Madagascar to build a shortwave station on his island for coverage into the Middle East. However, work on the projected new station in Madagascar will not begin until the second transmitter is on the air in Alaska (Adrian Michael Peterson, IN, AWR Wavescan July 20 via DXLD) Looking for more info on this, I first went to http://www.knls.org where I could find no mention of the Madagascar project, nor even a link to the parent organization WCBF! Then I searched on World Christian Broadcasting and Google found http://www.worldchristian.org which immediately changes to http://wcb.faithsite.com/ --- but again, not a word about Madagascar, even when doing a site search (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MADAGASCAR. 5010, R TV Malagasy, Antananarivo, 1801-1902*, Jul 07 and 08, French program with talks, songs and a distinctive selection of local tunes so different from the rest of Africa; the broadcast ended with the national anthem and what it seemed to be the station anthem too. On Jul 07 reception was a poor 25331, but on Jul 08 it was noted with a fantastic 45332. Only noise and fading did disturb such a superb signal, and it was the first time I've ever received Madagascar so well. East Africa reception is always tough for us here, particularly towards SE Africa, like Moçambique (Carlos Gonçalves, Portugal, DSWCI DX Window July 16 via DXLD)) ** MOLDOVA. Relays on MW: see CHINA ** PERU. 5486.66, Reina de la Selva 1040-1055 17 July [Wilkner-FL] 5471.87, tentative Radio San Nicolás 1105, noted, needs work, would like full ID, 17 July (Bob Wilkner, R75 NRD 535 R7 ~ Pompano Beach, Florida, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** RUSSIA. The new program from Moscow started at 1900 on both 1215 and 1386 with "Voice of Russia presents the programme Russkoye Mezhdunarodnoye Radio" announcement, and it is quite obvious that this is an attempt to attract young listeners. It would be interesting to learn where these programmes are actually produced since this hardly sounds like the output of the existing ul. Pyatnitskaya studios with Oktava MS219 mikes used at some distance, Mechlabor open reel tape recorders etc. So I guess the origin of these broadcasts should be either a refitted VoR studio or probably, with the reported participation of Radio Rossii in mind, Ostankino instead. By the way, recently there were some discussions about an unID station on 1386 broadcasting noting but music. So let me draw your attention on this from Bernd Trutenau: "Reports of the RBWI channel marker on 1386 kHz (25 kW, Giruliai, 2000-2100 UT) are also welcome." -- A transmitter from the former 1107 network I guess (Kai Ludwig, Germany, July 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** RUSSIA. /LITHUANIA. Monitoring shows that the Bolshakovo transmitter on 1386 kHz continues to sign off at 2000, contrary to the new schedule (s/off 2100) that was distributed in the DX press on the last days. The usage of 1386 kHz is being discussed between Lithuania and Russia on high governmental level. The Lithuanian position is that the Geneva Plan 1975 assignment for a 1000 kW transmitter in Kaunas gives Lithuania the right for an exclusive use of this frequency, while the Russian side has been proposing a time sharing model. The talks will continue until a solution is found. Radio Baltic Waves International is license holder for the use of 1386 kHz on Lithuanian territory since March 2002 (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, July 17, MW-DX via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. 7436.5, R Veda, Oryol, 0225-0302*, Jul 13, Russian religious, closing with ID by woman: `Radio Veda`, ex R Krishnaloka, 44444 (Torre Ekblom, Finland, DSWCI DX Window July 16 via DXLD) ** SAO TOME. The VOA São Tomé relay has been operating normally since the coup. 73 (Kim Elliott, VOA, July 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) VOA 4950 kHz was on air as usual. 73, (Guido Schotmans, Belgium, July 16, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Dear Glenn, I visited the IBB transmitter site at the Pinheira Plantation on the east coast of the island of São Tomé four months ago, so this morning I asked the Transmitting Station Manager, Mr. Charles Lewis, about the status. He replied at 1055 hours: "Anker, So far, our operations have not been affected. We do not have any sense of danger to us at this time. Regards, Charles" When I visited him, he told me that out of the total manning at this IBB station of 85, about 80 are Santomean employees. The relations to the local population have always been good. I travelled a lot by car and aircraft during the two weeks I was on these two islands and I only saw one or two military trucks with soldiers onboard, so the Army was not dominant on the roads at that time. The Parliament was closed for holidays. It is located at the coast in the southern part of the capital São Tomé which has a population of just 30,000 inhabitants. Remember that São Tomé and Príncipe is the smallest, independent state in Africa with a total of about 140,000 inhabitants. The Presidential Palace, the Government buildings and the Central Bank are located near the harbour in downtown São Tomé, 1 kilometre from the Parliament. In between, still at the coast, I passed the radio and TV Building of Rádio Nacional on Avenida Marginal 12 de Julho. It is just a large, two store bungalow in a nice garden. From there the radio and TV-programs are produced and transmitted via microlink to various FM and TV transmitters on the hilltops, and for MW 945 kHz down south to the IBB site four kilometres away. The U.S. operate and maintain this transmitter for the Santomean Government together with the VOA transmitters, but has nothing to do with the programs. The international airport is located 3 km north of downtown São Tomé. There is only one direct flight per week from and to Europe and that is by TAP Air Portugal which arrives with an Airbus Monday mornings at sunrise from Lisbon and returns a few hours later. Other flights go to nearby countries with smaller planes. I checked the VOA São Tomé transmissions on SW around 0600 and 1700 today here in Denmark and heard them as follows: 6045 French 0530-0600 SINPO 23322 6095 French 0530-0600 SINPO 22322 // 6045 7290 English 0530-0600 SINPO 15111 (beam 138 degrees) 7290 English 0600-0630 SINPO 35343 (beam 020 degrees) 9830 English 1630-1700 SINPO 32433 // 9850 9830 Port. 1700-1730 SINPO 32433 9850 English 1630-1700 SINPO 12111 // 9830 15730 Swahili 1630-1730 SINPO 25444 This confirms that the VOA transmissions from ST are not affected. On 7290 I heard at 0600 the program "Daybreak Africa" where the VOA from Washington reported that in São Tomé, the coup makers had taken control of the Government buildings, the Radio and TV station, the Central Bank and the International Airport. So far there had been no casualties (Anker Petersen, Denmark, July 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SEYCHELLES [non]. THE FEBA RADIO QSL ODYSSEY AND THE FUTURE OF QSL'S FROM THIS LONG TIME STALWART BROADCASTER. NOW THAT THEY DO NOT OWN TRANSMITTERS Last week, I received a vague no data "good to know you were able to listen" e-mail reply from Angela Brooke, Supporter Relations in the United Kingdom in one day for a report for 9465 FEBA Radio via Moosbrunn, Austria. Angela went on to say FEBA no longer owns its own transmitters and that they could no longer verify listener reception reports. In my reply I indicated that since they bought the transmission time and knew what they were broadcasting, answering reception reports was quite possible for them to undertake. The following day I received a very nice reply from Mike Procter, Head of Specialized English, in Cyprus. He provided a nice confirmation statement mentioning that the broadcast was relayed over ORF in Austria. He went on to ask about how they should look at QSL'ing (e-mail replies, Feba postcard replies, standard QSL cards or just forward reports to transmission agency). I responded that postal QSL cards was the way to go because not all SW listeners had Internet access and transmission agencies may not be responsive which could make listeners look unfavorably at FEBA. I'm hopeful that Mike in Cyprus will become the location for QSL cards for FEBA Radio transmissions. Further communication with both the Cyprus and United Kingdom offices over the next few days yields more on this topic. Mike Procter indicates that to my questions as to whether reports should go to the UK office or to Cyprus that the frequency management and transmitter allocation is done in UK. "Here in Cyprus we would only be able to verify "Spotlight" placngs and not other programs. (The Arabic dept. is also here but I don't think they know how to deal with reception reports)." He wasn't sure "how the folks in UK would respond to reports from outside the intended reception area. Now that we are not a transmitting entity there seems to be ambivalence there." Mike certainly is correct in that assessment. He did promise to pass along my suggestion about providing contact information to Passport to World Band Radio and the WRTH. Also, he indicated that my suggestion of a full data e-mail attachment similar to what HCJB-OZ has used would be considered. From the reluctant UK office came additional information from Angela Brooke. She noted that FEBA Radio is "using several different service providers. In order to simplify broadcasting, the individual programmes (mostly lasting 15 or 30 minutes) are combined into programme blocks of 1 hour or more. Some blocks include programmes in two or more languages. The information listed on our programme schedule gives details of programmes which are expected to be broadcast. What is actually aired can sometimes differ for technical reasons. Our service providers do eventually provide confirmation about the blocks which were actually broadcast, but this does not help with confirming a reception report for a particular programme and this type of confirmation would be more difficult and time-consuming to achieve." Thus since "Feba's purpose is to communicate the Gospel by radio and we concentrate on trying to provide our listeners with a good quality signal" it appears that the UK office continues to be somewhat reluctant to get into the reception report business. Angela notes "the work is funded by donations from churches and individual believers and we have to try to use their gifts wisely. Sometimes difficult decisions have to be made and I am afraid that this is one of them." However, a final piece of correspondence from Angela Brooke shows a softening of the anti-QSL position as she indicated that she understands the disappointment to SW listeners about not issuing QSLs and that she would share our correspondence "with the Director concerned --- on his return." The director she mentioned was apparently on the road during our e-mail exchange. The final word on all this came in my last e-mail from Mike Proctor in Cyprus who offers additional insights into the matter: "When you stop operating your own transmitters you also lose the infrastructure you have in place to manage them. It was from 'somewhere in this infrastructure' that a staff member acted as QSL secretary in Seychelles." Mike goes on to note, "For the moment we have just one tiny department (in UK) that manages what transmissions are placed where, and one look at our schedules will be enough to show that this is one busy department. My guess is that they just don't have the capacity to handle QSL's right now. I wish it were otherwise, and maybe in the future they'll figure out a way." In his final comments, Mike says, "I am copying our exchange to UK. I think and hope it may be helpful for us (Feba in general) to figure out what - if anything - we can do with reception reports in the post Seychelles era." I'm not sure what this all means but in summary it appears the United Kingdom office is reluctant about becoming the QSL Bureau for FEBA R while the Cyprus office is eager to help out but feels limited in its ability to actually confirm the transmissions. Mike Proctor has been very positive and helpful; perhaps he can help convince the UK office to be the issuers of official FEBA verifications from the various transmitter sites that will be used for broadcasts. It will be interesting to see how this plays out over the next few weeks and months "in the post Seychelles era". (Rich D`Angelo, PA, DXplorer July 8 via BC-DX via DXLD) Surely FEBA realise that QSL-collecting DXers can`t possibly have any genuine interest in their gospel-huxter programming in incomprehensible languages. See also QSL info below (gh, DXLD) ** SOMALIA. MYSTERY "AMERICAN-BASED" FM RADIO SAID HEARD IN MOGADISHU | Text of report by Canada-based Somali Balcad web site on 16 July An FM radio station called DOY [as published] is being heard in Mogadishu. The American-based radio station broadcasts programmes in English and Spanish [as published] on terrorism, US military operations, nuclear weapons and sports. The radio station had been heard previously in Mogadishu before it disappeared for several months. Nobody knows why it has hit the airwaves again, but many people see it as an intimidation tactic in which America hopes to demoralize the Somali people. Source: Balcad web site in Somali 16 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) WTFK? ** TAIWAN. Invito a todos los amigos a escribir sus palabras para la celebración de 75to aniversario de RTI, pues aquí la emisora celebrará una fiesta a finales de julio en donde nosotros expondremos todas las tarjetas (sean las enviadas por correo ordinario, o las enviadas por internet) de todos los oyentes del mundo en la sala de exhibición. Muchas gracias por tomar tu tiempo en la colaboración. http://www.cbs.org.tw/spanish Un abrazo (Bonnie Cheng, SECCION ESPANOLA DE RADIO TAIWAN INTERNACIONAL, via Nicolás Eramo, July 17, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** U K. The 109th season of the BBC Proms opens with a tribute to the Russian composer Sergey Prokofiev who died 50 years ago. The combined forces of the BBC Symphony Orchestra and two choruses under Leonard Slatkin perform his dramatic score to Sergei Eisenstein`s film `Ivan the Terrible`. From July 19 [thru mid-September] BBCWS Americas: Sun 0501, 1901 Europe: Sun 2101 W Africa: Sun 1301 You can also watch this performance live, as well as each performance during the first two weeks of the proms at http://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/watch/index.shtml We do hope that Charles Hazelwood will reprise his rôle as presenter for this year`s webcasts. His insights, as well as his wardrobe, were striking! (Ivan Grishin, July ODXA Listening In via DXLD) Otherwise one may listen to all the concerts on BBC Radio 3, far more than BBCWS gives you. Main time for live broadcast is 1830 UT, but there are variations especially when there is a double bill, the first one starting somewhat earlier. The First Night of the Proms, described by Ivan above, is upon us, Friday July 18 at 1830-2045 on BBC Radio 3. Selected concerts, about one a week, some overlapping, are available on demand via: http://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/listen/ Some of the concerts are expected to be repeated during the week following, in the local afternoon (morning here), but based on previous years, these lack the live ambience, as a studio announcer introduces the recorded music instead of the original live announcements. It is also traditional to repeat some of the previous summer`s Proms during Xmas season (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. MILLER IN COURT BATTLE OVER LICENCE FEE Ciar Byrne, Wednesday July 16, 2003, The Guardian Sunday Times columnist Jonathan Miller today appears at Guildford crown court in the latest round of his battle against the BBC licence fee, which he claims is in breach of his human rights. Miller will face Ben Emerson QC, who has been hired by the corporation to prosecute him over his failure to pay the £116 licence fee. He will argue that the fee is incompatible with article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which was incorporated into English law by the Human Rights Act, which entitles individuals to a private and family life. "My theory is that the lawfulness of the licence fee has expired without anyone noticing," Miller wrote in today's Daily Telegraph. He argued that this was partly because of the Human Rights Act, and partly because "the reason the BBC licence was ever legitimate in the first place has expired in the white heat of technology". "I can choose from hundreds of channels, with more providers than ever. There is no possible justification for a constantly expanding BBC, paid for by a blanket impost on television sets and even broadband computers," Miller said. "It is like being told to give more and more money to the Guardian to be allowed to read the Sun." Giving evidence to the culture and media select committee yesterday, the BBC's board of governors said the current rate of TV licence evasion in the UK was 7.2%. When the costs of evasion and collecting are combined, the BBC earns 12.7% less from licence fees than it would if 100% of television owners paid up. The corporation aims to reduce this figure to 9% of the total by the end of its current charter period, the governors revealed. Miller's case is one of at least four currently being fought against the licence fee. Jean-Jacques Marmont, a 60-year-old man from Oxfordshire who was prosecuted for licence fee evasion in 1992, has launched proceedings against the BBC representing a group of licence- fee payers In a separate case the so-called "Liverpool six" - five single parents and an asylum seeker - are claiming the licence fee is an unfair tax that targets poorer people. Miller also threw down this challenge to the BBC chairman, Gavyn Davies: "I will buy a licence fee under the following conditions. You must stop prosecuting poor people. And you must open the BBC to a full and open debate in which the rest of the country can share in the discussion of your future." (© Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003 via Daniel Say, DXLD) ** U K. Thunderstorms affect Orfordness mediumwave services We just got word from Merlin Communications that last night's thunderstorms that swept across this part of Europe damaged the mediumwave transmitters at Orfordness which broadcast BBC World Service programmes. Priority was given to getting 648 kHz back on the air. It seems to be operating normally as of 1600 UTC, but as it's always so strong here it's hard to tell whether the station is operating on full power and/or with a different antenna. There have been no DRM transmissions on 1296 kHz today (Andy Sennitt, Media Network blog July 17 via DXLD) ** U K. BBC REPORT GIVES A FUZZY PICTURE Matt Wells and Jason Deans, Thursday July 17, 2003, The Guardian The controversy over the BBC's annual report deepened yesterday as the corporation faced further accusations of obfuscation. Analysts at rival channels claimed the BBC under-reported expenditure on digital services and played down executive bonuses. Rivals were also incensed by its decision to schedule the Fame Academy talent show against ITV1's Pop Idol on Saturday nights, two days after the BBC's annual report said the corporation strived to be "distinctive". The BBC insisted its accounting procedures had been designed to be more transparent, and not to bolster the case for the renewal of its charter in 2006. However, the BBC's decision to change its accounting methods for the second year running has made it difficult to analyse its spending. This year, apparently following a request from the select committee for culture, media and sport, the BBC stripped out costs such as marketing, PR and newsgathering from the channel budgets. These are reported separately - but critics say they should also be totalled up, to make comparisons easier. BBC1's budget, for example, would have topped -L-1bn for the first time, had the accounting procedure not been changed. The cost of expansion into digital broadcasting would be well over -L-400m - far more than the -L-279.9m claimed in the annual report. Details of the full remuneration awarded to Rupert Gavin, chief executive of BBC Worldwide, the corporation's commercial arm, are only revealed in a footnote. This shows he was paid -L-45,000 by an incentive scheme, on top of his separately reported performance bonus of -L-62,000, taking his total pay to -L-407,000. Jana Bennett, the director of television, received a -L-167,000 relocation package when she moved from the Discovery channel in the United States. BBC chairman Gavyn Davies, said this was common in businesses such as Goldman Sachs, where he was formerly chief economist. Critics pointed out, however, that the investment bank, unlike the BBC, is not publicly funded. The tone of the report infuriated MPs on the select committee. Chris Bryant, MP for Rhondda, compared it to an Enron report, but later apologised for the reference to the failed energy firm. Committee chairman Gerald Kaufman said it was full of "euphemistic phraseology" and said the BBC should be brought fully under the remit of the independent regulator, Ofcom. Mr Bryant wrote to Mr Davies apologising for the Enron remark, but added: "I merely wanted to make the point that by making no criticism of the performance of the BBC and by resorting to virtually adulatory language, this year's governors' assessment, as contained in the annual report, undermines their claim to independence." A BBC spokeswoman denied any deliberate move to play down the corporation's spending, but accepted that between -L-15 and -L-20 of every -L-112 licence fee went on digital projects. "It's absolutely wrong to say we've slimmed down our spending figures for charter renewal or anything else." She defended the BBC's digital expenditure: "We don't apologise for incurring these costs. We've been charged by the government with driving digital take up, which is why we got a generous licence fee settlement. We are spending that extra money on digital services, as intended by the government." ITV reacted angrily to the BBC's announcement yesterday that it would put Fame Academy on Saturday nights - leading to a clash with Pop Idol. An ITV spokeswoman said: "Scheduling Fame Academy head to head with Pop Idol is clearly not in viewers' interests. We're disappointed the BBC has deliberately gone down this route." The BBC said it was "locked in" to an early evening slot because of the national lottery draw. Guardian Unlimited (c) Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003 (Via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. We've been assigned 5.100 MHz for our 4th frequency. It will be 50 kW / compatible sideband. Al has been running tests, and some simulcasting of 7.415 MHz and 9.330 MHz over the past week. I still don't know what will be programmed on it in the long run, but for now, listeners will hear either Christian Media Network, or the simulcast audio from 7.415 MHz during the evenings. We should have all testing and adjustment completed within about 2 weeks. It's currently running at low power [about 3 KW]. Reception reports can be sent via e-mail to: wbcq@gwi.net I'm trying to get Tasha interested in producing a "WBCQ Highlights" weekly e-mail newsletter. Also, fans of old time radio theater will find episodes of Suspense, The Shadow, Fibber McGee and Molly, X minus 1, Lum and Abner, The Life of Riley, and many others as the summer replacement for "Tasha Takes Control", heard on Friday nights at 9-10 pm Eastern [UT Sat 0100-0200] / 7.415 MHz (Michael Ketter / WBCQ, July 16, WORLD OF RADIO 1191, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Thanks for the wonderfully useful DX Programs list maintained on the WoR website. I realize that keeping this updated is a lot of work. Here are a few notes about some entries that I've noted over recent months when trying to listen, usually to Cumbre on the weekends. UT SATURDAY 0430-0500 WHRA DXING WITH CUMBRE AF/ME 7580 Not on in May, GCN there instead -- I don't think it's there now either. 0500-0530 WHRI DXING WITH CUMBRE 5745 7315 KWHR 17780 The program on 17780 was something else in both May and July. On July 12 the 5745 and 7315 airings were NOT in parallel. Both had dead air at the start time, then 7315 began the program. 5745 had a station ID and contact info, and then DXw/C began from the beginning. 1930-2000 WHRI DXING WITH CUMBRE N&SAm/Carib 9495 Not on July 5th. Had been good in June. 2230-2300 WHRI DXING WITH CUMBRE N&SAm/Carib 9495 Not detectable in May & June or early July. 2300-2330 WBCQ THE REAL AMATEUR RADIO SHOW NAm 7415 Something else is on here instead 7/12/03 UT MONDAY 0230-0300 WHRI DXING WITH CUMBRE 5745 No signal here 6/22/03 0300-0330 KWHR DXING WITH CUMBRE SPac 17510 Gospel music show "Turn Your Radio On" is consistently here instead I've been printing out the list and then making notes on it as I tune and listen, so this is compiled from several past editions' annotations. But I did check these against the latest on-line version and these lines are in there. So maybe you want to make some notes about these entries if the program producers still claim they are valid broadcast times. Regards & 73, (Will Martin, MO, July 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I recently entered a number of Cumbre changes which Wolfgang Bueschel sent, presumably derived from the WHR website. (You can search for the program title and get a display of all the airtimes.) Imaginary and inaccurate listings by WHR have been the norm forever, and I have been sorely tempted to delete all DWC listings as a result. I really don`t have the interest to research that myself, knowing that the info will likely be wrong in many cases, anyway. Also, one of the WHRI transmitters is often off the air for weeks at a time, something you would never know from consulting the website (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Glenn: A new GAO report about U.S. international broadcasting is now available at http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-03-772 http://www.gao.gov/highlights/d03772high.pdf 73 (Kim Elliott, IBB, July 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. FCC UPDATES, QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS In a recent FCC rule-making, the change from four broadcast seasons a year to two broadcast seasons a year for FCC-licensed International Service was made official. The Commission`s Order will be put in the Federal Register any day now. It will become effective 30 days after being put in the Federal Register. The frequency/hour fee per season will not change, because that is set by Congress. Effectively, the annual fees for HF broadcasters are cut in half because of the official reduction of seasons from four to two. This change will be in effect for the B-03 Season. The next HFCC meeting will be held in Norway the last week of August. The deadline for submitting B-03 requirements to the HFCC is July 18. The following HFCC meeting will take place in the United Arab Emirates the second week of February 2004. Russia is slated to host the conference following that. The FCC has almost completed updating their HF database to include the items that the HFCC requires. The FCC would appreciate if all those broadcasters who can would submit their requirements in the HFCC format. (Prior to his presentation, Tom distributed forms showing the HFCC format.) The Notice of Inquiry regarding power line use for distribution of broadband carrier transmission will be going out soon. See the FCC website. There is concern that this mode may interfere with reception of shortwave (Tom Lucey FCC summary reports of presentations at the NASB 2003 Annual Meeting in Aug NASB Newsletter, July 16 via DXLD) ** U S A. IBB Report and Update (Spectrum Management Division) John Wood/Del Carson/Dan Ferguson/Bill Whitacre John Wood gave an overview and report on the Spectrum Analysis Program. They`ve been heavily involved in preparations for WRC-03, both for USA interests and for Inter-American interests (CITEL). Recommendations were developed regarding additional allocations for broadcasting in the 4-10 MHz range. Much monitoring and scheduling data was analyzed to arrive at a conclusion that around 250 kHz additional would adequately address co-channel collisions, and that around 850 kHz of additional frequency allocations would cover both co-channel and adjacent band collisions. Del Carson of IBB Leasing reported that this year they have their highest leasing budget ever (approximately $13 million), largely due to the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. After the Iraq war, this will probably decline for budgetary reasons. At present, IBB is leasing about 150 hours per day on non-IBB facilities (about 90 hours for RFA; about 60 hours for VoA and RFE/RL). Of the leased time, about 86% of it is shortwave. The main trends Del sees in shortwave are privatization of facilities (many old state-run transmitters now in private hands), a lot more sharing of time on facilities (such as Merlin with VOA, for example), and consolidation (fewer stations overall). The IBB uses satellite distribution mostly for program delivery to local outlets rather than for direct broadcasting. There are not very many consumer satellite receivers at present. Dan Ferguson of IBB Frequency Management told of adding three major services in the past year: a 21-hour-per-day Persian service for Iran called Radio Farda, a Pashtu and Dari Afghan service that`s on shortwave 20 hours per day, and in March the Arabic Radio Sawa service was increased to 24 hours per day on shortwave. Bill Whitacre of IBB Frequency Monitoring related that 60 Remote Monitoring System sites are active. Additionally, they employ a major network of human monitors. They`ve been doing some monitoring work for the HFCC verifying whether or not coordinated transmissions are in fact taking place. This effort has turned up many ``wooden transmitters``---cases where more frequency hours are coordinated than are actually used. The HFCC makes contact with major offenders. Resolving this problem is a process, not a one-shot effort (summary report of presentations at the NASB 2003 Annual Meeting in Aug NASB Newsletter, July 16 via DXLD) ** U S A. WCPE *89.7 Raleigh NC, The Classical Station, is celebrating its silver anniversary on Friday July 18. Thruout the day will air stories and interviews giving a retrospective of its 25 years of broadcasting. Also CD and ticket giveaways; also via C-band satellite relayed by some other stations [such as KCSC 90.1 OK overnight], and internet http://www.wcpe.org (FMedia July via DXLD) ** U S A. The city council decided not to sell the venerable classical music station WRR 101.1 Dallas TX (July FMedia! via DXLD) Fornever? ** U S A. WBIX 1060 Natick MA is a Boston-area business talk station with 40 kW daytime, but with a CP for 50 kW days, 2500 W nights; 24 hour operation is expected by September. It`s local, live most of the time, according to GM Jerry Charm, whi had been GM of classic rocker WZLX 100.7. An exception is a 3 pm program from CBNBC. ``AFAIK, no other station in the country is doing what we`re doing, local and live, unlike the traditional ones that just throw an unending sream of numbers and statistics at you or all syndicated,`` Charm said. Recent guests include MA Governor Mitt Romney to ``a guy from VT producing yogurt from water buffalo milk who`s ready to do a national rollout.`` Once the power increase and expanded hours come about, ``we`ll have a fully competitive signal with all the other AM stations in the city,`` said Charm (July FMedia! via DXLD) ** U S A. WAMC *1400 Albany NY becomes noncommercial. It was WHTR and before that WABY (July FMedia! via DXLD) ** U S A. NY gets all-Russian station: ``People`s Wave Radio``, a.k.a. ``Narodnaya Volna`` said it has launched 24\7 Russian-language programming on WKDM 1380 in New York, offering news\talk and entertainment to Russian-speaking listeners in the tri-state area (July FMedia! via DXLD) ** U S A. An article in the business section of the Minneapolis [Star]-Tribune, contributed by reader John Ebeling, called attention to the independent-minded KSTP stations, which include TV-5 and 45, and KSTP-FM 94.5 and WFMP 107.1 Coon Rapids MN, which had moved from New Richmond WI as WIXK-FM. It mentions how the stations, now owned by Stanley S. Hubbard and family, might be prime targets for takeovers by large, out-of-town media empires, now that the FCC has liberalized ownership rules in TV. The Hubbards are now in the second and third generations of ownership, after founder Stanley E. Hubbard died in 1992. The children and grandchildren, unlike in so many other families, show great business acumen. Indeed, they may be interested in acquiring properties, such as has marked Hubbard expansions in Albuquerque NM and into Rochester and Albany NY. Revenues, however, are down, and Hubbard sold its United States Satellite Broadcasting to DirecTV in 1998 for $1.3 billion. It also let its news-gathering Conus satellite company go belly-up, laying off 130. Stanley S. Hubbard insists the company is not for sale. ``I think it`s been 30 years since we received a real offer. Everybody knows we`re not for sale.`` (July FMedia! via DXLD) ** U S A. The 5-year grace period, by which an AM station could operate both in the regular band and the expanded band of 1610 to 1700 kHz is nearing an end. Stations will have to decide which permit they will keep. Most expanded-band AM stations, according to an M Street study, have migrated from near the top of the AM band, like 1550 kHz. Thus KADZ 1550 Arvada CO is turning in its license in favor of KDDZ 1690. The stations migrating are not the ones that caused interference to other AM stations. Interference continues at the same levels in the lower and middle parts of the dial. Too, the presence of large numbers of radios that tune in the expanded band has taken a long time to come about, which might be instructive for digital audio broadcasters (July FMedia! via DXLD) ** U S A. The steering committee studying IBOC wrote: ``DAB subcommittee members who attended the NPR demonstration do not consider the audio quality demonstrated by the Ibiquity 36 kbps PAC technology to be suitable for broadcast.`` This is seen as unwelcome news for a new system whose rollout was seen as imminent. This puts the onus on Ibiquity Digital Corp. to solve he problem, and soon. Members of the committee also expressed concern about FM, and they have concerns about effects on FM/SCS and data services. Radio World chides Ibiquity to get a handle on what ``better`` audio via IBOC means and get it done, as quickly as possible. It is better to fix this now than wait to dump a problem in the laps of receiver makers and consumers. ``We urge Ibiquity to be as forthright and as open as possible with the industry as it seeks solutions to this problem.`` Clear Channel Communications had planned to transition one AM and seven FMs to ``HD Radio`` this year, which seems to be a modest pace. Uncertain is how the glitch in the digital system would affect the timing of new digital receivers and ICs for the system. Too, there`s concern consumers will find out about the delay and be shaken, especially if some units get into the hands of customers and have to be returned. Also affected would be those who are developing ancillary data procedures for the system. Those sources favor reducing the main audio channel of digital transmissions to 64 kbps in order to accommodate data (July FMedia! via DXLD) Breaking News: IBOC COULD BE IN SERIOUS TROUBLE Media Network has learned that Ibiquity, which developed the IBOC digital AM system adopted by the FCC in preference to DRM, is to part company with three of its top managers. Sources say that the three are E. Glynn Walden, vice president of broadcast engineering; Rick Martinson, vice president of program management; and Gerald Marcovsky, senior legal advisor. The changes, reportedly made for cost reasons, are effective at the end of the month. All have been involved with IBOC development for several years. Walden has been the "face" of digital radio for many in the United States radio industry; he has been involved in the technical development of IBOC technology since 1989 and was the main liaison between Ibiquity and broadcasters, said sources. Martinson was appointed director of digital radio broadcast development in 1996, and Marcovsky joined the company in 1998. Ibiquity had no comment other than to say it continues working on the IBOC system (Andy Sennitt, MN blog July 17 via DXLD) The people at the company`s top level were making serious dollars; the big hidden secret is it doesn't work at NIGHT on AM. Have heard the tests on 1670 and 730 am in the Washington DC Market; the adjacent channel buzz is just part of the problem (Lou Josephs, ibid.) ** U S A. 'BEER FOR HOMELESS' BLASTED By Ben Davey July 2 2003 http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/07/02/1056825441944.html A US "charity" that raises money to buy alcohol for homeless people was today attacked by the Salvation Army for adding "fuel to the fire". Gerard Byrne, social program secretary of recovery services with the Salvation Army in Sydney, said the idea was a dangerous stunt. Promoting themselves as a legitimate charity, Beer for the Homeless is the brainchild of talk radio personalities from WGOW-FM Chattanooga, Tennessee, who believe it will reduce begging by treating the homeless more equitably. On their website, the group writes: "Merely because one has no home does not mean that one is somehow a second-class citizen and is no longer allowed the simple pleasures that society allows to those lucky enough to put a roof over their head. "Beer For The Homeless steps up and strikes a blow for equality and human rights. Through this website, we will raise money to purchase and distribute beer to those who want it. Good old fashioned 100% American beer." In response to criticism that their unique philosophy is socially irresponsible, the liquor dispensers defended their brand of charity as being a beneficial, even dignified cause. "We feel that by our actions we are actually helping the homeless. No longer will they have to panhandle and annoy citizens in public asking for money, nor will they take government aid money to use on beer. But Mr Byrne said: "If something like that was introduced here there would certainly be serious concerns from community groups and the government alike." Byrne said that he initially thought the idea was a joke but was shocked when he saw pictures of the group distributing alcohol to homeless people. "It looks like a cynical publicity stunt by the radio station with beer 'babes' employed to hand out the beer," he said. "Since drugs and alcohol are a prominent factor in homelessness, providing them with alcohol is morally and ethically questionable." "It just adds fuel to the fire." The organisation asks for donations via credit card and claims that 70 per cent of all monies raised are used to buy beer, with the remaining 30 per cent spent on transport and website maintenance costs (Sydney Morning Herald, Australia, via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) Glenn, I took a quick look at the http://www.wgow.com website, but couldn't find any reference to the "beer for the homeless." 73- (Bill Westenhaver, QC, July 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Well, a fortnight has passed, so perhaps WGOW have been shamed out of it by now, if this was not in fact a put-on (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. PIRATES OF THE AIRWAVES --- UNLICENSED BROADCASTERS: CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE OR LAW BREAKERS? Not everyone is content with the listening options available on radio today. The Pirate Radio movement has been tetering on the brink of illegality for some time and its proponents seem to feel the risk is worth it. Your About.com Radio Guide recently conducted an email interview with John Anderson who has been reporting on and studying the microradio movement in the United States for the last five years, and maintains a website devoted to free radio and culture jamming at Diymedia.net. John has worked professionally as a radio journalist for commercial stations in Indiana and Wisconsin, and reported on stories for networks like ABC, CNN, and the BBC and is an anchor for the Workers Independent News Service. He is a graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communication. . . http://radio.about.com/library/weekly/aa090602a.htm (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. FEDERAL DISTRICT COURT ORDERS CIVIL JUDGMENT AGAINST RICHARD I. ROWLAND FOR UNLICENSED RADIO OPERATION. The FCC announced that in the US Middle District of Florida, Orlando Division, US District Judge Honorable Gregory A. Presnell granted judgment in favor of US to collect a civil penalty against defendant Richard I. Rowland in the amount of $10,000. News Release. News Media Contact: David Fiske at (202) 418-0500 EB. Contact Lisa Fowlkes at (202) 418-7450, TTY: 1(888) 835-5322 http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-236551A1.doc http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-236551A1.pdf http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-236551A1.txt (via Fred Vobbe, NRC FMTV via DXLD) viz.: The below is certainly the satellite-fed militia radio programming that was reported to me by several previously, from Longwood and listed on my page at 97.1 MHz (Terry Krueger, FL, DX LISTENING DIGEST) NEWS Federal Communications Commission 445 12th Street, S. W. Washington, D. C. 20554 This is an unofficial announcement of Commission action. Release of the full text of a Commission order constitutes official action. See MCI v. FCC. 515 F 2d 385 (D. C. Circ 1974). News Media Information 202 / 418- 0500 Internet: http://www.fcc.gov TTY: 1- 888- 835- 5322 -- DRAFT -- FEDERAL DISTRICT COURT ORDERS CIVIL JUDGMENT AGAINST RICHARD I. ROWLAND FOR UNLICENSED RADIO OPERATION Washington, D. C. - Today, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced that, in the United States Middle District of Florida, Orlando Division, United States District Judge, Honorable Gregory A. Presnell, granted judgment in favor of the United States to collect a civil penalty against Defendant Richard I. Rowland. The court ordered judgment against Rowland in the amount of $10,000 plus costs. The judgment is the result of an investigation that began in May of 2000. The Commission`s Tampa, Florida Field Office received a complaint of an unlicensed broadcast station operating in the Longwood, Florida area. Commission agents determined that Rowland operated an unlicensed radio station on the frequency 97.1 MHz from a Longwood, Florida address on numerous dates in the year 2000. Rowland`s unlicensed radio operation led to the seizure by U.S. Marshals and Commission agents of his radio station equipment in 2001. In addition, the Enforcement Bureau imposed a $10,000 monetary forfeiture on Rowland for multiple violations of operating an unlicensed FM radio facility, in violation of Title 47, United States Code, Section 301. After Rowland refused to pay the forfeiture, the Commission filed suit for collection through the United States Attorney in federal district court. The case was brought by the United States Attorney's Office, Middle District of Florida, Orlando Division. The operation of an unlicensed broadcast station is a violation of Section 301 of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended. Operators of unlicensed stations may be subject to civil monetary forfeitures of up to $11,000 per single violation or per day of a continuing violation not to exceed $87,500 for continuing violations. In addition, unlicensed operators may be subject to criminal sanctions, including a maximum $10,000 fine and up to one year imprisonment for a first offense. - FCC - Enforcement Bureau Contact: Lisa M. Fowlkes at (202) 418- 7450 / TTY 1( 888) 835- 5322 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 15, 2003 NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: David Fiske (202) 418- 0500 Above is also at: http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-236551A1.txt (via Terry L Krueger, Clearwater, Florida, USA, 27.55.83 N, 82.46.08 W Visit my "Florida Low Power Radio Stations" at: http://home.earthlink.net/~tocobagadx/flortis.html DX LISTENING DIGEST; also via Mike Terry, DXLD; also ARRL summarized via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. New York City ARES obtains distinctive call sign: New York City Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) now has its own vanity call sign, WC2WTC, to commemorate the September 11, 2001, activation following the World Trade Center terrorist attack. ``This special call sign also reflects on those who were affected by the devastation,`` said New York City District Emergency Coordinator Charles Hargrove, N2NOV. ``For those of us who worked at the World Trade Center, this call sign will forever remind us and others why NYC ARES exists -- to aid our community in times of need, with specialized skills in a professional manner.`` Hargrove, who worked at various jobs in the World Trade Center for 16 years, says the WC2WTC call sign will be used during special events, emergency operations or other activities ``that warrant the need for listeners to know that NYC ARES is on the air providing a much-needed service.`` (ARRL July 17 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. HOUSE PANEL VOTES TO BLOCK FCC'S NEW MEDIA RULE By Dan Morgan, Washington Post Staff Writer, Thursday, July 17, The House Appropriations Committee moved in a bipartisan vote yesterday to block the Federal Communications Commission from easing a rule that limits ownership concentration in commercial television markets. An amendment approved in a 40 to 25 vote applies to a June 2 FCC decision that would allow networks to acquire stations that reach as much as 45 percent of the national television audience. By preventing the FCC from spending money to carry out its ruling, the committee's action effectively would keep the current limit of 35 percent. The vote followed a broader effort in the Senate to reverse an FCC decision to ease rules that prevent one company from owning television stations and newspapers in the same market. Sen. Byron L. Dorgan (D- N.D.) has signed on 28 Democrats and seven Republicans to support a "resolution of disapproval" that would overturn the agency's ruling. That measure has been placed on the Senate calendar for expedited consideration, but no date has been set for debate. The House committee vote marked the start of a lobbying battle on Capitol Hill between big broadcasters such as NBC and CBS and members of Congress representing small communities who fear that the independence of local stations could be lost in a new wave of consolidation and buyouts. Rep. Zach Wamp (R-Tenn.) yesterday warned of a "Wal-Mart syndrome" affecting local stations. Rep. David R. Obey (D-Wis.), who offered the House amendment, said the FCC rule change threatened the future ability of independent television stations to provide programming consistent with local community values. Defenders of the recent FCC ruling said that critics were exaggerating its impact and that networks had to get bigger to continue providing free broadcast television. The White House supports the FCC ruling. The White House budget office said it would recommend that President Bush veto the fiscal 2004 spending bill for the Commerce, Justice and State departments unless the Obey amendment was deleted. The House committee's action yesterday was also opposed by Rep. W.J. "Billy" Tauzin (R-La.), chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which has jurisdiction over the FCC. "This is exactly not the way to do this," said Tauzin, who supports the FCC's action. "The Appropriations Committee is the last place you should be making this decision." Tauzin hinted that he might try to delay consideration of the spending bill by the full House floor next week, as had been planned. Republican and Democratic opponents of easing the media concentration rules said Tauzin had made it clear that he would not allow legislation overturning the FCC decision to pass through his committee, even though a majority support it. "If we don't move here absolutely nothing will happen," Obey said. Eleven Republicans joined Democrats in support of the amendment. Many lawmakers used the occasion to express their disapproval of broadcast television trends. Wolf cited "garbage" in television advertising and programming. Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D-Ohio) called commercial television "a garbage pit." The Appropriations Committee vote let stand other parts of the FCC's ruling, such as the easing of limits on media cross-ownership. A Republican amendment that also would have pared back that part of the ruling was defeated on a voice vote. Staff writer Frank Ahrens contributed to this report. © 2003 The Washington Post Company (via Kraig Krist, DXLD) HOUSE PANEL ADDS VOICE TO OPPONENTS OF MEDIA RULE By JACQUES STEINBERG The New York Times July 17, 2003 T he recent decision by federal regulators to loosen media ownership rules, already under fire in the Senate, took another blow in Congress yesterday. This setback was dealt by the House Appropriations Committee, which approved a budget amendment that would make it harder for big broadcasting companies to acquire more television stations. The vote represented a defeat for Michael K. Powell, the Federal Communications Commission chairman, who has led the effort to change the rules. It was also a rebuke to the Republican House leadership and the Bush administration, strong supporters of the commission's efforts. A White House spokeswoman, Claire Buchan, said last night that the "president's senior advisers would recommend a veto" if a bill including the amendment ultimately reached his desk. By a vote of 40 to 25, with 11 Republican members deserting their leaders to join the 29 Democratic committee members, the appropriations committee approved a measure that would effectively block the commission from enforcing a new rule that would permit broadcasters to own stations that reach more total households across the country than they do now. Under that rule, the television networks could own stations that reach as much as 45 percent of the nation's households. The previous rule, which the appropriations committee would reinstate, capped ownership in most cases at 35 percent. If it becomes law, the legislation would have the most immediate impact on two networks CBS, which is part of Viacom, and Fox, a unit of the News Corporation. They own television stations reaching about 40 percent of households. The networks were permitted temporarily to exceed the regulatory limit with the expectation that the cap would be reconsidered. The major networks and the stations they own have lobbied vigorously to ease the 35 percent cap, and they have been joined by other media companies in backing a new commission rule one the House committee did not address yesterday that would make it easier for one company to own a newspaper and a television station in the same market. The amendment's sponsor, Representative David R. Obey, Democrat of Wisconsin, said yesterday that the vote was a victory for those seeking to keep big media conglomerates from getting even bigger and perhaps from squelching smaller voices in the process. "This amendment preserves the needs of local control, so local views have a chance to counterbalance New York and L.A. executives," he said in a statement. "Networks that own larger shares of markets can ignore local concerns, and even punish stations that refuse to air network shows or change their time slots." Like similar legislation passed last month by a Senate committee, Mr. Obey's amendment was a response to complaints from hundreds of thousands of constituents who have descended on Congress in recent weeks. The opponents of greater media concentration represent an unusual political coalition that stretches from the National Rifle Association and some religious conservatives to the National Association for Women and Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports. The battle over the amendment passed yesterday is expected to be a bruising one, and committee leaders said that the full House might take up the measure as soon as early next week. And with the White House threatening to veto any effort to curb the federal commission's authority, stopping the new rules from going into effect still appears to be an uphill struggle. "The fight is far from over," said Ken Johnson, a spokesman for Representative Billy Tauzin, Republican of Louisiana and chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Mr. Tauzin is among the commission's most vocal supporters in Congress. "Many of the rules simply don't make sense in a 21st century marketplace," Mr. Johnson said. In the Senate, where opposition to the new commission rules is believed to be even more intense than in the House, a broadly bipartisan group of the Senate Commerce Committee approved legislation on June 19 that would not only restore the 35 percent cap but would also make it harder for a company to own a newspaper and a television station in the same market. The House committee turned back an effort by one member, Representative Anne M. Northup, Republican of Kentucky, to introduce an amendment that would have gone as far as the Senate committee. Supporters of Mr. Obey's amendment feared that Ms. Northup's proposal was too sweeping to win bipartisan approval. Nonetheless, even some opponents of the new rules said they were amazed that the 11 Republicans who defied party leaders included two House subcommittee chairmen, Ralph Regula of Ohio and Ernest J. Istook Jr. of Oklahoma. "The Republican leadership with White House backing is usually very disciplined in holding their Republicans on the party line," Gene Kimmelman, senior director for public policy for Consumers Union, said. "This breathes new life into the effort to overturn the F.C.C. decision." Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) LOCALISM'S LAST STAND By William Safire, Op-ed columnist, New York Times Thursday, July 17, 2003 Posted: 6:50 AM EDT (1050 GMT) http://www.cnn.com/2003/US/07/17/nyt.safire/index.html WASHINGTON -- General managers of 75 stations owned and operated by the Big Four television networks swept into a meeting of the House Appropriations Committee yesterday. Big Media's lobbying purpose was to squelch the bipartisan movement in Congress to nullify the Federal Communications Commission's cave-in to the networks' lust to gobble up more independent stations. Before the vote, the majority whip Roy Blunt, on Tom DeLay's orders, leaned on GOP members to allow the FCC cave-in to be financed. The National Association of Broadcasters, which had been supporting its many independent members against the networks' expansion, flip-flopped in panic because NBC, ABC, CBS and Fox threatened to bolt the lobby. But to everyone's amazement, the networks' power play was foiled. Rep. Frank Wolf of Virginia urged his GOP colleagues to vote their consciences, and an amendment to hold the cap on a huge conglomerate's ownership to 35 percent of the national TV audience was passed by a vote of 40 to 25. Here is what made this happen. Take the force of right-wingers upholding community standards who are determined to defend local control of the public airwaves; combine that with the force of lefties eager to maintain diversity of opinion in local media; add in the independent voters' mistrust of media manipulation; then let all these people have access to their representatives by e-mail and fax, and voilà! Congress awakens to slap down the power grab. Or at least half of it. In Sen. Ted Stevens's rollback-to-35-percent bill approved by the Senate Commerce Committee, an amendment protecting localism had been added to stop the growth of cross- ownership of TV stations and newspapers in single cities. But that amendment won't fly; as the Commerce chairman, John McCain, told me, "The fix is in on cross-ownership." Media General and The New York Times Company are becoming more influential nationally, and The Tribune Company dominates news coverage in Chicago, Los Angeles, Baltimore and Long Island. I scorn all polls except those that support my views. According to this week's Pew Research poll about the FCC plan (to break the ownership barrier and permit media crossover), "By roughly 10 to one (70 percent to 6 percent), those who have heard a lot about the rules change say its impact will be negative." Nearly half of those polled had heard about this issue, despite conflicted media coverage. This growing grass-roots grumbling against giantism is getting through to legislators ordinarily cowed by network-owned station managers or wowed by big-media campaign contributions. Unfortunately, the any- merger-goes FCC chairman, Michael Powell, has derided objections to his diktat as "garbage," and the White House strategist Karl Rove dismisses the depth of voter resentment that Democrats will be able to exploit next year. Catch the way the liberal Representative David Obey of Wisconsin, who put forward the Appropriations measure that passed yesterday, reaches out to social conservatives. He complained about the way prime-time network programming forced local affiliates to air film of Victoria's Secret models in their less-than-full regalia, a sight he does not consider suitable for his 7-year-old. Obey & Co. is stealing traditionalist Republican clothes, scanties and all, and many GOP candidates don't want to offend a core constituency. Eco-cons as well as libertarians may snicker, but Republican Rep. Richard Burr of North Carolina observed that 26 independent NBC affiliates had recently exercised their right to refuse to telecast "Maxim's Hot 100." If independents are gobbled up with the FCC's blessing, more decisions affecting local mores will be made in Rockefeller Center. Is that what George Bush stands for? Yesterday's victory in a House committee was only a skirmish about half the battle, and that only about delaying the funds for the FCC's misbegotten action by a year. Speaker Dennis Hastert could shoot it down in Rules, or block an embarrassing vote on the more comprehensive Burr rollback on the House floor. But public opinion is on the march. Some in-house pollster should awaken President Bush to a bipartisan sleeper issue that could blindside him next year. William Safire is an op-ed columnist for the New York Times (via Richard Cuff / Allentown, PA, swprograms via DXLD) ** UZBEKISTAN. Radio Tashkent International has now its own homepage: http://ino.uzpak.uz (in Uzbek, English, Russian) (Station info via Wolfgang Büschel-D via Bernd Trutenau-LTU, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** VENEZUELA. Como decimos en criollo aquí en Venezuela: - Cualquier persona que diga que determinado funcionario público está actuando en Casos de Corrupción aún presentando las pruebas correspondientes, pués sencillamente caerá en las "Cómodas Masmorras" de las cárceles del país. Incluso humoristas, y caricaturistas, de hoy en adelante no podran hacer alusión a personajes del estado, so pena de ir a la cárcel. Incluso si este servidor se atreve a protestar con un cacerolazo o una pita en plena vía pública, pués también podría ir preso. ¿Qué le parece? "La Robolución y su forma de impartir justicia en mi país es muy democrática" ¿Qué tal? (Jorge García Rangel, Barinas, Venezuela, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** VIRGIN ISLANDS US. Calls Assigned to *96.9 in Charlotte Amalie: WTJC-LP (July FMedia! via DXLD) Despite WTJC, without the -LP, already being assinged to 9370 in NC (gh, DXLD) ** WESTERN SAHARA [non]. Emission de 29-06-2003: L`écoute à été effectué de 0600 à 0630 UTc sur 7460 kHz. ``El Idaha el watania lljoumouria elarabia elsahrawia el watania``. Les émissions commencent par des verses du Kor`an + une émission ``tahiyate Sabah``, ce qui veut dire en arabe `le bonjour du matin` avec une rubrique sur la reine Belkis et une commémoration de la mort du poète arabe Nizar Kabani (Mohamed Kallel, July 17, France?, Tunisia? DX LISTENING DIGEST) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ QSLing ++++++ E-MAIL RECEPTION REPORTS Compiled by Ian Cattermole, Blenheim, NEW ZEALAND DX TIMES JULY 2003 These days I send 95% of all reports by e-mail. While many international broadcasters accept e-mail reports most will verify by conventional snail-mail QSL cards. It is therefore important to include postal address for that reason, and also, I believe a common courtesy to let the station know just who you are and where you live. Some verify by a simple e-mail message and recently there seems to be a trend to what they call e-cards which is a printed QSL card sent electronically. Some of these are quite attractive with many colours while others are simple black and white. Advantages of using e-mail reports are of course, cost saving in postage and instant delivery and ease in referring back to a sent report. They must also be a great time-saver to the recipient, especially those who reply by e-mail. Over recent years I have been indexing e-mail addresses which did not appear in WRTV and PWBR publications. Of course some do now appear in later editions. Here is a list of e-mail addresses from my index. COUNTRY BROADCASTER EMAIL ADDRESS AFGHANISTAN. V. of Afghanistan. afbc2001@hotmail.com Radio Afghanistan. radioafg@yahoo.com ARMENIA. Voice of Armenia. armen@arm.r.am AUSTRALIA. Voice International. Dxer@voice.com.au HCJB. english@hcjb.org.au AUSTRIA. TWR-Europe. eurofreq@twr-europe.at AWR transmissions. letters@awr.org AZERBAIJAN. Azbak Radio. root@aztv.baku.az BANGLADESH. Radio Bangladesh. rrc@aitlbd.net or dgbetar@drik.net BELARUS. Radio Hrodna/Minsk. RadioGrodno@tut.by BELGIUM. TDP (Ludo Maes) tdp@tijd.com RTBF. rtbf@rtbf.be BHUTAN. Radio Bhutan. bbs@bbs.com.bt BOLIVIA. All station with e-mail on: http://www.schoechi.de/as-bol.htm BULGARIA. Radio Bulgaria. rbul@nationalradio.bg CLANDESTINE. World Falun Dafa Radio. editor@falundafaradio.org Chan Choi Moi (CTM) ctm@radioctm.com CONGO. Radio Okapi. schleger@un.org COSTA RICA. RFPI. radiopaz@rasca.co.cr [No: info@rfpi.org --- gh] CROATIA. V. of Croatia. zklasan@hrt.hr or D.Pavlic@hrt.hr CUBA. RHC. radiohc@ip.etecsa.cu DOMINICAN REP. R.Amanecer. adra@codetel.net.do or amanecer@tricom.net ENGLAND. BFBS. marina.haward@bfbs.com Bible Voice BC. mail@biblevoice.org GERMANY. RDW. Adelheid.Lucas@dw-world.de (best address) ITALY. RAI. raiway.hfmonitoring@rai.it IRRS. reports@nexus.org JORDAN. Radio Jordan. Zada@jrtv.gov.jo LIBYA. Voice of Africa (ETC) africavoice@hotmail.com MOLDOVA. Radio Moldova. rmi.engl@mail.md NIGERIA. V. of Nigeria. vonlagos@fiberia.com or dgovon@nigol.net.ng PALAU. T8BZ. bentchan@hotmail.com PNG. R. Independent Mekamui. svoron@hotmail.com PERU. R. San Miguel cococabanillas@hotmail.com SAUDI ARABIA. IRAN [sic]. Sawt-al-Islah (Alislah) info@islah.org SOUTH AFRICA. S.A.R.L. armi@intecom.co.za R. Veritas. veriprod@iafrica.com SWEDEN: IBRA info@ibra.se and eva.skog@ibra.se USA. KVOH. mail@highadvenure.net or kathy@highadventure.net WEWN. gtapley@ewtn.com Radio Free Asia. iwanciwt@rfa.org Remnants Hope Ministry. remnantshope@hotmail.com Radio Africa Int. (UMC) dfrantz@tennessee.com [incorrect! Frantz is at WWRB] Radio Sawa. comments@radiosawa.com WJIE (new address) doc@wjie.org Radio Farda. comment@radiofarda.com Gospel For Asia. (GFA) gfaradio@mygfa.org Pan American Broadcasting. info@panambc.com ZIMBABWE. SW Radio Africa mail@swradioafrica.com Additional sources of e-mail addresses are of course WRTV and PWBR and a very good website is http://www.dxer.de/emailliste Sometimes additional e-mail addresses can be obtained by going to a particular stations` webpage For those seeking addresses for Latin American stations a very good site is Eldorado For LA Dxers found at http://www.members01.chello.se/mwm/eldorado.html (Ian Cattermole, Blenheim, New Zealand, July NZ DX Times, alphabetized by gh for DXLD) Although I personally got out of QSL hunting about 15 years ago, many in the hobby continue to do so. It's bad enough when a small Indonesian station doesn't reply, but it spells impending doom for the collection of QSL cards when the international broadcasters drop the service for budget concerns. From a few contacts that I do have in international broadcasting, they were getting frustrated replying to several QSL requests from the same person for the same program - i.e. trying to verify the same broadcast on each frequency and for each repeater transmitter. Although these individuals, some of whom are ODXA members, did not destroy QSL collecting, they have damaged it severely (Mark Coady, ODXA via DXLD) See also SEYCHELLES [non] PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ The W5YI Report to QRT The W5YI Report, dubbed ``America's Oldest Ham Radio Newsletter,`` has announced that it's ceasing publication with its July 15 issue. Begun some 25 years ago by Fred Maia, W5YI, as a service to the Richardson (Texas) Wireless Club, The W5YI Report evolved into a twice-monthly paid-subscription compilation of ham radio and -- more recently -- electronics industry and Internet-related news printed on distinctive pink paper. Maia, 68, sold his company, W5YI Group, which included The W5YI Report and the W5YI-VEC, to Larry Pollock, NB5X, in 2000. Maia agreed to continue editing the newsletter for another three years, but now he wants to give it up, although he will continue his monthly column in CQ. Current subscriptions to The W5YI Report will be fulfilled with CQ subscriptions starting with the August issue (ARRL July 17 via John Norfolk, DXLD) DRM +++ For all of us who use analogous receivers we have to get used to this new kind of interference (in former days it was East bloc jamming !). But the good news is that these DRM transmitters now have reached a more acceptable bandwidth than during the first tests where it was usual to hear their ``white`` noise 20-30 kHz on each side of the transmitted frequency. I measured the bandwidth of the broadcasts, using the most narrow bandwidth on my receiver, and in most cases the noise disappeared 6 kHz to each side of the transmitted frequency! In two cases it was 7 kHz. But that is not more than the wellknown sideband QRM from adjacent strong analogous transmitters (Anker Petersen, DSWCI DX Window July 16 via DXLD) Please note: You can now find a list of DRM broadcasts compiled and permanently updated by OM Klaus Schneider, Germany, at: http://www.wwdxc.de/drm.htm (WWDXC via DXLD) What about the official DRM version and the Media Network version? DRM UPDATE -- TECHNICAL AND MARKETING One idea about a secondary application of DRM technology is to provide local service on the higher HF bands that don`t see a lot of use---21 and 26 MHz. This could be accomplished using low power transmissions (500 w-1 kw), and would provide a service comparable to FM in quality. Don gave recognition to Mike Adams for his efforts in arranging for test and demonstration of DRM transmissions, and to Herb Jacobsen for his work in developing a DRM capable transmitter exciter. About six types of DRM exciters are ready for marketing (shortwave and mediumwave). Wide mediumwave usage of DRM is necessary if it is to find sufficient support for practical shortwave application. At WRC-2003, around a dozen DRM transmissions at various frequency ranges will be broadcast into the Geneva area. Several of the participating broadcasters have committed to continuing with DRM transmissions after this special demonstration period. Receiver manufacturers expect to have consumer-type DRM-capable receivers available by the end of 2004. These receivers will be capable of working with other modes (eg. AM/FM), and may be customized to the market in which they will be distributed (i.e. models for Europe may differ in some regard for models intended for sub-Saharan Africa). At this point, Don anticipates that making a DRM-capable receiver will increase the cost by about $50.00 above the cost of a comparable receiver without DRM capability. Specifications and standards for implementing DRM technology are worked out, improved, and available. Some DRM features are still being tested relating to channel width, with simulcast (both analogue and digital simultaneously) approaches, and with automatic selection of the best receive frequency (when multiple options are available). Another aspect still under test is the application of DRM technique to single-frequency networks, such as are commonly already used in Europe for public broadcasting (to cover an entire country with a service using one frequency on multiple synchronized transmitters). Don is pushing within the DRM group for the preparation of a ``how to`` manuel for broadcasters. This would explain at a user`shortwave level how best to make application of DRM technology. The DRM signal has much more energy, proportionally, near the edges of the occupied channel than does a double sideband transmission. This raises the possibility for much more adjacent channel interference by a digital transmission as compared to an analogue transmission. Tests and analytic work show that, for an adequate interference protection ratio, a digital signal must be operated at about 7 db less power level than would be appropriate if it were a regular analog AM transmission being used. That this factor was not observed in the past on-the-air tests, and because some DRM test transmitters were not adjusted to comply with the DRM-specified emission ``mash``, resulted in many complaints by listeners of major interference (excessive occupied bandwidth), for some DRM test transmissions (Don Messer, IBB, summary report of presentation at the NASB 2003 Annual Meeting in Aug NASB Newsletter, July 16 via DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-127, July 16, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn FIRST AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1191: Wed 2200 on WBCQ 7415, 17495-CUSB [and 5100-CUSB?] Thu 2030 on WWCR 15825, Sat 1030 on WWCR 5070 Fri 1930, Sat 0130, 0800, 1400, 1730, 2330 ... on RFPI 7445, 15039 Sun 0032 on WINB 12160 WRN ONDEMAND [from Fri]: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA]: [from early UT Thursday] Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1191h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1191.html [from Thu] WORLD OF RADIO ON 7485, 6200: Re DXLD 3-124: The relays of World of Radio on 7485 Sunday mornings UT are being made by Irish pirate Ozone Radio International. They have now moved to 6200 and heard announcing they would be relaying World of Radio 0925 July 13th (Mike Barraclough, Letchworth, UK, July 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ANGOLA. Radio Nacional de Angola, en 4950 kHz, el 15/07, a las 0437 UT, con SINPO 35433. Usualmente ni se escucha por estas latitudes; captación excepcional. Noticiero a las 0500 UT y comentarios sobre una feria internacional que se lleva a cabo en Luanda (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ARUBA. Hola Glenn, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA. La emisora Antillana 1270 kHz (PJ-8), de Aruba, ahora se identifica como "KISS 107.5 MHz" y algunas veces como Radio 1270 AM STEREO. Captada el pasado 12/07, a las 1721 UT. Transmitía soka y música POP. SINPO 33553. Ignoro desde cuándo se llama así (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. CABINET MAY UPHOLD RADIO RULING --- By SIMON TUCK, With a report from Shawn McCarthy, Wednesday, July 16, 2003 - Page A7 OTTAWA -- The federal cabinet is expected to announce today that it has upheld an earlier decision by its broadcast regulator to grant a licence for a radio station to a Toronto company that says it has been unfairly linked to terrorists. Ottawa will say that it found no evidence that a numbered company behind a bid for a new ethnic radio station in Toronto is affiliated with the World Tamil Movement, government sources say. The WTM is believed to be a key fundraiser for the Tamil Tigers, a rebel group that has been fighting a bloody civil war in Sri Lanka for more than three decades. The new station is to be launched this fall over the FM band at 101.3, a rare licence opportunity in the area. S. Sivakkumaran, chief operating officer of Canadian Multicultural Radio, the group behind the radio station, denied any connection between his company and any terrorist groups. He said members of the Sinhalese-Canadian community and Tamil groups that had also wanted the radio station licence started the rumours. "It's a whole big smear campaign." The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, the federal broadcast regulator, approved the licence application in April despite the objections of some Sri Lankan Canadians. After its initial ruling, the government received 47 petitions asking for a reversal. The federal cabinet, which has come under some pressure in recent months to outlaw the Tigers, discussed the matter earlier this month and has until midnight tonight to rule on the matter (Globe & Mail July 16 via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) The original CRTC decision approving this station may be found on their website: Search for Broadcast Decision 2003-115. 73- (Bill Westenhaver, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CHINA [non]. CHINA RADIO INTERNATIONAL EXPANDS MW/SW BROADCASTS TO EASTERN EUROPE China Radio International will soon increase its medium wave broadcasting to Europe though WRN Transmission. Starting from 15th July WRN will provide high power medium wave transmitters in Eastern Europe for broadcasts to former Yugoslavia in Serbian, to Romania and Moldova in Romanian and to South West Russia and Ukraine in Russian. The broadcast in Russian will be a new 2-hour programme on news, current affairs and features about China. Times and frequencies are: Romanian: 1700-1730 UT (2000-2030 Bucharest local time) on 1548 kHz Serbian: 1730-1800 UT (1930-2000 Belgrade local time) on 1548 kHz Russian: 1430-1630 UT (1830-2030 in Western Russia, 1730-2030 in Ukraine) on 1467 kHz AM This extension to the east follows on from the highly successful use of a facility in Luxembourg on 1440 kHz (208 metres), which has greatly increased CRI's audience for its English, French and German programmes in Europe. Medium Wave broadcasts has been used in Europe because there are far more radios with the AM band than SW. Kind regards (Tim Ayris, Broadcast Sales Manager, World Radio Network, July 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Let`s see --- 1548 would be Moldova 1000 kW; and 1467 Moldova 500 kW, right? What about the expanded SW referred to in the headline? (gh, DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. La Voz de tu Conciencia: Here is part of a recent mail from Russell M. Stendal: 6010 has been silent for a while, and Stendal is out at Lomalinda right now to fix the transmitter. 5910 will soon be ready with programs for listeners abroad, partly in English (Henrik Klemetz, July 3 via Dxplorer via DSWCIDX Window via Cumbre DX via DXLD) We just got back after putting 6010 on the air. One of our engineers made an impedance bridge that allowed us to fine tune the antenna so that it now resonates exactly on our frequency (it ended up about 50 cm longer than what we had calculated according to theory). Here in Colombia the performance improved noticeably (it will be interesting to see if there is any improvement internationally). We also made some adjustments to the height (now at 11 meters) and to the angle (the delta is pointing due north with the orientation of the dipole exactly east-west) and to the overall impedance (now at 550 ohms). The power is at 4200 watts and as soon as we install a new voltage regulator we may be able to up the power by a thousand watts or so (we are licenced for 5000 watts and I believe the specs say plus or minus ten percent). (via Klemetz Jul 5 via Dxplorer via DSWCI DX Window via Cumbre DX via DXLD) "Alcaraván Radio se ha movido a la frecuencia de 6009.96 kHz". Así escribí en mi mail anterior. Era en la mañana, en la noche la misma fecha de nuevo estuvo en 6009.78 kHz. Hoy, hace una hora aproximadamente la encontré en 6009.98 kHz, exactamente en la misma frecuencia como Parinacota. Solamente he notado HCJB a veces y muy temprano en la mañana con "bajo alemán" en 6010.00 kHz (Björn Malm, Ecuador, July 15, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** CONGO. Buena señal de Radio Congo, Brazzaville, en los 5985 kHz, a partir de las 2030 UT aproximadamente (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CONGO DR. 7435.0, RTNC, Lubumbashi, 1755-1810 (fade out), Jul 13, Vernacular talk, Congolese instrumental music and pop song by choir. Best before 1800 when Voice of Russia signed on with German on 7440. Until then: 13232 (Anker Petersen, Denmark, DSWCI DX Window via Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** COSTA RICA. 6105, Universidad de Costa Rica, San José, good signal, well understood. Heard in Honduras (Cerveglieri, DSWCI DX Window via Cumbre DX via DXLD) Reactivated! (DSWCI Ed., ibid.) ** CUBA. Heard Radio Rebelde with ID and Mesa Redonda Informativa on July 14, 1149-1215 on 9600 and also 11655. I haven't found the 11655 listed anywhere (Silvain Domen, temporarly on hoilday in Camden, NC- USA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) We`ve had several reports of it in DXLD ** CUBA. Jamming US satellite broadcasts to IRAN: q.v. ** DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. Desde Santo Domingo, SUPER Q FM (100.9 MHz), captada el 15/07, a las 0326 UT, en los 4959.86 kHz. Emitía un tema de Sérgio Mendes (remix) y la canción de Avril Lavigne "Complicated". SINPO 45533 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ECUADOR. A recent report doing the rounds in the international DX news outlets indicated that R. Oriental in Tena, Napo was currently off the air. However, I noted it in operation on July 13 and then again tonight (July 16), at around 1000 on both occasions. Fair level on 4871.4 (Rob Wagner (VK3BVW), Australia, EDXP via DXLD) ** GERMANY. Deutschlandfunk Longwave Donebach 153 kHz is cut off daily (weekdays Mon-Sat) approximately 0610-1900 UT due of the ANNUAL maintenance by TELEKOM T-systems. This lasts weekdays till July 28th, 2003. Sehr geehrter Herr Bueschel, Ihre Vermutung stimmt, der Sender wird durch die Telekom gewartet, und ist deshalb bis zum 28.07. immer von 08:10 Uhr bis 21:00 Uhr ausser Betrieb. Das sind Richtzeiten. Wir bedanken uns für Ihr Verständnis. Mit freundlichen Grüßen Bernd Förster DeutschlandRadio Sendernetzbetrieb Tel.: +49 30 8503 8112/8113 Fax.: +49 30 8503 8119 e-mail: bernd.foerster@dradio.de (via Wolfgang Bueschel, Germany, July 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HONDURAS. Re unID 2859.98: Mark, Big signal here this evening, spoiled by incessant QRN. Lots and lots of "R Cultura" IDs, but nothing else I can parse out to ID further. My latest WRTH is 99 - nothing likely in there. 73 (Jay Novello, NC, via Krueger, DXLD) Logged here GMT 0155-0259* 16 July. No solid info for you yet --- but I can tell you it's definitely Honduran. Frequent female canned "Cultura, Cultura, Radio Cultura" slogans, live M DJ with a couple of clear mentions of Honduras. At 0252, "Radio Cultura... potencia en vatios" and at 0258, closing ID by M mentioning "HR(-- H?)... la voz... muy buenas noches." Then off without anthem at 0259. Nothing in the 2003 WRTVH that matches, though of course several 1430 kHz entries. Lots of over-Florida and post Gulf hurricane QRN to mess things up, though the signal was quite strong and on 2859.98 here as well. Format mostly SP dance/"urban"-type (whatever that sound is called -- really noticed a proliferation of that on most XE FM'ers during E-skip a few days ago; not much of the old norteñas/tejano/ranchera stuff of past left, it seems). (Terry Krueger, Clearwater FL, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDIA. WHY NO NEWS IS BAD NEWS The Economic Times (India) Wednesday, July 16, 2003| DEVLIN ROY TIMES NEWS NETWORK [WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2003 02:27:29 AM] NEW DELHI: The morning papers are full of news, the internet streams news from all over the world, TV carries news live, even mobile phone SMSs carry news. But there's no news on India's new private FM radio channels. Why? Because when the government decided to open FM radio to private entry three years ago, it barred private FM broadcasters from broadcasting news and current affairs. This return to the command and control mindset of the 1970s lets state-owned radio broadcast news but excludes private channels from this activity. The government has no FM policy: instead, there are agreements between the government and FM broadcasters. These are governed by the archaic Indian Telegraph Act of 1885 and Wireless Telegraphy Act of 1933. Clause VII of the main agreement states that the license is for free-to-air broadcasts of audio, excluding news, current affairs and any other services under jurisdiction of the department of telecommunications (DoT). Meanwhile, schedule A of the agreement has a different spin, defining 'broadcast channel' as FM radio stations and their services as 'provided by the licensee, including entertainment, education and information dissemination...excluding news and current affairs.' But what's the difference between news and information? Dictionaries say that news is 'information about important or interesting recent events or newly received or noteworthy information.' Information is defined as 'items of knowledge or news'. Are government rules, which allow FM to air information, but not news, all about semantic quibbling? Can news be broadcast as long as it's called 'information'? Worse, Article VI of the agreement says that licensees shall emphasise programming to promote national integration, religious harmony, scientific temper and Indian culture. If a scientific programme about India's projected moon mission is broadcast, will the law be broken? Radio reaches more people cheaper than newspapers, the internet or TV programming. Given that, blanking news and current affairs from radio makes no sense. Radio programming becomes a featureless hotchpotch of bhangra and film music. Ironically, while Indian-owned channels can't broadcast news, dozens of overseas radio and TV channels, including BBC, Voice of America, CNN, Fox News and even PTV are free to broadcast to Indian homes. These restrictions have also strengthened the monopoly powers of state-owned AIR, which operates FM, MW and SW frequencies through 333 transmitters, dishing out popular music, news and other content to nearly 99% of the population. In a 1995 judgement, the Supreme Court, alarmed at the government's grip on broadcasting, said that airwaves were public property to be used to promote public good and expressing a plurality of views, opinions and ideas. In practice, organisations that are considered mature enough to provide news through print and TV, are barred from doing the same over radio. No other democratic country has similar curbs. None of America's 14,000-plus radio stations, 2,000-odd stations in Spain or the 1,000-plus each in Italy, France, Greece and Australia are barred from airing news and cultural affairs. In fact, many stations are solely news channels, including specialised ones for community radio. Remember, even tiny Sri Lanka has about 20 radio stations. In Nepal, Radio Sagarmatha, run by a body of environmental journalists, broadcasts 10 news and sports bulletins, two news magazines, a current affairs' morning show, editorials, Newari language programs and 75 minutes of BBC Nepali service every day. There are regular programs on good governance, gender issues, environment and other public matters, folk music, weekly live classical recitals, contemporary music and regular programs on the visual and oral arts. Even in Pakistan, which has recently issued FM licences to 60-odd private players, the government has said that there will eventually be no control over airing of any sort of content over private TV or radio stations, music or news. Given these global trends, should India lift senseless curbs on FM news? Or should it continue with curbs on the freedom of speech and expression, eroding the foundations of our democracy? (via Kim Elliott, DXLD) ** INDONESIA. WILL THE REAL VOICE OF INDONESIA PLEASE STEP FORWARD If you've ever tried to find some information on the Voice of Indonesia, you've probably, like me, ended up with lots of links to the Indonesian language http://www.rrionline.com website. Following an e-mail from the Voice of Indonesia's English service, however, it turns out that their official site can be found at: http://www.rri-online.com (note the subtle difference) which has news from Indonesia and information about VOI in English, French, German, Chinese and Indonesian. Curiously, if you search for this site in Google it doesn't come up at all, and everyone seems to link to the Indonesian only site. One for the bookmarks! (Daniel Atkinson, England, July 16, swprograms via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. AS SATELLITE ORDERS SLUMP, LORAL AND BOEING FACE TROUBLES --- July 16, 2003 By BARNABY J. FEDER Weakened by a long slump in new orders, two large companies that manufacture satellites, Loral Space and Communications and Boeing, released bitter financial news... [registration required] http://www.nytimes.com/2003/07/16/technology/16BIRD.html?ex=1059355716&ei=1&en=316b95abd10860b3 (via Jim Moats, DXLD) ** IRAN. BBG CONDEMNS CUBA'S JAMMING OF SATELLITE TV BROADCASTS TO IRAN Washington, D.C., July 15, 2003 - The Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) today condemned Cuba's jamming of U.S. international broadcasts to Iran, calling the action a "deliberate and malicious" effort to block Iranian audiences from gaining access to truthful news and information. The BBG, the federal agency which oversees all U.S. non-military international broadcasting, also urged providers such as Intelsat and Eutelsat to stop giving service to countries that have jammed satellite transmissions to Iran, where pro-democracy advocates have staged repeated demonstrations against the ruling Islamic government. "The BBG calls upon the international community to censure the states that have caused the interference," the nine-member board said in a unanimous resolution. "The BBG strongly condemns the deliberate and malicious interference with its legitimate efforts to impart truthful, objective, and balanced news to its Iranian audience." "Cuba's jamming of satellite transmissions is illegal and interferes with the free and open flow of international communications," said Kenneth Y. Tomlinson, the BBG's chairman. "This action is illegal, represents a major threat to satellite communication and must be stopped." The jamming was first detected on July 6, the day the BBG's Voice of America (VOA) launched a daily, 30-minute, Persian-language television news and analysis program, News and Views, aimed at providing information to the millions of people who have access to satellite TV in Iran. The program, broadcast from 9:30 p.m.-10:00 p.m. in Iran, features original, in-depth news reporting from Iran, world news round-ups, analyses of issues and events and special interest and cultural features. Two other weekly VOA Persian-language television programs, Next Chapter and Roundtable with You, are also jammed. The BBG said service providers have said the source of jamming is located near Havana, Cuba, which is about 90 miles from the coast of the United States. The resolution urged the State Department and the Federal Communications Commission to "lodge an appropriate formal protest against the government of Cuba for this unwarranted and wrongful interference." (BBG press release July 15 via DXLD) Plus: RESOLUTION ON THE JAMMING OF SATELLITE BROADCASTS TO IRAN Whereas: http://www.bbg.gov/_bbg_news.cfm?articleID=86&mode=general (BBG press release July 15 via DXLD) ** IRAQ. STATE-RUN INTERNET SITE RESURFACES WITH NEW CONTENT, DESIGN The internet site of the Iraqi State Company for Internet Services at http://www.uruklink.net/ is back on the web with a new design and content. It provides links to eight Iraqi newspapers, publications and news sites, including links to: - Al-Zaman, an independent newspaper run by Sa'd al-Bazzaz that prints in London, Baghdad and other locations, at http://www.azzaman.com/ - Nida al-Rafidayn - newspaper of the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq - at http://www.nidaa-arrafidain.com/ - Al-Naba, a Shi'i news network associated with Ayatollah Sadiq al- Husayni al-Shirazi, at http://www.annabaa.org/index.htm - Al-Majrashah, an Iraqi satirical newspaper issued by a number of volunteer journalists abroad, at http://muntada.net/maj/index.html - Al-Nahrayn Encyclopedia, an extensive Iraqi news site and portal, at http://www.nahrain.com/ - The Iraqi Home, an Iraqi bimonthly (once every two months) newspaper issued by the Iraqi community in the Netherlands, at http://iraqhome.8k.com/ - Iraq Today, an internet news page that focuses on Iraqi affairs and developments, at http://iraqtoday.net/ - Iraq For All Network, a news network, at http://www.iraq4allnews.dk/ The site also provides active links to the BBC Arabic Service, Radio Sawa and Radio Monte Carlo. It also provides links to two web-based e-mail services - one for inside Iraq at webmail.uruklink.net:8383; and one for outside Iraq at mail.uruklink.net:8383 The site features a "news" section, which appears to be under construction. The following copyright information is observed: State Company for Internet Services (Iraq) SCIS 2003 Prior to the fall of Saddam Husayn's regime, the site http://www.uruklink.net hosted all official Iraqi daily and weekly newspapers, all Iraqi government web sites and several sites for Iraqi universities and organizations. The site disappeared from the Internet just before the fall of Saddam Husayn's regime on 9 April. Source: BBC Monitoring research 15 Jul 03 (via DXLD) ** IRELAND. RTE Radio 1 is again broadcasting on LW 252 kHz. I noticed transmissions started at 9 am (0800 UT) today (Tuesday). Yesterday RTE was on all afternoon from approx 1300-1615 UT. The audio on 252 is very good - it sounds much better than BBC R4 which is noticeably muffled on LW compared to the RTE transmissions (Dave Kenny, July 16, BDXC-UK via DXLD) ** ISRAEL. ISRAEL SAYS BBC TV CAN RESUME "BALANCED, FACTUAL" REPORTING Israeli Government Press Office director Daniel Seaman has said the BBC can resume its reporting in Israel if it observes neutrality. He said the corporation was biased against Israel and he accused it of favouring the Palestinian version of events. He said instead of fair criticism, the BBC "crossed the line into vilification and demonization of the State of Israel". The following is the text of a commentary by Seaman in English published by Israeli newspaper The Jerusalem Post web site on 15 July: Media reaction to Israel's decision to re-evaluate its relationship with the BBC has tended to ignore the reasons why it was taken. While the decision's merits can be argued, any evaluation of Israel's grievances should be based on whether the BBC adheres to universal standards of journalistic ethics. In short: Does BBC coverage of Israel meet the tests of integrity, impartiality, honesty and accuracy? Recycling malicious falsehoods that have been documented and independently disproved is a clear measure of lack of integrity. Months after a UN investigation concluded there was no evidence of a massacre in Jenin, BBC anchors and the BBC web site still implied doubt as to what really happened. In a recent programme allegations were again raised about Israel's use of a "mysterious" gas in Gaza, ignoring the fact that medical experts refuted this hoax over two years ago. Adopting the narrative and terminology of one of the sides to a conflict is not impartiality. The BBC goes out of its way to state that the Temple Mount is called "Haram al-Sharif" by the Arabs, implying an Arab claim to the site. This in itself is not a problem - except that the same consideration is not extended to Israel. The West Bank is never "known by the Jews as Judaea and Samaria". The BBC goes so far as to accommodate the Hezbollah terror organization when it describes the UN-recognized Israeli border with Lebanon as "disputed." Similarly, Israeli settlements are "illegal" and the territories "occupied" rather than disputed. Undermining the credibility of sources by implying doubt, by questioning and conditioning is disingenuous, especially when it is applied to only one side of an issue. Israeli sources reported by the BBC almost always "allege," while Palestinians "report." When hard evidence is presented by Israel, such as the photo of an infant Palestinian dressed as a homicide bomber, its authenticity is questioned. Yet Palestinians levelling the most ludicrous of accusations against Israel are quoted verbatim. Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon is often assigned a militant adjective such as "extreme right-wing" or "former general," something that is almost never done when describing a Palestinian leader. Those working in television are keenly aware that how something is said or what is shown can be much more important in creating and solidifying an image than actual content. In this respect the Israeli position repeatedly suffers in the BBC's treatment of regional stories, a fact readily demonstrated by any objective analysis of its videotape archives. The use of camera angles, hidden cameras, cinematographic techniques of insinuation and innuendo, intonation - even rhetorical questions - can create a sinister, even diabolical image of an interviewee, cast doubt on his point of view and raise unofficial concern about his character and intention. Beyond that, Israel's position has repeatedly suffered through the focus on only those points that support a particular view. Contrary information is omitted in a manner that can only be regarded as knowing and deliberate. Such treatment of highly complex Middle East issues does not represent "legitimate criticism." It is not an objective attempt to expose the truth, but defamation aimed at creating prejudice. This kind of reporting does not require an official Israeli response; it demands a legal defence. To discuss or debate such baseless accusations only lends them credibility. In the past, defamation of Israel was neatly packaged in the claim of holding Israel to a "higher standard." Such pretense has now evolved into "creative journalism," in which all means are justified in order to depict Israel as a sinister society, one whose arrogance and total disregard for international law is the real menace to world peace and stability. Thus the BBC can draw a moral equivalence between the premeditated murder of innocent men, women and children in Israel by Palestinians and their supporters and Israel's justifiable actions of self-defence. Criticizing Israel's policies is the BBC's prerogative. However, an accumulation of grievances over a number of years leads us to believe that the BBC has crossed the line from valid criticism into vilification and demonization of the State of Israel, to such an extent as borders on delegitimization of the nation itself. A direct cause of incitement, such treatment reinforces acts of anti-Semitism and violence against Israelis and Jews worldwide. The BBC can continue to operate freely in Israel. Israel is an open democracy embracing freedom of the press. But only at such time that the corporation acknowledges its responsibility to provide its viewers and listeners with an honest, balanced and factual account of events in the Middle East will the government of Israel restore cordial cooperation. Source: The Jerusalem Post web site, in English 15 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** KOREA SOUTH. PLANS FOR WEEKLY PRESIDENTIAL RADIO ADDRESS DROPPED | Text of report in English by South Korean news agency Yonhap President Roh Moo-hyun has shelved his plan to make a weekly radio address beginning this week because of differences with a broadcaster over how to handle the programme, a presidential press secretary said Wednesday [16 July]. Acting on a request from the presidential office of Chongwadae [Blue House - presidential offices], state KBS Radio 1 had scheduled to air the president's pre-recorded speech for about five minutes between 0700 and 0800 every Friday. "The president has pushed for the radio address as a way of personally explaining public issues to the people, but provisionally cancelled the plan due to a difference of opinion with the broadcasting station", said Lee Hae-sung, the chief presidential spokesman. "KBS radio producers seemed to view the radio address as part of their news programmes, in which the president simply appears as a guest", Lee said. The KBS radio producers wanted to discuss the subject of Roh's speech every time before it is delivered, while the president simply wanted to borrow the media as a way of delivering his speech, he added. The spokesman hinted, however, that Roh may change his decision, saying that there is still "much room" for negotiations. Source: Yonhap news agency, Seoul, in English 0813 gmt 16 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** LIBERIA. See UGANDA ** MADAGASCAR. Otra cosa increíble --- Radio Madagasikara (¡al fin la capto luego de 17 años!) en la frecuencia de 5010 kHz, a las 0412 UT. Locutor y temas musicales autóctonos de la isla. Muy interferida por la ahora sobremodulada YVTO, 5000 kHz. SINPO 22432. Desvanecimiento contínuamente acentuado, hasta desaparecer a las 0432 UT (15/07). 73's y buen DX (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO [non]. FCC rules signal confusion for cross-border broadcasting Clear Channel's stations in Mexico may cross the line By Rachel Laing UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER July 15, 2003 http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/business/20030715-9999_1b15radio.html Clear Channel Communications' grip on the San Diego radio market could be loosened by the Federal Communications Commission's recent media- ownership rule changes. The San Antonio-based radio conglomerate, which owns or operates 11 local stations, might be forced to sell or end leasing agreements with at least four stations under the new FCC rules. The changes to the FCC rules affecting San Diego concern Mexican radio stations that Clear Channel operates. Before the rule changes the FCC approved early last month, stations broadcasting from Baja California did not count in the U.S. ownership limits. Those limits allow a single company to own or operate up to eight radio stations in a market, with no more than five stations per band. While Clear Channel owns only seven U.S. stations that broadcast in San Diego – five FM and two AM – it was able to increase its presence in the market legally through operating agreements with four Mexican FM stations that broadcast out of Tijuana but whose operations are in Clear Channel's Kearny Mesa complex. The arrangement has given Clear Channel an estimated 45 percent share of the San Diego market, which is about three times the share held by Jefferson Pilot Communications, Clear Channel's closest rival here. With the new rules not taking effect for two years, Clear Channel lobbyist and spokesman Andy Levin said it's too soon to tell what action the company will take to comply. "There are several options to get to the right number," Levin said. "You can terminate contracts with Mexican stations or sell our owned stations. That's a decision to be made." Darrel Goodin, general manager of Jefferson Pilot in San Diego, said the company had filed a grievance with the FCC a year ago, asking the agency to close the loophole that allowed Clear Channel such a dominant position in the local market. Goodin said that while Clear Channel is not in violation of the letter of the law, exemption of foreign-owned stations from the ownership limits allowed the company to skirt the "intent and spirit" of the law. "They have nine FM signals, and that enables them to control the competitive environment" in precisely the way regulations had been drawn up to prevent, Goodin said. According to Goodin, controlling five FM stations in a market forces a company to focus on finding the profitable niche for each station, which serves the marketplace by offering variety. But he asserted that with nine stations, Clear Channel has the luxury to wield its influence for the express goal of stifling competition. Goodin contended that after leasing Mexican station XHCR, which had a classic country and oldies format, it immediately changed the format to mimic the contemporary country format of Jefferson Pilot's KSON. This was not an effort to compete head to head with KSON, Goodin said, but rather an effort to gain just enough of KSON's audience to knock the established country station out of the top five FM stations so that another Clear Channel station could take its place. Advertising buyers who purchase air time are often under directives to buy spots in the top five stations for a particular age group or other demographic. But Mike Glickenhaus, who manages the local cluster of stations for Clear Channel, said Goodin's assertions were nonsense. "It is totally absurd that any company would take a multimillion- dollar radio property just to screw around with another company," Glickenhaus said. "That would not be a good business decision by any measure." Glickenhaus said it's not worth speculating at this point on how Clear Channel will comply with the new regulations because it's still unclear precisely how the company would be in violation. That's because the new rules change how markets are defined, and that may lead to some haggling over how far over the limit the company is in San Diego. The current rules define market boundaries by the intersection of signals in an area, whereas the new rules define a market based on geographical regions drawn by the Arbitron radio ratings service. Foreign stations that are considered to be part of a particular market by the media research firm BIA will no longer be exempted from ownership rules as they currently are. In most markets, holdings that exceed the limit under the new market definitions will be grandfathered in. But foreign-owned stations won't be. Glickenhaus said some stations could be difficult to define. For instance, he said, the company's XTRA AM sports news station is Mexican-owned and broadcasts from Tijuana, but all its sales operations, programming and most of its listeners are in Los Angeles. The company considers it a Los Angeles station. But it still has a listener base in San Diego, he said, which means it could possibly be counted as a San Diego station. "There are going to be a number of situations that don't fit the mold," he said. "It's a little too early to tell where this will go." (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. While this is somewhat a work in progress, most of Radio Netherlands' programming can now be enjoyed on-demand, with the latest edition of each feature program now available -- no longer do you need to figure out which archived English broadcast contains the program you're looking for. Not all programs are available yet -- Newslink was one program absent when I just checked -- but the basic framework is in place. I've already sent Andy Sennit and Pepijn Kalis some organizational ideas -- e.g. making sure the existing individual program web pages link to the most recent audio -- but it's great to have RNW join the ranks of the on-demand world! http://www.rnw.nl/distrib/realaudio/html/english.html (Richard Cuff / Allentown, PA USA, swprograms via DXLD) ** NIGERIA. Radio Kaduna, 4770 kHz, fuera del aire a las 2247 UT. Parece que no hay señal desde hace horas (12/07). (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 4770, R. Nigeria, Kaduna, 0532-0545, 16/07, English. Continuous pop ballads by YL, ID over music, "This is the English service of Radio Nigeria, Kaduna", followed by an unintelligible announcement. I think this is signing on at 0530 instead of usual 0430 as I have not logged this at 0430 in over a week; can anyone else verify this? I will check tonite (Scott R. Barbour Jr., NH, Sangean ATS 818, RF Systems MLB-1, RS longwire w/ RBA balun, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** OKLAHOMA. On July 14 I received a verification letter for an E-skip reception of KOTV, channel 6, Tulsa OK on May 30, 6:22 AM CDT. The letter was sent by Gerald Weaver, Asst Director of Engineering. Nothing unusual about that. But, in addition, he also sent me a video tape of a segment of the 6 o'clock news in which the local news anchors try to stump the weather guy about the "E Layer", and quote extensively from my QSL letter. Over his head with the subject, confusing ducting with skip, the weather guy finally refers to me as the Einstein who can explain it. They put my screen shot photo on camera showing their morning sports guy. They were quite amused by my old TV set which has knobs and dials, and suggest that in addition to the verification, the station should also send me a new TV. The female anchor says that my reception of the station is better than hers down the street from the station. My TV, by the way, is an old GE B&W model, vintage unknown. Perhaps this is a first, an on-air TV verification? Scott, too bad I didn't have this in time for the WTFDA convention! (Jim Renfrew, Byron NY, July 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. Oriente 99.5 MHz, escuchada en los 6190 kHz, el pasado 12/07, a las 2219 UT. SINPO 33532 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. Radio San Antonio (desconozco el QTH), transmitía boleros y anulaba totalmente a Radio Amazonas de Venezuela, en 4939.97 kHz, a las 2345 UT, el 12/07 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** RUSSIA. Russian International Radio --- Here is their current MW schedule: 1143 kHz via Kaliningrad/Bolshakovo 1200-1700, 1800-2100 1215 kHz via Kaliningrad/Bolshakovo 1900-2100 1386 kHz via Kaliningrad/Bolshakovo 1200-1500, 1900-2100 1494 kHz via St.Petersburg/Popovka 1500-1700; 2000-2100 (from August 10) (Mikhail Timofeyev, Russia, hard-core-dx via DXLD) see TANNU TUVA ** SAO TOME. MILITARY COUP IN SÃO TOMÉ Diplomats seek talks with army officers after they seize power in the West African state of São Tomé and Príncipe. http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/2/hi/africa/3070355.stm [illlustrated] Efforts are under way to hold talks with the leaders of the coup which toppled the government of the West African island state of Sao Tome and Principe on Wednesday. Rebel army officers in the tiny former Portuguese colony seized the prime minister and other cabinet members in the dawn coup which appears to have been largely bloodless. Gunshots and exploding rockets and grenades were heard around 0300 GMT and sporadic firing continued throughout the morning but there are no indications of casualties. The Portuguese ambassador is due to meet the coup leaders later on Wednesday to discuss their grievances and Sao Tome's foreign minister, speaking from Lisbon, said his government wished to open a dialogue. Portugal is calling for condemnation of the coup by its other ex- colonies and Mozambican President Joaquim Chissano has already appealed for a speedy return to "constitutional order". Sao Tome and Principe, one of the world's poorest states, has offshore oilfields which are due to begin producing within the next four years. Alex Vines from the Royal Institute for International Affairs told BBC World that he suspects that control of the oil money is behind the coup. OIL-FUELLED FUTURE Sao Tome has one of the world's highest foreign debts Oil production expected to start in 2006-7 The auctioning of oil permits in 2004 is due to net $100 million Sao Tome will receive 40% and Nigeria 60% of eventual oil revenue Last year, the United States was considering increasing military co- operation with the Sao Tome Government amid reports that the US was trying to buy more West African oil. The rebels appear to have exploited the absence of President Fradique de Menezes who is reported to be on a private visit to Nigeria. The rebels took control of government buildings, state TV and radio, the central bank and the airport. Their leader, named by the Portuguese news agency Lusa as Major Fernando "Cobo" Pereira, made a speech on national radio ordering all members of the government and parliament to report to police stations. 'People on streets' Political analyst Antonio Agiar in Sao Tome told the BBC's Network Africa programme that the capital was pretty calm by around 0700 GMT and the sound of shooting had stopped. "There are people on the streets but less than usual," he said. The Portuguese ambassador in Sao Tome, Mario de Jesus Santos, said there had been only sporadic shooting and that he was unaware of any "physical confrontations". Mr Santos was due to begin talks with the coup-leaders around midday, Portuguese Foreign Minister Antonio Martins da Cruz said in Lisbon. His Sao Tome counterpart, Mateus Meira Rita, said his government also wanted to engage in talks aimed at the "immediate restoration of constitutional order". Mr Meira Rita said the coup had been led by a unit of soldiers who had received training in South Africa. 'Violation' The Portuguese news agency Lusa reports that Lisbon is set to urge condemnation of the coup at a meeting of the Community of Portuguese- Speaking Countries (CPLP). A Portuguese "official source" told the agency that an emergency meeting of the CPLP had been convened to discuss the "unacceptable violation of a democratic regime". Along with Prime Minister Maria das Neves, National Assembly President Dionisio Dias, Defence Minister Fernando Daqua and Natural Resources Minister Rafael Branco were also seized. Mr Branco is considered a key member of the government as he handles the oil portfolio. Published: 2003/07/16 12:05:02 GMT © BBC MMIII (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) SAO TOME, São Tomé and Principe - Troops rebelled and detained the prime minister Wednesday in São Tomé and Principe, a tiny island nation off western Africa and one of the world's poorest countries, which has been in turmoil since the recent discovery of oil. Shots were heard before dawn, and Prime Minister Maria das Neves was arrested by renegade soldiers, Portuguese state radio Radiodifusão Portuguesa reported. Other senior government officials, including Oil Minister Rafael Branco, were also detained. Sporadic gunshots could still be heard six hours later in the capital São Tomé, though it was not clear whether the shots were from fighting or were fired into the air as a warning. No injuries were reported. The streets of São Tomé and Principe's capital were mostly empty. Public buildings and shops remained closed. In a brief statement read over state radio Rádio Nacional de São Tomé, Maj. Fernando Pereira - the head of military training and a participant in the rebellion - ordered all government officials and lawmakers to report to police headquarters. Health Minister Claudina Cruz and Justice Minister Justino Veiga, as well as about 30 lawmakers out of the 55 who sit in Parliament, handed themselves over to the mutineers, a police source said on condition of anonymity. President Fradique de Menezes was out of the country, on a private visit to Nigeria. The rebels have not said why they mutinied, nor was it immediately clear who was leading the rebellion. Soldiers in recent months have complained about low pay and poor living conditions. The country's armed forces number about 600 troops. The Portuguese ambassador in São Tomé, Mário de Jesus Santos, was due to meet the leaders of the revolt later Wednesday to discuss their grievances. Army officers rebelled in 1995, forcing the government to step down and hold new elections. They gave up their attempt to take power after the United States and the European Union threatened to cut off vital aid. The rebellious soldiers took control of the presidential palace, the parliament building and the airport. They also seized the central bank and the state radio and television headquarters in the capital of the former Portuguese colony. The Portuguese ambassador said the city was calm. "We are waiting for some clarification from the leaders [of the revolt] as to what they want," he told Portuguese radio. Das Neves was the country's first woman prime minister, appointed in October. Mozambican President Joaquim Chissano, who is also president of the African Union, urged the mutineers to give up their apparent power grab. "We condemn this coup and demand that its perpetrators restore constitutional order," Chissano said, quoted by the Portuguese national news agency Lusa. São Tomé and Principe, off the coast of Gabon, has a population of about 140,000 and is one of the world's poorest countries. But recent discoveries of oil in the waters of the Gulf of Guinea have brought hopes of quick economic advancement. The United States has made diplomatic overtures toward São Tomé and Príncipe hoping it and other countries bordering the Gulf of Guinea can provide a more stable source of oil than the Persian Gulf. But feuding among rival political parties over the oil wealth has caused political instability in recent years. The turmoil has stalled plans to explore the oil reserves. Since Menezes began his term in September 2001, he has fired four prime ministers and dissolved Parliament once. In January, Menezes revoked a decree that called for early elections and the dissolving of Parliament after striking a deal with lawmakers eager to trim his powers. Offshore development had been planned in conjunction with Nigeria. International tenders for development of the oil reserves were recently opened, though the results are not yet known (Fox news via Hans Johnson, Cumbre DX via DXLD) COUP IN SÃO TOMÉ http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/07/16/world/main563537.shtml (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) RADIO IN SAO TOME SAID STILL ON AIR, APPARENTLY "INFILTRATED" BY COUP MAKERS | Text of report by Portuguese TV for Africa on 16 July News just in - which has been confirmed by RTP's [Portuguese TV's] correspondent - is that a coup has been carried out in Sao Tome and Principe. There are soldiers on the streets and leaders have been detained, including the prime minister. The coup took place at 0300 [local time, the same as gmt [sic]] today, at a time when President Fradique de Menezes is out of the country on a private visit to Nigeria. The soldiers - and everything points to the fact that it was the soldiers who carried out this coup - have taken control of the television and the radio, and their broadcasts have been suspended [as heard - see further reporting below]. According to what is known, the situation is still very confusing as it is not known who has really taken over power in the country. On the line I have our correspondent, Ricardo Mota. Good day. Is there any more information about what is happening? [Mota] No. Here in Sao Tome and Principe it is 6.30 in the morning and the information is very scarce. Everything indicates, and as you have just said, that the coup started at three o'clock. Gunshots were heard sporadically throughout the capital city. I have just arrived at the RTP Africa offices and during my journey I saw some soldiers, but there is no panic or open conflict. I can confirm the detention of Prime Minister Maria das Neves, as well as some ministers, namely the infrastructure and natural resources minister, defence minister, as well as the interim president, who is the National Assembly president, Dr Dionisio Dias. The information is scarce in terms of who is carrying out this coup. Everything indicates that the command forces within the armed forces are not involved in this coup, but rather another faction. This is information that I state with some caution as there is no confirmation. No communiqué has been issued by those who carried out the coup. Meanwhile, the people woke up a little shocked by the gunshots that were heard sporadically during the night. To date and according to the scarce information, there is nothing serious taking place. It can be confirmed that the detained government members have been taken to the barracks, which has also been taken over by a faction of the armed forces. [Announcer] The information is scarce because, I'm not sure if you have been able to confirm, but the radio and television have suspended broadcasts. [Mota] In relation to the television this has not happened. At this moment I can say that I am watching RTP International which is broadcast via (?TVS) [presumably state-owned Televisao Sao Tome e Principe] as (?TVS) only starts broadcasting at 1800. Right now I am also watching RTP Africa. Therefore, if the television has been taken over it is still functioning normally. In relation to radio, I heard the radio from 4.30 this morning. I had the perception that the radio has been infiltrated [by the putschists]. Meanwhile, there are people who have said that a warning was issued, asking the people to stay at home and not to take to the streets. The information that we have been receiving comes from people who have gone to work. They say that in certain sections of the city the concentration of troops is more significant, especially close to public buildings and ministries. I saw two jeeps with troops, but this seemed normal. [Presenter] We are certainly going to follow what is happening in relation to this coup as it is still not known who is trying to take over power. Source: RTP Internacional TV, Lisbon, in Portuguese 0630 gmt 16 Jul 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) SAO TOME RADIO NOW SAID TO BE OFF THE AIR FOLLOWING COUP State radio in São Tomé is now off the air, Portugal's RTP Internacional TV reported at 0855 gmt on 16 July as part of its coverage of the overnight coup. (Earlier, an RTP reporter in Sao Tome had said that the radio was still broadcasting.) Source: RTP Internacional TV, Lisbon, in Portuguese 0745 gmt 16 Jul 03 One wonders if there will be any effect on the VOA relay. 73- (Bill Westenhaver, July 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Here`s the current IBB schedule for ``SAO``; of course, if the station is off, some of the same transmissions could be backed up by other sites, such as ASCENSION, BOTSWANA, MOROCCO, etc., without notice or any local IDs, depending on transmitter availability. 15410, for instance is normally taken over by Morocco after 1700, but something was still audible there at 1600. Current Frequency Schedule Report Jul.16,4:40:0,2003.GMT [all VOA] FREQUENCY TIME NET LANG XMTR AZI DAYS 1530 0300 0430 B ENGL SAO A 040 1530 0430 0500 F PORT SAO A 040 1530 0500 0530 F HAUS SAO A 040 1530 0530 0600 F FREN SAO A 040 12345 1530 0600 0630 B ENGL SAO A 040 1530 0630 0700 B ENGL SAO A 040 67 1530 1600 1700 B ENGL SAO A 040 1530 1700 1800 F PORT SAO A 040 1530 1800 1830 F PORT SAO A 040 12345 1530 1830 1900 F FREN SAO A 040 1530 1900 2000 F FREN SAO A 040 1530 2000 2200 B ENGL SAO A 040 1530 2200 2230 B ENGL SAO A 040 12345 4950 1900 2030 B ENGL SAO 05 030 4950 2030 2100 B ENGL SAO 05 030 67 4950 2030 2100 F HAUS SAO 05 030 12345 4960 0400 0430 B ENGL SAO 05 030 4960 0430 0500 B ENGL SAO 05 030 4960 0500 0530 F HAUS SAO 05 030 4960 0530 0600 F FREN SAO 05 030 12345 4960 0600 0630 F FREN SAO 05 030 12345 6045 0500 0530 F HAUS SAO 01 000 6045 0530 0600 F FREN SAO 01 000 12345 6045 0600 0630 F FREN SAO 01 000 12345 6080 0300 0430 B ENGL SAO 04 138 6080 0430 0500 B ENGL SAO 04 138 6080 0500 0630 B ENGL SAO 04 138 6080 0630 0700 B ENGL SAO 04 138 67 6095 0330 0430 F KNKR SAO 02 100 6095 0430 0500 F PORT SAO 02 124 6095 0500 0530 F HAUS SAO 02 020 6095 0530 0600 F FREN SAO 02 020 12345 6095 0600 0630 F FREN SAO 02 020 12345 7290 0300 0430 B ENGL SAO 03 138 7290 0430 0600 B ENGL SAO 03 138 7290 0600 0630 B ENGL SAO 03 020 12345 9710 1500 1530 F HAUS SAO 04 020 9830 1600 1700 B ENGL SAO 01 335 9830 1700 1800 F PORT SAO 01 335 9830 1800 1830 F PORT SAO 01 335 12345 9830 1830 1900 F FREN SAO 01 335 9830 1900 2000 F FREN SAO 01 335 9830 2000 2030 F FREN SAO 01 335 9830 2030 2100 F FREN SAO 01 335 67 9830 2030 2100 F HAUS SAO 01 335 12345 9830 2100 2130 F FREN SAO 01 335 12345 9850 1600 1700 B ENGL SAO 02 138 9850 1700 1800 B ENGL SAO 02 138 9850 1800 2200 B ENGL SAO 02 138 9850 2200 2230 B ENGL SAO 02 138 12345 11975 1700 1730 B1 SHON SAO 04 138 12345 11975 1730 1800 B1 ENGL SAO 04 138 12345 11975 1800 2200 B ENGL SAO 04 100 11975 2200 2230 B ENGL SAO 04 100 12345 11990 1500 1530 F HAUS SAO 03 335 12035 2100 2130 F FREN SAO 03 020 12345 13695 1500 1530 F HAUS SAO 01 000 13725 0330 0430 F KNKR SAO 01 114 13725 0430 0500 F PORT SAO 01 114 15410 1600 1700 B ENGL SAO 04 124 15730 1630 1700 F1 SWAH SAO 03 100 15730 1700 1730 F1 SWAH SAO 03 100 12345 15730 1730 1800 F PORT SAO 03 100 15730 1800 1830 F PORT SAO 03 138 12345 15730 1830 1900 F FREN SAO 03 076 15730 1900 2000 F FREN SAO 03 076 15730 2000 2030 F FREN SAO 03 076 15730 2030 2100 F FREN SAO 03 076 67 15730 2030 2100 F HAUS SAO 03 076 12345 (excerpted by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) Monitoring 15730, the usual VOA sign-on procedure was heard weakly at 1628 July 16, *not* including ``This is the Voice of America transmitter in São Tomé, signing on!`` (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SAUDI ARABIA. SAUDI ARABIA TO UPGRADE DAMMAM BROADCASTING STATION Saudi Minister of Culture and Information, Dr. Fouad bin Abdul-Salam Al-Farsi, signed an 80 million Riyal (US$21.4 million) contract on Tuesday for setting up a new radio transmission station in Dammam to replace the existing one. The project, which is scheduled for completion in 30 months, will broadcast three services on mediumwave and three on FM to cover Dammam city and the surrounding region (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 16 July 2003 via DXLD) ** SRI LANKA. See CANADA ** SWITZERLAND. Dear Mr. Harms, Thank you for your email. swissinfo/ SRI radio programmes will continue until 2005; however we no longer broadcast on shortwave to North America. Some listeners in North America have been able to pick up our programmes directed to South America at 2330 UT via 9885 KHz (Sottens) and 11905 KHz (Montsinéry). You may also want to visit our website http://www.swissinfo.org You'll find our radio programme, text, pictures and videos online. Sincerely, English Department swissinfo/SRI (via Bill Harms, MD, DXLD) Does this mean that SRI will stop broadcasting on SW? (Bill Harms, Elkridge, Maryland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hi Bill, Nice to hear from you. Yes, they are phasing out SW area by area (gh to Bill, via DXLD) That would be a serious mistake if SRI were to give up SW entirely (Harms, ibid.) ** SYRIA. OVERVIEW OF THE MEDIA - JULY 2003 | Text of editorial analysis by BBC Monitoring Media Services on 16 July 2003 Overview The government and Ba'th Party own and control most of Syria's print and broadcast media. The domestic and foreign press are censored for material deemed threatening or embarrassing to the government, and criticism of the president and his family is not permitted. In 2000, after Bashar al-Asad became president following the death of his father Hafiz al-Asad, he authorized the country's first private and non-Ba'th Party newspapers in nearly 40 years. Political discussion groups mushroomed, and media reform appeared to be under way. However, after a brief period of increased press and political freedom, the efforts to consolidate reform stalled - a situation many analysts blamed on Bashar's dependence on his late father's ageing conservative support base. Following a crackdown that began in early 2001, during the following year the government prosecuted and jailed several pro-democracy activists. In the words of the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), "the state-owned papers that had exhibited uncharacteristic panache in their opinion pages in 2000 today reflect the rigid style of previous years, displaying unwavering support for the government. Although the satirical weekly Al-Domari has mocked officials and some government policies, it, like all newly licensed private and party papers, largely avoids criticizing the regime." The passage of a new press law, first announced by Bashar in 2001, dashed all hopes of a media revival. The law imposes a range of restrictions against journalists, including requiring periodicals to obtain licences from the prime minister, who can deny any application not in the "public interest". Publications can be suspended for up to six months for violating content bans, and the prime minister can revoke the licences of repeat offenders. To date, some 15 private newspapers and magazines have been established, and publications from abroad are allowed to circulate. Curbs on the broadcast media are less onerous than on the print sector. Many TV viewers have access to foreign TV broadcasts, usually via satellite. Private, commercial FM radio stations are being licensed, but they cannot broadcast news or political content. Internet access continues to expand, and the country boasts dozens of internet cafes. The government remains Syria's sole internet provider. The press There are three main newspapers: Al-Ba'th (Ba'th Party paper); Al- Thawrah (The Revolution - government daily); and Tishrin (October), as well as the English-language Syria Times. Recent years have seen a modest proliferation of privately-published newspapers and magazines, the first such titles to be openly circulated since the early 1960s. In 2000 and 2001, three new party papers and two private papers were introduced in the country. There were new press laws in 2001. But while they permitted independent publications, they also spelt out the penalties for crossing the political line. New papers Sawt al-Shaab and Al-Wahdawi are pro-government and lack a critical edge, according to the CPJ. An independent, and at times satirical, voice was Al-Domari (The Lamplighter), edited by sacked Al-Thawrah cartoonist Ali Farzat. "Although we are an experiment and in terms of popularity it has been a success, we face many official obstacles. But what we have done is break the barrier of fear," said Farzat. However, Information Ministry rules limited its distribution, and the state advertisers' slice of the profits and pressure to censor some of the content led to the suspension of the paper, reported the World Press Review web site and Paris-based media watchdog Reporters Sans Frontieres. In 2002, the government licensed at least three additional private publications - an insurance magazine, an advertising publication, and a political-cultural magazine called Abyad wa Aswad (Black and White), which is run by the son of the Syrian army chief of staff. Links: Al-Ba'th - http://www.albaath.com Al-Thawra - http://www.thawra.com Tishrin - http://www.teshreen.com Syria Times - http://www.teshreen.com/syriatimes Television Many TV viewers have access to foreign TV broadcasts, usually via satellite. There are no restrictions on the use of satellite receiving equipment. State-run Syrian TV operates domestic channels broadcasting in Arabic, English and French, and a satellite service which offers news bulletins in English, Hebrew and Spanish in addition to Arabic- language programmes. Improvements in the three state TV channels and pan-Arab news and entertainment channels have built ever-greater TV audiences. Links: Syrian Arab television - http://www.rtv.gov.sy Radio Syrian Arab Republic Radio is the state-run broadcaster, which also operates Radio Damascus, the external service, which broadcasts in several languages including English. In 2002 the government set out conditions for licensing private, commercial FM radio stations. But it ruled that the stations could not broadcast news or political content. In May 2003 the government gave initial approval to license four private commercial FM radio stations. Arabic-language programmes from Radio Monte Carlo-Middle East, the Arabic-language French radio station of the Radio France Internationale (RFI) group, have been audible on FM in Damascus since March 2003, when the station set up a relay station in Ajlun in Jordan. In September 2002 a clandestine opposition radio targeted at listeners in Syria was monitored broadcasting material condemning the Syrian government and its human rights record. The station, which identified itself after a few weeks as The Arabic Radio, has a web site with the following URL: http://www.arabicsyradio.org Links: Syrian Arab Republic Radio - http://www.rtv.gov.sy The Arabic Radio - http://www.arabicsyradio.org News agency The Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA) provides general news services in Arabic, English and French. Links: Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA) - http://www.sana.org Internet Internet access continues to expand; the country boasts dozens of internet cafes. In December 2001 some 60,000 people were estimated to be online. An April 2002 forecast said the number of Internet subscribers would grow at an annual rate of 43% between 2001 and 2006. The government is Syria's sole internet provider and blocks content about Israel, sex and Syria's human rights record, as well as sites that allow access to free internet e-mail. However, web surfers appear to have little trouble evading the restrictions by using proxy sites or dialling into internet service providers outside the country. Source: BBC Monitoring research 16 Jul 03 (via DXLD) ** TANNU TUVA. RUSSIA. Effective 1 July, transmitter in Kyzyl, Tuva (6100 kHz) is on the air with Mayak audio, instead of relaying Radio Rossii. According to my S meter, they increased the power to approximately 10...15 kW. Now frequency is steadily audible in Novosibirsk during the daytime. Broadcasting time must be 2200-1400. (open_dx - Igor Yaremenko, Novosibirsk, Russia, via Signal July 16 via DXLD) ** UGANDA [and non]. Dear Partners, In our previous newsletters we have told you of our work in Monrovia, Liberia. We wanted to establish a beachhead there so that we could once again blast the Word of God back into the Middle East. However, Doc Burkhart, our shortwave manager here in Louisville, Kentucky, telephoned me and asked that we urgently pray for our staff and friends in Liberia. Terrorist activities and threats of war had caused an evacuation of all Americans in Liberia. This information quickly brought back a flood of memories of all the heartache and difficulties High Adventure had suffered only three years before in May of 2000. At that time, Isaac Gronberg had telephoned me to say that former Prime Minister Ehud Barak was pulling the Israeli Army off the South Lebanon/Israel border. The High Adventure Lebanese staff had to run for their lives. Our American Engineering staff hurriedly moved our equipment to the safety of Israel. Suddenly, the ferocious terrorists took over the area where we had been for thirty years. Now, once again, we had anticipated a secure, safe location in Liberia but heard the all too familiar terrorist activity and threat of war. Doc and I continued with our conversation. I reminded him that we had not been comfortable for several months with the deteriorating situation in Monrovia. I recalled that Don McLaughlin, the Director of High Adventure Global Broadcasting in Canada, recently told me of an open door in Uganda in which the government would grant us a license to broadcast from Kampala. God has sent a great outpouring there and a base has been established – a place where we could now raise up a tower and transmitter to reach the world. The Lord was right on time! Doc ended his conversation with me and called Don in Canada. They discussed the upheaval in Liberia. Bob Rodgers was contacted and it was agreed that the Holy Spirit was forbidding us to go any further into Liberia. We had a problem, however, as Paul Hunter was loading the equipment at that very moment into a huge shipping container directed toward Monrovia! We found out later that Hunter was only minutes away from completing the shipment information when an inspector informed him that he did not have all of the documentation that was needed. The shipment would be delayed until the next day. God had sovereignly stepped in and stopped the delivery. The equipment was immediately redirected to Uganda and our staff returned safely to America. Now, from Uganda we will be able to provide superior coverage to the Middle East as our weapons (transmitters) of mass salvation and deliverance beam a more powerful signal from Uganda. In Uganda, we have partnered with Bishop Grivas Muisisi. The Bishop oversees twelve rapidly growing churches and provides housing to 375 children who have been orphaned by the AIDS virus. In addition, he has 20 children in his own home. Uganda President Yoweri Museveni is addressing the AIDS epidemic in his country with United States President Bush. We have been told that there are hundreds of documented healings of this disease in Uganda. Many Christians there are crying out to God for a great revival. Post Office Box 197569 • Louisville, KY 40259 • Phone (502) 968-7550 • Fax (502) 968-7580 http://www.highadventure.org • Email: mail@highadventure.net (Jackie Yockey, July High Adventure Ministries newsletter, tnx to tip from Andy Sennitt, via DXLD) ** U K. BBC vs ISRAEL: q.v. [held over from previous issue] ** U S A [and non]. Hello Everyone, woke up early this morning, and I decided to monitor the WYFR 3955 kHz Merlin Skelton tests at 4-5 UT. 75 mb log at 0350-0357 UT: 3975 S9+20 dB on Kenwood (7 diodes shining on Sony 2010) R Budapest in Spanish til 0357 UT c-down. 3995 S9+60 dB on Kenwood (10 diodes shining on Sony 2010) DW Wertachtal, powerhouse as usual. 4005 S=6-7 thiny Vatican radio in un-readable language. Noisy. 75 mb log at 0400-0500 UT: 3955 S9+30 dB on Kenwood (7-8 diodes shining on Sony 2010) WYFR GERMAN service, Crash start at 04.00:09 UT! Program audio four[!] seconds behind \\ 9985 kHz direct from Florida. Latter starts S9=+40 dB til 0420 UT, then decreasing to S=9 +0 dB, like \\ 9355 Engl sce. But WYFR 7355 English still keeps S=9 +30 dB til 0500 UT. WYFR 3955 cut midst in playing WYFR hymn at 05.00:01 UT 3995 S9+40 dB on Kenwood (10 diodes shining on Sony 2010) DW Wertachtal, powerhouse as usual. 73 wb df5sx (Wolfgang Bueschel, Germany, July 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Rush Limbaugh, big fat liar, claims still to be on WRNO SW! (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) His official site still lists WRNO: http://www.rushlimbaugh.com/home/menu/rush.guest.la.html ``Our international audience can hear Rush Limbaugh on a commercial shortwave radio station out of New Orleans USA: station WRNO Monday thru Friday 1200 to 1500 (12noon to 3PM) New York City time - 1600 to 1900 UTC. as of October 25, 1998 to March 28, 1999 10:00AM - 5:00PM CST (1600-2300 UTC) - 7.395 MHZ* 5:00PM - 10:00PM CST (2300-0400 UTC) - 7.355 MHZ 10:00PM - 10:00AM CST (0400-0600 UTC) - 7.395 MHZ *This is a temporary frequency allocation. Please stay tuned for an announcement of our return to 15.420 MHZ`` (via Andy Sennitt, DXLD) ** U S A. 5100, USA, WBCQ (tests), 2302-2333, 15/07, EG. Christian Media Network programming with ads for colloidal silver, water filters, religious program mentioning broadcasting on "WBCQ 9335", real "fire and brimstone". Good (Scott Barbour, NH, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Yes, I also noticed 5100 paralleling 9330 instead of 7415. The RTTY on the lower side continues to be an annoyance (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. KCBQ, 1170, San Diego CA gets to stay on the air after its current transmitter site gets paved over. The Salem station told its listeners it might have to go dark in September, when its six-tower site in Santee is due to become a Home Depot --- but now it`s won a reprieve. While KCBQ fights with county officials about its plans for a new site up in the hills above Santee, it`ll operate at much lower power form the tower of Clear Channel`s KPOP, San Diego (1360), covering the city but losing its suburban signal after dark. KMYR, 1410, Wichita KS, has returned to air June 6 with Adult Standards, ``Music You Remember``, just six days after losing its transmitter building in a fire. Instead of its pre-fire 5000/1000 watt direxional signal, the standards station is running under STA with 250 watts into a single tower until it can get more of its transmission facility rebuilt (M-Street Journal via Domestic DX Digest, NRC DX News July 14 via DXLD) ** U S A. KTIM, 1510, San Rafael CA, 6/30, format has returned to Classical, ex-C&W (100000watts.com via Domestic DX Digest, NRC DX News July 14 via DXLD) Yay! ** U S A. KFUO AM WENT WITH IBOC There was a blurb in the business section of the St. Louis Post- Dispatch for Tuesday July 15th that KFUO-AM, 850 kHz, has started using IBOC. (They phrased it as HD Digital Radio from Ibiquity.) Since that is a daytimer, I suppose it isn't of much import to the MW DXing community. I tuned across the 830-870 kHz spectrum after reading that during the day and did hear the buzz on adjacent frequencies, but there seemed to be an awful lot of noises and buzzes and distinguishing the IBOC-caused noise from all the others was beyond me. The blurb seemed to imply that this was the first AMer here in St. Louis to implement IBOC. If it does improve their signal quality for the small amount of classical music they do air on the AM side, and if it is daytime only, I suppose it is a good thing. I seldom tune KFUO- AM myself, but KFUO-FM is our only classical resource left and one of the few local stations I listen to with any frequency. 73, (Will Martin, St. Louis, MO, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. HOUSE COMMITTEE VOTES TO BLOCK FCC FROM EASING LIMITS ON TV STATION OWNERSHIP --- By ALAN FRAM, Associated Press, 7/16/03 12:56 PM WASHINGTON (AP) -- A House committee voted Wednesday to block federal regulators from letting companies purchase larger numbers of television stations, ignoring a Bush administration veto threat and handing a setback to the commercial television networks. By a bipartisan 40-25 vote, the House Appropriations Committee voted to derail a new Federal Communications Commission rule that would let a single company own TV stations reaching 45 percent of American households. That new rule replaced a 35 percent limit, which has been favored by smaller broadcasters and an amalgam of groups ranging from the National Rifle Association to consumer advocates. The Appropriations Committee's approval of the provision, which was attached to a must-pass spending bill for the Commerce, Justice and State departments, breathed new life into an effort by congressional opponents to undo the June 2 FCC decision. Separate House and Senate bills to thwart the new FCC have bogged down, having run into opposition from pivotal committee chairmen. Even so, with the White House threatening a veto, House Republican leaders backing the administration and continued opposition from the major commercial broadcast networks, the prospects for the provision approved on Wednesday were unclear. Rep. David Obey, D-Wis., sponsor of the amendment, cast it as an attempt to keep national corporations from dictating what will be aired on local television stations. He and others complained about prime-time broadcasts of Victoria Secrets models and other programming they said was unsuitable for young children. "I don't want ownership factors to get in the way of districts like mine from being able to preserve their own cultural attitudes," Obey said. Supporters of the new FCC rules said they reflected the growing competition that large network broadcasters face from cable and satellite television and the Internet. Blocking those rules won't change the programming, they said. "It doesn't matter whether they're owned by a guy in that town or a conglomerate," said Rep. Henry Bonilla, R-Texas. Obey's amendment did not affect other parts of the FCC decision that ended many of the prohibitions against a single company owning newspapers and broadcast stations in the same community. Prior to approving the amendment, the committee by voice vote killed an effort to broaden it by also blocking the part of the FCC ruling having to do with joint newspaper-broadcast ownership. The sponsor of that amendment, Rep. Anne Northup, R-Ky., said she wanted to contain the expansion of all media organizations, not just television networks. But Obey said her proposal, if approved, would have spelled the defeat of the entire amendment by increasing the number of groups -- and lawmakers -- opposed to it (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. BERKELEY RADIO PIRATES BROADCAST DESPITE FCC INTERVENTION, THREATS --- By AL WINSLOW Special to the Planet (07-15-03) Berkeley Daily Planet Edition Date: Tuesday, July 15, 2003 http://www.berkeleydaily.org/text/article.cfm?issue=07-15-03&storyID=16999 The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has been trying to silence Berkeley`s pirate radio broadcasters for 10 years. The broadcasters continue to broadcast, but they say it`s getting harder. ``[The FCC] is starting to pick on people who have property, who have something to lose,`` said labor activist Michael Delacour, who quit Berkeley Liberation Radio (104.1 FM) last year after being threatened by the FCC with a fine of up to $100,000. ``I was afraid they were threatening my retirement,`` said Delacour, 65, who receives a pension from the Boilermakers` Union. A current broadcaster—``Captain Fred``—said the ranks of Berkeley Liberation Radio have thinned and that some local pirate stations—such as Queer Kids Radio and Vulcan Radio, an anarchist music station—went off the air entirely after getting an FCC letter. ``Typically, what happens is they get a letter called a notice of liability and a letter threatening dire consequences if they don`t go off the air,`` Captain Fred said. Another broadcaster—``DJ Advocacy``— added: ``Usually, for most people, that`s all the warning they need.`` DJ Advocacy said broadcasters use pseudonyms because, ``Basically, the FCC doesn`t know who we are. They didn`t know where to send the letter to, so they sent it to Delacour.`` The May 6, 2002, letter to Delacour, five-time Peace and Freedom Party candidate for mayor and Berkeley`s best known usual suspect, reads: ``[The FCC] has received complaints from residents ... concerning interference to reception of FM broadcast signals ... investigation revealed that you lease space at Skyline Studios ... and that that space is used by the illegal radio station known as Berkeley Liberation Radio ... You are hereby officially advised that operation of radio transmitting equipment without a valid license ... may subject the operator to penalties of a maximum criminal fine of $100,000 and/or one-year imprisonment, a civil forfeiture up to $11,000 or seizure of the equipment for the first offense.`` When shown the letter, the Berkeley civil liberties lawyer David Beauvais said, ``They`re intending to chill people out with it. That`s the point.`` The radio station is breaking the law, he said, and the FCC is enforcing it. ``It`s a civil disobedience kind of thing, and when you do civil disobedience, you`ve got to take your lumps,`` Beauvais said. The FCC made good on its ``seizure of the equipment`` threat Dec. 11, storming the Berkeley Liberation Radio station at 2427 Telegraph Ave. at 55 Street. The pirate station now operates in another location. The station has no paid employees and costs $600 a month for rent and $20 for a phone, according to Captain Fred. What is broadcast is virtually anything. Berkeley pirate broadcasters have aired a Marxist interpretation of the news, regular readings of articles from the local newspapers, shows on animal rights, parenting, bicycle liberation and the experiences of gay Afro-Americans, articles by adult film actress Nina Hartley, programs by the Peace and Freedom Party and the Libertarian Party, and an on-air appearance by then- Mayor Shirley Dean. A lot of it is for enjoyment, Delacour said. ``It`s a form of therapy. You can sit in a room and talk for a couple of hours without anyone interrupting. You can be the disc jockey you always dreamed of since you were a kid.`` Tony McNair, a Berkeley homeless activist, was alone in the one-room station at 11 a.m., broadcasting the tape of a San Francisco anti-war rally. He said about a dozen men in blue jackets with FCC or U.S. Marshall written on them, came in carrying sledge hammers and a battering ram. ``They yanked me out by the shirt and slammed me up against the wall and held guns pointed at my head,`` McNair said. ``They kept saying, `Who are the leaders? Who are the leaders?``` McNair said the raiding party turned off the station and removed all the equipment, including a computer and its records. He was let go an hour later, after an Oakland policeman ran a warrant check on him, he said. The station, though, was back on the air in four days and continues to broadcast. It now costs about $1,000 to fully equip a micropower station and the cost is about to plunge again, according to Free Radio Berkeley founder Stephen Dunifer. Barred by federal court order from broadcasting, Dunifer is collaborating with other transmitter engineers throughout the country to find ways to reduce equipment costs. ``We`re ready to introduce a $100 kit that, with other equipment you can get at a hardware store, will let you broadcast four to six miles, which is really all you need, for $500,`` he said. ``As long as equipment costs can be kept low, these raids are really not that effective. They cost a lot and there is the indirect cost that storm troopers coming in and stealing a microphone is not the best image the FCC wants to project in terms of free speech issues,`` Dunifer said. Dunifer advocates flooding the country with so many micropower stations the government will be powerless. ``If it becomes popular enough, mainstream enough, the FCC could face having to go into a rest home to stop an 80-year-old woman from broadcasting Glenn Miller,`` he said. Because they come and go so often, it`s hard to estimate how many unlicensed stations operate in the country. Dunifer estimates hundreds. One Web site lists 21 by name in California, including six in the Bay Area. The FCC regularly reports shutting down about 200 a year. Broadcaster Suzan Rodriguez, using her real name --- ``I don`t care who knows who I am`` --- said prior to her regular Friday morning show on Berkeley Liberation Radio, ``We`re not going to just roll over.`` ``Micro-radio is the last platform for the people to have a voice in a country where the government is bent on gagging our voices. Dissent is the American way. Our country was founded on dissent,`` she said. Meanwhile, it`s not certain the FCC has rid itself of Delacour. ``Actually, I made a bad decision,`` he said about quitting the station. ``I had other things going on, like fighting an eviction, but I wish I`d stayed with it and not chickened out.`` (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) It looks like Frank Charlie Charlie is now saying you can make big fines slow through repeat offenses. I wonder if they're going to make any decisive moves against the well-known pirates in San Francisco and Berkeley any time soon (Joel Rubin, DX LISTENING DIGEST) FEDERAL DISTRICT COURT ORDERS CIVIL JUDGMENT AGAINST RICHARD I. ROWLAND FOR UNLICENSED RADIO OPERATION. The FCC announced that in the US Middle District of Florida, Orlando Division, US District Judge Honorable Gregory A. Presnell granted judgment in favor of US to collect a civil penalty against defendant Richard I. Rowland in the amount of $10,000. News Release. News Media Contact: David Fiske at (202) 418-0500 EB. Contact Lisa Fowlkes at (202) 418-7450, TTY: 1(888) 835-5322 http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-236551A1.doc http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-236551A1.pdf http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-236551A1.txt (via radioman390 via Joel Rubin, DXLD) ** U S A. TODD MUNDT SHOW: Our final show is July 25th. Nothing lasts forever, except maybe an Adam Sandler movie, which only SEEMS that way. And like all things - summer, the sweet innocence of childhood, "Hee Haw" - the Todd Mundt Show is ending on July 25th. Todd has decided to do other things. He will continue to host Morning Edition on Michigan Radio from 5am to 9am. He will also be working with our sister station, Michigan Television on various public television projects. It`s been a good run. (from http://www.toddshow.org/goodbye.asp via DXLD) ** U S A. REUNION --- ALUMS RECALL WEBR'S SWITCH TO ALL-NEWS By JOHN F. BONFATTI, News Staff Reporter, 7/13/2003 Some of the more familiar voices in Buffalo news radio history filled Romanello's Roseland restaurant as alumni of WEBR radio gathered for a reunion Saturday night. Gathered by former WEBR anchor Mark Hamrick, about 20 former staffers glanced through a scrapbook of photos and reminisced about the days after the station switched from an oldies format to an all-news format in 1976. "That station was such a unique situation because we had a lot of young, highly talented people working together at a special time," said Hamrick, who went on to work for AP Broadcast in Washington, where he has been business editor for the past seven years. WEBR, located at 970 on the AM dial - a spot now used by its successor, WNED - was one of the first radio stations in Buffalo, originally going on the air in 1924. It was the first commercial radio station to be purchased by a public radio station in 50 years when the Western New York Public Broadcasting Association bought it in 1975. The switch in formats the next year made it the first public all-news station in the country. more at: http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20030713/1035826.asp (via Fred Waterer, DXLD) ** U S A. NASHVILLE SKYLINE: Anarchy on the Airwaves Chet Flippo 07/10/2003 (NASHVILLE SKYLINE is a column by CMT/CMT.com Editorial Director Chet Flippo.) http://www.cmt.com/news/display/1473736.jhtml In the fascinating Stanley Kramer doomsday movie On the Beach, there`s a pivotal scene where a submarine crew -- survivors of a nuclear holocaust -- scan the radio waves in vain looking for signs of life elsewhere in the world. Finally, a ray of hope! There`s a mysterious signal coming over the airwaves -- but it`s a sort of clicking, like Morse code. A search team from the submarine goes ashore in San Diego to find the source of the signal. And they find it. In an otherwise lifeless city, in an otherwise lifeless radio station, there`s a Coke bottle that`s become entangled in the window shade cord and -- blown by the breeze through the window -- it`s tapping out a nonsensical message through the radio`s board. Is that where big radio is headed? A signal with no message? Mainline radio executives this week appearing before Congress to defend their boycott of the Dixie Chicks sounded defensive and finally … afraid. Their justification of the Chicks boycott as a business decision rather than a political one is shamefully transparent -- especially when they claim that listener response ``forced`` the boycott. And it is demonstrating to listeners that big radio is not responsive to their wishes. As corporate radio increasingly becomes homogenized and chases the dollar through any means necessary, listeners increasingly look to alternatives. Not just in country radio, where airplay at major stations equals chart success equals album sales and ticket sales on tour. That`s still the mainstream model -- but it should not be the only country outlet for listeners. These days though, it`s not so much a case of ``either or`` -- having to choose between either mainstream or underground radio. It`s now a case of having a much larger tray to elect from. Not since the days of true pirate radio with offshore stations like Radio Caroline have so many alternatives to big commercial radio been emerging. Country fans, especially, are looking to satellite radio such as XM and Sirius. And more and more, people are turning to the Internet for radio alternatives . And size no longer matters When your favorite radio station is on wheels, what does that tell you? In a world of 100,000- watt mega stations, tiny WDVX transmits with a puny 200 watts from a 14-foot trailer in rural Tennessee. Thanks to the Internet, though, WDVX.com is a giant among stations. It`s nonprofit and commercial-free and it plays many strains of American music, with a focus on bluegrass. That WDVX trailer will be rolling into downtown Knoxville later this year. It`s been lured away from its spot at the Fox Inn Campgrounds in Clinton, Tenn., as part of the development of the Gay Street area of downtown Knoxville. WDVX has already been transmitting live concerts from downtown Knoxville, and its new site will have an adjacent 75- seat auditorium for live shows. Internet stations such as WDVX and lively WNCW on the campus of Isothermal Community College in Spindale, N.C., are proving that size doesn`t matter. As long as they can exist with even marginal support, such viable alternatives are going to be sought out by listeners with an ear for adventure. You should be able to hear George Strait and Bruce Springsteen, Merle Haggard and Norah Jones, Joe Nichols and Alison Krauss, Delbert McClinton and Allison Moorer, Roscoe Holcomb and Lightnin` Hopkins, Tracy Chapman and Ben Harper, Ani DiFranco and Willie Nelson, Dierks Bentley and Ralph Stanley, Billie Holiday and Charley Patton, T-Bone Walker and Lyle Lovett, Dolly Parton and Etta James, Miles Davis and the Carter Family, Bill Monroe and the Jayhawks. Specialized radio outlets for that music are here and they`re growing. In this limitless future of MP3 streams, iPods and satellites, personal radio is an inevitability. Our own CMT.com radio stations have demonstrated the enormous listener appeal of customized radio. The day is coming when your personal iPod will transmit your own personal radio favorites to you on demand. Visitors to Microsoft founder Bill Gates` mansion are given visitors` passes that are embedded with chips containing the visitors` own personal preferences in music and art. Each room in the house is programmed to play that music and show those images on the wall. That`s about as personal it gets -- until the day when you get your government-provided computer chip installed in your brain. Let a thousand radio alternatives bloom (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. INTERVIEW --- CIGAR DAVE, TURNING OVER A FAMILIAR LEAF By ANTHONY VIOLANTI, News Staff Reporter, 7/14/2003 The legend of Cigar Dave started in North Buffalo nearly 30 years ago. It all began when little David Zeplowitz would climb up on his grandfather's knee. Grandpa Abe used to smoke Gold Circle cigars, and young Dave relished the smell of a stogie wafting across the room. "My grandfather always smoked cigars and I loved to be around him, and I loved the aroma," said Zeplowitz, 39, known to radio fans as Cigar Dave. He now lives in Tampa and hosts the weekly Cigar Dave Show, syndicated to nearly 100 hundred stations, with an estimated audience of about 800,000 listeners. The two-hour program has been on the air for eight years and is heard locally at 7 p.m. Saturdays on WBEN-AM 930. Zeplowitz as Cigar Dave offers a throwback to the Rat Pack era, a time of smokes, cocktails, thick steaks, off-color jokes and guy talk. On the air, Cigar Dave is known as "The General," and weaves tales of sports, good times and a "harem" of female admirers, not to mention detailed information on the art of smoking cigars. Some may call the program politically incorrect, but Cigar Dave couldn't care less. "My show is about going back to simpler times and I'm unapologetic about it, no matter what the pleasure police say," Zeplowitz said in a telephone interview. And just who are the pleasure police? "All those nannies telling you what not to do," Zeplowitz said. "Too many people think that we shouldn't do anything that is enjoyable. Their lives are so miserable the only way they feel good is to make people unhappy. Let me worry about myself. I have the right to smoke cigars and eat steak." He admits that high doses of beef and tobacco can clog the arteries and the lungs. "I tell people to enjoy things in moderation," said Zeplowitz, who only smokes a few cigars a week. "A little steak, a little wine, a good cigar; what's wrong with that? Have it in moderation and you will be fine." more at: http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20030714/1048822.asp (Via Fred Waterer, Ont., DXLD) ** U S A. WORKER DIES FROM 450-FOOT RADIO TOWER FALL http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/news/local/6309282.htm Posted on Tue, Jul. 15, 2003 Associated Press HOOKSTOWN, Pa. - A worker repairing an antenna on a radio tower Tuesday morning fell about 450 feet to his death, authorities said. The 26-year-old man, believed to be from Paducah, Ky., was pronounced dead at the scene before 11 a.m., the Beaver County Coroner's office said. The victim's identity was being withheld pending notification of family, state police Trooper Randall McPherson said. The worker, a subcontractor for World Tower Co. Inc. of Mayfield, Ky., was working on a 490-feet-tall radio tower in Greene Township, near the Ohio border. Another man working on the tower at the time said he believed each man was secured to his harness, McPherson said. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration was investigating, McPherson said (via Mike Terry, DXLD) What station??!! News - 400-Foot Drop Kills Radio Tower Worker" The link: http://www.thepittsburghchannel.com/news/2334066/detail.html State Police, OSHA Investigating GREENE TOWNSHIP, Pa. -- A man died Tuesday morning after falling about 450 feet from a radio tower while he was repairing an antenna, WTAE's Sheldon Ingram reported. Authorities say the 26-year-old man, believed to be from Paducah, Ky., was pronounced dead at the scene in a remote area of Greene, Beaver County. His name has not been revealed. The man was working on a tower used by WOGF Froggy 104, of East Liverpool, Ohio. He was a subcontractor for World Tower Co. Inc., of Mayfield, Ky. State police Trooper Randall McPherson said the man and a co- worker were apparently both wearing their harnesses and were attached to the tower, looking at each other, when the fall happened. As of now, the death is being considered an accident. State police and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration are continuing to investigate. Oddly enough, this station is currently running a promotion called "Leap for Life"! (via Jerry Rappel, amfmtvdx at qth.net via DXLD) ** U S A. STILL NO WORD ON WHY TOWER FELL Shiloh Woolman, Managing Editor http://www.theomahachannel.com/ketv7/2315531/detail.html POSTED: 12:15 p.m. CDT July 7, 2003 UPDATED: 5:25 p.m. CDT July 8, 2003 OMAHA, Neb. -- Crews returned to the site of Friday's KETV tower collapse at 72nd and Crown Point Monday. They are hoping to determine what brought down the 1,200-foot tower and begin to assess how and when the station will be able to rebuild. Slideshow: Photos From The Tower Collapse http://www.theomahachannel.com/ketv7/2315531/detail.html http://www.earthsignals.com/add_CGC/KETV_TWR.jpg The main broadcast tower for Channel 7 fell to the ground Friday at 11:09 p.m. Neighbors reported hearing the guy wires snap, but they mistakenly thought the noise was fireworks. "All of a sudden I heard this noise like a jet and the tower just fell on top of itself," said Tracy Oliver, a witness to the collapse. "The lights went out as it went down." KETV was upgrading the tower with new HDTV technology. No one was hurt in the fall and Channel 7 is still being broadcast from an auxiliary tower near the station at 27th and Douglas streets. KVNO is not so lucky, however. The classical music station had an antenna on the tower and it has no backup location. For the indefinite future, KVNO can be heard on the Internet KVNO (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. HAM RADIO ASSISTS RELIEF EFFORT AS CLAUDETTE HITS TEXAS COAST NEWINGTON, CT, Jul 15, 2003--Now that Hurricane Claudette has made landfall at Matagorda Bay on the middle Texas coast, the Hurricane Watch Net (HWN) has secured operations, and Amateur Radio Emergency Service teams have begun to aid relief organizations. The HWN had activated on 14.325 MHz to gather observed or measured weather data and storm damage reports as the stormed headed toward the Texas coast. When a storm threatens, HWN relays reports to forecasters via WX4NHC at the National Hurricane Center in Miami. ``We secured the Hurricane Watch Net as Hurricane Claudette has moved inland near Port O`Connor, Texas, and ceases to be a serious threat,`` said HWN Manager Mike Pilgrim, K5MP. The National Hurricane Center expects Claudette to weaken as the storm`s eye moves further inland. ARRL South Texas Section Manager Ray Taylor, N5NAV, says the storm came ashore a bit earlier than anticipated. The ARES station at the Texas State Emergency Operations Center has been on the air since July 13, he said. ARES crews also have been helping the Baptist Men`s Kitchen, Red Cross and The Salvation Army relief efforts. An FCC-declared general communications emergency for the Texas coastal area for 7285 kHz (days) and 3873 kHz (nights) remains in effect. The FCC says amateurs are required to refrain from using those frequencies, plus or minus 3 kHz, unless they are taking part in the handling of emergency traffic. The declaration remains in effect until it`s rescinded. A hurricane warning remains in effect along the Texas coast from Baffin Bay to High Island. A tropical storm warning remains in effect north of High Island, Texas, to Sabine Pass. As of 1600 UT, Claudette was some 15 miles west-northwest of Port O`Connor, Texas moving to the west-northwest at nearly 12 MPH and packing maximum sustained winds near 80 MPH with higher gusts. Intense rainfall resulting in possible flooding seems to be the major threat, with the NHC predicting up to eight inches of rain along with storm surge flooding of four to six feet above normal. Isolated tornadoes also are possible. Taylor said parts of South Texas already are saturated from previous heavy rains. WX4NHC has requested that amateurs submit weather and damage reports from affected areas via the Hurricane Watch Net on 14.325 MHz and via IRLP SKYWARN Node (Dallas Reflector) 9455. Non-IRLP repeaters will be linked via the Cactus Intertie System to cover a large area of Texas. Texas Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) Coordinator Mel Goodwin, KI5WT, has advised SATERN members to listen to the emergency net on 7.285 MHz daytime. The SATERN net meets on 14.265 MHz weekdays at 1500 UT. The Salvation Army has put disaster relief teams on notice for immediate activation. Canteen units are equipped with Amateur Radio gear. The Salvation Army already has opened two shelters in Corpus Christi and another in Freeport is housing some 25 residents mostly from the flooded Surfside area. Another shelter was scheduled to open in Lufkin. The Salvation Army reports it has four shelters on standby in Cameron County and another in McAllen to handle any storm-related evacuees. The International Space Station crew of Commander Yuri Malenchenko, RK3DUO, and NASA ISS Science Officer and Flight Engineer Ed Lu, KC5WKJ, were able to see Hurricane Claudette from their unique vantage point 240 miles above Earth. NASA says the Expedition 7 team captured ``spectacular video`` of the storm as it made landfall. (The video will be broadcast on NASA Television.) Copyright © 2003, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved. (via John Norfolk, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-126, July 15, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3g.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1190: RFPI: Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 on 7445/15039 WWCR: Wed 0930 on 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO [also for CONTINENT OF MEDIA]: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1190.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1190.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1190h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1190h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1190.html FIRST AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1191: Wed 2200 on WBCQ 7415, 17495-CUSB [and 5100-CUSB?] Thu 2030 on WWCR 15825 Fri 1930 on RFPI 15039 Sun 0032 on WINB 12160 ** AFRICA. OK, OK. As many people had problems with the zipped file and the server doesn't handle normal .xls-files properly, I've now uploaded AFRICALIST as zipped .doc (60 kB, editable) or standard .pdf (120 kB). http://africa.coolfreepage.com/africalist/ (Thorsten Hallmann, Muenster, Germany, July 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. HCA (HCJB Australia) changes wef 21st July '03 0100 0130 UT - 15420 South Asia URDU Daily 0130 0330 UT - 15420 South Asia ENG Daily 1230 1700 UT - 15390 South Asia ENG Daily 1700 1730 UT - 15405 South Asia URDU Daily 0800 1200 UT - 11750 South Pac ENG Daily 1800 2030 UT - 11765 South Pac ENG Daily Regds, (Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, July 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. Right now (0237 UT) I'm listening to what I presume is Radio Gaucha on 11916.2 kHz (all databases say it's 11915). Male announcer in Portuguese which I "no comprende". It looks like the Brazilians are going to be coming in well tonight. SINPO 34333 on the R-390A, just barely discernible on the Yaesu VR-5000. Sloper antenna. 73 de (Phil, KO6BB Atchley, CA, July 15, swl at qth.net via DXLD) ** CANADA. Aboriginal Voices Radio's CFIE (106.5 Toronto) has been granted a power increase. It'll go from 350 watts to 1100 watts from its First Canadian Place transmitter; right now, it gets killed by co- channel interference from WYRK (106.5 Buffalo) as close in as Etobicoke! And the CRTC is getting out of the low-power business: it announced last week that it will no longer require parks information, traffic information and weather stations to submit to its licensing procedures as long as they're less than 100 watts on AM, 50 watts at 60 meters on FM. Those stations will still have to get technical approval from Industry Canada --- and, this being Canada, will have to pledge to comply with the Canadian Association of Broadcasters' guidelines on gender portrayal! (Scott Fybush, NE Radio Watch July 14 via DXLD) ** CANADA. NEW RADIO STATION AIMED AT GREEK COMMUNITY NTR Thursday, July 10, 2003 Montreal's Greek community will be able to listen to a new FM radio station this winter that will broadcast primarily in Greek on the frequency of 105.1. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission recently granted Canadian Hellenic Cable Radio the license to launch the new commercial station. The station, which will be known as CKIQ-FM, will aim its broadcasts primarily at the city's Greek community, but will also broadcast in Armenian, Serbian, Croatian, Russian and Tagalog. CKIQ will also integrate certain elements of its programming in French and English. (c) Copyright 2003 NTR (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** CANADA. RADIO STATION ACCUSED OF LINK TO TAMIL TIGERS --- SMEAR CAMPAIGN ALLEGED: Cabinet to decide this week whether to revoke licence Stewart Bell, National Post, Tuesday, July 15, 2003 http://www.nationalpost.com/home/story.html?id=330749D2-F735-4CF7-B2E7-B2422654F6EA TORONTO - The federal Cabinet is to decide this week whether to cancel a radio licence granted by the CRTC to a Toronto company with alleged links to a South Asian terrorist organization. The new station, to be launched this fall in Toronto at 101.3 FM, denies any ties to extremists and insists it is the target of a smear campaign by opponents of its plan to broadcast to the city's ethnic communities. But government officials are concerned by allegations the broadcaster is affiliated with the World Tamil Movement (WTM), a fundraising front for the Tamil Tigers, a Sri Lankan terrorist group. The RCMP is aware of the allegations and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service has been advising the government on the matter. Cabinet is to decide by tomorrow whether to overturn the CRTC decision. The allegations come as the Cabinet is taking criticism for failing to outlaw the Tamil Tigers under Canada's Anti-Terrorist Act. Stockwell Day, the Canadian Alliance's foreign affairs critic, has launched a campaign to ban the group. Allegations of terrorist ties were brought to the attention of the CRTC last summer by Sri Lankan Canadians, who wrote letters opposing a radio licence application by Canadian Multicultural Radio. The letters claimed the numbered company behind the radio bid was tied to the WTM. The letters also claim WTM volunteers had gone door to door in Tamil neighbourhoods in Toronto to intimidate Sri Lankans into supporting the radio licence bid. The CRTC approved the licence anyway on April 17. Denis Carmel, a CRTC spokesman, said of the "thousands and thousands" of responses to the proposed station, only a few raised concerns about terrorism and the station responded to all the allegations in full. "We felt there was a competitive process and people were being a little too passionate," he said. "The language of these letters was vague and there was a lot of interventions, most of them favourable." The Privy Council Office has since received 47 petitions seeking an appeal of the decision. They have been referred to the Department of Canadian Heritage, which has made a recommendation to Cabinet. It must announce its decision by July 16. Several of the petitions allege a link to the Tamil Tigers, also known as the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam or LTTE. Though the organization has not been banned, the federal government has frozen since the fall of 2001 on suspicion of terrorist links. "It is well known in the Sri Lankan community that the people who are behind the licence ... are the fronts for the LTTE's major organizers in Canada," said one petition. The station denies the claims. S. Sivakumaran, the radio station's chief operating officer, said some of those who complained were supporters of competing bids. The company has tried to track them down to serve them with defamation suits, but has not been able to find them, he said. "I don't even know if some of these people exist." He said the station has responded to each of the allegations in detail and will make its written response available after the Cabinet decision is announced. "It's a smear campaign," he said. "I could sense that, from having looked at these appeals, it's a joint effort by some of the members of our community who did not get the licence and some of these same people wrote support for the other applicants during the application process." The allegations do not concern members of the radio station team but rather their relatives and friends, he said. "They are trying to say that he's got a friend of so-and-so, he's got a relative. We're in no position to comment about a third party. It's ridiculous.... "Post-Sept. 11, everyone's worried about terrorist link and terrorist things and whoever is doing the strategy for these guys has told them to write stuff like this because it gets everyone anxious and everyone's attention. "If [members of the station's board] have any links, I'd be sure that the Privy Council would get the RCMP and CSIS to give them a report." He said neither agency had contacted the company concerning any investigation. The Tamil Tigers have frequently used terrorist tactics such as suicide bombings and political assassinations during a two-decade insurgency that sought independence for the island's ethnic Tamil minority. The violence was financed largely by expatriate Tamil communities, particularly in Canada. CSIS has estimated the Tigers raised millions in Canada through front organizations and crime. The Tigers agreed to a ceasefire last year and entered peace talks with the government. But they walked away from the negotiations in April and there have been reports the LTTE is preparing for renewed war. "I can tell you for sure that concerns with respect to security that have been expressed, the RCMP is aware of them," said François Jubinville, of the Privy Council Office. The RCMP confirmed it was aware of the allegations but would not comment further. "It's not our practice to identify who or what might be the subject of a criminal investigation," Corporal Benoit Desjardins said. "We are aware of it, but in regard to is there an investigation, I cannot comment on whether there is one or not." (via Mike Brooker, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** CANADA. VETERAN OF OLD HAPPY GANG RADIO SERIES, EDDIE ALLEN, DIES AT AGE 82 --- Canadian Press Monday, July 14, 2003 http://www.canada.com/search/story.aspx?id=604a2dd3-d7dc-409f-8dc4-b9a2204465c3 (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** CANADA. If Clear Channel is going to buy WWV ("give us 20 minutes, we'll give you 20 minutes"), can CHUM Ltd. buy CHU? With a change to slogan "the Chew", or "Tock 3330/7335". Horrors, they're one of the few Canadian stations still using a call letter ID. 73 (Mike Brooker, Toronto, ON, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** CUBA. RHC is providing decent signals here in Europe. Try 9820 for Habana's 0200 US service. Regards and 73's (Dan Goldfarb, Brentwood, England, July 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Yawn ** CUBA. Since RHC incessantly beats the drum about 5 Cuban political prisoners in the US --- and I`d dearly like some OBJECTIVE info about their cases --- it is only fitting that we refer you to info about Cuban political prisoners in Cuba, who are held in appalling conditions, unlike whatever is going on with PPs in the US. One case is that of Martha Beatriz Roque; search on her name and you will find pages such as this with links to many others: http://www.marporcuba.org/marthabeatriz/ ``Cuba --- último territorio esclavo en América --- Patria o suerte, ¡pensaremos!`` (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. DENUNCIAN QUE CUBA INTERCEPTA SEÑALES DE EXILIADOS IRANÍES Tomado de la edición electrónica del diario "El Nuevo Herald" con fecha martes 15 de julio del 2003. Nota: informacion ya aportada en inglés por Glenn Hauser http://www.miami.com/mld/elnuevo/news/world/cuba/6304036.htm (El Nuevo Herald | 07/15/2003 | via Óscar de Céspedes, FL, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. 5009.68, Radio Cristal, *1028 -1040 11 July. National Anthem , "la emisora Radio Cristal... en todo el país... transmite...", many mentions de Santo Domingo. "Ésta es Radio Cristal..." (Icom R-75, JRC NRD 535, Drake R7, Pompano Beach, Florida, US, Bob Wilkner, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ERITREA. VOICE OF AMERICA CORRESPONDENT REPORTEDLY ARRESTED | Text of report in English by Eritrean opposition Awate.com