DX LISTENING DIGEST JUNE 2003 ARCHIVE

Glenn Hauser's World of Radio

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DX LISTENING DIGEST JUNE 2003 ARCHIVE

||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-116, June 29, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3f.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1188: RFPI: Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 7445, 15039 WBCQ: Mon 0445 7415 WWCR: Wed 1030 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1188.html WORLD OF RADIO ON WINB [not]: Once again this week, WINB failed to air WOR at the new scheduled time of 0030 UT Sun June 29 on 12160, tho it did manage to broadcast DX Partyline before it and AWR Wavescan after it, unlike last week. You might wonder, why do I put up with this? 1) There are still lots of other opportunities to hear WOR on other stations; 2) I would not if I had incurred additional trouble or expense in shipping them tapes; but WINB is supposed to download WOR from our website. More under ECUADOR non and USA WORLD OF RADIO ON WJIE: Similar thinking applies to the even less reliable WJIE. However, June 29 at 1630, barely audible on 13595 with CODAR, not audible on 7490, STILL WOR 1179 from April 23, so this is becoming quite pointless. ** AUSTRALIA. 3222 Harmonic. Radio 2, Sydney. 2 x 1611. Southern Cross Network new 0500, ID 0505, 22/6 (Seager-L) 4860 Harmonic. 3 x 1620, Aussie extended band station with Arabic music, fair 22/6 (Craig Seager, Limekilns NSW DXpedition site, July Australian DX News via DXLD) Doubt these would propagate much beyond NSW, but you never know; could cause consternation vis-à-vis fundamental tropical band stations (gh, DXLD) ** AUSTRIA. Estimados amigos: La historia del fin del español por ORF Radio Austria Internacional parece que no termina, en realidad recién empieza... porque un anuncio inesperado nos ha cambiado totalmente el gris panorama que veníamos observando. En la emisión de ayer, 28 de junio, Manuel Aletrino comenzó diciendo "Nos vamos a despedir, en estos sábados de Radio Austria Internacional, de ustedes, gracias por su sintonía durante tantos años, para mí incluso tantas décadas... Y una despedida de nuestros amigos en Barcelona de Francisco Rubio y sus compañeros de la Asociación DX de aquella linda ciudad catalana en que va a ser repaso a exactamente 20 años de cooperación con esta emisora... Habrá un nuevo programa aquí en Radio Austria Internacional también en español por los menos así se nos ha indicado ligeramente pero les invito a que mañana nos escuchen en el Buzón, el Buzón de la Despedida, que será presentado por Jaime Carbonell y este servidor (Manuel Aletrino) en que hablaremos también de un posible futuro de programas en lengua española de Radio Austria Internacional habrá algún retorno al éter lo que, aunque sea pequeño, va a gustar a nuestros oyentes". Antes de cerrar la emisión del día Manuel Aletrino terminó diciendo "Mañana, estimados oyentes, estaremos en el aire con el Buzón de la Despedida, Jaime Carbonell y este servidor Manuel Aletrino, y les vamos a anunciar una pequeña noticia que, a lo mejor, será un poco de alivio. Solamente quiero decirles que nos sigan fieles, no dejen de controlar dentro de algún tiempo, estas mismas frecuencias. El español en Radio Austria Internacional no desaparecerá del todo, algo es algo". Próximamente seguiremos tratando este tema. Un cordial saludo de... (Rubén Guillermo Margenet, Rosario A R G E N T I N A, June 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. More on trans-Atlantic FM and TV DX: see PROPAGATION below ** CANADA. Shelagh's Back! On Tuesday, July 1st, Sounds Like Canada on CBC will be preempted by a special Canada Day Show. Shelagh Rogers will be hosting from Pier 21 in Halifax, and then later in the day, from Ottawa. As part of the show former citizenship judge and retired CBC host, Don Tremaine, will conduct a ceremony so Canadians who are listening can reaffirm their Canadian citizenship. This should be available via RCI as well on 9515, 13655 and 17800 kHz. Shelagh Rogers after taking a break since January for medical reasons is returning for this Special Canada Day show at 10 AM Eastern on CBC. Here is a link to the Globe and Mail article about her: http://www.globeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20030628/RVHAMP28/Entertainment/Idx HOW SHELAGH GOT HER GROOVE BACK --- The veteran broadcaster used a very public break from her radio career to rediscover her private self. That introspective voice will join her when she returns to the airwaves next week, SARAH HAMPSON writes By SARAH HAMPSON Saturday, June 28, 2003 - Page R3 I should begin this profile of CBC Radio's Shelagh Rogers, who returns to the national airwaves on Canada Day with two live broadcasts after a six-month medical leave, with this quote: "I've learned a lot through all these twists and turns," the 47-year-old broadcaster says. "I'm like a punching clown. I'm always going to come back up." . . . (via Art Preis, Ottawa, Canada, June 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Same?: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20030628/RVHAMP28/TPEntertainment/Columnists (via Ricky Leong, DXLD) ** CHILE. 6009.98, Radio Parinacota, Putre. June 2003 - 2325 UT. The frequency is now quite clean, (the Colombian is off air), so it is possible sometimes to hear Parinacota quite well but never strong. Was "fooled" when they had a program with Peruvian music. Sometimes QRM from Radio Mil on 6010.02 kHz. Sometimes relaying Radio Coöperativa with news. Irregularly (?) also HCJB is heard with Dutch [RN/Canada?? -gh]. Listen to a recording from this occasion at: http://homepage.sverige.net/~a-0901/ (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin June 29, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) 6010.02, Radio Parinacota, Putre, 0850-0916, June 29. Spanish. Latin music non stop. TC: "Ya es la hora cinco, dos minutos"; after ID as: "Estas escuchando... Radio Parinacota"; strong signal s/0900 UT and low at 0915. 34322 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentina, BCL News via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. I noted in the HCDX mailing list that a Finnish DXer logged RD Nacional de Colombia on 4955, but here in Quito only the Huanta-Peru station is heard. 6009.77 Alcaraván Radio, Puerto Lleras (Colombia) off air. June 16: Reactivated station in Colombia! 4975.03, Ondas del Orteguaza, Florencia. June 16 2003 - 1105 UT. I stopped at the frequency during a religious program and normally I should have continued thinking it was Radio del Pacífico. When Pacífico recently is on 4974.77 kHz, heard at the same time but weak, I waited for an ID. I have not heard the station for several years. Listen to a recording from this occasion: http://homepage.sverige.net/~a-0901/ 73 from BM in Quito! (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin June 29, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CONGO DR. 7435.007, 19.6 1830, Troligen Lumumbashi, Zaire med nyheter och politik på franska. 2 SA (Stig Adolfsson, Sweden, SW Bulletin via DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. As of 0000 GMT 29 June: no trace of Radio Martí, but interestingly, a fair level but very definite Cuban jammer of the bubble-type variety, alone on the channel save for occasional (presumed) Radio Guamá. Radio Martí was loud-and-clear though most of the Florida Keys (some co-channel Rebelde) three weeks ago, so I am certain this is in addition to. EC-130E again? The MW channel they used possibly only once was 530 (hard to believe anyone could have heard it what with Visión Cristiana from the Turks & Caicos so powerful). Wasn't 1020 the channel Radio Martí appeared on briefly years ago, speculation being either a portable unit or the other (then Caribbean Christian Radio) Turks & Caicos MW transmitter? I forget the details there, though thought one of our "spook" contacts claimed the former (Terry L Krueger Clearwater, Florida, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Probably buying time on a commercial transmitter somewhere in the Caribe. My salary, etc., mostly came from Martí. IBB transmitters are funded proportionally according to which service uses the transmitters. Delano and Greenville are about 60% Marti. Marathon-1180 uses four in-line towers aimed at Cuba, and the pattern is really directional. That's why it's more than usually hard to pick up elsewhere. Actually runs 50 kW, not 100 kW. Alternate two Continental 317Cs. Ex Marti Kid, (Charlie Taylor, Greenville, NC, IRCA via DXLD) ** CZECH REPUBLIC [and non]. WRMI News - July, 2003 We are sorry to announce that due to a sudden and severe budget cut at Radio Prague, the station's transmissions via the Czech Republic have been reduced and all relays via WRMI have been discontinued as of July 1, 2003. For the past few years, WRMI has relayed Radio Prague's daily programs in English, Spanish and Czech to the Americas. We wish the station well. This is only the latest in a series of major cutbacks at shortwave stations worldwide. The Radio Prague relays on weekdays will be replaced on WRMI by an expanded schedule from Christian Media Network, which as of July 1 will run weekdays from 1200 to 2300 UT on 15725; and 2300-0400 and 0415-0900 on 7385 kHz; all beamed to North America. Among other things, the expansion of CMN will allow the second hour of its daily flagship program "The Apocalypse Chronicles" to be heard on 7385 kHz from 0200-0300 UT (Jeff White, Noticias DX via DXLD) Whoopee!! L'avenir des émissions internationales de Radio Prague : Les changements dans l'environnement médiatique font que les idées changent depuis quelques années. A un extrême, on parle de la suppression des ondes courtes et de leur remplacement par des émissions nationales ou par des projets spéciaux (en Suisse, aux Pays- Bas, en Autriche). A l'autre extrême, conservation des émissions OC comme moyen d'information unique vers l'étranger (Chine, Russie, certains pays de l'Europe de l'est ou de l'ouest). Radio Prague serait plutôt pour la combinaison de ces deux extrêmes. La Direction veut poursuivre la diffusion en ondes courtes dont l'audience est satisfaisante (15000 lettres par an contre 12000 il y a 4 ans). On peut penser à une réduction de ces émissions mais pas à leur remplacement (par le web par exemple). Les émissions OC n'ont certes pas un grand développpement devant elles, avant la numérisation. Le public des émissons en OC n'est pas le même que celui de l'Internet et la suppression des ondes décamétriques entrainerait la perte d'auditeurs en Europe et en Amérique du Nord. Radio Prague pense qu'il est nécessaire de renforcer de manière sélective l'émetteur de Litomysl et surtout d'utiliser des relais à l'étranger (ce qui se fait déjà avec la Slovaquie et aux Etats-Unis à Miami [pas encore --- ggh]). Certains sont planifiés en Amérique Latine et en Russie. En Russie, Radio Prague émet déjà depuis Saint- Petersbourg via WRN et à partir de cet été, à Moscou. Les émissions sont rediffusées depuis des stations en Croatie, Roumanie, Australie, Etats-Unis, Mexique, Espagne et Russie. La coopération avec Radio France Internationale devrait débuter cet automne. Radio Prague est également sur le satellite. Bien que représenant la plus petite part de l'audience, ces émissions seront développées. Grâce à WRN, Radio Prague touche un nouveau public. La station participe au projet de Radio E, une station internationale qui devrait diffuser en anglais, français et allemand. Une contribution pour "Accents d'Europe", l'émission de RFI, est régulièrement préparée. Sur le territoire national, Radio Prague est aussi présente en ondes moyennes. L'avenir de Radio Prague sera encore discuté au sein de la station, de la radio tchèque et au Parlement, car il ne faut pas oublier que la station est financée par le budget de l'état (Radio Prague - 24 juin 2003) (les informations sont issues de http://perso.wanadoo.fr/jm.aubier via DXLD) ** DEUTSCHES REICH. [Mediumwave transmitter on WHEELS 1932-1945, Deutsche Reichspost] "Rundfunksender auf Raedern. Die fahrbaren Rundfunksendeanlagen der Deutschen Reichspost in den Jahren 1932 bis 1945", (2003). Author: Bernd-Andreas Moeller, Weststrasse 125, D-09116 Chemnitz, Germany. Fax: ++49 371 36 11 95. Published by Verlag Dr. Ruediger Walz, Alte Poststrasse 12, D-65510 Idstein, Germany. Phone: ++49 61 26 99 26 26. Fax: Phone: ++49 61 26 99 26 28. Email: ruediger.walz@t... [truncated] Price: 25.00 EUR plus postage and packing. About 26 radio stations on wheels used by Nazi Germany [like Soldatensender Radio Belgrade]. By the way, "When the Koenigsbergradio came to the farm" A story about Sender L (Lappland) is published in a new radio history chapter under http://www.northernstar.no/konigs.htm (from radioanoraks.uk (They don't seem to be in English language though, so be careful before you buy!) (Sven Martinsen, Norwoay, BrDXC June 28 via BC-DX via DXLD) ** ECUADOR. Bandscan SW 68: I start this bandscan with some various notes: 3289.92, Radio Centro, Ambato heard very weakly due to transmitter problems. 4781.32, Radio Oriental, Tena, has been off air for a while (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin June 29, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) See also PERU for 1610+ ** ECUADOR. According to the German DX-broadcast on June 21, the [HCJB] German department hope to continue the transmissions from Quito to Europe for at least another year from Sept 28 2003 (the official final date for German language to Europe). The plan is to send 1 hour a day at 0700 CET [0500 summer, 0600 UT winter]. The cost for this is estimated to $15.000 - 20.000 annually. The German listeners are urged to sponsor the transmission costs (Christer Brunström, Sweden, SW Bulletin June 29, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) That reminds me, last Saturday until 2015 I ran across this DX program on 17795, excellent reception here in Europe[non]; not paying attention to the frequency at first, I assumed I was listening to a DW relay. Double checking the info, since I did not log it at the time, at WWDXC`s DX program list http://www.wwdxc.de/swl.pdf dated April 29 I find instead: Sat 2100 HCJB Quito##, G – 15545 17795 21455usb EUR ## Will be ceased from June 1st, 2003 But that must have missed the one-hour time shift a month earlier, for in the WWDXC schedule of all German broadcasts, Stand: 1. Juni 2003, http://www.wwdxc.de/hfd.pdf we find: 2000-2030 HCJB Quito 15545, 17795, 21455 (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ECUADOR [non]. This week, DX Partyline aired almost intact on WINB, UT Sun June 29 on 12160 at 0001-0030. Unfortunately, the program must be close to a full 30 minutes, as it was cut off before the closing announcements finished. During the show, Allen Graham announced that from July 6, DXPL would also be carried on WWCR, UT Sun 0200 on 5070 (that is, the semihour once occupied by VOA Communications World) --- and two more airings would be added at times TBA. He also said that last week on WINB, DXPL aired an hour later than scheduled. As we already reported, this was not the case, as we monitored continuously until 0131, and WOR started at 0106. Some non-DX religious show started promptly at 0130, so we quickly tuned out. Possibly DXPL was on some time after that, or at 0200? But this week after 0200, WINB was in Russian (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ERITREA. 7100, 20.6 1750, Voice of the Broad Masses of Eritrea, program 1, fantastic signal. S 4 and nice music. BEFF 7175, 20.6 1755, Voice of the Broad Masses of Eritrea also here, but with program 2. To me both broadcasts sounded almost the same but apparently not //. S 4. BEFF (Björn Fransson, Sweden, SW Bulletin June 29, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. But not included in T-systems Juelich list. 15670 1700-1759 38,39,48 304 145 degr 1346=Su/Tu/We/Fr JUL 100 kW SBO R Freedom, Vo the Ogadeni People, Huriyo (R Xoriyo), in Somali. 1630-1700 Tu/Fr EaAF 15670 JUL V o Democratic Eritrea, EaAF 1700-1730 Mon/Thu Tigre 15670 JUL 1730-1800 Mon/Thu Ar 15670 JUL SBO - Oromo Liberation, (Sagalee Bilisumma Oromoo) 1700-1730 Tu/We/Fr/Su Oromo 15670 JUL 1700-1800 Tu/We/Fr/Su Amhar 15670 JUL [x9930, x15335]. (BC-DX June 28 via DXLD) see also IRAN; DEUTSCHES REICH ** HUNGARY. 11710, R. Liberty via Jaszberény. Russian program from 0400 22/6, including IDs 0407. New relay, strong 22/6 (Seager-L) 11885, R. Liberty, Jaszberény. New relay, strong in Russian 0529, 22/6 (Craig Seager, Limekilns NSW DXpedition site, July Australian DX News via DXLD) Die erste westliche Nutzung ungarischer Sender waren Sendungen von Radio France Internationale vom August 1991 bis November 1993 fuer Nordafrika (Dr. Hansjoerg Biener, Germany, BC-DX June 25 via DXLD) ** INDONESIA. 4869.96. RRI Wamena. 0957 15/6, Indonesian music. 1000 ID as "Programa Satu, Radio Republik Indonesia Wamena". Good (Nobuo Takeno, Yamagata, Japan (NRD-535D with 10 meters wire, July Australia DX News via DXLD) Up-tempo music, 1123 19/6, sung in local dialect, Indonesian announcements (Phil Ireland, Limekilns NSW DXpediton site, July Australian DX News via DXLD) ** INDONESIA. 9743.6, RRI Sorong. Presume the one here 0740 16/6 with ballad followed by announcement in Indonesian. Poor signal with some modulation issues. Blocked at 0759 by HCJB (Paul Ormandy, NZ, July Australian DX News via DXLD) Usual muddy signal 0548 22/6 with EZL pops, Indonesian announcements. Good to hear them this early (Craig Seager, Limekilns NSW DXpedition site, July Australian DX News via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL. RADIOAFICIONADOS FAMOSOS --- Estos son algunos de los radioaficionados famosos que ha habido y que hay en el Mundo. 7L2NJY Dr. Mamora Mohri - astronauta Japones 9K2CS Principe Yousef Al-Sabah 9N1MM Padre Marshall Moran - misionero (silent key) A41AA Qaboos Bin Said Al-Said, Sultan de Oman CN8MH rey Hassan de Marruecos, SK EA0JC Juan Carlos I, Rey de España F0OMB FO5GJ Marlon Brando tambien conocido como Martin Brandeux - actor G3TZH Tony Dolby, hermano de 'the' Dolby G5RV Louis Varney - inventor de la antena G5RV, (silent key) GB1MIR Helen Sharman, Astronauta HS1A Bhumiphol Adulayadej - rey de Tailandia I0FCG Francesco Cossiga - Ex presidente de Italia JA3FA Tokuzo Inoue - presidente y fundador de Icom JA5FHB Ministro de transporte y comunicaciones del Japón JY1 Rey Hussein de Jordania (silent key) JY1NH Principe Abdullah ahora Rey de Jordania JY2 Reina Nur de Jordania K1JT Dr Joseph Taylor Jr, Premio Nobel de Fisica 1993 K1OKI Mickey Schulhof - presidente de Sony USA K2HEP John Scully - presidente de Apple computer K5FLU Martin F. Jue - presidente y fundador de MFJ K7TA Clifford Stoll - autor y científico K7UGA Barry Goldwater - senador de los Estados Unidos [SK!] KB6LQR Jeana Yeager, piloto del Voyager en 1986 KB6LQS Dick Rutan, piloto del Voyager en 1986 KC5OZX Nancy Currie - astronauta de la NASA KC7NHZ Kathy Sullivan - comandante de la 2a expedición de la estación espacial internacional [another entry below] KD4WUJ Patty Loveless - cantante Country KD5GSL William Shepard - comandante de la 1ª expedicion de la estación espacial internacional KD5OPQ Frank Culbertson - comandante de la 3ª expedicion de la estación espacial internacional KD6OY Garry Shandling - comediante y actor KN4UB Larry Junstrom, músico de rock LU1SM Carlos Saul Menem - Ex presidente de Argentina N4RH Ralph Haller - jefe de relaciones publicas de la FCC N5YYV Kathy Sullivan - cientifica de NOAA (antes astronauta) N6FUP Stu Cooks - jugador de baseball N6KGB Stewart Granger (born James Stewart) actor (silent key) NK7U Joe Rudi - jugador de baseball NN1SS estación espacial internacional ON1AFD Conde Dirk Frimouth - astronauta belga RW3FU Yuri Usachev - cosmonauta en la estación espacial internacional SP3RN Padre Maximiliano Kolbe, silent key S21A Saif D Shahid, Head of Bangladeshi PTT SU1VN/P Principe Talal de Arabia Saudita U2MIR/UV3AM Musa Manarov, Cosmonauta UA1LO Yuri Gagarin - cosmonauta VK2BL Graham Connelly, anunciador de radio VK2DIK Dick Smith - empresario y multimillonario VK2IG Dave Grey - comisionado adjunto VK2KB Sir Allan Fairhall, Político VR6TC Tom Christian, bisnieto de Fletcher Christian VU2RG Rajiv Gandhi, Primer Ministro de la India (silent key) VU2SON Sonia Gandhi, esposa de VU2RG W0ORE Tony England, Astronauta W3ACE Armin Meyer, US embajador en Japón W4RA Larry E. Price - presidente de IARU W5JBP Jim Haynie - presidente de la ARRL W5LFL Owen Garriot - astronauta W6EZV General Curtis LeMay (silent key) W6FZZ Samuel F B Morse III W6QYI Cardenal de Los Angeles Roger Mahoney W6ZH Herbert Hoover Jr. - nieto del ex presidente Hoover de los USA W8JK John Kraus - astrónomo WA4CZD Chet Atkins, Guitarrista WA4SIR Ron Parise - astronauta WA7WYV Andy Griffith - actor WB6RER Andy Devine, actor (silent key) WD4SKT Donnie Osmond - actor y comediante YN1AS General Anastasio Somoza Debayle Presidente República de Nicaragua (silent key) (Manrique EA1FRK via Info-CRAM, Boletín informativo de jun 23, ampliado por Horacio Nigro, jun 27, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** IRAN/GERMANY. 9545, a channel used by Deutsche Welle's German service since the Fifties!, suffers terrible co-channel interference by IRIB Kamalabad station in Bosnian and Albanian, 500 kW in 298 degrees. (wb, June 27) === !===! 9545 1730-1830 28S KAM 500 298 degr 0 146 BOSNIAN 9545 1830-1930 28SE KAM 500 298 degr 0 146 ALBANIAN 73 de (Wolfgang Bueschel, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRAQ. IRAQ'S MEDIA FREE-FOR-ALL By Tarik Kafala BBC News Online, 27 June, 2003 Full article and picture: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3023752.stm (via Sergei Sosedkin, IL, June 28, DXLD) Same? as in 3-114 but we didn`t have the URL for pix (gh, DXLD) ** IRAQ [non]. Towards Freedom still on the air --- Tarek Zeidan in Cairo has been monitoring this UK produced programme. He reports: "On the Eutelsat W1 10 deg East on the freq. 11106 GHz I am watching Towards Freedom, 13.55 UTC the news , showing the return of some of the British soldiers with hugs and kisses all over...though the kids were waving the Scottish flag in their hands! The Iraqi Philharmonic Orchestra is back on track again. The programme ended at 1400 UTC. There was a note at the end of the programme stating that Towards Freedom is edited in London and broadcast to the Iraqi people from the coalition media." (Media Network blog June 29 via DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH. The North Koreans must love me!!! I got yet another QSL last week and a goodie bag and a couple of days ago a letter from the head of their American bureau telling me where I can order tapes (I had said I liked their choirs) and that he wanted to learn more about me and my friends...hah! Oh well I bet if I were in the US I'd be under investigation. later, 73s, (Sue Hickey, Grand Falls-Windsor, Newfoundland, Canada, June 29, GRDXC via DXLD) 9334.92, V. of Korea 1403-1428 6/29. News in French to 1417 ID "Ici La Voix de La Corée" and into commentary. Parallel to 11709.82 (good) and 15245.05 (poor). The 25 meter freq had drifted down to 11709.72 by 1427, while 9334.92 had not varied and 15245 seemed to have disappeared (John Wilkins, CO, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** LAOS [non]. UZBEKISTAN 17540 on Wed, Fri only, Hmong Lao Radio [ULM organization] 0100-0200 UT (x12070 in B-02) via Tashkent-UZB. Address: 302 University Avenue, West, St. Paul, MN 55103, USA. Reply from P. O. Box 6426, St. Paul, MN 55106, USA. v/s Shoua Cha, Chairman. (wb, BC-DX June 19) I checked 17540 this morning (Fri 27 Jun) from QTH Madras/Chennai in India, where I'm also on holiday, quite a long distance from the intended target area. There were test tones from around 0050 and program at 0100-0200 with some SE-Asian sounding music, but reception was poor due to a combination of rather weak signal, local electrical noise in my hotel room and splatter from very strong China on 17550 kHz. Also I think the audio / modulation on 17540 was rather shallow. I would have to rate it as SINPO 22331 overall as really the audio was not intelligible, and at most times it was even difficult to tell if the program was speech or music. Generally best propagation on 17 MHz at that time was from the east (e.g. powerhouses BBC-Singapore 17790, RA-Darwin 17775 and CNR 17550, with VOA-PHL rather weaker on 17740 and 17820). (Alan Davies-INS, at present in Madras-IND, BC-DX June 27 via DXLD) Hmong Lao Radio (Laos) 12070, verified a follow up report with a no data (very plain without masthead) letter from v/s Shoua Cha, Chairman indicating transmissions into Laos are twice a week at 0800-0900 Lao time every Wednesday and Friday. Report sent to 302 University Avenue, West, St. Paul, MN 55103 address unearthed by Wendel Craighead although reply from P. O. Box 6426, St. Paul, MN 55106 (Rich D`Angelo, PA, July ADXN via DXLD) ** LATVIA. According to info from the transmitter operator, Laserradio UK is going to return to the old 5935 kHz (ex 9520) for transmissions during the summer. A suitable winter frequency is going to be coördinated at the coming HFCC conference (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, DXplorer June 25 via BC-DX via DXLD) ** LIBERIA. RADIO VERITAS - LIBERIA, 0720 UT EN 5470. After being off the air for several days is back again with religious talks and gospel music in English. ID at 0725 (César Pérez Dioses, Chimbote, Perú, June 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MADAGASCAR. 3287.665, 23.6 1835, RTV Malagasy, Antananarivo // with 5009.887. Nice music and French. Thunderstorm-QRM. 2 resp 4. SA (Stig Adolfsson, Sweden, SW Bulletin June 29, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MALI. Small window from Mali towards EUR around 0800-0830 UT, usual 9635.00 EVEN started after 0800 UT in VERNAC, but was wandering down 50 Hertz every 10 minutes, to 9634.900 at 0830 UT, very thiny 11960 \\ on even 11960.00 as usual (Wolfgang Bueschel, Germany, June 28, BC-DX via DXLD) Mali on 9 MHz is a regular here from 0800, and can usually be distinguished off frequency. But I am still struggling to find 11960! Either it is beamed inland or the power is lower than 9 maybe? (Noel R. Green, UK, BC-DX June 28 via DXLD) ** MEXICO. From the SWBC realm --- XEXQ, Radio Universidad de San Luis Potosí, has reactivated their 49-meter frequency of 6045 kHz. Heard here in the mornings around 1200-1300 UT with Classical music format, occasional Spanish announcement. Fair/poor in general, and have not ID'ed it yet, but has been reported by others. QSL'ed here in 1989 (John Wilkins, Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Drake R-8, 100-foot RW, June 29, Corazón DX via DXLD) Another version: 6045 R. Universidad, San Luis Potosí (tentative) 1250-1305 6/29. Possibly the one here with classical music, YL announcer in Spanish at 1258. No ID's yet, but would seem to be the one heard here daily around the same time with same format. Generally poor, with an occasional fair peak (John Wilkins, Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Drake R-8, 100-foot RW, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** MYANMAR. I've had no luck finding Myanmar on 4725 over the past few weeks, listening in various locations in Thailand, Laos and India, so I assume it's silent on this frequency. 5040v still seems to be active but usually gives poor reception because of the AIR stn on 5040 (Alan Davies, Indonesia, at present in Madras-IND, DXplorer June 28via BC-DX via DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. John Figliozzi at Radio Netherlands --- We had the pleasure of a visit from a friend and loyal Radio Netherlands listener John Figliozzi today. John will be writing a feature article about Radio Netherlands for Monitoring Times magazine. I've got to know John well over the past few years, and since so much nonsense has been written and said about Radio Netherlands by outsiders in the past few weeks, it will be great to have a decent and properly researched feature about us for a change. John understands international broadcasting and knows what questions to ask. I think he was happy with the answers! The awards keep on coming --- Jonathan Marks this week said he had spent 23 years working with "the best colleagues in the business" at Radio Netherlands, something that was borne out 24 hours later with the news that Radio Netherlands has been awarded five medals and three finalist certificates at this year's New York Radio Festivals - the annual event honouring the world's best radio programmes. The English department won three medals and three finalist certificates, and the Latin American department was awarded two medals. They were up against more than a thousand entries from about 40 countries. The awards ceremony took place on 26 June 2003. It will be interesting to see if the Dutch media --- and some international media-related Web sites --- choose to give this achievement as much coverage as they gave to the leaked and now discredited McKinsey findings about Radio Netherlands. Probably not, because when people are doing their jobs well and being recognised for it, it gets boring...there's no story in it. We understand that. We're journalists :-) (Media Network blog June 27 via DXLD) ** PERU. 4955.00, Radio Cultural Amauta, Huanta. I noted in the HCDX mailing list that a Finnish DXer logged RD Nacional de Colombia on this frequency but here in Quito only the Huanta-station is heard. 5470.21, Radio San Nicolás, Rodriguez de Mendoza, off air. 6042.59, Radio Melodía, Arequipa, safely anchored on this split. The following items from some of the "SWB América Latina" earlier received by e-mail. All of the stations mentioned below can still be heard. June 23: New Peruvian radio station on 5176.51 kHz! 5176.51, Radio La Amistad, possible QTH - Tayabamba, la provincia de Pataz, el departamento de La Libertad. June 23 2003 - 1120 UT. Started Monday morning June 23 at about 06 local time in Quito and clearly stated it was a new station. IDs: "Radio La Amistad, la nueva radio al servício..." and "Radio La Amistad está transmitiendo desde la población de Tayabamba, capital provincial de (Pataz??)". Said they transmit on FM and SW. The only geographic name I clearly hear is "La província de Bolívar" and an uncertain "Tayabamba". Both places are located in dpto "La Libertad". The fact that the station was heard well a whole hour after local sunrise here in Quito indicates a northern QTH, for instance "La Libertad". Very hard to hear the QTH 100% as the male DJ uses a mike of inferior quality. Listen to a recording from this occasion: http://homepage.sverige.net/~a-0901/ Info from "Ventanaperú": Provincia de Pataz, cuya capital es Tayabamba. Sus distritos son: Buldibuyo, Chillia, Huancaspata, Huaylillas, Huayo, Ongón, Parcoy, Pataz, Pías, Santiago de Challa, Taurija, Tayabamba, Urpay; con una población total de 63,688 hab. 1610.10, Ecos del Portete, Girón (Ecuador). June 16 2003 - 0200 1610.10, "Radio Sabor", unknown QTH (probably Perú). June 16 - 0200 Of course it is fantastic, almost incredible - 2 Andean stations on the same split, on the X-band where no Andean stations normally broadcast and at evenings nonstop Andean music. When our member Hasse Mattisson/HM said that he heard a unID Andean station on 1610.10 kHz we both supposed it was Ecos del Portete. Everything matched. I contacted Ecos del Portete by telephone and later got an e-mail from Sr. Ángelo, a reporter at the station. HM sent a tape recording but the music is not Ecuadorian and does not match what I hear from Ecos del Portete, a station mostly with Ecuadorian "rocolera" and "cumbia"-music. After careful frequency checking for many hours I finally got a bite! Actually there are 2 stations on the same split. The "newly added" station has music similar to that from HM`s tape recording. Several evenings I have heard them with nonstop music without any sign of talk. Tonight, June 16, the station almost did nothing else than "ID-ed". Unfortunately with lousy signal. ID: "...toda la gente Radio Radio Radio Sabor". No idea of QTH and Ecos del Portete was heard simultaneously also with lousy signal. Portete in AM-mode and "Sabor" in USB with narrow bandwidth. To hear the name of the station is very hard so please send your comments if I heard something wrong. Listen to a recording from this occasion: http://homepage.sverige.net/~a-0901/ where also the recording from 1610.10 Ecos del Portete can be found (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin June 29, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** RUSSIA. NO MORE FREE TV IN RUSSIA Privately-owned Russian TV station TVS has been closed down by the government and replaced by a sports channel. Some say it marks the end of independent TV journalism in Russia. . . http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/features/html/russia030627.html (RN Media Network via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. 11975, Kamchatka Rybatskaya via Kamchatka Radio. F/D e-mail verie for Snail Mail f/up in 28 days. V/S A.F. Borodin, Head of Radio Company Kamchatka. Sent via WRTH 2002 address. E-mail was received in Russian - tnx to Walt Salmaniw for translation (John Wilkins, Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Drake R-8, 100-foot RW. Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** SOMALILAND. 7530.4, 20.6 1740, Radio Hargeisa with quite good signal, but a little off. S 3. BEFF (Björn Fransson, Sweden, SW Bulletin June 29, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SRI LANKA. 4870 SLBC, Ekala. Sinhalese service heard with vocals at 1355 22/6 prior to ad block. Fair strength (John Schache, Limekilns NSW DXpediton site, July Australian DX News via DXLD) 4870.88, unID 1857-2000 20/6.Talk and music like South East Asia. Strong signal w/little QRM from 4869.96 Wamena. Fair (Nobuo Takeno, Yamagata, Japan (NRD-535D with 10meters wire, July Australian DX News via DXLD) SLBC running late? -cs (Craig Seager, ADXN Trail ed. Via DXLD) Oh, yes, SLBC does that when there be a full moon (gh, DXLD) ** TAJIKISTAN. 4995, R. Liberty, Dushanbe. Thanks to Ian Johnson for info on this. Open carrier at 1355 prior to s/on at 1400 23/6 in Kazakh. The odd English phrase was heard during the program. The audio was a bit over-modulated and sounded as if the feed was via landline. Fair at times and a bit better. (John Schache, Limekilns NSW DXpedition site, July Australian DX News via DXLD) Previously an unID ** TIBET [non]. Voice of Tibet schedule is now: 1215-1300 15660-KAZ, 15670-UZB/KAZ, 21545-UZB, 21560-UZB. First program, only two frequencies in use at a time. 1430-1520 17520-UZB or 17540-UZB. 2nd program on single frequency, and Chinese jammer music ... over and over again ... [Noted on 15660 and 21560 kHz, as well as on 17540 on June 28th] (wb, June 28, BCDX via DXLD) ** TOGO [non]. It seems that Radio Togo Libre has gone off air due to lack of funds --- according to an item in DXLD. I have heard RSA relaying RFI until 1300 on 21760, and heard the carrier go off air after time pips on the hour (Noel R. Green, UK, BC-DX June 26 via DXLD) Yes, I missed 21760 outlet on previous days too. Lack of funds, I read the same item. A DXer phoned the station`s manager in Canada, and was asked immediately to donate RTogo Libre station (wb, June 26, ibid.) Radio Togo Libre: Neither 26 nor 27 they were transmitted. What did it happen? (Zacharias Liangas, Greece, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Well, FWIW, both frequencies are still on the TDP schedule checked June 29: http://www.airtime.be/schedule.html Previous items from Anker Petersen indicated that the broadcasts heard earlier this month were merely limited-duration tests. And I gather that the big election is July 1, not June 1 (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. The BBC has now published a new map showing their expanded DAB coverage area once the new transmission network has been installed by the end of 2004. This will extend coverage to 85% of the UK population. To see if your area is going to be able to receive the BBC DAB channels click on this link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/digitalradio/listen/where.shtml A map showing the current coverage area can be seen at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/reception/radio_transmitters/digital_radio.shtml (British DX Club (BDXC-UK), June 24 via BC-DX via DXLD) ** U K. SIXTY YEARS OF UPSETTING POLITICIANS Sunday June 29, 2003, The Observer 1940: Winston Churchill wants to 'establish more effective control' over the BBC. He sends a memo to the Ministry of Information less than a week after taking over as Prime Minister: 'I should be glad to receive some proposals from you for establishing a more effective control over the BBC. Now we have a Government representing the Opposition as well as the Majority, we should have a much freer hand in this respect.' 1956: During the Suez crisis, Prime Minister Anthony Eden tries to take over the BBC's External Services. 1982: Margaret Thatcher rebukes the BBC for its Falklands coverage. Director-General Alasdair Milne is summoned to Westminster by the Tory backbench 1922 Committee for a dressing-down. 1986: Conservative Party chairman Norman Tebbit asks party officials to prepare a report of the alleged political bias of the BBC following his indictment of its coverage of the US air raid on Libya. 'I was not bullying or softening up the BBC but I was asking them to maintain the standards they are required to maintain,' he said. April 1999 John Simpson, the BBC's World Affairs Editor, on assignment in Belgrade, refutes No 10's charges that he is a tool of the Serbs. 'This is my 30th war,' he says. 'There's a depressing pattern: when things go wrong British governments tend to lose their nerve. They get frightened at the thought of people getting independent, objective information, so they start whispering about the abilities of broadcasters.' http://politics.guardian.co.uk/media/story/0,12123,987383,00.html (via Kim Elliott, DXLD) See site for links to many more BBC stories! ** U S A. Dear Allan, I was really surprised and disappointed by what happened on the evening of June 25th at the time of the World of Radio broadcast (2200 UT). This was the first Wednesday in many weeks that you had a transmission going out during the 2100-2200 UT hour on 17495 kHz, and it was coming in fine and clearly here in St. Louis. 7415 kHz was poor and noisy in comparison. So I expected that you would resume the previous practice you engaged in during the past, to broadcast World of Radio simultaneously on both frequencies. But I was shocked, infuriated, and deeply disappointed that instead you shut off the 17495 kHz transmitter instead of letting it run for that next half- hour and carry World of Radio. We were forced to listen to a barely- understandable transmission on 7415 kHz only. I never did quite understand why you stopped transmitting the repeat of your personal-comments show during that 2100-2200 UT hour on 17495 when you didn't have paid programming utilizing the time, since you DID do it before. Maybe you felt that the cost to run the 17495 transmitter for that time to just carry your own words was not worth it. But I, for one, enjoyed hearing that. The time it is originally transmitted and other repeats I knew of had too many conflicts to let me listen regularly, so that Wednesday-afternoon time when I was preparing to listen to World of Radio was always a good time to hear it. When you stopped that and just had no transmissions on 17495, I could understand not bringing that transmitter up just to carry World of Radio for its half-hour. But I cannot understand taking it down just *before* World of Radio starts! If you have paid programming on 17495 kHz up till 2200 UT on Wednesdays, PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE leave that transmitter on the air and broadcast World of Radio on that frequency too! Thank you, (Will Martin St. Louis, MO, cc to DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Again this week, WINB 12160 failed to air WOR as scheduled at 0030 UT Sunday on 12160, tho they did get DX Partyline on just before it [see ECUADOR non]. Instead, gospel music played during this half hour, with the sound often fading to virtually inaudible on the still-adequate carrier. Wavescan did come up at 0100, its correct time (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [and non]. The AFRTS website http://myafn.dodmedia.osd.mil/radio/shortwave/ indicates new frequencies for both Key West and Puerto Rico: both are currently marked "TBD". (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, DXplorer June 27 via BC-DX via DXLD) To be determined? ** U S A. 5034.22, WWRB, McKaysville. Poor 0611 with religious program, better on 5050 and 5085 so this is possibly a spur? Next night, 5050 and 5085 are both off so maybe their techs are working on a problem? 8 June (Paul Ormandy, New Zealand, July Australian DX News via DXLD) We already had the first part of this, but not the follow-up. Confusion continues to reign regarding Dave Frantz`s stations. WWRB has never been in McCaysville (note spelling), which is in Georgia very near the North Carolina {and TN} border. WWRB is near Manchester, Tennessee, and is the successor to WWFV (and before that WGTG) in McCaysville. AFAIK, according to what Frantz has said, the WWFV facility no longer does any transmitting, but may be used as a receive-only site for his ``Nashville Radio`` aeronautical operation (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [non]. Re 15650 PAB: Who is this? (Hans Johnson-USA) 15650 1500-1515 39,40 102 115 1 0106-261003 JUL 100 PAB 15650 1530-1545 39,40 208 100 1 2206-261003 JUL 100 PAB 15650 1545-1600 39,40 110 100 1 0106-261003 JUL 100 PAB I tuned in today Sunday 29/6 to 15650 at around 1440 but heard no signal past 1450. But on returning at about 1503 I found a transmission in progress. Unfortunately, I had local noise problems which were enough to make audibility of the transmission difficult to follow. The signal was about S3+ in American English and religious in nature. There was an address given in America - a P. O. Box number in a town called Lakeland?? Very tentative. Transmission finished at 1515. Another transmission --- it sounds the same one to my ears --- has started at 1530 on 15650. Signal strength still only 3+ in local noise and very difficult to copy. But it's religious broadcaster. (later): A correction to my last concerning 15650. The broadcast at 1530 was NOT identical to the one at 1500-1515. It was American religious and lasted till 1600, but split into two 15 min segments. I could not understand very much of it, and the announcements / IDs were unclear, but I thought I heard mention of "- - - radio network international - - -" at 1545. Unfortunately, Israel put their carrier on at 1556 with IS and this more or less wiped out the other broadcaster. Sorry I couldn`t do any better. It is established as a Sunday broadcaster anyway (Noel R. Green-UK, BC-DX June 29 via DXLD) 1st program: 15650 scheduled at 1500-1515, and 1530-1600 UT, I tuned in today June 29th (Sun only broadcast) at 1501 UT, so I missed the opening procedure. Bad reception at my location due of dead zone of Juelich site (only 380 km away, too bad for proper 19 mb reception). Bad reception Sinpo 22222, much static noise. Recognized an US (accented gospel huxter) religious preacher broadcaster. Could only trace some word fragments like "Way mark, ... offers Bible Teaching Cassette...". The given P. O. Box 2324, Macon, Georgia 31203, U.S.A.; details revealed the Bible Teaching Radio station, when put that on Yahoo USA searching machine, as follows Waymarks International Ministries - Bible Teaching & Radio. [of Loren and Diana Wilson] Our mailing address is: Waymarks Ministries, P.O.Box 2324, Macon, Georgia 31203, U.S.A. Telephone: ++1 [912] 750-1422 FAX: ++1 [912] 750-1422. e-mail: lorenwilson@waymarks.org URL: http://www.waymarks.org We are presently broadcasting our weekly teaching messages over these radio stations: Radio Africa #2 Shortwave to more than 8 countries in Southern Africa, Thu at 8:45 am. WINB Shortwave to all of North America, 13800 [sic] kHz, Sat at 12:45 pm. CHMR 93.5 FM, to St. Johns, Newfoundland, Canada at 12:45 pm Eastern USA time. [what use is that in Nfld?] WBML 900 AM, to Macon, Georgia, Saturdays at 7:45 pm. But the website`s "Last Update: October 24, 2000" !!!! 2nd program: The 1530-1600[1557] UT portion suffered by similar bad reception. Could hear some numbers like "?POB 6008?", and "?phone 73296?", sorry conditions were very bad. But from 1552 to 1557 UT, the signal peaked up to some short skip openings up to S=8, just before KOL Israel interval signal joined co- channel scene at 15.56:40 UT powerhouse S=9 +60 dB, and latter opened program at 1600 UT with Yiddish [similar Middle Age German] language service. Waymarks program cut suddenly by the Juelich personnel at exact 1700 UT, midst in a sentence (Wolfgang Bueschel, Germany, BC-DX June 29 via DXLD) {Answer: 3-117} ** U S A. Senator Hollings may not be a fan of WKTU's "War of the Roses" -- but Senator Chuck Schumer is. Followup to this morning's Inside Radio story about Senator Hollings damning WKTU's morning show bit about cheating mates -- you can hear the audio of a recent call to the show by New York Senator Schumer on the KTU website http://www.ktu.com (Inside Radio via DXLD) ** U S A. WHERE HAVE ALL THE LISTENERS GONE? A PIONEER STATION HAS TO DEAL WITH ITS VANISHING LISTENERS by Steven J. Moffitt, Executive Director, KBVM Portland, Oregon Editor`s Note: Mr. Moffitt wrote this article on my request. He originally sent me news of his successful fund drive, and I asked him to consider doing an article on how things have turned around dramatically at this pioneer Catholic radio station. After several weeks of prodding, he came up with a draft I thought excellent, but he wanted to revise it again. Here is his final version. In it, he relates experiences that will be of great interest to everyone in Catholic radio. In the Spring of 2001, KBVM`s General Manager, with the approval of a majority of the then Board of Directors, initiated a radical change in its programming. The result of those changes and the aftermath are the topic of this article. {I suspect the calls are not explained in this long article; any? Catholic would recognize BVM = Blessed Virgin Mary, Tampa too} How it all began On the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, December 8, 1989, KBVM-FM 88.3 aired its first broadcast --- becoming, arguably, the first Lay- Owned Catholic Radio station to do so. This was the culmination of a dream that began with a committed Rosary cenacle group which began in Portland back in the 1940`s. This group`s original effort, begun in the 1960`s, was simply to get the Rosary aired on local radio so that those at home could participate in the daily recitation of the Rosary. They began by buying time on a local station for their 15 minute Rosary broadcast. Over time, however, the radio business being what it is, they were ``un-welcomed`` by a succession of stations, culminating in deep frustration for the group, and their (for them) radical idea of getting their own radio station. They began work on this new project in the early 1980`s. Through some hard work, many prayers and the good will of many broadcast professionals from the Portland area, they were able to identify an available frequency at 88.3 FM. They filed an application for it in 1983 and were granted a CP in 1986. A miracle, since the Portland Metro has a TV station on Channel 6 and KBVM`s new frequency would interfere with their audio signal. That TV station saw fit not only to not contest KBVM`s application, but to provide much needed assistance to KBVM in applying for its license and in constructing it facilities. To this day, the station broadcasts from the same transmitter site as Channel 6. When KBVM went on the air, there was a very limited amount of programming available to Catholic Radio stations. It wasn`t until the mid to late 90`s that EWTN began providing radio programming via satellite. So, KBVM aired music for most of the day, since in KBVM`s early years music was most readily available to fill their programming hours – this in addition to its mission of airing the rosary, which it did several times a day. Further, KBVM limited their hours of broadcast to at first 10 hours a day and then, later, with the advent of automation and programming from EWTN, they increased it to 24 hours a day. Where have all the listeners gone? KBVM went on the air in a relative vacuum in regards to other Christian radio stations in Portland and certainly as regards Catholic radio nationally. However, by the late 1990`s Christian radio had gained a foothold in the Portland market --- most notably with the arrival of Family radio`s K-LOVE at 88.9 FM --- right next to KBVM on the dial. By 1999, it was apparent to the management and the board of directors, that KBVM`s audience numbers had dropped dramatically – by about half. The assumption they made was that this was attributable to K-Love`s format, which aims for an 18-34 demographic. KBVM`s 18-34 numbers were very low in comparison, but had been much stronger prior to K-Loves arrival. This, along with other factors, one of which was the prospect of continuing budget shortfalls attributed to falling audience numbers, contributed to KBVM`s decision to alter its format in order to increase its audience numbers. The line of reasoning was that to increase the numbers you had to remove ``tune-outs`` --- things that cause people to tune to another (read K-Love) station. (KBVM at that time had Arbitron ratings that showed that at the times the Rosary and Mass aired their audience numbers plummeted.) So, the decision was made to move the Rosary, the Mass, and the other devotions out of the primary listening hours and replace them with short 30- or 60-second messages instead, and to increase the amount of contemporary Christian music aired in each hour. KBVM also at that time modified its mission statement, and modified its image, moving from its ``Positive Difference`` image to ``Family Radio.`` Efforts were also made to position KBVM away from an overtly Catholic and Marian image to one of a more generic Christian image for a number of reasons. (One reason for this image shift was to make KBVM seem more palatable to non- Catholic foundations so that KBVM could apply for grants from them without being rejected. In addition, it was believed that the shift in audience was the result of its large percentage of non-Catholic listeners moving to K-Love because of doctrinal differences with KBVM`s programming. In other words, they now had a Protestant radio station to listen to, so they did.) The manner in which KBVM`s management made these changes may have contributed to the public outcry that ensued. The switch was made right after completing the spring 2001 Sharathon, during which time no mention was made of the impending changes or the reasoning behind them --- a serious error for a station that had spent years building a strong sense of listener ownership in all of its fundraising efforts. The outcry that ensued centered mostly on the station`s seeming embarrassment of its Catholic and Marian identity. This is not to say that KBVM`s listeners weren`t unhappy with the changes in the music format. Many were, probably most. Included in that number were a number of the Board of Directors who lobbied successfully to restore KBVM to its original format and identity as a Catholic Station. It is easy to look back over events such as those faced by KBVM in the smug knowledge that one would never fall prey to such a mistake (if you`ll allow me that term). But, it would be wise to consider that no one involved with KBVM during this time period had anything but the best of intentions. A new direction In April of 2002, KBVM hired a new General Manager and began the difficult process of rebuilding itself. In doing so, they took into consideration a number of factors including public opinion. But more importantly, they wanted KBVM to remain faithful to its Catholic roots and heritage. This raised the question then of just what model does the station use to determine what KBVM`s brand of Catholic radio would be while attempting to remain faithful to its own individual roots. In pondering this question it helped greatly for the station to ponder another question. That is, what is Catholic? If KBVM was to be a Catholic radio station, then how should it go about being Catholic? The answers that they have so far developed and implemented may seem obvious, but keep in mind that KBVM remains unique among most of Catholic radio today, in that it is primarily a music station. That uniqueness came into question for reasons that should be obvious. In its mission statement, KBVM states that evangelization is its primary mission. No one could answer. however, just how does music fulfill that mission if it indeed does at all? It was suggested that KBVM could only accomplish evangelization through Catechetical programming (A matter of some debate in Catholic Radio circles). It was also suggested that, while music had value, it was merely for entertainment, or to give the listener a break between teaching and devotions. Music does provide entertainment, it also provides a break for listeners, but is that all it can be said to accomplish? In pondering these difficult questions, KBVM looked for something with which to use as an example to follow or as a model to use. Eventually, they settled on the Church itself as its model. How does the Church mark her day? With prayer and worship. How does the Church worship? With the word, with music, and with her prayers. This, then, is the model that KBVM chose to follow and everyday seeks to emulate. It is also the cause of their revised self image for themselves as a ministry. Instead of attempting to meet the lowest common denominator among potential listeners by avoiding ``preaching to the choir,`` KBVM sees its role as that of being a ``city on a hill.`` Heavenly Beauty The resulting effect on the station`s image and format are that KBVM now unapologetically announces itself as the Catholic Radio station in Portland. Its music has changed as well. In pondering the effectiveness of music as a tool of evangelization, KBVM`s management noticed that a crucial aspect of music had been overlooked. This aspect is the key to why music is effective as a means of evangelization. Perhaps, in many circumstances, the best tool for evangelization. What they saw was that music, while it is certainly useful as entertainment and can make a welcome break between teaching programs, has a higher function. Music, as the Church has known for centuries, has the ability to bring the hearer into brief contact with transcendent beauty — heavenly beauty. I`m sure that no one would doubt music`s ability to do this; however, what isn`t understood or even thought of is, how does the human heart and mind react to an encounter with the beauty of heaven? What KBVM found, when it began to look, was that music is indeed successful as a tool of evangelization precisely because it brings people into contact with transcendent beauty, and that that encounter attracts them to beauty so strongly that they are forced to make a moral choice for the good. We are in essence drawn to God the author of beauty through beauty itself. Using that as an underlying foundation, KBVM began to look at what the Church had to say about music. The Church herself has proclaimed by long usage and careful preservation, that certain types of music and even certain songs are conducive to worship – to beauty. These include Gregorian Chant, the music of long use in the liturgy, Choral, and so on. This is not to say that contemporary music has no value, but rather that a balance of the ``old`` and the ``new`` forms makes for a better and more effective musical mix than an either or proposition does. Both forms --- the old and the contemporary --- have the ability to bring the hearer into contact with transcendent beauty. So, KBVM adjusted its music mixture to include the greatest of the Church`s long list of beautiful musical pieces. This served to enhance the station`s Catholic image, as well as to broaden its audience reach. In addition, in a time when the Catholic Church is being resoundingly criticized from all corners, KBVM is giving Catholics something they can point to with a sense of pride. KBVM now proclaims itself to be a Catholic Radio station. The result has been a great increase in the number of pledges it received for its last spring sharathon – up over 50%. Audiences vote with their dollars and the vote says that they are greatly pleased with the new KBVM. In the words of one of the original founders, Fr. Duffner of the Rosary Center, ``KBVM has never sounded so Catholic.`` Does it really work? One final note. Does music really work for evangelization? KBVM points to two telling stories (among many) from individuals who have contacted them. Both, say that while committed to taking their own lives, they stumbled upon KBVM`s broadcast and that *the music was so beautiful* that they couldn`t go through with it. Contact with beauty caused them to make a moral choice for good. Does this mean that teaching has no place? No. Rather, both are necessary. Some are not open to hearing the word, others are. Eventually, everyone needs to hear the word. So, KBVM provides both in what it hopes to be the most effective balance. Pleasing to its listeners, and pleasing to God as well. This spring KBVM finished it`s Sharathon by reaching the highest number of dollars raised ($191,000. as of this writing) and the highest number of pledges it has ever seen in 14 years (2111 so far)! Clearly KBVM`s audience is letting their opinions be known in their support of the station (Catholic Radio Update June 30 via DXLD) ** U S A. More on trans-Atlantic FM and TV DX: PROPAGATION ** URUGUAY. 6140.11, Radio Monte Carlo, Montevideo. June 2003 - 1035 UT. I have never before heard this station. I don`t know if that depends on station inactivity or varying conditions. Heard a few days with program format quite similar to CPN in Perú earlier logged on 6141v kHz (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin June 29, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VENEZUELA. 4939.67, Radio Amazonas, Puerto Ayacucho, now with far better audio quality, earlier very weak modulation (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin June 29, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VIETNAM. Re: WRTH SW Guide shows 6020 as VOV 4/1/2, whatever that means [? 4 dipoles, 1 row, half wave above ground level, wb] (BC-DX via DXLD) Maybe, but such antenna parameters are not normally shown in this publication: the numbers were positioned as if they were part of the name of the station (gh, DXLD) ** ZAMBIA. 4910, Zambia BC, 1845 June 26, seemingly a radio debate between two men in a local language. Discussion ended at 1856 then with a tribal music interval. At TOH OM with ID ``... broadcasting corporation`` followed by music and flute. At 1900 OM IDing with 'Zambia' then SINPO 32232 talks in local language (Swahili?) (Zacharias Liangas, Thessaloniki Greece, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Not in Zambia ** ZANZIBAR. 6015, 28.6 0350, R. Tanzania, Zanzibar, Dole, Swahili, long interwiew, local music S2-3 GAL (Giampaolo Galassi, Savignano, Italy, SW Bulletin June 29 via DXLD) ** ZIMBABWE [non]. 4880, SW Radio Africa, 1756 June 27, with a tribal song,1800 OM giving web address and frequencies, then with a discussion program , ended at 1812, man with ID, web address , a telephone ..4420, 1813 music and man talking on kowanda then a song, 1824 with talks by two OM, 1842 with a political talk followed by OM with ID, address and same, then closing with a music program. Signal best heard at 4875 [34433] though at TOH and 1830 was QRM from ULX with signal S6 at 1800 gradually enhancing to S9+5 at 1830. Strong FSK on 4884 at a steady S9 (Zacharias Liangas. Thessaloniki. Greece http://www.geocities.com/zliangas/kchibo.pdf DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ZIMBABWE [and non]. Update on SW Radio Africa, heard on 4880, this evening from 1600 UT. Schedules for this transmission do not note this change [ex-6145]. Reception is excellent here in the target area, Zimbabwe. 4880 khz is a long time favorite of mine; it`s from the South African facility of Sentech (formerly the SABC, South Africa). (Great to finally confirm this to you all, but it needed a frequency change to confirm it). To gh: The local media hasn`t confirmed yet on the status of the radio station takeover, etc. It won`t affect the Zimbabwe govt`s action, etc. I will keep you informed. Also: Thanks to VOA for their service heard here Mon-Fri on 17895 (and 909 kHz MW from Botswana) from 1700 to 1800 UT (David Pringle-Wood, Harare, Zimbabwe, June 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. 15750: Came across an UNID station around 1800-1900 UT, seemingly in Persian [or similar] language, audio level poor, very thiny signal, and IRN? jamming underneath, sounding like a 'idle motion' fax machine. ? Radio Voice of Mojahed" again on air? (wb, June 27, BC-DX via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ 2003 MEXICAN NATIONAL DXERS MEETING IN TIZAYUCA, HIDALGO WRMI is a member of the National Association of Shortwave Broadcasters (NASB), to which most of the privately-owned shortwave stations in the U.S. belong, and WRMI General Manager Jeff White has just begun a one- year term as President of the NASB. Jeff will be taking an NASB display to the 2003 Mexican National DXers Meeting in Tizayuca, Hidalgo State (just north of Mexico City) August 1-3. The display will include program schedules and other promotional materials from all 18 NASB member stations. NASB is an associate member of the DRM (Digital Radio Mondiale) Coalition, which is promoting the establishment of digital AM and shortwave broadcasts throughout the world, and at the DX Meeting in Tizayuca there will be the first ever demonstration of DRM reception in Mexico. Several shortwave broadcasters from Mexico and abroad -- as far away as China -- are expected to attend the meeting, as well as shortwave listeners and DXers from throughout Mexico and the United States. For more information on the Mexican National DX Meeting, send an e-mail to: info@w... [presumably info@wrmi.net is the non-truncated version?] (Jeff White, WRMI News, via Noticias DX via DXLD) Tizayuca is where the 1630 X-band station is coming; conventioneers should check into that (gh, DXLD) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ RADIO YOUR WAY Glenn - Have you seen this? It seems to have been out a while, so I probably just overlooked it... Too bad it doesn't include shortwave! It does have a line-in jack, though http://www.radioyourway.com/ (Doni Rosenzweig, June 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Part of ad: Never miss another radio program again! Blow through commercials allowing you to listen to a 3-hour radio show in half the time. Record 4 1/2 hours on its internal 32MB memory. Can be expanded to another 36 hours with SD/MMC card (256 MB). Be sure to check our accessories to purchase additional memory cards. 10 built-in timers to record your favorite radio shows (via DXLD) NEW TOY: TEN-TEC RX-320D I recently purchased a Ten-Tec RX-320D computer-controlled "black box" receiver. This compact unit, described at http://www.tentec.com/TT320.htm runs off a 15 VDC wall-wart and connects to a PC through a serial port control cable. If audio is to be transferred to the PC's sound card, a separate audio cable is connected for that. Alternately, you can connect headphones or a speaker directly to the radio. The supplied software provides a simple-to-use graphical user interface. One cool feature is the spectrum chart, much like the old Heath panadapters or a rudimentary version of spectrum analyzers used in professional test and measurement labs. There were a few things I wanted to do that I couldn't figure out. Apparently a recording function is not integrated into the software. I wanted to record MP3 or WAV files straight from the receiver software without having to open up other software. Another thing I want to do is have the receiver take in an Excel or tab-delimited text file of times and frequencies for unattended "robot" DXing / recording. Maybe DXers, on their own, have developed C/C++ or Visual Basic code that can do exactly what I want. This would be to record desired frequencies at specified times / dates and also put out a data file consisting of signal strength readings. I could use the receiver as a propagation analyzer or spectrum occupancy study aid. Nick Hall- Patch has done this successfully with another receiver. Conceivably, software could be structured to make decisions such as "If you find this, then go look for that, otherwise go to a different test to decide what to do next". Such disciplined scanning would simulate the actions of a real-life DXer at the dials. Who knows what goodies you might find in the morning on your PC in the MP3 and data summary files if you have this capability ? All this said, how did the receiver perform ? On its built-in whip antenna, a lot of PC, TV, and other house-based hash & oddball buzzy carriers were noted. On a real antenna, fortunately, all that went away. Reception was quite similar to the Drake R8A without its preamplifier engaged. Since I was using a Flag antenna with fairly low output, some daytimers receivable on the R8A (such as CHTN-720) were in the noise floor on the RX-320D. With a less efficient antenna such as a Pennant or Flag, an extra 10 dB of low-noise preamplification would be a great thing. Since this radio is touted more for shortwave than medium wave, sensitivity was probably ratcheted down a bit since SW antennas tend to be much more efficient and closer to a resonant length. I did not note any spurs / intermods, not bad since 50 kW WRKO-680 is less than 3 miles / 5 km away. Even 1360 (=680*2), a perennial overload channel here, had clear WLYN instead of the WRKO overload that my car radio gets. With a bigger antenna, or an amplified one, I might not be quite as lucky. The fast AGC setting didn't seem quite fast enough for quick adjustments of loop, phaser, or variable termination resistance derived nulls. There's a bit of lag time on the PC screen "S-meter". The IF filter selections were good and they seemed effective. I would have liked DSP based continuously-variable bandwidth, but what can you expect for $300 ? It will be interesting to set this up during a decent opening and bag some TA's with it. Its need for the laptop and a +15V supply probably means that I won't be using it in the car on mini-DXpeditions to the seashore. Running this arrangement in a dark, cramped, and (often) cold vehicle doesn't seem likely. Use on a house-based DXpedition (e.g. Cappahayden, Grayland, Chamberlain, Miscou Island, or Sheigra) could be worthwhile however. I'm not sure what the airport security people would make of the little black box. Having the radio integrated to the laptop can be a good thing since logging programs, Geoclock, Euro-MWLog and Pacific Log PDF's could all be accessed. John Bryant, Nick Hall-Patch, and the rest of the Grayland crew have certainly proved this. The D model is supposed to be usable to decode DRM broadcasts. For a review of an earlier version see http://www.anarc.org/naswa/issues/1298/equip1298.html Once I get the unattended recording schemes worked out, I'll be having a lot of fun with this radio (Mark Connelly, WA1ION - Billerica, MA, hard-core-dx via DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ TA DX FROM IRELAND JUNE 26TH Hi all, there`s a lot of discussion going on of this amazing reception on the night of June 26th. So I thought I should introduce myself as I have not posted to the list in some time, but regularly read the digests. I am located some 30 miles inland from the Atlantic coast of Ireland in the Northern Irish county of Fermanagh. There isn`t much blocking me from the WNW and it was in this direction that my humble 4 element yagi was pointing Thursday night when the unimaginable happened. For years DXers this side of the pond have discussed and dreamed about a Transatlantic opening. I guess the attraction was the notion of openings in which most of the stations heard are in our own language. Plus the distance of course! Over here we contend with everything from the usual Spanish and Italian openings to Arab North Africa and a slew of stuff from Eastern Europe and former Soviet bloc states. Its all good stuff, but for years the holy grail of DXers over here has been an opening that might span the Atlantic. I think most of us have tried AM DX-ing and after hearing a few signals from North America that way --- I think the idea always comes up at some point, wouldn`t this stuff sound great in stereo! Of course this was all dreaming. Until last Thursday night. The first signs of someth1ng happening were the plots on the 6 metre contact loggers online which showed a wide open path across the pond around 1730 UT. Then all the TV carriers and some audio started rolling in. But then around 1810 there were brief blasts of North American speech on 88.5 interspersed amongst the huge European opening which was in full swing. I just didn't believe my ears. A station came up with a reference to New York and then talk about comedy. (I thought it must be AFN Europe) Then there was a French language station on 88.5 for ages --- maybe 20 minutes and very strong which was giving hints at its source being outside Europe but I didn't want to get too excited --- and then while on the phone to David Hamilton in Scotland the YL DJ said "Radio-Canada" and I couldn't believe my ears. Next was light music on 88.5 coming up to 1900 followed by a full ID on the hour from WHCF Bangor, Maine. And that was it --- no more doubts. I was literally in a state of shock. The distance from my QTH to Bangor Maine is 2756 miles. And I am confident that other stations from along the Eastern seaboard were coming in but the open frequencies like 95.9 sounded like soup. With a number of stations bubbling all over each other. Here`s the final log for what made it through: 88.5 1815 CAN CBAF Moncton NB. YL with "Radio Canada" ID, talk about Brazilian music in French 88.5 1815 CAN CBVG Gaspé QC. CBC English, comedy show, mixing with CBAF. Gaspé just North from NB. Later very good at 1959 88.5 1900 USA WHCF Bangor ME. ID on top of hour and news. Fair to good at times. Later strong Gospel music. 88.7 1910 ? N. American Station, country, with Mark Knopfler country song; not RTE or Radio2. Strong but brief. 92.9 1930 CAN CKLE Bathurst NB. ads, frequent IDs very very strong. Still there at 2000 and after. 92.9 2020 CAN CBTR Roddickton NL. CBC fisheries program --- brief burst of signal giving number in "St. Johns area". 95.9 1952 ? Two North American Stations here: One Contemporary Rock, other Country fighting it out. 97.1 2005 CAN CBTB Baie Vert, NL. Fisheries programme, received on 97.05 due to local QRM. David Hamilton also received this. 97.5 2010 CAN? VOCM St. Johns NL. Presumed Rock music station, heard at same time as 97.1 Baie Verte. 99.3 2015 CAN CBV6 la Malbaie QC? three Quebec stations listed but this one close to Northern NB which seemed centre of opening. In French audible on 99.35 battling with local Lyric FM. I have a recording of a country station heard on 95.9 giving a partial ID and have forwarded it to Mike Bugaj in CT to have a listen to and I think there`s some detective work going on as to what the source of it was. I`d like to ask a big favour of members of the WFTDA. Right now for some reason I can`t upload the file to my geocities web page so I wonder if anyone is interested in having a go at solving this one? Please feel free to email me and I will send on the short mp3. I feel the more people get to hear this recording the more chance there is of a positive ID. And as I`m sure you will all know, it's not every day that one gets to hear signals from such distances! So it happened and now everyone over here is hoping for a repeat --- which may or may not come. And I must confess in the days since I have been watching for A2 video a lot and trying to convince myself that Thursday night really did happen. On a personal level I waited 20 years for this opening; I hope that the next one doesn`t take as long. And again- anyone willing to help out with the 95.9 unID, please get in contact- regards for now- (Paul Logan, Lisnaskea, N. Ireland, Location: 54 15 N, 7 27 W in IO64GF; Low VHF Skip and Scanner page http://www.geocities.com/yogi540 WTFDA via DXLD) Here's what I've been able to decipher so far from his file after Mike asked me to. I've used Cool Edit to chop it, slow it, enhance the quality. "It's Finally Friday Shinanagins, Another edition of funny friday" "That`s right if you can name (inaudible) we'll give you a really cool prize" Missy Elliott "Get Your Freak On" in the background. Voice: "From the (oak??) in the McIntyre plaza (inaudible) either GRETCHEN or CATCH IT in the morning (inaudible) someone that knows country (end of clip) 1. This is a North American station 2. By the nature of the promo it was either going into a stopset or coming back from one, which means there were likely ads on either side of it. 3. Where is the McIntyre Plaza? 4. What are country stations on 95.9 in the Maritimes? I can not find any country in the Northeast US, which would have to make me think this was indeed a Canadian Maritime station. I can also not find any good list of formats in the Maritimes (Adam Rivers, MA, ibid.) TA audio and Photos Here! http://fmdx.usclargo.com/unidtadx.htm Maybe YOU can decipher it all for Paul and David (Mike Bugaj, WTFDA via DXLD) There's a McIntyre Plaza in Quincy,MA, and a Mcintire Plaza in Syracuse, NY (Google). (Lenny, ibid.) This sounds like two stations to me. Anyway, I have a couple of comments as to what I hear in it: The end of the clip: "...Most Country, Froggy |end of clip|" It sounds like the slogan is "Froggy _____", which is a common slogan for country stations. It almost sounds like the clip ends right in the middle of the slogan. Also, I don't think they are saying "McIntyre Plaza" as others have thought. There is an unnatural pause after "McIntyre", and the way the announcer stresses the word that follows "McIntyre" doesn't sound consistent with the previous word. To me, it sounds like "....Linda McIntyre, |singular unintelligible word|". (Mike Hawk, NE, ibid.) It vaguely looks like the RTL (German) TV logo --- elongated with three horizontal squares, each containing one of the three letters --- but there's no way to know. You might match up the frequency with all frequencies used by RTL (I don't have a list) and at least eliminate that as a possibility. FWIW, there's a "McIntyre Plaza" of some sort in Thunder Bay, Ontario. (David Austin, Columbia SC, ibid.) Don't get too hung up on the "McIntyre," people...they're clearly saying "Reba McEntire" (listen again for the Reba just before it). (Jeff Kruszka, LA, ibid.) Well, let's see: a Google search comes up with Quincy, MA, Thunder Bay, ON, & Golden, CO ( right! ). Not only haven't I found a country station in the Maritimes, I haven't found one anywhere near the Northeast Coast of North America (Russ Edmunds, PA, ibid.) Right...that was the conclusion I was coming to (Reba McEntire). BTW, I found this link on the web: http://www.froggy101.com/default.asp [Wilkes-Barre and Pittston PA] The site says 101.3 is //95.9. There's a "Doc and Kelley" morning show, which sounds similar to what others have thought they've heard. I know, that's a lot of conclusions to jump to, but might be worth investigating further. :) (Mike Hawk, Omaha, NE, ibid.) I'd considered this, but discarded it as being too far inland, especially as measured along the projected signal path to Ireland. But, in a situation like this, perhaps it's no better to discard things too quickly than to 'decide' on them (Russ Edmunds, ibid.) I agree with Mike about the "McIntyre Plaza". Also at the start of the clip there is something like ".... Friday's in the Northlands its another edition of the funny papers"..... Now as far as David Hamilton's A2 screen shot. This one has me really scratching my head. Maybe I need my eyes checked but to me, in the upper right hand corner there seems to be stylized "3". Like the 3 that both WCAX and WFSB use. To my eyes there is some sort of logo just to the left of that with dark lettering(??) on the top and bottom with what may be a white "C" stuck in between at the start of the logo. Also in the upper left hand corner seems to be the letters "AL". Like I said maybe I'm seeing things but if not then ?????? (Keith McGinnis, Winthrop MA, ibid.) Now that you mention it, that DOES look a lot like the WCAX-3 logo. Call it the power of suggestion, but I definitely see the "3", and WCAX has its call letters horizontal to the left of the "3". (David Austin, Columbia SC, ibid.) Listening again for about the 7th time, I don't hear the "Froggy", however I do now think Mike is right on it not being McIntyre Plaza. I hear "...McIntyre, plus...". I also don't hear the word as "Hamptons" earlier (Russ Edmunds, PA, ibid.) As I sit back and stare at it a little crosseyed, it looks an awful lot to me like a smeary "CTV" logo of the sort commonly seen in the lower right corner of most CTV affiliates...which in turn suggests CKCW-TV Moncton. It does NOT look like anything I've ever seen on WLBZ or WGBH, which would be the US 2s closest to the UK, nor does it look like any of the other Canadian network logos that might be seen on channel 2 (Global's swoosh, CBC/Radio-Canada's exploding pizza). And none of the local affiliates of any of those networks in the Maritimes (with the exception of Global/CTV affiliate "ntv" in Newfoundland) does any sort of local ID in the form of a bug anymore. s (Scott Fybush, NY, ibid.) Here's my take on the TA audio. First, it's a "recycler" promo, played in another day part, promoting the morning show. Here's a transcript of what I hear... Promo Announcer: "...Don't have to. Just think of what you've been missing." [edit] Male DJ: "It's finally Friday and that means it's another edition of Froggy free throws." Female DJ: "That's right, if you can make a shot, we'll give you a really cool [unintelligible]... What's that? [edit] Male DJ: "Reba... With the most Reba McIntyre." [edit] Promo Announcer: "Froggy... Catch it in the morning, with the best and most country, Froggy... [end of clip] I would give a strong vote to "Froggy 101 and 95.9". I wonder if somebody out there can monitor WGGI (95.9), Benton, PA or WGGY (101.3), Scranton, PA to see if they are STILL running a recycler promo that matches. If nothing else, this is fun (Girard Westerberg, Court Approved Expert Witness in Audio Surveillance, Lexington, KY, ibid.) Hi all .. now that I have calmed down a bit I can tell you a little about what happened on Thursday 26 June 2003. About 1800 GMT I did notice on the 6 meter cluster that UK stations were working into Canada etc. so I checked A2 and A4 for carriers and for the next hour the carriers got steadily stronger and video was received on ch A2. Paul Logan from Ireland did phone me that he was hearing US stations on 88.5 and I did say a few choice words to him when he told me his recorder wasn't running. So this was it. After the disappointment of my short reception on Monday I started tuning around. I did hear some weak TV audio on 87.75 and some French on 88.3 and 88.5 but nothing strong enough for a recording. After a short while I thought this is not going to happen so I actually tuned to 97.1 to see if there was any tropo. After 5 mins I heard a weak YL, then it got stronger and then I heard the US/Canadian accent and I thought I was dreaming. The recording button was hit with a vengeance. Paul Logan and Tim Bucknall were phoned and were told I was getting Canada on 97.1 .. yes 97.1 .. I think Tim and Paul were in a state of shock. Shock doesn't adequately describe how I was feeling at the time! The first reception was of a court case about a driving accident and the next was the fishing report with John Murphy ... thanks Mark Hattam for the website ... this has turned out to be CBTB-FM in Baie Verte, Newfoundland, Canada with 5 kW but after telephoning the station I was told it is a old transmitter and puts out much less. I also did a small interview for them. I have over 20 recordings to sort out and also possible A2 video pics and screen grabs from A2 and A4 video. So what's next ... South America? Well, after Thursday`s propagation anything is possible as Paul had N America up to 99.3 MHz. Thanks everyone for the help especially Paul Logan and Tim Bucknall Equipment used: Sony ST SB920, 2 x 6 element stack Icom PCR 1000, dsp, 4 element band 1 yagi Plustron TVRC 5D band 1 tv Spectrum Lab software web site http://www.geocities.com/tvdxrools/index.htm (David Hamilton, Scotland, UK, June 29, WTFDA via DXLD) Hi Folks! I asked David Hamilton about potential TA targets for this side of the Atlantic. He graciously (and with much apparent work and research) sent me this list, which I now share with the group. I know you folks in the Maritimes and New England should be able to get results with info like this. Happy hunting! Regards, (Curtis Sadowski, WTFDA via DXLD) YOU CAN TRY THESE IN UK AND FRANCE .. REMEMBER I GOT CBTB WHICH ONLY RUNS 5 KW ... ALL THE BEST LUCK .... IF I CAN DO IT YOU CAN ... REGARDS ... DAVID HAMILTON FRANCE 88.700 F Lille-Bouvigny ''France Musiques'' 400.000 Watt QTH: 02e39/50n25 89.000 F Le Mans-Mayet ''France Culture'' 200.000 Watt QTH: 00e19/47n45 89.400 F Brest-Roc Tredudon ''France Musiques'' 50.000 Watt QTH: 03w53/48n24 89.900 F Rennes/St.Pern ''France Musiques'' 100.000 Watt QTH: 01w57/48n17 90.600 F Nantes/Haute-Goulaine ''France Inter'' 200.000 Watt QTH: 01w26/47n11 92.600 F Le Mans-Mayet ''France Inter'' 270.000 Watt QTH: 00e19/47n45 95.400 F Brest-Roc Tredudon ''France Inter'' 50.000 Watt QTH: 03w53/48n24 95.600 F Caen-Mont Pinson ''France Musiques'' 100.000 Watt QTH: 00w36/48n58 96.000 F Vannes-Moustoir'Ac ''France Culture'' 20.000 Watt QTH: 02w53/47n49 96.400 F Niort-Melle ''France Culture'' 200.000 Watt QTH: 00w03/46n11 97.800 F Brest-Roc Tredudon ''France Culture'' 50.000 Watt QTH: 03w53/48n24 98.300 F Rennes-St.Pern ''France Culture'' 100.000 Watt QTH: 01w57/48n17 98.900 F Nantes/Haute-Goulaine ''France Musiques'' 200.000 Watt QTH: 01w26/47n11 99.600 F Caen-Mont Pinson ''France Inter'' 50.000 Watt QTH: 00w36/48n58 100.100 F Rouen-Grand Couronne ''France Bleu Haute Normandie'' 115.000 Watt QTH: 01e00/49n20 101.000 F Niort-Melle ''France Bleu Poitou'' 50.000 Watt QTH: 00w28/46n20 101.300 F Vannes-Moustoir'Ac ''France Bleu Armorique'' 20.000 Watt QTH: 02w53/47n49 101.800 F Nantes/Haute-Goulaine ''France Bleu Loire Ocean'' 158.000 Watt QTH: 01w26/47n11 102.600 F Caen-Mont Pinson ''France Bleu Basse Normandie'' 100.000 Watt QTH: 00w36/48n58 103.100 F Rennes-St.Pern ''France Bleu Armorique'' 100.000 Watt QTH: 01w57/48n17 103.900 F Saintes-Preguillac ''France Bleu La Rochelle'' 60.000 Watt QTH: 00w37/45n39 105.500 F Nantes/Haute-Goulaine ''France Info'' 200.000 Watt: QTH: 01w26/47n11 105.500 F Niort/Melle ''France Info'' 200.000 Watt QTH: 00w03/46n11 105.500 F Rennes/St.Pern ''France Info'' 100.000 Watt QTH: 01w57/48n17 105.700 F Rouen-Grand Couronne ''France Info'' 100.000 Watt QTH: 01e00/49n20 UK 88.1 G Sandale ''BBC2'' 250.000 Watt QTH: 03w08/54n55 88.7 G Blaenplwyf ''BBC2'' 250.000 Watt QTH: 04w06/52n22 89.9 G Blackhill/Bathgate ''BBC2'' 250.000 Watt QTH: 03w52/55n52 90.9 G Meldrum ''BBC3'' 150.000 Watt QTH: 02w24/57n23 93.1 G Londonderry ''BBC R. Ulster'' 31.000 Watt QTH: 07w22/55n00 93.1 G Meldrum ''BBC R. Scotland'' 150.000 Watt QTH: 02w24/57n23 94.3 G Black Hill/Bathgate ''BBC R. Scotland'' 250.000 Watt QTH: 03w52/55n52 94.5 G Divis ''BBC R. Ulster'' 125.000 Watt QTH: 06w01/54n36 98.1 G Skriaig ''BBC1'' 30.000 Watt QTH: 06w15/57n23 98.7 G Melvaig ''BBC1'' 50.000 Watt QTH: 05w47/57n51 99.7 G Divis ''BBC1'' 250.000 Watt QTH: 06w01/54n36 99.9 G Sandale ''Classic FM'' 250.000 Watt QTH: 03w08/54n45 100.5 G Meldrum ''Classic FM'' 150.000 Watt QTH: 02w24/57n23 101.9 G Divis ''Classic FM'' 250.000 Watt QTH: 06w01/54n36 IRELAND ... THE BEST CHANCE I THINK 88.8 EI Maghera ''RTE Radio 1'' 180.000 Watt QTH: 08w43/52n57 91.0 EI Maghera ''RTE Radio 2 FM'' 160.000 Watt QTH: 08w43/52n57 91.8 EI Mount Leinster ''RTE Radio 2 FM''100.000 Watt QTH: 06w47/52n37 92.3 EI Mullaghanish ''RTE Radio 2 FM'' 160.000 Watt QTH: 09w09/51n59 93.2 EI Maghera ''RTE Radio Na Gaeltachta'' 160.000 Wat QTH: 08w43/52n57 94.4 EI Mullaghanish ''RTE Radio Na Gaeltachta''160.000 Watt QTH: 09w09/51n59 99.6 EI Mullaghanish ''RTE Lyric FM'' 80.000 Watt QTH: 09w09/51n59 101.8 EI Mullaghanish ''Radio Today'' 80.000 Watt QTH: 09w09/51n59 103.7 EI Monagahn ''KISS FM'' 40.000 Watt QTH: 06w58/54n15 105.5 EI Clermont Carn ''Today FM'' 40.000 Watt QTH: 06w19/54n05 SURFIN': WEATHER IN SPACE AND YOUR RADIO http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2003/06/27/100/?nc=1 By Stan Horzepa, WA1LOU Contributing Editor Visit a Web site that tracks the weather in space and learn how that weather can effect radio communication. Since sun activity has such a pronounced effect on radio propagation conditions here on Earth, a visit to Tony Phillips' SpaceWeather.com Web site will be of interest to radio hams. http://www.spaceweather.com/ The site bills itself as a source for "science news and information about the Sun-Earth environment." It provides the current state of solar wind, solar flares, sunspots, coronal holes, interplanetary magnetic field, and geomagnetic storms, all of which effect how well our radios put out and pull in signals. If you visit the SpaceWeather.com archives and enter June 10 or 11, 2003, in the "Select a Date" field, you can view some amazing screen shots that will be of particular interest to ham radio operators. On those days, Phillips posted a dynamic spectrum of a shortwave radio blackout following an X-class solar flare. How many times have you found yourself away from the radio at the wrong time? The SpaceWeather.com Web site offers a service that will alert you by telephone when something important is occurring or about to occur. "Spaceweather PHONE" is the name of this service and ham radio operators use it to learn about solar flares, radio blackouts and space station flybys. You can also sign up for an e-mail subscription to the Space Weather News at this Web site. While exploring the SpaceWeather.com Web site, you will discover a lot of fascinating things, especially if you are interested in outer space. Some are related to radio, some are not, but are very interesting nonetheless. For example, I learned that between now and July 10th, three NASA rockets will launch from Wallops Island, VA, to disperse a chemical called trimethylaluminum (TMA) in the near space over the Atlantic Ocean to study the ionosphere. This will result in beautifully glowing clouds when TMA reacts with air and these clouds will be visible along the US East Coast. I remember viewing similar clouds back when I was a kid and I look forward to seeing them again 40 years later! My thanks go out to reader Mike Heiler, KA0ZLG, for suggesting the SpaceWeather.com Web site. Until next time, keep on surfin'. [Now that you're armed with the numbers, you can click on over to the ARRL Technical Information Service's Propagation Page http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/propagation.html for details on how to use those numbers to your advantage while operating. There you can find the excellent Ian Poole, G3YWX, article "Understanding Solar Indices." http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/pdf/0209038.pdf The TIS Propagation Page also has technical articles, information for beginners, links and discussion on the finer points of solar weather and its effects on the ionosphere. --Ed.] Stan Horzepa, WA1LOU, resides in downtown Wolcott, Connecticut, and has been a QST writer for over 25 years. Since getting his ticket in 1969, Stan has sampled nearly every entrée in the Amateur Radio menu (including a stint as Connecticut Section Manager), but he keeps coming back to his favorite preoccupations: VHF and packet radio. As a result, he runs a 2-meter APRS digipeater and weather station (WA1LOU-15) from his mountaintop location in central Connecticut. Stan, a long time advocate of using computers with Amateur Radio, wrote programs to dupe contests and calculate antenna bearings way back in 1978. Today, he is on the board of directors of Tucson Amateur Packet Radio (TAPR) and uses his Mac to surf the Internet searching for that perfect ham radio Web page. To contact Stan, send e-mail to wa1lou@arrl.net. Page last modified: 04:14 PM, 27 Jun 2003 ET Page author: awextra@arrl.org Copyright © 2003, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved (via John Norfolk) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-115, June 28, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3f.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1188: RFPI: Sat 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 7445, 15039 WINB: Sun 0030 12160 [we hope] WWCR: Sun 0230 5070, Sun 0630 3210, Wed 1030 9475 WBCQ: Mon 0445 7415 WRN: Rest of world Sat 0800, Europe Sun 0430, North America Sun 1400 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1188.html ** ALASKA. FCC CUTS RADIO Web posted Thursday, June 26, 2003 By HAL SPENCE, [Kenai] Peninsula Clarion A Federal Communications Commission administrative law judge has revoked two FM full-power radio station licenses held by Peninsula Communications Inc., ruling that the stations' operator had willfully disobeyed for more than a year an FCC order to terminate operation of a network of seven translators whose signals were fed by the full- power stations. Those low-power translators ceased operations in August 2002, but the termination order had been issued in May 2001. Under the "initial decision" released June 19, Peninsula Communications Pres-ident David Becker loses the licenses for Homer station KWVV-FM, often called "K- Wave," and Soldotna station KPEN-FM, stations that had fed the network of translators. Their loss represents only part of the punishment meted out by the FCC. Peninsula Communications also faces a $140,000 fine, a separate issue currently in litigation. The judge's decision takes effect 50 days after its release --- Aug. 8 --- if exceptions are not filed within 30 days, or unless the FCC decides to review the case on it own motion. Becker, of Homer, said Wednesday he fully intends to file exceptions. "Obviously, we think the judge reached the wrong conclusions," Becker said. Becker did not forfeit his remaining licenses. Station licenses for KGTL-AM in Homer and KXBA-FM in Nikiski remain in effect, as do licenses covering FM translators K292ED in Kachemak City, K285DU in Homer, and K285EG and K272DG serving Seward. Revocation of KPEN's license could have an impact on the Kenai Peninsula Borough, which contracts with Peninsula Communica-tions to broadcast borough assembly meetings across the peninsula. Borough Clerk Linda Murphy said the borough is talking with KBBI Public Radio in Homer about possibly taking over those broadcasts, if necessary, but KBBI is in the process of hiring a new general manager and has yet to make a decision. Becker said the appeals process could take some time, considering it's already been under consideration and in and out of courts for seven years. Meanwhile KWVV and KPEN are continuing to broadcast, he said, and likely would through the appeal process. According to Administrative Law Judge Richard L. Sippel, Becker willfully continued broadcasting over seven unauthorized translators after being ordered on May 19, 2001, to cease operations. Without justification, PCI committed a clear breach of duty to obey the "unambiguous termination order," Sippel said. Becker defended his action by arguing he had "an absolute right" to continue while the termination order was appealed. That defense was rejected. Becker also argued that tougher regulations regarding translators adopted by the FCC in 1990 were never intended to apply in Alaska. Becker continued broadcasting over the seven translators until Aug. 28, 2002, when, facing an October 2001 injunction issued by the U.S. District Court for Alaska that was affirmed later by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, PCI finally stopped operating the translators. The network of translators had served the communities of Kenai, Soldotna, Anchor Point, Kachemak City, Homer and Kodiak. Some locations were served by more than one translator. Already facing the prospect of paying the $140,000 fine, Becker called the additional punishment of losing the licenses excessive and senseless. "I'm qualified to be a licensee," he said, adding that was made clear when the ruling did not strip him of all his broadcast licenses. "Either I'm qualified or I'm not. If I am, that should be the end of it. I don't think the additional penalties he is trying to apply on top of what already has been assessed is reasonable or fair." Sippel's ruling said Becker actions were motivated by profit. "Through a carefully crafted 'network'' PCI captured revenues that otherwise would have gone to competing full-service licensees operating properly within their assigned service areas," the ruling said. "Through the seven offending translators, PCI placed its own economic interests ahead of the commission's regulatory scheme and the public interest in having honest competition." The issues that eventually led to the decision have a long history. Becker formed PCI in 1978 and began broadcasting in September 1979 over KGTL-FM (now KWVV-FM). The station became Homer's first commercial FM venture. PCI added KPEN-FM in 1984, providing Soldotna with full-service radio. By the 1980s, PCI had built its network of FM translators enabling the broadcast corporation to reach customers in competition with full- power stations operating without supplemental translators. In other words, advertisers would find advantage in buying airtime on the PCI's network, which was able to reach more listeners on the Kenai Peninsula and Kodiak Island than could Anchorage stations. "Therefore, there was a clear economic incentive for PCI to keep its low-cost translator 'network' operating for as long as possible," Sippel said. "PCI's income was almost 40 percent derived from ad sales in Anchorage which was outside PCI's primary FM coverage areas," he said. In 1990, the FCC strengthened the rules governing ownership and financial conditions for translators. The stricter standards were meant to protect existing FM stations from the "adverse, anticompetitive effects of translators." Waivers could be granted for translators broadcasting into areas not covered by primary stations. That was the FCC's practice for Alaska where so-called "white areas" receiving no radio signals were common because of terrain. Stations that had operated prior to March 1, 1991, were permitted to continue through March 1, 1994, including translators owned by full-service stations that had signals reaching beyond authorized zones. After March 1994, however, the new rules applied to all broadcasters. PCI, which actually lacked formal waivers for its network prior to June 1991, continued operating without them, according to the FCC. In November 1995, the company filed renewal applications for its translators. Through that year and into 1996, PCI thought it had the necessary waivers to operate its translators, believing the FCC's earlier approval of initial construction permits and licenses for translators sufficed. "At the time, there did not appear to be any rigid application or strict observance of the waiver rules," Sippel said. In March 1996, PCI was informed by letter that it might be in violation of the commission's 1990 FM translator rules and likely would have to demonstrate that its translators served only areas unable to get other radio signals. Meanwhile, competitors filed petitions to deny PCI's renewal applications, arguing that the translators were rebroadcasting KPEN's and KWVV's signals "beyond their respective authorized contours." On Sept. 11, 1996, an FCC division chief notified Becker he had no valid waivers for the translators. PCI was, however, given the benefit of the doubt. FCC staffers concluded, Sippel said, that PCI "could have reasonably, but mistakenly, believed staff had implicitly waived" the rules. PCI was granted 60 days to file applications to assign the nine licenses then in question to unaffiliated parties. License renewal was made contingent on those assignments. An attempt was made to assign the translators to Coastal Broadcasting Communications Inc., owned by David and Judy Buchanan, Becker's long- time acquaintances. That deal included a number of relationships between the two companies, including financing to be provided by Becker, a condition that ultimately doomed the transaction. The FCC ruled such financing left a connection to primary stations owned by PCI. In 1997, the two companies re-filed their application without the financing aspect. There followed a couple of years during which PCI continued to utilize the translators under license renewals and temporary waivers granted because of the prospect of eventual assignment. But the deal was never consummated and by March 1, 2000, the assignment was dead. Complicating matters for Becker was the fact that the translators were losing value. Four translators had become worthless after Kodiak translators had been denied satellite waivers and could not receive primary station signals. Seward translators would lose value whenever a full-service station went on the air covering the same area. With the assignment option dead, PCI unsuccessfully sought stays from the commission and from the Washing-ton, D.C., Circuit Court. On Feb. 14, 2000, the commission dismissed PCI's petition for reconsideration and a motion for stay. In March 2000, in what Sippel called "a last ditch effort," PCI filed a pleading rejecting conditional renewals it was granted in 1997 and 1998, theorizing that such a rejection would require the FCC to set the translator renewal applications for a hearing. A little over a year later, on May 18, 2001, the commission dismissed PCI's rejection argument as untimely and rescinded the company's conditional renewals and assignment grants. The commission deleted the call signs for translators serving Kenai, Kenai-Soldotna, Anchor Point, Homer, Kachemak City and the two translators on Kodiak and order PCI to cease operations. PCI appealed, seeking a stay from the D.C. Circuit Court. That appeal was denied. Nevertheless, PCI would continue to operate unlawfully for 15 months, the FCC said, prompting the U.S. Attorney for Alaska to seek a court order in July 2001 to enforce the termination order. A few weeks later, the commission threatened PCI's licenses if it continued using the translators. A U.S. District Court (Alaska) ruling against Becker and PCI followed in October, backed up by the Ninth Circuit's affirmation in April 2002. On Feb. 6, 2002, the commission issued a forfeiture order, finding PCI had "willfully and repeatedly" failed to comply. A fine of $140,000 was handed down. On July 3, 2002, the Ninth Circuit denied a PCI petition for rehearing, and on Aug. 13, 2002, the D.C. Circuit Court denied PCI's last request for a stay of the termination order. On Aug. 28, 2002, PCI finally shut down the seven FM translators, announcing that it was a temporary move while the legality of the termination order was decided by the D.C. court. The court upheld the order. While Becker had bucked the FCC at nearly every turn, he had used the process legally, the judge said. He also had not demonstrated any intention to defraud. Those factors led the judge to rule that while he must forfeit the two full-service stations that had fed the translator network, Becker could keep licenses not associated with that network. The commission has a general policy to revoke only offending licenses. The company had already paid "a heavy price" with the loss of the seven translators, Sippel said, and likely would pay still more when and if the fine was upheld. "PCI's conduct was seriously misguided, bordered on contemptuous, and was deserving of those sanctions, in addition to revocation of two full-service FM stations that were use to operate the network," he said. However, that misconduct was not so cavalier, he added, that Becker should lose unrelated licenses. Becker said the judge was "cutting the baby in half like Solomon" by revoking the licenses. He said the fine was the maximum permitted. "Enough is enough," he said. The judge's action can be appealed to the full FCC and from there to the Washington, D.C., Court of Appeals, Becker said. How long that might take is anybody's guess. "You can't put a time table on this stuff," he said (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** AUSTRIA. La transmisión en español de Radio Austria Internacional emitida el pasado miércoles 25 de junio estuvo interrumpida después del boletín informativo hasta el final del programa. Cuando la locutora anunció el siguiente espacio "Noticiero de Austria" pasó un sesquiminuto sin audio; luego en idiomas alemán, inglés, francés y español se emitió la siguiente aclaración: "Aquí Radio Austria Internacional; rogamos a ustedes disculpas por la interrupción en nuestros transmisores" sin precisar las causas. Posteriormente se difundió música clásica con anuncios en alemán hasta cumplirse la media hora de programación habitual. Ayer, viernes 27 de junio, el programa salió al aire completo y sin interrupciones. Después de las noticias se escuchó por última vez la voz del locutor que dijo: "Desde los estudios de Radio Austria Internacional se despide de ustedes hasta más ver u oir en esta vida o en la próxima, Santiago Mata". Manuel Aletrino tomó el micrófono para continuar diciendo: "En nuestra última entrega de la serie 'Viena Diplomática' tenemos el agrado de hablar con el nuevo embajador de Colombia en Austria, el General Roso José Serrano" (el tema: la legalización de las drogas y el panorama de paz en Colombia). Julieta Quintana entrevistó a Manuel Romero, un guía de turismo que acompaña a los visitantes de Viena que desean conocer todo lo referente al Modernismo (conocido como Jugendstil, estilo de arte de fines del Siglo XIX) y finalmente Manuel Aletrino anunció "Radio Austria Internacional desde Viena; nuestras emisiones en español se suspenderán con fecha 30 de junio próximo, nuestra dirección es A-1136 Viena, Austria, el correo electrónico es roi.hispano@o... [truncated] y en Internet http://www.roiorf.at El último espacio fue "Charlas musicales" presentado por Fernando Montes de Oca y la emisión se cerró con estas palabras: "El próximo domingo, nuestro Buzón de la despedida, haremos un repaso a más de treinta años de informaciones dominicales entre los más veteranos de esta emisora que somos Jaime Carbonell y su servidor Manuel Aletrino" No olviden de escuchar y grabar los dos últimos programas del sábado 29 y domingo 30 de junio de 2003. Agradeciendo la difusión del presente mensaje, les saluda cordialmente: (Rubén Guillermo Margenet, Rosario, ARGENTINA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BELARUS`. Unfortunately, since 18 June 2003 I cannot handle reports sent to official Radio Hrodna address (ul. Gorkogo 85, Hrodna 230015, Belarus`). Station heading staff is glad to receive letters from distant listeners, but has no interest in QSLing them. If you wish to have station's verification in a reliable way, please first contact me (dxing@t...) [truncateds]. I'll have to bring reports to their office myself and convince station's officials to reply. Automatic address kdp2@a..., where you could get the current Radio Hrodna schedule, will be closed very soon (Sergei Alekseichik, Hrodna, Belarus`, Signal via DXLD) ** CANADA. More on Trans-Atlantic TV and FM DX: See PROPAGATION below ** CAYMAN ISLANDS. See CUBA [non]. R. Martí ** CONGO DR. Me and my wife spent two magnificent weeks in the southernmost municipality of the province of North Karelia, Kesalahti. It was crystal clear Lake Pyhajarvi, part of it belonging to Russia, former Finnish territory. We enjoyed a lot of peace of nature. Lake water was 14-16 degrees, air temperature 10-20 degrees, sauna every evening 100 degrees! Noise level was very low, so I did some DX-ing usually from mid-night to the three o´clock. Here´s some of my best loggings: DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO: R Okapi, Kinshasa on 6030 kHz 2215-2315 UT playing mostly Congolese music without breaks. Only one short "Okapi"-ID. Some splashes from R Budapest on 6025 kHz. My antenna was only 30 meter longwire! 73´s (Jouko Huuskonen, Turku/Kesalahti, FINLAND, June 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA [non]. Last night, at around 0330 Z I found Radio Martí on 1020 kHz, Spanish news directed to Cuba, parallel 6030, strong, clear, slight fading. Posted this on the NRC list and a reply there from Barry McLarnon in Toronto who was hearing them weakly under KDKA. No idea how long this has been here, or if this changes anything with the 1180 operation which I was never able to hear from here (Bob Foxworth, Tampa, FL, IRCA via DXLD) As we suggested in last issue, seems likely this is the Turks & Caicos transmitter which was tested a few weeks ago. Hits Cuba from the east (gh, DXLD) ESTIMADO AMIGO GLENN HAUSER: Gracias por la información. Se habia anunciado también que se realizarían pruebas en AM desde Cayman Island. 73's (Oscar de Céspedes, FL, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Somebody should get a fix on 1020 ASAP (gh, DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. WHITE HOUSE REQUESTED COMMANDO SOLO TO TRANSMIT TO CUBA DXing.info has learned that a request to deploy Commando Solo EC-130 aircraft to broadcast to Cuba on May 20 came from the National Security Council (NSC). The NSC is the President's principal forum for considering national security and foreign policy matters with his senior national security advisors and cabinet officials. Earlier, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) had received inquiries from the U.S. International Broadcasting Bureau (IBB) concerning the possibility of IBB using Commando Solo to broadcast Radio and TV Martí into Cuba. IBB is the U.S. agency that manages Radio and TV Martí, the U.S. propaganda station broadcasting to Cuba 24 hours a day on mediumwave and shortwave frequencies. Eventually the NSC requested the DOD to support the IBB with Commando Solo broadcasting capability to better broadcast the President's address on the anniversary of Cuban independence on Tuesday, May 20, 2003. According to information received by DXing.info, the mission was approved and Commando Solo was able to broadcast the President's message along with approximately 2.5 hours of TV Martí programming from an orbit inside U.S. airspace starting at around 6.30 p.m. Eastern time (1430 UTC [sic!]) on May 20. The broadcast included a retransmission of President George Bush's speech carried earlier on Radio Martí. The IBB has been evaluating the coverage and effectiveness of the one-time transmission via Commando Solo, which was chosen to overcome Cuban jamming of TV Martí. The day after, Cuban daily Granma said that very few Cubans were able to hear the U.S. airborne test transmission. Cuban-American activists have long complained that the U.S. needs to improve the poor reception of Radio Martí, which is why Commando Solo was tested as a potential new transmission platform. The mission was carried out by an EC-130E plane that was earlier used to broadcast Information Radio programming to Iraq. After the plane had returned from Qatar back to its home base at the Harrisburg International airport in Pennsylvania, it was deployed to Hurlburt Field near Pensacola, Florida, for a training mission. Another sign of increased activity in making Radio Marti more accessible, on June 28 Radio Martí was logged on a new frequency of 1020 kHz mediumwave by DXer Bob Foxworth in Florida (DXing.info, June 27, 2003, updated June 28 via DXLD) ** ETHIOPIA [non]. Radio Xoriyo 15670, E-mail report with RealAudio attachment sent to ogaden@yahoo.com and staff@ogaden.com brought same day E-mail from "International Ogaden Website" ogaden@yahoo.com: "We thank you for your interest about R. Xoriyo. The information you provided is correct. Regards, Ogaden Online staff." (J. Berg, MA, Jun 22, 2003 in DXplorer-ML via CRW via DXLD) ** GERMANY. DEUTSCHE WELLE FEIERT 50 JAHRE - RAU WUERDIGT ERFOLGSGESCHICHTE Bonn (dpa) --- Mit einem Festakt im frueheren Bundestagsplenarsaal in Bonn hat die Deutsche Welle am Freitag ihr 50-jaehriges Bestehen gefeiert. Bundespraesident Johannes Rau wuerdigte die Arbeit des deutschen Auslandssenders als eine Erfolgsgeschichte. Die Deutsche Welle (DW) habe sich einen "exzellenten Ruf an Seriositaet und Glaubwuerdigkeit" erarbeitet, sagte Rau. Ihre Sendungen in zahlreichen Sprachen und in alle Welt seien eine Investition, "auf die Deutschland nicht verzichten sollte". Die DW wird aus Steuergeldern aus dem Bundeshaushalt finanziert. Neben dem Jubilaeum feierte die DW zugleich die Einweihung des neuen Funkhauses und der Zentrale in Bonn. Nach dem mit Asbest belasteten alten Funkhaus in Koeln ist der Schuermannbau im frueheren Regierungsviertel ab sofort ihr Domizil. Aus dem neuen Funkhaus senden mit modernster Technik mehr als 1000 Mitarbeiter Hoerfunksendungen in mehr als 30 Sprachen. Aus Berlin sendet die DW ihre Fernsehbeitraege. Die DW sei ein "fester Pfeiler der auswaertigen Kulturpolitik", sagte die Beauftragte der Bundesregierung fuer Kultur und Medien, Staatsministerin Christina Weiss. In vielen Laendern sei die DW auch eine wichtige Informationsquelle. Die Grundzuege der Gesetzesnovelle fuer die Zukunft des Senders seien nicht laenger strittig. Die Bundesregierung werde auch fuer die notwendige Finanzierungssicherheit Sorge tragen, sicherte Weiss zu. Eine finanzielle Planungssicherheit ueber einen Zeitraum von fuenf Jahren waere ein "starker Beitrag", die Staatsferne der DW zu dokumentieren, sagte Intendant Erik Bettermann. Der stellvertretende Vorsitzende der ARD und Intendant des Westdeutschen Rundfunks, Fritz Pleitgen, sagte, die DW sei weltweit zu einer "hoch geschaetzten Institution" geworden. Aus dem reinen Kurzwellensender sei ein multimediales Programmunternehmen geworden. "Den Vergleich mit anderen Auslandssendern braucht die Deutsche Welle nicht zu scheuen." Es sei wichtig, in aller Welt ein Bild zu verbreiten, das der Wirklichkeit Deutschlands und seiner "bunten Vielfalt" entspreche und auch eine Sympathiewerbung sei, sagte Rau. "Wir koennen guten Gewissens fuer unser Land so werben, wie es ist." Daneben sei das objektive Informationsangebot des Senders in den fremdsprachigen Programmen vor allem auch dort gefragt, wo Krieg und Buergerkriege sowie Zensur und Informationsmangel herrschten. Hier leiste die Deutsche Welle einen wesentlichen Beitrag zur Aufklaerung. Am 3. Mai 1953 war die DW erstmals auf Sendung gegangen - mit Hoerfunk in Deutsch via Kurzwelle. Schon im Jahr darauf folgten Radiosendungen in Englisch, Franzoesisch, Spanisch und Portugiesisch. Heute gestalten rund 1500 Mitarbeiter aus mehr als 60 Laendern die Programme von DW-TV und DW-RADIO sowie die Website dw-world.de. Gesetzlicher Auftrag der DW ist es, "Rundfunkteilnehmern im Ausland ein umfassendes Bild des politischen, kulturellen und wirtschaftlichen Lebens in Deutschland zu vermitteln und ihnen die deutschen Auffassungen zu wichtigen Fragen darzustellen und zu erlaeutern". Das Reformkonzept fuer die DW, das noch in diesem Jahr verabschiedet werden soll, zielt im wesentlichen darauf, das Aufgabenprofil zu modernisieren und weltoffener zu gestalten. Dabei soll sich die DW kuenftig als ein Forum darstellen, auf dem sich Deutschland sowohl als europaeische Kulturnation wie auch als demokratischer Verfassungsstaat praesentiert. (Internet: Deutsche Welle: http://www.dw-world.de) dpa ba yynwk ma (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** INDIA / U K. PRASAR BHARATI-BBC TALKS ON EXCHANGE OF PROGRAMMES FAIL --- Rajnish Sharma New Delhi, June 27. Talks between the Prasar Baharti Corporation and BBC on exchange of radio programmes have ended in a deadlock. Sources in the Prasar Bharati said BBC was not keen on giving a time slot to All India Radio for airing its entertainment, art and cultural programmes. The BBC, on the other hand, wanted slots on AIR's FM channel for news and current affairs programmes. Prasar Bharati CEO, K. S. Sarma met top BBC officials in London earlier this week. But the talks failed following BBC's reluctance. Officials said though Sarma discussed several issues with BBC officials, there was no agreement on exchange of programmes. "The possibility of BBC coming on the AIR platform may not happen in the near future." a senior Prasar Bharati official said (Hindustan Times, June 28, 2003 via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, DXLD) ** INDONESIA. A minor correction to my item unid RRI 4790. I estimated the frequency being 4789.95, not 4789.5 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Jari, I had probable loggings of RRI Fak Fak back on June 1st and June 2nd. The frequency was 4789.1. Reception was poor, but the program was parallel to Makassar (4753.4) and Pontianak (3976). best DX, (Guy Atkins, Puyallup, WA, modified AR7030 & R-75 receivers, Western Beverage antenna @ 270 deg., hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** IRAN. SATELLITE TVS AT WAR OF FREQUENCIES Tehran fighting Persian-language satellite TVs with microwave noise frequencies putting Iranians' health at risk. By Fereshteh Modarresi, Middle East Online June 13, 2003 http://www.middle-east-online.com/english/?id=5957 (Middle East Online Jun 13, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. IS PRESIDENT BUSH INSTIGATING PROTESTS IN IRAN? FoxNews "Special Report with Brit Hume" Transcript http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,89877,00.html (Fox News Jun 16, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. WHEN IRANIAN AMERICAN MEDIA SHOUT, IRAN LISTENS By Sandip Roy, Pacific News Service June 19, 2003 Editor's Note: Members of Iranian American media, accused of fomenting recent unrest in Iran, say they're no stooges of the U.S. government. But most agree that, with the help of technology like the Internet, the Iranian community in America is affecting policy in its home country. Hossein Hedjazi, host of Radio Iran in Los Angeles, risked being called "un-American" for criticizing the government after it detained hundreds of Iranian immigrants as they registered with U.S. authorities last December. But Iranian American media like his are now being called a tool of the same American government, because of the way they are covering the student protests rocking Iran. "We've always been called the agent of the Islamic republic -- now they are calling us agents of the CIA," says Hedjazi. Even if that charge is overblown, the community may now actually be shaping events back in Iran instead of just covering them. . . http://news.pacificnews.org/news/view_article.html?article_id=2489442d259 71dd311e3937731cd2c7a (Pacific News Service Jun 19, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. VALLEY IS VENUE FOR LIBERATE-IRAN TV CAMPAIGN By Lisa Mascaro, L.A. DailyNews.com June 20, 2003 http://www.dailynews.com/Stories/0,1413,200~20954~1468347,00.html (DailyNews.com Jun 20, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. NORTH AMERICAN MEDIA HELP IRAN PROTESTS GROW By Jonathan Curiel, San Francisco Chronicle, page A-12 June 20, 2003 Some experts call it a "media movement" or a "satellite revolution." But whatever the label, one thing is clear: A growing network of Iranian American media outlets -- from television to radio to Web sites -- is helping spark the student-led protests erupting in that Islamic nation. . . http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/06 /20/MN293330.DTL (San Francisco Chronicle Jun 20, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. DISPLACED IRANIANS SPEAK OUT AGAINST TYRANNY IN TEHRAN By Jacqui Goddard, South China Morning Post June 20, 2003 http://www.asiamedia.ucla.edu/Weekly2003/06.17.2003/World5.htm (South China Morning Post Jun 20, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) ** IRAN {non]. IRANIAN-AMERICANS DEMONSTRATE IN SUPPORT OF REPRESSED STUDENTS IN IRAN By Tom Harrigan, Associated Press June 21, 2003 http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/news/archive/2003/06/21/stat e2038EDT0115.DTL (Associated Press Jun 21, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. SATELLITE CHANNEL HAS GRAND VISION By David Rennie, London Telegraph June 21 2003 Los Angeles - It is noon in North Hollywood and Zia Atabay, a retired Iranian pop star they once called the Tom Jones of Tehran, is alone on his tiny sound stage in a former porn studio at the wrong end of town. Sitting in front of a crudely painted backdrop, Mr Atabay addresses the armed forces of Iran, a country he last saw 23 years ago. . . http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/06/20/1055828496817.html (London Telegraph Jun 21, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. AREA MEDIA GOAD IRAN --- Broadcasts in 'Tehrangeles,' with largest Iranian bloc outside Iran, make waves. By John Gittelsohn, The Orange County Register June 22, 2003 http://www2.ocregister.com/ocrweb/ocr/article.do?id=44834§ion=NEWS&su bsection=FOCUS_IN_DEPTH&year=2003&month=6&day=22 (Orange County Register Jun 22, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. Voice of Mojahed, 9280, 20/6 1730-sign off 1733 with sign off tune. ID in Farsi before off. Jammer found the frequency for a few seconds, then left before ID (F. Krone, Denmark, Jun 20, 2003 in DX-plorer-ML) 9280 - This frequency has hot been used before as far as I know. Until the recent Iraq war it was believed that the programmes were produced and transmitted from Iraq. They stopped when an Iraqi broadcast facility near Baghdad was bombed [no, Basra --- gh], but from where are they now broadcast and by whom? (A. Petersen, Denmark, Jun 24, 2003 for DXW/CRW via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. IRANIAN DISSIDENT SAID ABDUCTED IN BAGHDAD [what radio station would this be? Andy.] An Iranian man who runs a Baghdad-based radio station opposed to the Tehran regime was abducted by four gunmen in front of his home in the Iraqi capital Thursday, his Iraqi wife told AFP. Nader Mohsen al- Barki, 49, operated the opposition station here since 1988, Nada Abdul Karim said. The four armed men "forced him into their car and sped away," she said. Abdul Karim charged that the Iranian regime was behind the kidnapping, saying her husband had "no enemies in Iraq." (AFP via A. Sennitt, Holland, Jun 20, 2003 for CRW via DXLD) ** IRAQ [non]. THE ROLE OF BROADCAST MEDIA IN INFLUENCING OPERATIONS IN IRAQ Perhaps this isn't anything new, but I was struck by the following sentence: "The Iraqi National Accord, a grouping of former-Ba'athists, continues to run three radio stations -- Radio Sumer (formerly Radio Tikrit), Two Rivers Radio, and The Future (al-Mustaqbal) -- in cooperation with the CIA and Jordanian intelligence." I don't recall Jordanian intelligence being mentioned previously in connection with Sumer/Tikrit. But then, I don't recall lots of things... http://www.washingtoninstitute.org/watch/Policywatch/policywatch2003/758.htm (washingtoninstitute.org via A. Sennitt, HOL Jun 24, 2003 for CRW via DXLD) ** IVORY COAST. COTE D'IVOIRE: SURVEY OF THE COUNTRY'S MEDIA ENVIRONMENT [gh has not put in all the accents, but some of them] Overview Côte d'Ivoire, a model of stability and relative prosperity in post- colonial Africa during the authoritarian rule (1960-93) of President Felix Houphouet-Boigny, suffered a protracted political crisis after his death which culminated in a coup in December 1999. This was followed by continued instability leading to the outbreak of a military insurgency in September 2002. Following the start of the 2002 rebellion, observers have noted the emergence of what is sometimes called "hate speech" in some sections of the Ivorian media. The principal news media of Cote d'Ivoire consist of two state-owned radio stations, two state-owned television stations, and several daily newspapers, most of which are privately owned and some of which are affiliated to political parties. Ivorians also have access to major international radio broadcasters such as the BBC and Radio France Internationale (RFI), as well as to some local, noncommercial radio stations, many of which are church-run. Internet access is available in some locations, but relatively few Ivorians can take advantage of it. Cote d'Ivoire also has a state-owned news agency. Ivorian media broadcast and publish primarily in French, the official national language. An English-language news web site - http://www.express7.com - carries reports from news agencies as well as its own articles and editorials. The principal media are based almost exclusively in Abidjan, the country's economic capital. Radio is the most popular medium, partly because it is the least expensive and partly because the country's low adult literacy rate restricts access to newspapers. Media freedom The Ivorian government either controls or strongly influences the country's media, primarily through its ownership of the major radio and television stations. The government exercises less direct control over print media, but security officers still occasionally harass, assault or otherwise attempt to intimidate journalists. Observers such as the US State Department, which reports on press freedom in its annual Human Rights Report, and the US-based NGO Freedom House had noted, however, that incidents of such intimidation had been decreasing through 2001 and the first nine months of 2002. These organizations said that during that time print journalists were willing to criticize the government and did not practise self- censorship, and both agreed that the situation was improving. Nevertheless, Freedom House, in both its 2002 and 2003 surveys of press freedom around the world, rated Cote d'Ivoire as "not free". Situation deteriorates after September 2002; emergence of hate speech Pressure on the media increased following the military rebellion that began on 19 September 2002. Media organizations such as the International Journalist's Network (IJNET) and Reporters Without Borders (RSF) documented a number of attacks on the press. The local FM relays of the BBC and RFI were shut down for several months. The movement of foreign journalists was restricted and attacks on local journalists increased. An RSF report criticized the government's response to the attacks, contending that when the then-Ivorian Minister of Communication Sery Bailly said "the safest thing for journalists to do is report the news in a proper manner", he acted as if the issue was biased reporting and not the safety of journalists and freedom of _expression. RSF believed that this statement was intended to suggest that, although the media were officially still "free", journalists needed to exercise self- censorship in order to avoid attacks. The government is not the only party hostile to the media; rebel groups have been known to inflict damage as well. A 28 October 2002 RSF report added that the media were being "attacked by both the armed forces and police and by the rebels. No media currently feel safe." At the same time, the government has claimed that journalists are not mere victims in the conflict and has accused the media of contributing to the conflict with calls for war. According to the RSF's 2002 annual report, former Prime Minister Affi N'Guessan stated that the journalists caused "75 per cent of the fear" of a coup. Some Ivorian journalists have made similar charges, particularly against state- owned and pro-government media. An IJNET report identified Le National, Notre Voie and L'Oeil du Peuple as newspapers that "openly call for war and violence". The report quotes a former editor of an unidentified "xenophobic daily" as saying: "We Ivorian journalists have set the scene for this war. We must take responsibility for that. Our diatribes and hate-filled language have filled Ivorian heads with war." Guillaume Soro, the minister of communication in the national unity government which first met in April 2003, acknowledged the problem. In a statement on 16 April he urged to press to exercise greater "professionalism" and to recognize its role in rebuilding Cote d'Ivoire. Soro, who is a member of the political arm of the rebel movement, attacked the press for "injecting venom" into the Ivorian population and warned them against "perpetuating lies or radical ideas". Media observers note, however, that the use of inflammatory language has not abated significantly in spite of this warning. Lack of journalistic professionalism In the early 1990s the advent of multiparty politics led to the creation of many newspapers. Newspaper owners hired many "journalists" who did not have proper training or qualifications. Consequently, the quality of reporting and writing was low. To improve the level of professionalism, the Ministry of Communication decided to issue professional ID cards to journalists and to require at least a bachelor's degree (in any field of study) of anyone seeking an ID. There is no full-fledged journalism school in Cote d'Ivoire, but several training institutes offer communications studies. These include: \ \ The Centre for Communication Studies. \ \ The Department of Communication Studies of the National University of Cote d'Ivoire, which trains students in all areas of communication. \ The Institute of Science and Technologies of Communication, which runs a continuing education programme and has a partnership with the University of Bordeaux in France. Radio Radio is the main media source in the Cote d'Ivoire because of the high cost of newspapers and television and low adult literacy rates. According to "African Broadcast Cultures: Radio in Transition" (Oxford: 2000), 68 per cent of the population owned a radio and listened to it at least once a week in 1992. According to the same source, 96 per cent of the population of Abidjan owned a radio set in 1996. The two main radio stations, Radio Côte d'Ivoire and Frequence 2, are owned by Radiodiffusion Télévision Ivorienne (RTI), the state-owned broadcasting company. Radio Cote d'Ivoire is heard nationwide through a system of FM relays from 0500 to midnight daily. Its news programming includes broadcasts in French throughout the day, as well as news bulletins in the country's indigenous languages at 1700 on weekdays. Its news programming clearly promotes government activities and viewpoints. Frequence 2, which is heard only in Abidjan and its environs, is primarily a music station and broadcasts 24 hours a day. Frequence 2 generally relays Radio Cote d'Ivoire from 0500 to 0800, 1200 to 1230, and 1900 to 1930. There are also approximately 30 local, non-commercial, low-power radio stations scattered throughout the country. Many of these community radio stations are managed by religious groups, including the Catholic stations Radio Espoir, Radio Paix Sanwi, Radio Notre Dame and Radio Dix-Huit Montagnes. In addition to these local stations, the Catholic Church also started a nationwide station in February 2002, at the same time the Protestant Radio Vie began broadcasting. All of these stations broadcast religious services, discussions and sacred music. Al Bayane, an Islamic radio station, opened in November 1999 and serves all the Muslim groups in the country. These local radio stations are not allowed to "broadcast programmes... of a political nature", according to the RSF Annual Report. Stations that fail to comply with this restriction can lose their licences, as did Radio Yopougon, for example, when it carried a live report of ex-President Bedie's return from his Paris exile in 2001. The station was not allowed back on the air until eight days later. Furthermore, the Ministry of Communication and New Information Technologies, the government licensing authority for radio stations, has also been known to deny licences to prospective stations that are affiliated with a political party (State Department Human Rights Report). In addition, four major international radio stations are relayed locally on FM: the BBC, RFI, the Gabon-based pan-African station Africa Number One and Radio Nostalgie. All of these transmit via FM in Abidjan only, except for RFI, which also broadcasts via relays in the north and centre of the country. According to experienced media observers, RFI is by far the most popular and trusted news source across the country; Ivorians consider it to be much more reliable than Radio Cote d'Ivoire. BBC broadcasts in French are also popular. The local relay of Africa Number One is 51 per cent owned by Ivorian investors. It broadcasts Ivorian-produced material for six hours a day with the remainder of its programming coming from its HQ in Libreville, Gabon. Its sports broadcasts are particularly popular in Cote d'Ivoire. Radio Nostalgie is 51 per cent owned by Radio Nostalgie France. Media observers note that the government monitors Nostalgie's broadcasts more closely than those of BBC, RFI or Africa Number One because its major domestic shareholders are closely associated with Alassane Ouattara, the president of the opposition Rally of Republicans, RDR. The station's general manager is Ahmed Bakayoko, an RDR loyalist and close adviser to Ouattara, who was recently appointed to the unity government as minister of news information technology. In the past, Radio Nostalgie's licence was suspended several times for airing political commentaries, and following the military rebellion in September 2002, pro-government mobs attacked the station and destroyed its broadcasting equipment because of its perceived connection to the rebels. Rebel radio Shortly after the military rebellion in 2002, Patriotic Movement of Cote d'Ivoire (PDCI) rebels began using RTI facilities in Bouake (in the centre of the country) to broadcast their own message. The rebel radio can be heard in towns and villages around Bouake and, according to some reports, even in the country's political capital, Yamoussoukro. In the western part of the country, rebels of the Movement for Justice and Peace are also said to be broadcasting on a local radio station heard around the town of Man. Television Although Cote d'Ivoire has one of the most developed television systems in Francophone Africa, TV is still a relatively limited means of communication, especially in the more rural areas. ("Mass Media in Sub-Saharan Africa" by Louis M. Bourgault) According to Bourgault, 78 per cent of the population had access to television in 1987. That access, however, was concentrated in urban areas, as only 22 per cent of the village population had television access. As with radio, the government owns the major television stations, which promote only government policy and activities. The state broadcaster RTI runs the stations Chaîne Une and Chaîne Deux. The former operates nationwide, while the latter can only be viewed in and around Abidjan. Chaine Une's programming includes news and current affairs shows, while Chaine Deux offers primarily sports and music programming. Though both are government-funded stations, commercials are part of the programming and a regular source of income. The French-owned Canal Horizon provides a satellite subscription service, which makes French, US and other foreign television stations available to Ivorians. RTI clearly serves the government's interests. According to George Benson, an Ivorian newscaster quoted in "Mass Media in Sub-Saharan Africa", the RTI stations unabashedly broadcast the "directives and orders" of the ruling party and the government. "Mass Media" notes that during the time of President Houphouet-Boigny and his immediate successors, in RTI's newscasts, "editorials, always supporting the government's point of view, were freely intermixed with the news and were rarely identified as opinion". When President Gbagbo came to power in 2000, he asked journalists not to devote extensive time to his activities but instead to report on developmental activities; he even asked government agencies to not post his photos in the offices. Media observers report, however, that government-controlled electronic media have continued to dedicate a lot of time to reporting on the president's and the first lady's activities. Moreover, following the 19 September 2002 coup attempt, state media, especially the radio, became openly pro-regime. RTI's entertainment programming, according to "Mass Media", aims at providing Ivorians with a "window on the modern world". To do this it relies heavily on documentaries made available by Canal France Internationale, CFI, and other Western sources such as Time-Life, Lorimar Productions, Viacom and CBS. Brazilian soap operas and sitcoms also make up a high proportion of the broadcast day. Rebel TV The PDCI rebels that have controlled the northern half of the country since September 2002 took over an RTI transmitter in the central city of Bouake and began television broadcasts on 21 October 2002. According to the RSF 2003 annual report, the rebel station, Tele-Notre Patrie, carries nothing but "official rebel propaganda", including the speeches and activities of the leaders of the rebels' political arm. Print media In contrast to the broadcast media, many newspapers are privately owned. Private publications include approximately 20 dailies, 30 weeklies, five semi-weeklies and 10 monthlies. The smaller publications often fold quickly because of the highly competitive market and limited funding, according to the International Journalists Network profile of Ivorian media http://www.ijnet.org The majority of the country's newspapers are published and printed in Abidjan and transported to major cities across the country. Many of the papers have Internet versions, which are probably intended principally for a foreign and diaspora audience, since few Ivorians use the Internet regularly. Print media does not reach as wide an audience as broadcast media. According to the CIA World Factbook, only 48.5 per cent of the Ivorian population was literate in 2002. Moreover, "African Broadcast Cultures: Radio in Transition" (Oxford: 2000) reports that in 1992, the last year for which data are available, only 27 per cent of the population read a newspaper at least once a week. The leading daily (Fraternité Matin) is stated owned. The private press is a mixture of truly independent papers, which frequently criticize the government, and other daily papers that openly espouse the cause of a particular political party. \ \ Cote d'Ivoire's largest-circulation and most respected daily newspaper is the state-owned Fraternite Matin, which claims an average print-run of 32,000 papers daily and regularly publishes papers of 26- 30 pages, while other newspapers in the country are generally about 12 pages long. Media observers note that the paper is read by people across the political spectrum and is by far the most professional newspaper in the country. Fraternite Matin is the most respected Ivorian newspaper, and, according to long-time observers, has generally been known for balanced reporting. Since the beginning of the military rebellion in 2002, however, observers have noticed the paper taking a more overtly pro-government stance. \ \ Notre Voie is a daily owned by the ruling party, the Ivorian Popular Front (FPI) and, like other papers associated with political parties, is highly partisan in its reporting and editorializing. Since September 2002 its reporting and commentary have been characterized by a militantly patriotic tone in support of the government and against the rebels. At times, Notre Voie has appeared more hard-line than the government, criticizing President Gbagbo if he appeared willing to negotiate with the rebels or with France. Notre Voie claims a circulation of 20,000, but like the other party-linked papers, its audience is confined primarily to party activists. \ \ Le Patriote, which claims a circulation of 40,000, is a daily that serves as the mouthpiece of the opposition RDR, a party that is particularly strong among northerners and the country's Muslim population. Other newspapers that generally support the RDR include Le Liberal, which claims a circulation of 15,000, and Le Populaire. \ \ The privately owned daily Le Nouveau Reveil is close to the Democratic Party of Cote d'Ivoire (PDCI) and claims a circulation of 17,000. \ \ Traditionally independent dailies include Le Jour (circulation 15,000), which often favours opposition parties, Soir Info (22,000), and L'Inter (18,000), a daily that emphasizes international news and reprints stories from newspapers around the world. Immediately following the military rebellion in September 2002, these papers, all of which had expressed relatively balanced and independent viewpoints in the past, appeared to adapt a more pro-government tone. Media observers note, however, that as President Gbagbo and his administration continue to struggle through the crisis, the independent papers have become more willing to criticize the government. Xenophobia in the press; "hate speech" The September 2002 rebellion sparked a flurry of extremist rhetoric in some newspapers. According to media observers, the most inflammatory of these was Le National, a paper which its managing director claims to have founded solely to oppose RDR leader Alassane Ouattara. Le National, which claims a circulation of 20,000, stirred up fervent pro-government patriotism and open xenophobia with its attacks on foreigners living in the country; foreign countries, including France and Burkina Faso; the foreign press; and, of course, Ouattara himself (who his opponents say is not a true Ivorian but of Burkina Faso origin). The paper rejected political solutions to the rebellion and constantly urged military action against the rebels. It openly celebrated and encouraged the "young patriots" involved in sometimes violent demonstrations against France, the rebels and foreigners living in the country. The privately-owned daily L'Oeil du Peuple (circulation 10,000) engaged in similar rhetoric, often attacking the RDR. Some Ivorians see a link between L'Oeil and the shadowy death squads, claiming that people criticized in the paper were soon afterwards found murdered. As already noted in this survey, in addition to the xenophobic Le National and L'Oeil du Peuple, media observers have expressed concern that some other Ivorian newspapers have been involved in publishing what is sometimes termed "hate speech". Other papers that have been mentioned in this connection include Notre Voie, Le Patriote and L'Inter. Internet Internet access remains limited in Cote d'Ivoire. According to the CIA World Factbook, Cote d'Ivoire had only 10,000 Internet users and five Internet service providers in 2001. The largest of the providers were AfricaOnline and Globe Access. A service provider called Centre Syfed offers free access to not-for-profit organizations and to the students, lecturers and researchers at the university in Abidjan, who use the Internet cafe on campus, which is funded by the Francophonie Organization. Most of the country's Internet users are college and high school students and a few professionals. Most of them use the public Internet cafes to access the web. Several major political parties have web sites, including the FPI, PDCI, RDR and the Ivorian Workers Party, as does the National Presidency. The web sites serve mainly to promote party propaganda and often contain official statements from party leaders and government officials, news reports from press agencies and Ivorian papers, and political cartoons. News agency Agence Ivorienne Presse (Ivorian Press Agency or AIP) is a state-owned news agency founded in 1961. It has 14 regional sub-branches (in Abengourour, Agboville, Bondoukou, Bouafle, Bouake, Daloa, Dimbrokro, Divo, Gagnoa, Karhogo, Man, Odienne, San-Pedro and Yamoussoukro) from which more than 50 freelance writers gather and report news. AIP has no international offices. AIP distributes local news, as well as international news by agreement with other press agencies, including the French Press Agency (AFP), the Chinese news agency Xinhua and the Pan-African News Agency (PANA). On its web site, AIP claims to be based on two fundamentals: complete objectivity and reporting events according to their importance. Observers note that, even during the latest military rebellion, AIP reporting has indeed appeared unbiased. Source: (Chris Greenway, BBC Monitoring research Jun 03 via DXLD) ** JAPAN [non]. Iva Tells Her Tale: She was pardoned by a president for a crime she never committed. Yet Iva Toguri's name remains synonymous with the treachery of 'Tokyo Rose.' Now she's hoping a film will set the record straight By Erling Hoh/CHICAGO, Far Eastern Economic Review, June 26, 2003 http://www.feer.com/articles/2003/0306_26/p054current.html George Stephanopoulos: Remember, even Tokyo Rose only got six years. Cokie Roberts: Well, and . . . George Stephanopoulos: I don't think he [John Walker Lindh] is going to get the death penalty. Cokie Roberts: . . . George brought up Ezra Pound. Ezra Pound pleaded insanity and ended up serving more time than Tokyo Rose and all the rest of them combined . . . --This Week, ABC Television, December 9, 2001. THE ORIENTAL GIFTSHOP sits on West Belmont Avenue in northern Chicago. A cavernous store, it's filled with Japanese records, lacquer Kleenex boxes, futons, Japanese wrapping paper and Fukagawa porcelain. A faint trace of incense lingers in the musty air. Young people from the neighborhood browse among books on Zen Buddhism and buy belts for their taekwondo classes. Few of these shoppers probably realize that the store belongs to the family of Iva Toguri, the woman dubbed "Tokyo Rose," who in 1949 was convicted of treason against the United States during World War II and sentenced to 10 years in jail. Fewer still understand that her story represents probably one of the most remarkable miscarriages of justice in American legal history. "She doesn't come into the store any more," says Joanne Toguri of her Aunt Iva. "She is very private." Aged 86, Iva Toguri lives quietly by herself in Andersonville, the city's old Swedish enclave. "She doesn't say anything, and we don't ask anything," adds her oldest nephew, William. Her family and friends all guard her privacy with the same care. Yet for more than a decade, the Hollywood producer Barbara Trembley has been fighting to bring Iva's story to the silver screen. And late last week, the director Frank Darabont, with movies such as The Green Mile and The Shawshank Redemption to his name, announced that he will be doing precisely that. "This is a stunning true-life story," said Darabont, who is in talks about a screenplay with Christopher Hampton (Dangerous Liaisons, The Quiet American). "It's about enormous personal courage and integrity in the face of rabid public sentiment, media villainy, cultural and racial hatred, and startling judicial injustice." A Hollywood movie could be Toguri's last chance to set the record straight. "I don't want what happened to me to happen to anybody else," she said in a statement. "When this production comes to pass, it will clear the air resulting from the weight of the myth and name 'Tokyo Rose'." Perhaps, but despite an unconditional presidential pardon from President Gerald Ford in 1977, Toguri's link to the mythical Tokyo Rose lives on in the minds of many. When National Geographic marked the 20th anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War, it sought out Trinh Thi Ngo, alias "Hanoi Hannah," and compared her treasonous broadcasts with those supposedly made by Tokyo Rose. Even respected TV commentators regularly group Tokyo Rose with some of America's most infamous traitors. "Myths die hard," says Ron Yates, the Chicago Tribune's correspondent in Tokyo from 1974-77, and one of the few journalists to interview Toguri. "People always want to believe fiction before fact. Others simply cannot believe that the U.S. government could have been so cruel and calculating as to rig a trial with witnesses who were forced to lie." Those witnesses were George Mitsushio and Kenkichi Oki, two Japanese- Americans who collaborated with the Japanese during the war and renounced their U.S. citizenships. In interviews with Yates in the mid-1970s, they confessed that they had been coerced into lying about Toguri by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Justice Department. Yates's articles were instrumental in bringing about Toguri's 1977 presidential pardon. "Of all the stories I have done, this has to be the most satisfying," says Yates today. "Because it was journalists who got her into trouble in the first place." One of the top stories on every reporter's list after Allied forces landed in Japan in August 1945 was an interview with Tokyo Rose, the siren of the Pacific who, according to legend, had taunted American Gis with her sultry, seductive voice. The only problem was that Tokyo Rose didn't exist. Whereas Mildred Gillars, alias Axis Sally, was a real person whose virulently anti-Semitic broadcasts from Berlin were amply documented, Tokyo Rose was a myth -- a composite fantasy assembled out of the several women who had broadcast for the Japanese during the war. One of them was Iva Toguri, a Japanese-American born in California who had become stranded in Japan after travelling there to visit a sick aunt just before the December 1941 Pearl Harbour attack. At the time, many Japanese-Americans in Japan renounced their U.S. citizenships, but Iva refused. To make ends meet, she worked as a typist at the Danish embassy, a piano teacher, and later as a typist at Radio Tokyo. It was there that she was ordered by the Japanese to work as a radio announcer on the programme Zero Hour. The show was produced by Maj. Charles Cousens, an Australian prisoner-of-war who, after threats, had consented to broadcast for the Japanese, but was surreptitiously trying to sabotage the country's propaganda effort. He had selected Iva for two reasons: she stood on the Allies' side, and, in Cousens' words, had a "gin fog" voice. The content of her broadcasts, which Iva presented under the name "Orphan Ann," were innocuous, and none of the accusations levelled against her -- including the claim that she notoriously referred to U.S. troops as "orphans of the Pacific" -- were ever substantiated by the Americans' own monitoring of her broadcasts. Furthermore, there were several Japanese-American women broadcasting for Radio Tokyo at the time, all of whom had renounced their American citizenships. One of the many cruel twists in Iva's story was that, by remaining loyal to her country, she opened herself to the accusation of treason against it. Several more bad decisions and tragic turns were to follow. Even before the Japanese surrender in 1945, the U.S. Office of War Information had stated that "there is no Tokyo Rose; the name is strictly a GI invention . . ." But for the press pack the hunt was on: At Radio Tokyo, the reporters Clark Lee and Harry Brundidge were pointed in Iva's direction. When they met her at the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo on September 1, 1945, they offered her a contract for an exclusive interview with Cosmopolitan magazine worth $2,000, and asked her to sign a document identifying herself as "the one and only 'Tokyo Rose'." Iva, lured by the large sum and unaware that Tokyo Rose would become the symbol for everything hateful the Japanese had done during the war, signed the contract and gave the interview. She never received the $2,000: Cosmopolitan told the reporters that they would not pay a traitor. In October, 1945, she was imprisoned for one year at the Sugamo Prison in Tokyo, before the U.S. Attorney General's office finally concluded that "the identification of Toguri as 'Tokyo Rose' is erroneous." In 1948, the newborn child of Iva and her husband Filipe d'Aquino died and, later that year, Iva was arrested again and sent back to the U.S. to stand trial. D'Aquino was allowed to enter the country to serve as a witness for his wife's defence, but had to post a bond guaranteeing his return to Japan. The two remained married until 1980, but never saw each other again. For the trial, which began in July 1949, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover effectively wrote a blank cheque to have Toguri convicted. At a total cost then of $750,000, the trial was the most expensive to date in U.S. history. Scores of witnesses were flown in by the prosecution to testify against Toguri. She was defended on a shoestring by Wayne Mortimer Collins, a San Francisco lawyer who had made his name fighting for the underdog. "My father did not believe that whispering in the ears of power or accommodating belief to the needs of popular opposition movements were true guarantors of civil liberty or human dignity," says Collins' son, Wayne Merrill, who after his father's death continued the fight that led to Toguri's presidential pardon. "It was this that allowed him to stand against the current with the beginning of the war, when patriotism ran rampant and Japanese internment, citizenship denaturalization proceedings against German-Americans and prosecution of religious conscientious objectors became the order of the day." When, after 13 weeks, the jurors announced they couldn't reach a decision, Judge Michael Roche did not rule it a hung jury, but instead reminded the jurors of the length, expense and importance of the case, and urged them to reach a verdict. Finally, based on Oki and Mitsushio's perjury, Iva Toguri was declared guilty on one of the eight counts of treason. She was fined $10,000, and sentenced to 10 years in prison. Upon her release on parole in 1956, she was served with a deportation notice for being an undesirable alien, despite the fact that the establishment of her citizenship had been crucial to her conviction. Collins successfully challenged the deportation order. Given her first fateful meeting with journalists, it's hardly surprising that Iva Toguri has since maintained a Greta Garbo-like silence. In the past 40 years, she has granted only a handful of interviews. "She comes out of an era when there was an enormous hatred towards the Japanese," says Ron Yates, who interviewed Toguri in 1991. "She doesn't want publicity, but she wants her story told." "The story Iva wants to tell is the story of the heroism of the people who stood up for the truth," adds Dafydd Neal Dyar, a retired U.S. Air Force technical sergeant in Seattle who has proposed a monument in Iva's honour with this dedication: "To the loyalty and courage of Iva Ikuko Toguri. She never changed her stripes." (via N. Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) ** PERU. 6042.72, Radio Melodia, Arequipa, 0920+, June 25. Spanish. News. Ann. & ID: "Melodía en la Noticia" and TC: "cuatro veinticuatro", 33433 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentina, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** RUSSIA [non]. FRANCE/KAZAKHSTAN. Voice of Orthodoxy: 9355 (13 June, 1530), SINPO=54544, ID: "V efire Golos Pravoslaviya", program "Our Church and our children" in Russian. Relayed via Kazakhstan (Andrey Seregin, Ryazan oblast, Russia, Signal via DXLD) ** SAUDI ARABIA [non]. Voice of Reform: Radio Alislah with a new frequency, it is 15700 kHz, I listened to it 10/06 and 04/06 SINPO *54555, no broadcast on 12025 kHz. Radio Alislah a une nouvelle fréquence, c`est 15700 kHz; je l`ai écouté le 10/06 et le 04/06 SINPO#54555, pas d`émission sur 12025 kHz (M. Kallel, Tunisia, Jun 10, 2003 for CRW via DXLD) Elsewhere reported as 15705; do you have accurate frequency readout? (gh) SAUDI DISSIDENT STABBED IN LONDON There's a clandestine TV connection in this story. http://onenews.nzoom.com/onenews_detail/0,1227,200203-1-9,00.html (onenews via A. Sennitt, HOL Jun 23, 2003 for CRW via DXLD) Messengers' from Saudi government assault opposition figure in London LONDON (AFP) - Saad Faqih, the spokesman for a London-based Saudi opposition movement, was wounded at his London home late Sunday by two men who claimed to have a "message from the Saudi government," a source close to him said. Faqih himself later told AFP by mobile phone from Saint Mary's Hospital that the men had said it was "a message from the Saudi government". Saad Faqih is the spokesman for the Islamic Movement for Reform in Arabia (IMRA). A spokesman for the hospital in north London said Faqih had apparently been knifed but that his wounds were "not very serious" and he was expected to be able to leave the hospital shortly. Faqih said he had been struck with a metal object on the face, the legs and the body. His aggressors were white, "apparently British" and spoke English. To get him to open the door the two men had pretended to be plumbers answering an emergency call, Faqih said. IMRA was set up in 1996. Saad Faqih has since December 2002 run an Arabic-language radio station, Voice of al-Islah, broadcasting programmes highly critical of the Saudi government out of London (AFP via A. Sennitt, HOL Jun 24, 2003 for CRW via DXLD) also at http://www.brunei-online.com/bb/tue/jun24w18.htm (brunei-online.com Jun 24, 2003 via J. Dybka, USA for CRW via DXLD) ** TOGO [non]. Radio Free Togo "RTL" is a Togolese station which emits since the foreigner towards Togo, it is created has presidential cause of the elections which takes place on 01/07/2003. It uses two frequencies 12125 kHz and 21760 kHz de 1300 UTC in 1500 UTC [sic, was -1400 --- gh]; I get only 21760 kHz with a SINPO 44223. The station speaks one half French one half local language which I can [not -CRW] identify. And all the subjects are in the tour of the elections http://www.diastode.org Radio Togo Libre "RTL" est une station Togolaise qui émet depuis l'étranger vers le Togo, elle est créé a cause des élections présidentielle qui se déroule le 01/07/2003. Elle utilise deux fréquences 12125 kHz et 21760 kHz de 1300 UTC à 1500 UTC; moi je ne capte que la 21760 kHz avec un SINPO 44223. La station parle moitié français moitié langue locale que je ne peux identifié. Et tous les sujets sont au tour des élections. http://www.diastode.org (M. Kallel, Tunisia, Jun 20, 2003 for CRW via DXLD) ** UGANDA. 4976, 0303-0313 June 27, R. Uganda. Carrier noted at 0230 till top of hour. Short IS and to female announcer in English with ID at 0301, then to a male announcer at 0303 and a rooster crow heard and some birds in the background as he gave program details. Difficult copy with noise or het on same freq. Then to music program. S 3 signal level. I am uncertain when the IS started as checked other frequency at that time. Carrier appeared stronger before sign on, however (Bob Montgomery, Levittown PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** U K. From The RSGB Sunday 29 June, 2003 [advance dated] Some 40 years ago the Royal Air Force Amateur Radio Society used to broadcast news to its members on 5105 kHz from callsign MRM located at RAF Locking in Somerset. Older listeners may remember that this could be heard over much of the UK. Thanks to the Ministry of Defence and the Radiocommunications Agency, several hundred UK radio amateurs are now able to investigate Near Vertical Incidence Skywave propagation at 5MHz or 60 metres. As part of these investigations, the RA has given permission for the RSGB to broadcast GB2RS News on 5405 kHz - repeat 5405 kHz - starting today and thereafter every Sunday, at 12.30 pm local time. Each bulletin will last about 20 to 25 minutes, after which the newsreading station will be seeking reception reports in the SINPO code, plus QTH locators, from NoV-holders on 5 MHz. Furthermore, at 1300BST GB5RS - repeat GB5RS - will also call on or near 3645 and 7045 kHz for similar reports on the 5 MHz transmission from non-NoV holders. Short Wave Listeners are invited to send written SINPO reports, preferably including their QTH locators, direct to G3LEQ, whose address is correct in the RSGB Yearbook. This operation is aimed at gaining more information about propagation conditions on 5MHz during the period of peak absorption in the D- region of the ionosphere. Further information can be obtained from Gordon Adams, G3LEQ, on 01 565 652 652 or by e-mail from gb2rs@boltblue.com (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A [non?]. Here in Lima, at this moment, Sat. Jun 28th, 0737 UT, a radio station on 7506.9 USB is active with music, radio announcements, and talk program. Signal, though not that strong, it's solid and comes clear thru the cochannel interference in 7505. Presumably it's AFRTS, but no positive ID has been heard so far. (I got into the freq. just a couple of minutes ago). Thanxs to those South Pacific DXers (for the tip) and to my terrible insomnia for this interesting catch!! Greetings from Peru, (Moisés Corilloclla, Perú, Receiver: Sony ICF-SW77. Antenna: copper wired inverted L antenna with MFJ1020C active antenna, hard-core-dx via DXLD) 2000-2100, 12133.5, US Armed Forces Network (pissibly via FL or PR); EE, Jun (Harold Frodge, MI) 2100-2200, 12133.5, US Armed Forces Network (pissibly via FL or PR); EE, Jun (HF) (MARE SWBC Summary via DXLD) ** U S A. MW station info: go to http://www.geocities.com/amlogbook/main.htm Towards the bottom of the page is a link to a site you can search from. This site uses our database as the basis for their site. We also have a complete list by frequency, call sign, state and city. Best of all, IT'S FREE --- and shall remain so. With the changes coming to 100000watts.com, we are looking real hard at some changes and additions to our site. fresh (Lee Freshwater, IRCA via DXLD) ** U S A. Re DXLD 3-114: Having grown up in Western NY, I remember when WEBR was sold and became an all-news (except for evening jazz) public radio AM station. Good to see them get some publicity! In many ways I wish more commercial MW stations would consider selling to a public radio entity as an option if they can no longer be profitable as commercial stations. The Buffalo Broadcast Pioneers website is also very entertaining to someone (like myself) who grew up on Buffalo / Niagara / Toronto AM radio in the 1950s and 1960s. I still remember most of the theme tunes Clint Buehlman used to open each quarter-hour on WBEN in the mornings (Richard Cuff / Allentown, PA USA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) There have been several instances of public radio buying ex-commercial AM stations, e.g. Denver, Nashville, Pensacola (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. FCC SHUTS DOWN RADIO FREE BRATTLEBORO [VERMONT] From http://www.reformer.com/Stories/0,1413,102~8860~1478256,00.html Article Published: Thursday, June 26, 2003 - 2:28:56 AM EST By DANIEL BARLOW, Reformer Staff BRATTLEBORO -- The Federal Communications Commission shut down radio free brattleboro [sic, always in lower case] on Tuesday because the organization lacks a broadcasting license. The independent radio station, which broadcasts out of an apartment in downtown Brattleboro, was forced to cease transmission Tuesday afternoon when two officials from the FCC went to the station. "It was a very civil interaction, but they made it very clear that we were in violation of the law," said Ian Kiehle, the host of Ian's Bookshelf, a weekly show at the station, who was present when the FCC arrived on Tuesday. Radio free brattleboro has been broadcasting under 10 watts in the area for more than five years and could primarily only be heard within the Brattleboro town limits. The station has between 60 and 70 disk jockeys, all of whom pay dues to fund the cost of the station. Billed as an educational and creative opportunity for area residents to learn about radio, the station was "part of the national movement to resist homogeneous corporate influence and return the airwaves to the hands and voices of the citizens, as it was intended," according to a publicity pamphlet. George Dillon, an engineer advisor to the enforcement bureau chief of the FCC in Washington, said he was not familiar with the situation, but said it was FCC policy not to comment on ongoing investigations. He referenced the law prohibiting unlicensed radio broadcast and its penalties, which are located at the FCC's Web site http://www.fcc.gov/ Section 301 of the Communications Act of 1934 prohibits the "use of operation of any apparatus for the transmission of energy or communications or signals by radio" without a license issued by the FCC, according to the site. Penalties for running an unlicensed station include fines of up to $11,000 per violation, seizure by court order of all equipment and possibly criminal charges and imprisonment. Between 2000 and 2001, the FCC shut down over 300 unlicensed stations, according to the Web site. An amateur video of Tuesday's shutdown supplied to the Reformer shows two field agents of the FCC ordering one of the station's DJs to turn off the mixing board and end the station's transmission. The agents were accompanied by an officer from the Brattleboro Police Department. The agents, who were not identified in the video but stated they were from an FCC field office in Quincy, Mass., said two complaints against radio free brattleboro were lodged with the FCC this year. One was from WFCR, a Massachusetts-based public radio station, and the other was from a resident of Guilford. The agents said both parties complained that radio free brattleboro's broadcasts occasionally bled into other station's broadcasts. "Your station is illegal," said one of the agents. "You need a license to operate a station on an FM band." Radio free brattleboro had recently switched its frequency from 88.1 FM to 88.9 FM to make room for an upcoming classical music station from National Public Radio. One of the agents requested the names and addresses of all the members of radio free brattleboro. He appeared slightly frustrated when the DJ said he would not hand them over. "I want to know who the members of this so-called group are," the agent said. Kiehle, who said he was speaking out as a DJ and not as a representative of the station, said radio free brattleboro did not operate with a controlling board. All the DJs were equal members of the group and "everything was done by consensus," he said. One of the agents warned the DJ that if the station went back on the air, U.S. Marshals would seize the equipment as proof "and put it in jail." "The key thing is that if we have to come back if you are on the air, it will get rougher," he said. The agents said the shutdown could be challenged legally in court, or the station could apply for an FCC license. Kiehle, who had been doing a show at the station since February, said the openness and diversity offered by radio free brattleboro was its appeal to listeners and DJs. "Everyone gets to do their own thing," he said. "The appeal was that the station could be almost anything you want it to be." Members of radio free brattleboro were expected to meet last night to discuss the shutdown. A call to Rep. Bernard Sanders, I-Vt., who has been highly critical of corporate media and the FCC's recent ruling to lighten rules on cross-media ownership, was not returned Wednesday (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. LOCAL PIRATE RADIO STATION OUTSMARTS FCC http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ibsys/20030628/lo_kgtv/1677182 [Radio Free San Diego, 96.9] (via Curtis Sadowski, June 28, WTFDA via DXLD) ** U S A. "Filth" By DEE-ANN DURBIN, Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON (AP) --- A bill that would increase fines for indecent radio broadcasts passed a Senate committee Thursday, spurred by a Detroit radio broadcast that one senator described as "filth." Sen. Fritz Hollings, D-S.C., sponsored the amendment to a bill that authorizes spending for the Federal Communications Commission, which oversees broadcasters. The amendment passed the Senate Commerce Committee and now moves to the full Senate. Hollings said it would be in the public's best interest to revoke the license of Detroit radio station WKRK-FM for a show that aired in January 2002. On the show, two hosts took calls from nine listeners who described sexual positions in explicit detail. Several callers also joked about acts of violence against women. "I wouldn't publicly repeat that language, indecency and filth myself," Hollings said. "They ought to just ream this fellow and he ought never to have a license again." Hollings' bill would expand indecency laws so that separate fines could be levied against each person who utters obscene speech on a radio show. Right now, the FCC charges one fine no matter how many people are speaking. The bill also calls for license revocation hearings for any station that violates obscenity or indecency laws. The FCC can now hold such hearings, but generally won't unless a station has aired lewd broadcasts more than once. "I'm just trying to wake up the FCC," said Hollings, who said he is frustrated that stations are escaping with minimal fines. Several senators were unconvinced of the need for the bill. Sen. Conrad Burns, R-Mont., said Detroit residents should act if they don't like what the station is airing. "Broadcasters already fall under some fines now," he said. "The public has to do something to get this smut off the air." Sen. Trent Lott, R-Miss., said Hollings' bill isn't specific enough, and needs to say how many violations a station could have before the FCC holds a license revocation hearing. But committee Chairman John McCain, R-Ariz., urged fellow members to pass the amendment and make changes when it reaches the full Senate. The FCC levied a $27,500 fine against WKRK-FM's parent company, New York-based Infinity Broadcasting, in April. Right now, $27,500 is the maximum fine the FCC can levy against a station for broadcasting indecent material between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. Infinity had 30 days to pay the fine or file a response with the FCC. The FCC said Thursday Infinity has filed a response and the FCC is considering it. Dana McClintock, a spokesman for Infinity, said Thursday the company believes the FCC violated the law when it fined the company, but he wouldn't elaborate (From Harry van Vugt, Windsor, Ontario, Canada via DXLD) ** ZAMBIA. 4910, 0253-0320 Jun 27, R. Zambia 1. IS, Fish Eagle started at 0249, then NA at 0250. 0252 drums heard, then a female announcer with mentions of Radio Zambia. Program announcements in local language by male announcer. 0255 to some very good African music. Excellent copy at S 5 level and little fading. More talks about programs during the music at 0256. Male announcer fast talker. Phone number given at 0253. Checked 6265 and nothing heard. Possible frequency change. Thanks for the tip from David Ross. Conditions poor this evening but have to think this frequency is an improvement over the 6265 as had become difficult reception of late (Bob Montgomery, Levittown PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ CONTESTS & COMPETITIONS +++++++++++++++++++++++ VACATION BCL CONTEST 2003 WILL START TUESDAY 1 JULY You can read the rules of the contest on the web site http://swlcontest.homestead.com Thank you and 73 from (F-14368 Frank Parisot, France, DX LISTENING DIGEST) CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ ASWLC MEETING SATURDAY JULY 5, 2003 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM [PDT] This is for those folks who live in Southern California and would like to attend a monthly shortwave radio listeners group. Please drop by for a visit and have a great day with the gang of swlers. Coffee and Donuts will be on hand for all to enjoy. Bring a Friend plus your comments and questions about our great hobby. See YOU there!! This event repeats on the first Saturday of every month. The next reminder for this event will be sent in 6 days, 4 minutes. Event Location: At the home of Stewart MacKenzie WDX6AA Street: 16182 Ballad Lane City, State, Zip: Huntington Beach, CA 92649 Phone: 714-846-1685 "World Friendship Through Shortwave Radio Where Culture and Language Meet" ASWLC - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ASWLC/ SCADS - http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCADS/ (Stewart H. MacKenzie, WDX6AA, June 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ THE K7RA SOLAR UPDATE SEATTLE, WA, Jun 27, 2003 -- This week had somewhat quieter geomagnetic conditions compared to the previous week, but average daily solar flux was down a bit and average daily sunspot numbers remained about the same. Recent projections anticipate no truly quiet periods ahead. ARRL Field Day is this weekend, and I wish the geomagnetic conditions could be better. The predicted planetary A index for Friday through Monday is 20, 25, 20 and 20. Although an A index of 25 for Saturday doesn't look very promising, this prediction is made several days prior, and like weather forecasts, the real conditions could be different. In addition, a planetary A index of 20 or 25 doesn't guarantee a radio blackout on the high frequencies. Just to run some numbers for this weekend, using W6ELprop http://www.qsl.net/w6elprop/ for Saturday with a path from California to Ohio, a solar flux of 125 and K index of 4, we see 20-meters opening on Saturday morning before the start of Field Day and continuing a good path through the day. Around 2330z the path may be unreliable, then it comes back a lot stronger at 0100z. This is just as 40-meters is starting to open. Both bands stay strong through the night until local sunrise in California. 80-meters opens after sunset in California, and fades after sunrise in Ohio. The path opens on 20-meters around 1430z. David Moore of Morro Bay, California wrote in with a tip about an interesting article that details some new findings regarding the mechanics of the solar cycle http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=11874 The article reports research suggesting slowly moving circulating currents of compressed gasses 125,000 miles into the sun's interior influence the production of sunspots. The article also says that the speed of these circulating currents of gasses varies from cycle to cycle, and the fast circulation in the last cycle suggests the next cycle should be strong, peaking around 7 or 8 years from now. Still more reports arrived about the VHF openings around June 17. Jake Groenhof, N0LX http://hometown.aol.com/n0lx/vhf.html wrote to say he was on Mount Evans in Colorado and using one half watt on 2-meter SSB when he worked a station 850 miles away in California. He went up to 5 watts and worked five more Californians. Ward Silver, N0AX wrote to say that the description in last week's bulletin of the A index being linear was incorrect. The related K index is logarithmic, but the A index is a larger scale, and not linear. Sunspot numbers for June 19 through 25 were 108, 121, 118, 94, 104, 131, and 115, with a mean of 113. 10.7 cm flux was 122.9, 116.9, 115, 110.2, 113.5, 114.5, and 116.3, with a mean of 115.6. Estimated planetary A indices were 18, 12, 23, 16, 20, 31, and 19, with a mean of 19.9. Amateur solar observer Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, Washington, provides this weekly report on solar conditions and propagation. This report also is available via W1AW every Friday and an abbreviated version also appears in The ARRL Letter. Readers may contact the author via k7ra@arrl.net (ARRL June 27 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) TRANS-ATLANTIC MULTIPLE HOP SPORADIC E TV DX [more] Hi All, OK, here is the story of a very remarkable Thursday 26 June 2003. Times given are UTC, local time is UTC + 2 hours. Before I start one note: I have been confusing myself and others by first stating that I received A2 through A6 during the TA opening, and later stating it was A2 through A5. The final word is that is was A2 through A6, the details are given below. In the morning of the 26th there was many hours with nice sporadic E into the Iberian peninsula and North Africa. The MUF was well into the FM broadcasting band, although the FM conditions were by far not as good as in the UK. This has been repeatedly the case this season. Although not very far apart, the UK is getting much better conditions than The Netherlands. But no complaints, Northern Europe is getting almost nothing! In the early afternoon I decided to go to work because the FM conditions had almost gone away. When I came home late in the afternoon Band I was almost empty, except for some weak video carriers from Portugal and Spain on E2. I checked the band again at 1700 UT and noted that at that very moment video carriers were fast getting much stronger at all Band I channels simultaneously. It was quite amazing to see this, also because the carriers were coming in from many different directions. I quickly identified Romania, Moldova and Ukraine on R1 through R3, Italy on A and B, Spain on E2 through E4, and Portugal on E2 and E3. The MUF stayed at R3 and therefore I decided to have a quick dinner, hoping for better things to come in the evening. And sometimes dreams come true --- I got back in the shack at 1745 UT and started checking the Band I video carrier frequencies from R5 downwards. When I arrived at 55.275 MHz I noted two carriers, which is very rare. One of the two had to be Izana on the Canary Islands! I decided to check the 6 meter Ham band to see if I could find any EA8's. Very soon, with the antenna pointing south-southwest I heard a strong signal of VE1YX from Canada. Then I immediately new: this is going to be a BIG night. The TA opening lasted from 1745 UT (of a little bit earlier, I may have missed the start) until 2125. What I did in this timeframe is checking the A2 through A6 video and audio frequencies as well as the FM broadcasting band. I did not check for any watchable video on the TV set. This would have been impossible because the DX was coming in from all of Europe and there were too many strong 'local' carriers all over the place. Here is what I heard, with video frequency measuring by means of the BFO method: A2 video: 55.2401 55.2402 55.24025 55.2497 55.2498 55.2500 55.2501 55.2600 55.26005 55.2601 A2 audio: [as corrected by gh --- had read 55.xx] 59.74 - at 20.35 UTC some sort of soap series, English language, a man saying ``Antonio`s wife, giving the fine back``. Fair signal at times, lots of fading. 59.75 - at 1815 UT the Oprah Winfrey show! One of her female guests saying ``all the bones in my face were broken. I was in a coma for 30 days``. (I am sorry for this subject, but this is what I heard). Strong signal at times, slow fading. 59.75 - at 2010 UT a French language program, seemed to be a sort of a contest, maybe a dance contest with country & western music in the background. Male and female giving a live report on the event. Fair signal, slow fading. 59.76 - at 2020 UT a French language documentary or report on an unknown subject. Weak signal, slow fading. A3 video: 61.24005 61.2404 61.2500 61.2501 61.2503 61.2507 61.2589 61.2604 61.26075 A3 audio: 65.75, too weak for any details. A4 video: 67.2401 67.2402 67.2499 67.2500 67.2501 67.25015 67.2502 67.2600 67.2601 A5 video: 77.2501 77.2600 77.2602 A6 video: 83.2401 83.2500 83.2601 83.26015 Except for channel A2 all video carriers were at BFO level. I did not spend much time checking the 6 meter Ham band. I heard Hams from FN76, FN74, FN41, FN46, FN31, FN34 and FN25. I had my FM tuner continuously on 88.3 MHz, which is pretty much empty, but heard nothing. At times when the video carriers on A6 had some elevated strength I also checked 87.75 MHz but again nothing. This is not surprising because I have a lot of hash on 87.75 MHz from the adjacent frequencies. Reading the fantastic reports from the UK DX-ers I think I should have checked more frequencies. But I do not think that I would have heard anything. The signals on A4, A5 and A6 were too weak for that. What really makes me wonder after having experienced this all is what causes this kind of `super mode`. Not only because of the Canada / USA reception, but more the conditions in general. The reception area was extremely large. A large part of Eastern Canada, North Eastern USA, but at the same time also 6 meter hams / beacons from Iceland, Greenland, the Azores and from really all parts of Europe, including a lot of short skip. It seemed that a blanket of ionisation existed over the daylight part of the Northern hemisphere. Are any articles known that describe this kind propagation? A big congratulations to the guys in the UK that managed the TA FM broadcasting DX. It proves that this is possible and it makes me confident that I can continue dreaming that one day I will be as lucky as you were on the 26th. Best regards, (Janpeter van Dijk, Zoetermeer, The Netherlands, ICDX June 28 via Curtis Sadowski, WTFDA via DXLD). Our friend in the Netherlands was definitely picking up Radio-Canada (SRC) on ch. 2 (now go figure which one!!). What is described here is a broadcast of the Acadian Games (Jeux de l'Acadie), a sporting and cultural event for the French speaking youth of the Maritimes. SRC was showing a special on its National network on June 26 between 16:00- 17:00 Eastern (17:00-18:00 Atlantic). Still amazed at this transatlantic stuff! (Charles Gauthier, St-Lambert, PQ Canada, ibid.) Hi and I hope you don`t mind me sending you this email. Just to let you know on the 26 June 2003 I did receive CBTB FM in Baie Verte, Newfoundland, Canada on 97.1 and also ch A2 video. Could you do me a big favour can you take a look at my ch A2 video picture and see if you can ID the logo for me. Some are saying it is WGBH in Boston but I don`t know. You can also hear the TA reception as well in my web page. The CBTB audio is in the audio section and the ch A2 video pic is in the TV DX pictures. Also could you please pass my picture around to see if anyone can ID the logo. Many regards (David Hamilton, Cumnock, Ayrshire, Scotland UK; my website http://www.geocities.com/tvdxrools/index.htm WTFDA via DXLD) I can tell you that it is NOT WGBH-2 Boston. I have never seen WGBH have their logo in the upper right hand corner. Do you have a date/time on this picture? That would help (Adam Rivers, MA, ibid.) Here's a link to Ryan Grabow's site with US logos http://www.egrabow.com/dx/ I don't think it's WGBH either (noting that the pic could have rolled up and caused a lower right logo to appear as upper right. Actually your pic does appear as if it has a line going thru it about 20% from the top of the screen so perhaps it was rolled. I hope Canadian members take a good look at this or provide you with links to websites of likely targets. 73 KAZ (Neil Kazaross, IL, ibid.) I have looked every which way at his image. I do realize that logo is in the bottom right. I'm pretty sure it's not WGBH, still. Only because they usually use a transparent, circular GBH 2 logo, and not something that would make the screen darker like that Adam Ribers, ibid.) This is interesting, as have been the UK posts, HOWEVER... As more of an FM DX'er than TV, and not being really up on European bands, I don't have a clue about all of these band designations with alphanumerics. Further, as only a casual TV DX'er, I don't pay a lot of attention to the audio or video frequencies of the various channels. And I'm sure I'm not alone on this list. I could no more be of help in ID'ing anything posted from Europe this way than the man in the moon because I have no idea what North American channels are being discussed. Could someone provide a reference (preferably not overly technical nor complex) for those of us who might want to learn more about this? ===== (Russ Edmunds, Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL, WTFDA via DXLD) ?? The above post even specified which American channels go with which audio and video frequencies specified. Every(?) edition of the WRTH has a page showing the video/audio frequencies of the different TV systems, e.g. page 650 in the 2003y edition (gh, DXLD) Hi Russ, It isn't as hard as you think, OK, here's a brief explanation. The channels mentioned in the Dutch posting are the various Band I (otherwise known as VHF-Low) channels for the three main systems in use internationally. The A channels are our own American NTSC system ones, A2 is just our old Es stomping ground, channel 2 (video at 55.25+/- MHz, audio at 59.75+/- MHz). The E channels are the European PAL system ones, E2 video is at 48.25 MHz, (which is frequently be used as a propagation indicator by our ham radio operators for European openings on six meters), E3 video is on the same frequency as our A2. The spacing between the audio and video signals in the European (and Russian) system is different than ours, but the two systems are remarkably compatible with ours (the 625 line video in Europe and Russia was heavily derived from our 525 line NTSC) a European set can receive American video (though not filling out the screen), and an American NTSC set can receive European video (with the picture not showing fully in our screens). The color signals between NTSC and PAL are incompatible, so the image you would see would be a stunning black and white one, unless you have a multi standard set. The R channels are the Russian standard ones (which is now a PAL system) and are in use throughout Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, Mongolia, and China. Channel R2 has its video at 49.75 MHz, this one is, like channel E2, low enough down to be commonly reflected via the F-2 layer. Doug Smith has on his magnificent technical site, a full listing of all the frequencies in use worldwide. The very exact frequencies noted in the European reports reflect a DX trend there that you seldom find here. Every television transmitter has a frequency that it usually sits at, varying by only a small bit throughout fairly long periods of time. DX'ers internationally use frequency measurements to identify which station they've received, many times without even resolvable video. DX'ers on the East Coast with the ability to accurately measure the frequencies of their local Band I stations would be able to fully identify which stations had in fact been received by our European brethren. Todd Emslie is the expert in this sort of thing; take a look at his site for details in how to do this. I hope this brief explanation helped some. I've spent the last couple of years hanging out in the ICDX group (Inter-Continental DX) which is centered in Australia (with DX'ers scattered elsewhere) which specializes in long haul F-2 reception, and our more familiar forms prevalent here, so I've been able to pick up a bit of their lingo and tradecraft (Curtis Sadowski, Paxton IL, WTFDA via DXLD) I am very familiar with the concept (one which is heresy to many long-time AM DX'ers --- a hobby I've also enjoyed for many years) of "identifying" stations via a specific frequency signature. That technique, along with monitoring subaudible heterodynes, has been in use by some of the more high-tech AM DX'ers since the early 1970's. (Russ Edmunds, Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL ), ibid.) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-114, June 27, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3f.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1188: RFPI: Sat 0800, 1400, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 7445, 15039 WRN: Rest of world Sat 0800, Europe Sun 0430, North America Sun 1400 WWCR: Sat 1030 5070, Sun 0230 5070, Sun 0630 3210 ... WINB: Sun 0030 12160 [we hope] WBCQ: Mon 0445 7415 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1188.html ** ARGENTINA. Hi Glenn; Normally at this time of year RAE comes in very well here 0200-0300 (English) on 11710 kHz. Last night was no exception with a nice signal from them including their 10 minute DX program (approx 0244-0254) with some very current DX tips. I noted during the sign on announcements that they would appreciate receiving reception reports of 20 to 30 minutes. They mentioned that they realize their signal does not get out too well so a 60 minute report might be hard for listeners to obtain. It was also mentioned that they would appreciate return postage of 3 IRC's and NOT to send cash as it is against postal regulations to do so, and the $ would probably not make it to them anyway. With all the cut backs in shortwave, it is nice to hear RAE trying hard to reach listeners with current programming and understanding that they have difficulties with their transmitter. Unlike Radio Cairo and Radio Georgia (to name a few) that punch out some pretty good power only to have a poorly modulated signal from the studio make listening unreadable. Letters to these stations seem to fall on deaf ears. If you get a chance, send RAE a letter or e-mail just to let them know we are still listening. 73 (Mickey Delmage, AB, June 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) {English is UT Tue-Sat only} ** BRAZIL. Re 3-113: Dear Glenn, On some websites I found a reference to 'Radio EDUCACAO Rural' on 4765. I am now inclined to think that was it, as I heard 'Radio Educação' ID (Robertas Pogorelis, Belgium, June 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. Trans-atlantic FM DX reception! See PROPAGATION below ** CANADA. This week on Quirks & Quarks [June 28] our feature item is: "From Exploding Volcanoes to Exploding Stars": Scintillating Summer Science Books For our final program of the season, we'll interview the authors of two of the most intriguing science books of the year: Krakatoa, and The Extravagant Universe. In the first book, best- selling writer and geologist Simon Winchester tells about the day the world exploded: August 27, 1883. That's when the volcano-island of Krakatoa erupted, annihilating the island and killing almost 40- thousand people. In the second book, astrophysicist Robert Kirshner tells us about the most mysterious force in the universe: dark energy --- and how it makes space itself expand. Plus, why birds sing at dawn. Here is our summer schedule, which includes an extra program on Tuesday evenings at 8:00 PM [sic; presumably 8:05 pm local, i.e. 2305 UT in Atlantic/NF zone, +1/2/3/4 hours]. These shows are the best from our past season so you have a chance to catch the ones you missed or hear your favourites again. Prime Time Quirks: Tuesdays – 8:00pm Jul 1 : QQ701 Music and the Brain – June 15, 2002 (CSWA & NY winner) Jul 8 : QQ708 Wind Power – Sept 14, 2002 Jul 15 : QQ715 Downloading the Mind – Oct 19, 2002 Jul 22 : QQ722 Flushing Pharmaceuticals – Nov 2, 2002 Jul 29 : QQ729 Dr. Tatiana – Jan. 18, 2003 Aug 5 : QQ805 Obesity – March 15, 2003 Aug 12 : QQ812 Why Sex – May 24, 2003 Aug 19 : QQ819 DNA Special – April 19, 2003 Aug 26 : QQ826 Road to Beringia – June 7, 2003 Best of Quirks & Quarks - Saturdays Jul 5 : QQ705 A Recipe for Life – Sept. 7, 2002 Jul 12 : QQ712 Science & the Courts – Oct. 12, 2002 Jul 19 : QQ719 Science of Climate Change – Nov. 16, 2002 (AGU winner) Jul 26 : QQ726 Avoiding Armageddon – Dec. 7, 2002 Aug 2 : QQ802 Fear & Fright – Feb 1, 2003 Aug 9 : QQ809 Weather or Not – March 1, 2003 Aug 16 : QQ816 New Rocket Science – April 12, 2003 Aug 23 : QQ823 Dino`s Demise – May 17, 2003 Aug 30 : QQ830 Vancouver Question Show – June 14, 2003 Have a great summer (Bob McDonald Host, Quirks & Quarks, June 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. http://www3.cbc.ca/sections/newsitem_redux.asp?ID=2880 CELEBRATING CANADIAN CULTURE IN ALL ITS DIVERSITY: CANADA DAY ON CBC RADIO CBC Radio One and Two will celebrate Canada's 136th birthday with special programming that reflects the diversity of this country, offering an entertaining and illuminating portrait of Canadian culture in the 21st century. On CBC Radio One, Shelagh Rogers will host two live broadcasts. The first will be heard at 10 a.m. (10:30 NT) [1305? UT] from Pier 21 in Halifax, with guests Lennie Gallant, Mir, the Nova Scotia Mass Choir and more. Then, Rogers will be whisked to Ottawa, where she'll host the live concert from Parliament Hill at 9 p.m. (10 AT, 10:30 NT) [0100 UT July 2]. The Guess Who, Leahy and La Bottine Souriante will be among the performers heard that evening. This is a shared event with CBC-TV. On CBC Radio Two, highlights of the day include a live concert from the Vancouver Jazz Festival titled JAZZ À L'OUEST beginning at 3 p.m. [1900 UT on the Toronto webcast?] David Grierson and Radio-Canada's André Rhéaume will host the bilingual simulcast. Performers include saxophonist Christine Jensen with her Juno Award-winning sister, trumpeter Ingrid Jensen. MUSIC AND COMPANY will feature Canadian composers beginning at 6 a.m. [1000 UT] and the concert portion of TAKE FIVE, airing at 1 p.m. [1700 UT], showcases the Hannaford Street Silver Band's Women Of Brass concert. A detailed listing of all Canada Day programming on CBC is available at http://cbc.ca/canadaday (via Ricky Leong, DXLD) ** CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC. I heard also R. Centrafricaine, Bangui on sharp 5035 kHz with booming signals. French talks and music around 2000 UT. 73 (Jarmo Patala, Finland, June 26, dxing.info via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. Les envío un enlace a la página oficial por la celebración del 50 aniversario de la Cadena Todelar de Colombia; en ella además de historias, hay fotografías del ayer y grabaciones de momentos en la historia que Todelar ha transmitido. En realidad está muy interesante esta página. http://www.colombia.com/todelar50/index.asp (Rafael Rodriguez, Colombia, June 26, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** CONGO DR. HEMA MILITIA LEADER DEMANDS CONTROL OF BUNIA'S RADIO CANDIP | Excerpt from report by Congolese rebel-controlled radio from Goma on 26 June Operation No Visible Weapons in Bunia, launched by Gen [Jean-Paul] Thonier of the multinational force, is now a reality. [Passage omitted] Yesterday the security limits were set out and the international force will not be able to intervene beyond its limits of [a radius of] about 10 kilometres. Meanwhile [the leader of the Hema Union of Congolese Patriots for Peace and Reconciliation, UPC-RP] Thomas Lubanga [who has been permitted to remain in Bunia with the protection of a small band of fighters] is demanding the control of the local radio [Radio Candip]. Gen Thonier has given his assent in principle but has said he needs more time to give a definitive ruling on whether Thomas Lubanga's UPC can [continue to] run Bunia's Radio Candip. Meantime life has resumed its normal course in Bunia where schools and markets are reopening. Source: RTNC radio, Goma, in French 0500 gmt 26 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** CUBA. CASTRO'S BEHAVIOR BAFFLES ANALYSTS By Nancy San Martin Posted on Sun, Jun. 22, 2003 in The Miami Herald Three months after Cuban President Fidel Castro launched his harshest crackdown on dissidents in decades, there's still no agreement on what drove him to take such steps and then lash out at valuable European allies that criticized him. Fear that dissent had escalated into a real threat? A fit of pique by a grumpy old man? An attempt to tighten controls on society as the island's economy tumbles? Some foreign analysts profess to be baffled by Castro's decision to silence dissent and blast European allies that are Cuba's most loyal sources of trade and tourism. ''His behavior since the March crackdown has been abominable on a moral level, and more recently against the Europeans, inexplicable,'' said Brian Latell, a retired CIA top analyst on Cuba and Castro. Over the past two weeks, Castro staged massive protest marches past the Spanish and Italian embassies in Havana, announced the takeover of a Spanish cultural center in the capital and insulted European leaders in language he generally reserves for enemies in the United States... http://www.cubanet.org/CNews/y03/jun03/23e4.htm (CUBANET NEWS. Prensa independiente de Cuba via David E. Crawford Titusville, Florida, DXLD) ** CUBA. Courrier électronique de Radio Havane Cuba : "(...) Effectivement nous sommes en train de procéder à des réparations de nos émetteurs afin d'améliorer nos transmissions et donc, les émissions vers l'Europe ont été affectées car elles sont transmises avec moins de puissance. Nous espérons bien que nous en verrons bientôt le bénéfice. (...)" (Radio Havane Cuba - courrier électronique du 24 juin 2003) NDR : cela vient un peu en contradiction avec l'information du 3 juin selon laquelle les émissions vers l'Europe étaient diffusées irrégulièrement (les informations sont issues de http://perso.wanadoo.fr/jm.aubier via DXLD) Item one: Many nice reports about the new RHC Pacific Coast of North America antenna. Thanks amigos to you all for taking the time to monitor our signals and then sending such detailed reports that have made our engineering staff and yours truly very happy persons indeed! Cuba radio broadcasting is undergoing the most significant upgrade in the past 20 years, and that includes our nation's AM medium wave broadcasting facilities, the FM stations, the already existing two national TV networks, plus the new nationwide Educational TV "Canal Educativo", a fourth yet to be named national TV network still to be named, and of course Radio Havana Cuba too. So in the not too distant future many of you RHC listeners will begin to pick up our station with much better signal intensity and also much better audio quality, as the new equipment comes on line (Arnie Coro, DXers Unlimited June 24 via Bob Chandler, ODXA via DXLD) ** CUBA - U S A. FIRST JOINT CUBA-US FIELD DAY OPERATION SET (Jun 27, 2003) -- Members of the Piña Colada Contest Club (KP2AA) will join forces with the Federación de Radioaficionados de Cuba http://frc.co.cu/ in the first-ever joint Cuba-US Field Day operation June 28-29. Operating as CO0US (and T42FD for the "Get On The Air" newcomer station), the team will operate from a location near Havana (Grid EL83) on 80 through 2 meters. Commemorative QSLs recognizing the two countries' common interest in emergency communication preparedness and international goodwill through Amateur Radio will be available via K7JA (include an SASE or SAE and other return postage). Participating Cuban operators will include Arnie Coro, CO2KK. Chip Margelli, K7JA, will be among the US operators. "All the operators and support people look forward to making as many QSOs as possible and testing our ability to provide a wide-area emergency communications link throughout the duration of Field Day," Margelli said. This marks the second year that Field Day welcomes participation by stations throughout International Amateur Radio Union Region 2 -- the Americas. In Field Day, operators outside the US and Canada exchange operating class and "DX" as their "section" designator. Signal reports are not exchanged during ARRL Field Day, which begins at 1800 UT June 28 and ends 2100 UTC June 29. Complete rules are on the ARRL Web site at http://www2.arrl.org/contests/rules/2003/rules-fd-2003.html (Chip Margelli, K7JA via ARRL June 27 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA [and non]. LIST OF CUBAN STATIONS INCLUDING FM Hi Folks, I stumbled onto this; have a look! http://www.tvradioworld.com/region1/cbu/Radio_TV_On_Internet.asp They have pages covering other countries too, including the Bahamas (Curtis Sadowski, WTFDA via DXLD) This appears to be limited to stations `on the internet` with websites, a few with audio too. Tho there are a surprising number of Cubans there, the list can hardly be considered complete for off-the- air DXing purposes (gh, DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. Anoche en uno de los cambios de frecuencias que realiza Radio Martí se anunció que además de las frecuencias en operación en la onda corta se añadía la de 1020 AM. Desde mi QTH (Miami) no he podido sintonizarla. ¿Alguien de los diexistas ha sintonizado la misma? 73's (Oscar de Céspedes, June 27, Conexión Digital via DXLD). Ahora sabemos por qué llevaron a cabo pruebas hace algunas semanas desde la emisora antes evangélica de Turks & Caicos en 1020. Pero todavia no cuenta en la lista de frecuencias en IBB: Monitoring. http://sds.his.com:4000/fmds_z/schedules/cur_freqsked.txt 73, (Glenn Hauser, ibid.) {Later: T&C confirmed} ** ECUADOR. Hi Glenn, Would you believe MacHarg: ``Ken HacHarg, former DXPL host. . .`` (Ken MacHarg, FL, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hi Ken, Ooops. Sorry, that was certainly a typo no one including myself had noticed. 73, (Glenn to Ken, via DXLD) ** GOA. Today, finally, I have received a QSL from All India Radio, for their broadcast from Panaji, Goa. Date of reception was January 20, 2003 on 11740 at 1530. I have tried for years to obtain this QSL, and this is my 214th country verified. (Using the NASWA Country List). After countless reports, they have finally verified with a full data QSL (from New Delhi, v/s A.K. Bhatnagar). A happy day! (Steve Lare, Holland, MI, June 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Congrats! ** GREECE. VOG: It's Greek to Me: Hello everyone, Not sure if anyone heard the last program at 1800 UT on Sunday June 22 [17705 Delano], but the host was talking about the recent summit on globalization that took place in Athens recently. He said that sadly there was violence by some of the protesters and that many were deported without ever being tried in court. The host stated that if it was up to him, he would break those peoples legs for the violence they came there to commit. Does anyone know if the VOG is really relaxed on their opinions of their presenters? It just seemed like such an odd statement to hear from a worldband station run by the government (Chris Campbell, location unknown, swl at qth.net via DXLD) ** HAWAII [and non]. On Sunday June 22, 2003, monitoring 9930 from 1000 to 1500 UT and this the result: 1000 English from WHR 1030 Mandarin from WHR 1145 Continued English religious program again until 1400 1400 Vietnamese with news read by OM & YL and some Vietnamese songs. At the end of broadcast, mentioning ID 'This is radio Free Asia' in English. --- All times with SIO 333 1500 continued China National Radio (CNR) broadcast with lower power than before [sic; when was that?], SIO 322 (Lim Kwet Hian, Jakarta, June 27, hard-core-dx via DXLD) And no KWHR audible then?? ** HAWAII. PINEAPPLE NETWORK A radio network called the "Pineapple Network"? Where ever could that be located? If you guessed "Hawaii" as your answer, then that would be correct. But, what is known about this unique radio network that was on the air in the middle of last century. Actually, very little is known about the Pineapple Network, and even this information lay quietly at rest until New Zealander David Riquish made a visit to old time DXer Ray Crawford in Brisbane, Queensland. As they were reminiscing about the past, they came across a reference to the Pineapple Network in the old radio club magazine. "Skyrider" in the issue dated for January & February 1948. In this brief reference about the Pineapple Network, mention is made of two mediumwave stations in Hawaii operated by AFRS, the American Forces Radio Service. Station WVTZ (American Zee) is listed in Hawaii on 1300 kHz, and another station is listed on the island of Oahu on 1260 kHz. Research into other radio magazines and publications of that era indicate that there was indeed a network of AFRS mediumwave stations in Hawaii for a few years beginning in mid 1945. The key station was WVTZ which was operated by the Marine Corps at Ewa on the capital city island of Oahu. This station operated on 1360 kHz, though this channel was changed later to 1300 kHz. Other AFRS stations in the area that relayed the main programming from WVTZ were listed on six other mediumwave frequencies. All seven of these stations carried the same WVTZ programming and they were all located on the same island, Oahu. Several of these low powered AFRS stations in Hawaii were heard in the United States, New Zealand and Australia, including the one on 1350 kHz which identified on air simply as "Station B". During the years just before and just after the end of the Pacific War, all of the AFRS stations in the Central Pacific were loosely designated as the "Pacific Ocean Network". The two other AFRS networks in the Pacific at the time were designated as the "Mosquito Network" and the "Jungle Network". There is no other known reference to the "Pineapple Network", though it is quite clear that this network was in Hawaii and that station WVTZ was the key station for this network. It would be suggested then that the term "Pineapple Network" was either an official or unofficial designation for the AFRS stations of the Pacific Ocean Network that were located in Hawaii. It should be mentioned also that AFRS programming was heard on shortwave from two other stations in Hawaii during the same era. The Voice of America transmitters, KRHO and KRHK, regularly carried AFRS programming. In addition, the Army Signal Corps transmitters, WTV & WTJ, were also noted with relays of AFRS programming to the Jungle & Mosquito Networks (Dr Adrian Michael Peterson, AWR Wavescan June 29 via DXLD) ** ICELAND. Hoy probé a diferentes horas, entre las 0730-1000 UT y en ningún momento pude volver a captar a la AFN Keflavik que estaba entrando muy fuerte en USB 73's (Arnaldo Slaen, Galvan 2735, 1.431 BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA, June 25, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Arnaldo, Prueba en 13855U: AFN, Keflavik, 0117-0242+; la escuché allí el pasado 24 de junio, con SINPO: 45444. 73's GIB (Gabriel Iván Barrera, Argentina, ibid.) ** INDONESIA. On 27 June at 2020 there was an RRI station on 4790 (4789.5 was the nearest I can get with my Icom). Didn't get the local ID due to QRN, but audible still around 2120. Is RRI Fak Fak nowadays on this frequency? (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) {See 3-115} ** IRAN [non]. IRANIAN EXILES SOW CHANGE VIA SATELLITE --- Islamic Government's Foes Tap TV, Web and Phones to Encourage Protests By Michael Dobbs, Washington Post Staff Writer, Thursday, June 26, 2003; Page A01 LOS ANGELES -- "Good morning, Iran," says Zia Atabay, a former Iranian pop star who fled Iran after the 1979 Islamic revolution. "And good evening, America." It is 9 a.m. in Tehran, 9 p.m. in Los Angeles [sic: so Iran is on UT plus 5 now??]. The previous evening, Iranian demonstrators roamed the streets of Tehran, shouting, "Down with the mullahs." From a makeshift television studio halfway around the world, Atabay is urging people to join the protests -- and news reports from Iran suggest the appeal is striking a chord. "If you don't act now, the regime will be around for a long time," he shouts into the television camera, as a telephone console on his desk flickers with calls from Iran. "So join with the students to bring the regime down. If you believe in freedom and democracy, everyone must be together." . . . http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A33643-2003Jun25.html (via Kraig Krist, DXLD) ** IRAQ. 'COMICAL ALI' RESURFACES One of the most remarkable figures of the Iraq war has resurfaced for the first time since the collapse of Saddam Hussein's regime in April. Former Iraqi Information Minister Mohammed Saeed al-Sahhaf - dubbed "Comical Ali" for his deadpan insistence that Iraqi forces were crushing the invading Americans - appeared in brief interviews on Al- Arabiya and Abu Dhabi TV on Thursday. . . http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3024046.stm (via Tom McNiff, DX, DXLD) Wow, has he aged in three months!! (Tom McNiff, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRAQ [non]. A NEW EXPERIENCE FOR IRAQIS _ WATCHING SATELLITE TV By DONNA ABU-NASR, The Associated Press, 6/24/03 5:27 PM BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) -- After years of all-Saddam-most-of-the-time, it comes as quite a change for Iraqis to watch "Tom and Jerry" and the Arabic version of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire." Liberated from 35 years of stilted official TV glorifying Saddam Hussein, Iraqis are snatching up satellite dishes by the thousands. Cartoons, fitness programs, movies and commercials are flooding into Iraqi living rooms. . . . http://tinyurl.com/fgj2 (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** IRAQ. ANALYSIS: IRAQ'S MEDIA FREE-FOR-ALL | Text of report by Tarik Kafala of BBC News Online dated 27 June 2003 All over central Iraq, independent radio and television stations are suddenly emerging to fill the void left by the destruction and collapse of the old national broadcaster. In Najaf, Kerbala, Kut and Hilla engineers and technicians who used to work for the Iraqi national station have taken over relay stations and started broadcasting. Iraqis are enthusiastically embracing the possibilities of a free media after years of heavy censorship. Alongside these do-it-yourself radio and TV stations, dozens of newspapers representing every kind of political viewpoint are suddenly available. For now it's a kind of media Wild West. Anyone who can grab a relay station and get a radio or TV station off the ground becomes a station manager. Anyone who can get hold of a printing press, or even a photocopier, is suddenly a newspaper editor. The Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) and the US or UK military only step in to close down a station or newspaper if it is found to be promoting the Ba'th Party, the party through which Saddam Husayn ruled Iraq, or if the output incites violence. That is the extent of the current media regulation - the CPA clearly has more urgent priorities. But this may not be the case for long. The coalition is already consulting media law experts on a regulatory framework for the media and may soon be licensing papers, stations and frequencies. Ingenuity Under the old regime the regional stations simply relayed programmes produced in Baghdad. The system was heavily centralized and tightly controlled. The people taking over the relay stations are showing extraordinary ingenuity and determination. In Kut a 67-year-old man spent seven hours fitting a radio aerial 55 metres up an electricity pylon. The pylon has no ladder and was not designed to be climbed. Abu Musa, a short man built like a miniature weightlifter, gives himself the grand title of "mast manager, Kut Radio and Television". "It was hot and very windy, but I tied myself to the girders. I took water up with me. There was no electricity running through the wires, so there was no real danger. I was more worried about the American planes and helicopters," he said. Abu Musa and his colleagues spent the three weeks immediately after the collapse of the Iraqi regime hiding two trucks, one containing a TV production facility and transmitter, the other a radio station and transmitter. They were built by the Iraqi regime in anticipation of the bombing by US and UK planes of the fixed TV and radio stations during the invasion. When the regime evaporated and the looting began, Abu Musa and others moved the trucks every night, hiding them under camouflage under trees, in ditches and in isolated farm building to keep them safe. Now they are running Kut TV and Radio from inside the walls of the compound of a former Saddam Fedayeen headquarters, which has been looted right down to the door frames. Independence At the moment the new stations are mainly broadcasting music, Koran and poetry readings, and programmes recorded from various Arab satellite stations - particularly news programmes and football matches. In Najaf, Kerbala and Kut station staff were making rough and ready TV and radio reports on topical local issues - the high price of public transport, the re-opening of a school, CPA attempts to restore water and electricity, some insect that is attacking the local date trees ("from Iran," I was told). The computers, video recorders, cameras and everything else used to run the station are borrowed from the staff or locals who want to support the station. Each piece of kit has a white label on it recording the owner's name, their address and the date of the loan. Each station insists it is the first independent station in the new, free Iraq. In Kerbala, station manager Kahlil al-Tayyar said that the Najaf station was being paid for by the Iranians. In Najaf, Ali Kashif al- Ghitta insisted the station manager in Kerbala was in the pocket of the Americans. The Najaf station's motto is "peace, reform, neutrality". In fact the CPA was trying to establish good relations with all the new stations in the area. US or UK soldiers are making great efforts to encourage these stations, sometimes paying salaries, sometimes supplying broadcast equipment. Propaganda or public information The arrangement is that the coalition forces provide some technical and financial backing in return for the broadcast of public information announcements that the CPA needs communicating to Iraqis. This arrangement does not always go smoothly. The station manager in Najaf said the US Army was leaning on him to carry what he viewed as pro-coalition propaganda. "We are an independent station. The CPA can't tell us what to say. They want us to tell everyone how good the governor they have appointed is when he is a crook and a Baathist," Ali Kashif al-Ghitta said. The US Army insists it is only trying to get essential information across to Iraqis. The threat of the withdrawal of salaries paid by the CPA hung over the conversation. And there are other dangers. A van with the station's logo on it had its back windows shot out. According to the station manager local political groups were trying to intimidate the station into reporting in a certain way. Baghdad TV In the capital, what is left of the Iraqi national station is being taken over by the Iraqi Media Network (IMN), a radio and TV station sponsored by the coalition. Journalists at the IMN insist they are completely independent of the CPA. In its earliest days, the IMN battled with coalition officials who tried to screen broadcasts. Hero Talabani, the wife of Kurdish leader Jalal Talabani, was briefly given a leading editorial role until the IMN staff threatened to walk out. On the day I visited the IMN, they were out on strike. The station had been on air for four weeks without any of the staff getting any pay at all. The strike was ended when the CPA paid salaries for about 50 staff. The coalition plan is to relay the IMN's broadcasts across the country, making it into the new national broadcaster. Relations between coalition officials and the IMN have improved recently. The CPA is spending tens of millions of dollars on installing production facilities, equipping offices and strengthening transmission. And now it is even paying salaries. Iraqis who have watched the channel are aware that it is backed by the CPA and treat it as such. "What do you expect? Of course they want their own channel and they need to get their message across. We won't really have a free media until the occupation is over," one Iraqi journalist said. Source: BBC News Online, London, in English 27 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** ISRAEL. Not for their ears By Anat Balint http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=309964 It's new immigrants, Arabs, and lovers of classical music who will suffer the most from the proposed cutbacks to Israel's radio broadcasts. The document currently sitting on the table of the Israel Broadcasting Authority's administrative committee should be of interest to quite a number of sectors in the population. Their common denominator is that they are minority groups: new immigrants, Arabs, lovers of classical music and fans of the culture and education programs of Israel Radio's Reshet Alef, most of whom are older people. According to the plans formulated by IBA head Yosef Barel, radio programs (and some television programs as well) designed for these populations will be dramatically cut back, and many of them will simply disappear. The details of the plan were revealed gradually and have aroused a tremendous stream of reactions: Hundreds of listeners of the Voice of Music classical music station sent the IBA and newspapers letters protesting the intention of merging the station with Reshet Alef and decreasing its broadcasts, and distributed a manifesto via e-mail. To these were added direct appeals to Barel and to the chair of the IBA, Avraham Natan, from Education and Culture Minister Limor Livnat and from Labor MKs Isaac Herzog and Colette Avital. Also when the intention of closing Reka, the network broadcasting to new immigrants, was publicized, a wave of protest letters arrived. Hundreds of appeals reached the station from listeners and from immigrant organizations, Minister of Immigrant Absorption Tzipi Livni initiated a discussion in the Knesset Immigration and Absorption Committee, and strongly worded statements were also heard from Transportation Minister Avigdor Lieberman and Minister without Portfolio Natan Sharansky. Last week, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and the minister responsible for the IBA, Ehud Olmert, announced that Reka would not be shut down, but the IBA didn't rush to confirm this. No more license fee Yesterday the program for cutbacks was brought for a first discussion in the administrative committee, the body responsible for deciding IBA policy (the meeting hadn't at press time). Barel's plan is part of a campaign he has been waging in recent months against the decision of the Finance Ministry to make significant cutbacks in the IBA budget. This is an intensive campaign, which has included personal conversations designed to influence Knesset members (after which editors in the news department received orders to interview various MKs because "they helped us in the Knesset committee"), stormy debates at meetings of the Knesset Economics Committee about treasury statistics, personal enlistment of public figures, and a harsh attack on treasury officials at meetings of the IBA. In the final analysis, Barel was partly successful. On May 12, the Knesset Economics Committee approved a more moderate program of cutbacks than the original proposal of the treasury, which was later passed in the Knesset. The IBA budget for 2003 is NIS 902 million, and according to the plan, by 2006, NIS 200 million will gradually be cut from it. The agra (radio license fee) will be gradually decreased starting next year: In 2004 the cutback will mean a decline of NIS 9 million in revenues, and in 2004 and 2005, a decline of NIS 10 million each year. Afterward, the revenues from the agra will decrease by 5 percent each year. The cutback in the television agra is greater. Among other cuts, about NIS 23 million will be cut from the budget because of the decision to stop using state funds to pay for the Middle East channel and because of the overall salary reduction, which applies to the IBA as well. After 2006, the agra will decline by 5 percent each year, until it is completely abolished within 10 years. Losing the languages On Sunday the broadcasting of "Good Morning Israel," Channel One's morning program, was discontinued. The IBA said the program had gone out for a summer break, but associates of Barel hinted that the program would not return, because of the cutbacks. That is only a symbolic step that hints at Barel's other intentions. The main blow resulting from the IBA cutbacks is planned for Israel Radio, affecting services of a noncommercial nature, which are the heart of public broadcasting. Barel proposes closing Reshet Alef, the Voice of Music and Reka, and turning them into a "culture network" that will combine all the services - classical music, cultural programs and news programs in English, French and Russian, three times a day in each language. An examination of the foreign language broadcasts is enough to understand that the blow is directed at small populations with special needs. Israel Radio now offers broadcasts in 12 languages, including 12 hours a day of Russian-language programs, two in Amharic, about an hour each in English and French, half an hour in Spanish and another 15-25 minutes a day in Romanian, Mughrabi, Tigris (a dialect of Amharic), Bukharan, Georgian, Yiddish and Ladino. All of these will disappear. Another item in Barel's plan proposes a merger between television's Channel 33 and the Middle East satellite channel, which was dedicated with great fanfare only a year ago. The government invested NIS 75 million to establish the channel, which is seen by its critics as a superfluous and wasteful propaganda channel, with an annual budget of NIS 80 million. Now Barel proposes transferring the Arabic broadcasts to Channel 33, and creating a bilingual channel on which the Hebrew programs will be translated into Arabic. Officials in the IBA and outside it are raising doubts as to the necessity of such a sweeping reduction in the broadcasts for the purpose of implementing the cutbacks, and tend to see it as a tactical move by Barel, who is trying to enlist pressure groups who will help to abolish the decrees by means of Knesset legislation, perhaps even this coming January, with the approval of the agra for 2004. `Problematic plan' These officials are asking how it is possible to submit such a comprehensive plan without including numbers to demonstrate the savings it will entail, why it is mainly radio broadcasts that are affected when most of the cutbacks have been made in television, and why Barel formulated his plan without consulting professionals within the IBA. Alon Elroi, a member of the administrative committee and the chair of the radio committee, is known as someone who usually supports Barel's moves, but now he is offering cautious criticism. "I told Barel at the radio committee meeting," he says, "that the plan is problematic. I wasn't shown sums or alternative plans. I asked them to return with a more well-thought-out plan." Elroi also pointed out at the meeting that his view is that it should not be the broadcasts that don't attract advertising that suffer, because such programs are supposed to be supported by the money raised from the agra. Elroi thinks that instead of reducing the broadcasts, there should be massive retirement of IBA workers for the purposes of efficiency. "It is possible to build a more efficient and cost-effective authority," he says. "Not every cutback means that services to the citizen should suffer." Elroi points out the need for a basic change in the IBA work agreements and a reduction in the number of employees, in order to get rid of strange practices, such as the decision that every time a television studio is used, there will be at least six technicians present, even if there is no need for them. This is probably exactly what the treasury had in mind in its plan. Amir Levy, the treasury's deputy budget director, explains that, according to the model he prepared, which relies on reports issued in the past, of the 1,800 regular employees of the IBA, between 700 and 900 are superfluous. The cutback is meant to bring about the departure of 700 employees within three years. Barel and Levy seem to be speaking in entirely different terms. Barel says the treasury is working to abolish public broadcasting, and the cutback it is demanding is so deep, there is no possibility of avoiding cancellation of programs and broadcasts. Because of the fog surrounding the financial administration of the IBA, there is at present no professional assessment, backed by numbers, regarding the implications of the cutback on the functioning of the IBA. The deputy financial director, Motti Levy, has been absent from the IBA for eight months and at the end of the month will be leaving the IBA. The comptroller appointed by the treasury, on the other hand, has only recently begun work (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** ISRAEL. Message de Mati ben Avraham, rédacteur en chef de Kol Israel: "(...)En ce qui concerne la restructuration de l'Office de radio- télévision, les rumeurs, les ballons d'essai l'emportent, pour l`heure, sur les projets réels. Seul point vérifié: le Trésor a mis la pression sur l'Office pour le contraindre à une cure d'amaigrissement (200-250 millions de shekels sur un budget global de 900 millions environ). En ce qui concerne la radio, le directeur-général a lancé trois chantiers : et d'un, fusion de reshet Aleph et Kol hamusiqua (l'équivalent de France Musique); et de deux, suppression de Reka, la chaine des "russes"; et de trois, transfert du département arabe à la chaine 33 de télévision publique. Dans ce cadre, russes, anglais et français disposeront de trois journaux quotidiens chacun sur les ondes de la nouvelle chaine dite culturelle. Le temps d`antenne n'a pas été précisé. En ce qui me concerne, je perds les deux éditions diffusés en ondes courtes à 18h30 et 22h30 (NDR : 1530 et 1930 TU). Etant donné qu'en quatre mois, la rédaction a perdu quatre journalistes (retraites anticipées et démission), que l'embauche est fermée, trois journaux au quotidien répondent à nos possibilités actuelles. Nous ne sommes plus que six (contre 16 il y a encore une douzaine d'années), pour devoir assurer au minimun 25 tours de services par semaine, chaque journaliste assurant quatre tours de service, par rotation (matin, journée, soirée). Dans de telles conditions, le moindre départ en vacances, la moindre maladie créent des tensions sur l'emploi du temps général, virant parfois au casse- tête. Partant, mon problème se situe au niveau des horaires de diffusion, afin de préserver les acquis, à l'extérieur principalement. Mais encore une fois, rien n'est encore joué. La disparition envisagée de la chaine musicale en tant que telle a provoqué une levée de boucliers, celle de Reka l'intervention du ministre de tutelle. La marche arrière n'est pas loin, pour peu que le PDG réussisse à lever la pression exercée par le ministère des Finances pour la reporter sur... le ministère des Finances et amener celui-ci à revoir à la baisse son plan d'austérité. (...)" (Mati ben Avraham, Kol Israël - 22 juin 2003 -- les informations sont issues de http://perso.wanadoo.fr/jm.aubier via DXLD) ** KOREA SOUTH [non]. Voice of National Salvation seems to continue issuing verifications. Received in 7 months a letter and card for my taped report. Similar card and letter can be seen at Martin Schöch's web pages at http://www.schoechi.de/pic-cla.html#Korea%20South Web page of the station containing also material in English is: http://www.ndfsk.dyn.to/ Address was: Greneir Osawa 107, 40 Nando-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan. 73 (jhy - Jyrki Hytönen - Kannus -Finland, June 25, dxing.info via DXLD) ** LIBERIA. Charles Taylor continues to transmit via his KISS-FM outlet in Monrovia. Perhaps his shortwave outlet is off because it is no longer under his control. It was originally situated at Totota, which is about 140 km north of Monrovia. I remember them saying that they planned to move it to Monrovia, but I wonder if they ever did. This outlet was on 5100 kHz. The news reports say he was speaking to the nation, but without the shortwave he certainly wasn't. Shortwave is still needed to reach the "upcountry" regions of Liberia. Radio Veritas, the Catholic station, was last heard on 5470 kHz. I know that they were at least still on FM in early June, is anyone hearing their shortwave? ELWA 4760 kHz was set up SIM International using a transmitter and antenna provided by HCJB less than two years ago. Anyone hearing them? High Adventure briefly operated around 11515v using their old 5 kW transmitter from Lebanon. They reported that this outlet, known as Voice of Liberty, was off of the air a few weeks ago due to technical difficulties (Hans Johnson, Jun 27, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** LUXEMBOURG. MORE THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS By Tim Burt, Financial Times; Jun 25, 2003 In an industry of national champions, Radio Television Luxembourg (RTL) is a peculiar beast. European television has been dominated for years by influential flag carriers - like the airline sector - many of them state-funded. The BBC, France's TF1 and Italy's Radiotelevisione Italiana still overshadow their respective markets. . . http://tinyurl.com/fgik (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) Good ol' 49 meter shortwave frequency 6090 we knew and loved, listed as 6092 in my recently acquired 1948 and 1953 White's radio logs (Brock Whaley, ibid.) ** MALI. 4735, 2301-2320, 6/25. Nice signal with a familiar sounding format of pop ballads in French and Vernacular with male announcer in French between songs. On a hunch I checked 4835, Mali and sure enough, it was there in parallel, as was 5995 though with splatter via 6000, Cuba. 4785 was a mess of QRN and has been on a regular basis during my checks of African stations. Does anyone know if Mali has moved from 4785 to 4735 or is this a spur of some sort? If anyone else can monitor this it would be appreciated. I will not be able too for a week due to work schedule (Scott R Barbour, Jr., Intervale, NH, Sangean ATS 818, RF Systems MLB-1, RS longwire w/ RBA balun, DX LISTENING DIGEST). Well, 4735 could be a `leapfrog` mixing product between 4835 and 4785 if both were on at the time (gh, DXLD) ** MEXICO. 3:43 PM CDT [2043 UT] --- seeing what appears to be Mexican programming on channel 7. Not enough to ID (Tom Bryant / Nashville, TN June 24, WTFDA via DXLD) Add me to the list of those who saw Es from Mexico on channel 7 today. An Azteca-7 relayer was in-and-out for a few minutes, beginning about 1225 CT. A few of the short bursts of signal were pretty strong. No ID. Many Mexican signals today, but few were IDed. It was difficult to tell that locals are channels 3 and 6 (Danny Oglethorpe, Shreveport, LA, June 24, ibid.) I hope you guys in the central US caught the record breaking Es from 1155 to 1716 CT on 6/24. From Charleston, Illinois, I had over 5 hours continuous top of the band Es at a distance of over 1500 miles to Veracruz. I've talked to other DXers and I can't come up with anyone who has ever had 1500+ miles for a duration of more than 80 minutes until today. The 103.7 in Veracruz was solid for the entire 5 hours! DXers I talked with today from the Illinois-Indiana area report very strong Es from the Mérida / Cancún area during the noon to 1700 time frame. Nothing seen on TV-7 (Andy Bolin via Mike Bugaj, WTFDA via DXLD) See also PROPAGATION below ** MEXICO. Radio Universidad [San Luís Potosí SLP] Estimado Nestor J. Vargas: Le escribo desde San Luis Potosí, México para ver si usted me puede informar dónde escribir para saber si nuestra estación de onda corta se escucha fuera de nuestra ciudad. La estación es XEXQ-OC 6.045 MHz en la banda de 49 metros. RADIO UNIVERSIDAD. Se encuentra en Arista 245, zona centro, C.P. 78000 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. México. Nuesta coordinadora es L.C.C. Leticia Zavala Pérez y la directora de la División de Difusión Cultural y Comunicación es la L.E. Ma. Del Pilar Delgadillo Silva. Ya teníamos varios años sin operar por cuestiones técnicas pero ya estamos otra vez al aire. La programación consta de obras clásicas como: Mozart, Respighi, J.C. Bach, Berlioz, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Barber, Britten, etc. Mañana mando programción completa. Me despido agradeciéndole el tiempo prestado a este e-mail; y esperando respuesta queda de usted. I.E.C. Lizbeth Deyanira Tapia Hernández, Radio Operador de Radio Universidad (via Néstor J. Vargas via José Elías, June 24, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Efectivamente, esa es la emisora que ayer reporté mi escucha el domingo, y la de hoy. Tengo entendido que hicieron intentos de regresar hace tres meses, pero tuvieron problemas y unos días atrás han vuelto al aire. Tengo entendido que ya no tienen el apartado postal. Y en su identificación dan esa dirección y su teléfono en cabina. Está difícil que sintonices a Radio Universidad, pues sólo transmite con 250 watts y hay muchas emisoras fuertes cercanas a esta frecuencia. La 6105 [Mérida] no está al aire; llevo varias semanas que no he podido sintonizarla. Las únicas frecuencias de emisoras activas hasta hoy son: 2390 Radio Huayacocotla, 6010 Radio Mil, 6045 Radio Universidad, 6185 Radio Educación, 9600 (9598) Radio UNAM, 9705 Radio México Internacional, 11770 Radio México Internacional. 6045, XEXQ Radio Universidad, 1215-1300, 26 de junio del 2003. Hoy escuché mejor a Radio Universidad con un SINPO de 44444; empezaron con una marcha austríaca, y a las 1230 se identificaron, dando dirección y teléfono. Después empezó la barra infantil con canciones infantiles interpretadas por un coro de niños. A las 1300 empiezan a dar noticias de las actividades de la UASLP (Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí) (Héctor García Bojorge, DF, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** MOROCCO. RADIO BROADCAST FOR MOROCCANS ABROAD LAUNCHED | Text of report in English by Moroccan news agency MAP web site Rabat, 26 June: Advisor of HM King Mohammed VI and member of the Mohammed V Foundation for Solidarity, Zoulika Nasri, launched on Wednesday [25 June] "En direct du Maroc" (Live from Morocco), a special radio broadcast destined to Moroccans living abroad. The ten-day radio broadcast (from June 25 to July 5) will beam its programmes on a daily basis to listeners in France, Switzerland and Europe, in partnership between the Moroccan radio body "RTM" and Paris-based "Radio Orient". In a related development, communication minister, Nabil Benabdellah, said the two Moroccan TV channels have started broadcasting special information and entertainment programmes destined to the Moroccan community abroad. Source: MAP news agency web site, Rabat, in English 26 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) WTFK? Any SW involved? RTM already has SW broadcasts, surely for abroad, but all domestic service relays? (gh, DXLD) ** MYANMAR. 5985, Myanmar, Yangon. Received QSL letter, program sked, and frequency list in 85d for taped report. V/S: Ko Ko Htway-Director of Broadcasting. Address: Pyay Road, Yangon Myanmar. I am pleased with this! (Patrick Martin, Seaside OR, June 28, hard-core-dx et al., via DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. Hi Glenn; I was just flipping around the frequencies on this beautiful day on the west coast of Florida when BINGO there was your voice that I know so well having been with the English Department of Radio Nederland for 14 years. I left to return to the USA in 79. I guess you heard that Harry van Gelder passed away a few days ago. He will be certainly missed by one and all. I keep in touch with several of my old colleagues such as Jerry Cowan, Tom Meijer and Rob Green who, I understand was about the last of the old gang to take his leave. Anyway, Glenn it was nice to hear your voice again. Oh yes, Dick Speekman has been to my home here in Florida once and I visited him in Australia once three years ago. Good DX sir. Sincerely, (Bruce Parsons (Parsons' Penthouse, Opinion Exchange, Cloud 9 and the weekly top 40 with Alan Clark), June 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) HARRY VAN GELDER RIP As you may have seen on the Media Newsdesk page on our main Web site, Harry passed away on Tuesday. We had been warned by his son Chris, who's a colleague at Radio Netherlands, that he was very weak and it would only be a matter of days. But Harry's friends around the world - and he had many - will be comforted to know that even in his final days he was alert and at peace, having come to terms with what was going to happen. We don't have any details yet of funeral arrangements, but will pass these along if his family wish them to be made public. One of my great regrets is that I never met Harry in person. We had planned something two years ago for the 40th anniversary of the Radio Netherlands building. I was going to talk to Harry about his memories of the early days at Witte Kruislaan 55. Sadly, the events of 9/11 intervened and we never did get to make that interview. If you remember Harry, and especially if you had personal contact with him, do feel free to send your memories to media@rnw.nl and we'll see they get passed on to his family. We'll also include some on our Web site. (Andy Sennitt, Media Network blog via DXLD) Harry van Gelder RIP Former Radio Netherlands broadcaster Harry van Gelder passed away on 24 June 2003. Harry will be best remembered by many older listeners as host for many years of DX Jukebox, the forerunner to Media Network. Read our tribute to Harry. http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/features/html/hvg030626.html 25 June 2003 [illustrated] Former Radio Netherlands broadcaster Harry van Gelder passed away on 24 June 2003. Harry will be best remembered by many older listeners as host for many years of DX Jukebox, the forerunner to Media Network. Harry actually retired from Radio Netherlands more than 25 years ago, and although he had lost his sight, his general health remained good right up until the last weeks of his life. His son Chris, who works here at Radio Netherlands, tells us that Harry's mind remained alert, and he was a frequent listener to Radio Netherlands. Harry had a special talent for making every individual listener feel special. Alok das Gupta writes from India: "I'm very much fortunate to meet him and his wife at his residence in Hilversum when Wim van Amstel took me to his place during my visit to Holland and other European countries in 1979. And after that we used to correspond till 1991. He wrote me a long letter and literally wept, avoiding his wife in a different room, after hearing the death of my son in 1986. Still I've that letter with me." Dick Speekman, living in Austalia, took over as presenter of DX Jukebox after Harry retired, and has fond memories of his association with Harry: "The loss of Harry van Gelder to me means the loss of one of the most sympathetic gentlemen I have ever encountered. During 1974, having convinced me that this is what I had always wanted, he gently set me off on a career in the media, that was to last some twenty or so years. Over that time, I have had many superiors but he was superior to them all." Victor Goonetilleke in Sri Lanka was a regular reporter for DX Jukebox, and for Media Network. Victor sums up eloquently what many people feel about Harry: "People of our generation - neither young nor old - owe it to ourselves to pay tribute to Harry Van Gelder. For what we are and for the countless hours of joy we received from our shortwave radio life style, we owe much to Harry Van Gelder. Who amongst us, who came into the hobby in the second half of the last century can forget Harry and his cheery voice every Thursday on Radio Nederland's DX Juke Box. "Most of us started out as casual short wave radio listeners and it was Harry who made us discover the fire we had within, for the hobby of DXing. It is Harry who taught us to be more technical than casual short wave radio programme listeners. For people like us the only regular source of radio information was DX Juke Box. From Harry we discovered what QSLs were, how to give our antennas some air, to multiply our Q , and to Crystal calibrate ourselves and go on to pick up the finer points of radio and DXing. "Harry's death takes me back to the golden years of radio and DXing and my own youthful years. Names like Eddy Startz, Arthur Cushen, Jens Frost, Arne Skoog and among a few more Harry Van Gelder warms our hearts with joy for what those fine humans gave to their fellow men in their chosen field. They have gone having enriched our lives bringing joy to millions in our day. We shall always remember. May he rest in peace that he richly deserves." Radio Netherlands issued this QSL card to mark Harry's farewell broadcast on 16 September 1976. The picture shows Harry with some of the awards he won from DX organisations during his career [caption] If you have memories of Harry and DX Jukebox that you would like to share with other listeners, please mail us at media@rnw.nl and we'll pass them on to his family (Media Network via DXLD) I owe a lot to Harry van Gelder, as he got my shortwave broadcasting career going, by inviting me to do the monthly North American DX Report on DX Juke Box, which continued as long as the program lasted, until Jonathan Marks remade it into Media Network (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RN CREATIVE DIRECTOR MARKS STARTS NEW PRODUCTION COMPANY International broadcaster Jonathan Marks (44) is to exchange his post as Radio Netherlands Creative Director for a career in charge of his own media company, Creative Media Consultants. As from September 1st 2003, Jonathan will combine strategic consultancy with project management and productions. "I follow both the commercial and public service media in many countries", says Jonathan, "particularly the Middle East, Latin America and Africa. I've been asked to apply that knowledge to develop new formats involving TV, radio and the Internet. I'm excited to be resuming production, since I love the passion involved with good programming." Jonathan Marks was born in the UK, but has spent most of his working life abroad, 22 of those years in The Netherlands. After working in Austria and Britain, Marks settled in Hilversum area and quickly built new audiences for Radio Netherlands' English language service. Marks has held several functions at Radio Netherlands, including eight years as Programme Director. "I was originally hired to turn a media programme into a science show. But I ended up developing both concepts into long running radio series that brought in excellent reactions from all over the world. But setting up satellite television and new media projects have been the most challenging work. I've been fortunate to have the best colleagues in the business, which is why I stayed so long". Marks is a frequent speaker at media conferences, notably at recent gatherings of the European Broadcasting Union and the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association. "As a media detective, I know that some of the best ideas for reaching people are coming out of the developing world. I enjoy acting as a catalyst to make new projects really happen." Alongside the new activities, Jonathan Marks will continue to advise Radio Netherlands on strategy (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 26 June 2003 [illustrated] via DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. RADIO NETHERLANDS SURPRISED AT SLOPPINESS OF MCKINSEY REPORT The much-anticipated McKinsey Report into efficiency within Dutch public broadcasting was finally published today. It includes a number of examples of how major cost savings could be achieved through cutting or eliminating certain services. One suggestion is scrapping both the Dutch and foreign language services of Radio Netherlands. "Internet is, after all, sufficient and the role of Radio Netherlands for non-Dutch listeners could easily be taken over by embassies and other agencies," says the report. Under this scenario, only the supply of news to the Netherlands Antilles, Aruba and Surinam would be maintained. Radio Netherlands today issued a press release pointing out that it is an autonomous organisation that doesn't come under the umbrella of domestic public broadcasting. Radio Netherlands believes that recommending changes to the core tasks of the Dutch international service was outside the remit of the McKinsey Report, as such decisions are made by politicians in The Hague. On the other hand, the report does not mention a number of "non-core tasks" in domestic public broadcasting that could equally have been considered. Radio Netherlands regards this approach as inconsistent. Radio Netherlands says that if McKinsey's researchers had delved deeper, they would have discovered that Dutch expatriates would not be so well informed without the specifically targeted programming it provides. They would also have found out that, while satellite and Internet make an important contribution, shortwave remains indispensable for the time being. The McKinsey researchers would also have learned that only the independent and highly respected Radio Netherlands can fulfil the role of giving listeners in other languages "a true picture of The Netherlands." This is done, amongst other things, via around 6000 partner stations on FM and cable, reaching tens of millions of listeners a day. Radio Netherlands points out that, only a year and a half ago, an external study by the equally renowned international bureau Andersson Elffers Felix (AEF) confirmed its importance as an international source of information about The Netherlands and Dutch issues. AEF did not base its conclusion on internal interviews, but carried out extensive external research, both internationally and amongst a focus group of Dutch stakeholders. This group included representatives of industry, culture, the diplomatic service, politicians, non- governmental organisations, etc. On the basis of the AEF findings, Radio Netherlands has already embarked on a modernisation and cost-saving plan that involves more partnerships, more focus on The Netherlands, and a rationalised use of shortwave. This plan will produce cost savings of around 10%. As for the McKinsey report, Radio Netherlands concludes that it is of such a poor standard that it cannot be taken seriously (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 25 June 2003 via DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. Amigos: Con respecto a los cambios propuestos para Octubre próximo en relación al español, éste SEGUIRA IGUAL QUE HASTA AHORA, es decir de 5 horas diarias y no 3 como se había anunciado. Habrá una modificación en el horario de inicio de las transmisiones. No será a las medias horas como es actualmente. Toda esta información se podrá escuchar este miércoles (jueves UT), a las 0003 UT en la repetición del espacio "Cartas..." que conduce Jaime Báguena. Será que nuestra campaña a tenido su efecto? 73' (Hugo López, Chile, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** OKLAHOMA. More than a week ago, there was a story on KFOR-TV channel 4 in OKC, and frequently promoted since, that on Cox cable in OKC, in addition to their usual position ch 7, KFOR-TV is also on cable 3, due to interference many subscribers are now getting on channel 7. One partial report I saw went into irrelevant info such as that `signals travel a great distance over flat terrain like this,` while the real reason, to anyone familiar with DTV, is that rival KOCO-TV 5 has started up their own DTV on channel 7, as assigned, replacing a low-power translator on that channel in OKC. The higher- power DTV signal is getting into some cable connexions, just as a high-power analog signal would (and thus the need to put local outlets on a different cable channel in the first place, so they won`t interfere with themselves). I`ve yet to hear KOCO-DT-7 mentioned on KFOR as the cause of the problem (tho this may have happened). There is currently a video report on this subject near the bottom of http://www.kfor.com if you have the right version installed, but I can`t get it to play (Glenn Hauser, Enid, June 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Since it went news-talk, KOMA-1520 has a billboard campaign (surely not Clear Channel`s billboards!) around OKC, one of which says: ``KOMA 1520, like KTOK used to be`` (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PARAGUAY. Radio América, desde el vecino pais, sigue en el aire las 24 horas por los 9983 kHz (la idea es cambiar esa frecuencia por otra en la banda de 31 metros) y 15185. ¿Alguien la pudo o puede recepcionar???? 73's (Arnaldo Slaen, June 24, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Amigo Arnaldo, Solamente una señal de portadora en 9983.23 por las noches, pero ninguna señal de audio. No se podría decir entonces que se trata de Radio América, dado que no hay señal de audio. 73's GIB (Gabriel Iván Barrera, Argentina, ibid.) ** PERU. 6042.53, Radio Melodía, 1000-1020 June 27. Steady Spanish comments from a number of men. Sounds like news. This signal is between theshold and poor. However, a noticable increase in gain just prior to sunrise here which is scheduled for 1029 (Bolland, Chuck, Clewiston, Florida, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. A los amigos que puedan echarme un cable, Spacemaster u otros, les pido chequeen 1610 para ver qué emisora peruana "del centro", quizás del depto. de Junín, puedan captar en esa frecuencia. Un colega, Hasse Mattisson, me envía desde el sur de Suecia, una fascinante grabación de una emisora peruana que él captó el 25 de mayo. Contiene unos huaynos y arpegios que, sin lugar a dudas, provienen del centro, "del corazón de los Andes, adentrando en Junín" como dice el locutor en un momento. El programa musical se limitaba estrictamente a la música vernacular del centro y era bilingüe, pues habia también anuncios en quechua. Nada de identificaciones en un periodo comprendido entre la 0100 y 0200 GMT. [Luego:] En cuanto a la emisora captada por Hasse Mattisson, que naturalmente puede ser la mencionada Radio Sabor, hay sin embargo un par de cosas que conviene poner en claro: la captación la realizó Hasse el 25 de mayo, mientras que Radio Sabor fue grabada por Björn el 12 de junio (espero no confundirme en las fechas). La de Hasse es claramente bilingüe y no tiene, como es el caso de Radio Sabor, ninguna identificación grabada ni anuncio de la hora exacta. Hay poca música en la grabación de Radio Sabor, pero la que suena es la que se suele denominar "música vernacular". Sin embargo, el formato de Radio Sabor se me hace distinto, más ágil y más alegre que el de la emisora que oyó Hasse. En tres semanas siempre se puede alterar un formato, o la presentación de una emisora, incorporando la novedad de algunas cuñas grabadas, así que para que se resuelva la identidad de esta emisora y otras, algunas por cierto muy efímeras, sería interesante que pudiéramos contar con la valiosa colaboración de otros colegas de la zona. Pero a fin de que sea útil el esfuerzo mancomunado convendría que las novedades y las emisoras sin identificar se publicaran, de una, y sin dilación alguna, en alguna lista adicional a las que ahora reciben el fruto del trabajo de Björn. Para que ello se haga realidad, supongo que primero debería cambiarse la política de publicación del mismo SWB y del MV Eko, que es el boletín del ARC (Arctic Radio Club), que han venido dilatando la puesta en conocimiento del público en general de algunas novedades consideradas "interesantes" para que los suscriptores de esos boletines puedan ejercer lo que pudiéramos llamar el derecho de pernada. Qué crees tú, Björn? Sería posible eso? Yo confío que sí, ya que ahora diste un primer paso en darnos a conocer en esta lista lo que hallaste en 1610, me refiero a Ecos del Portete y Radio Sabor. Un cordial saludo para todos (Henrik Klemetz, June 25, Sweden, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** RUSSIA EXTENDS RADIO LIBERTY LICENCE | Text of report in English by Russian news agency Interfax Moscow, 25 June: Russia's authorities have extended the Radio Liberty licence. "Radio Liberty's licence expires on 3 July, and we have decided to extend it for another five years," First Deputy Press Minister Mikhail Seslavinskiy told Interfax on Wednesday [25 June]. Yelena Rykovtseva, editor-in-chief of the Radio Liberty Moscow office, hailed the decision. She told Interfax that "this decision is particularly welcome for us, as three weeks ago we received a letter from the Press Ministry saying there was a candidate for our frequency. And although we received no warnings and believed that our licence would be extended, some uncertainty remained." Source: Interfax news agency, Moscow, in English 1727 gmt 25 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. USA/RUSSIA -- As far as I know, FEBC stops its MW relays via Vladivostok and Ussuriysk after 1 July 2003 (open_dx - Sergey Sosedkin, USA, Signal June 25 via DXLD) ** SOLOMON ISLANDS. SIBC worth monitoring in the next couple of weeks Duane and Phil, keep monitoring SIBC on 5020v as it looks as if law and order have broken down completely necessitating the immediate deployment of a multi-national force led by Australia. Also Australia has signalled that they are going to take over justice and finance within the Solomon Islands. I wonder also if the multi-national force will also run the SIBC (Robin L. Harwood, Spotlight on SWLing, Amateur Radio Magazine, Tasmania, June 26, swl @ qth.net via DXLD) SOLOMONS AID IN NATIONAL INTEREST: HOWARD The Prime Minister says Australia's involvement in the Solomon Islands is in the nation's best interest. Up to 2,000 police and defence force members will be sent to the island state to restore law and order. The Government is planning to send 150 police and up to 200 combat soldiers backed up by 1,500 defence logistics and support personnel. A transport and command ship, likely to be HMAS Kanimbla will also be involved. The Foreign Minister, Alexander Downer, says their key role will be to protect the police and disarm people with high powered and automatic weapons. "This is essentially an operation designed very substantially to reinforce the capacity of the Royal Solomons Islands Police Force," Mr Downer said. The Prime Minister, John Howard, says the operation represents a very significant change in regional policy. "It would be dangerous for the police to go in without adequate military back-up," Mr Howard said. "That's why in the final analysis you could be looking at quite a substantial contribution." But Mr Howard says it is not in Australia's interest for the Solomon Islands to collapse. "It could then become potentially a haven for drug running, for money laundering, terrorism," Mr Howard said. Labor's foreign affairs spokesman Kevin Rudd says Australia has a responsibility to help restore law and order in the Solomon Islands. "There is a grave danger in international relations if you simply stand back and hope that things fix themselves up, they have a habit of not doing that," Mr Rudd said. "There is great danger also that if we don't seek to act cooperatively with local governments then others beyond the region perhaps would seek to act as well." The Government is now waiting for a formal request from the Solomon Islands Government. New Zealand has indicated it will also contribute to the force, and the Government hopes Fiji and Papua New Guinea will also play a role (From ABC News Online via Robin Harwood, June 26, swl @ qth.net via DXLD) ** SWEDEN. RADIO SWEDEN -- Coming up on Radio Sweden: Thursday: In the "S-Files" a visit to Vadstena, and diving for more from the "Wasa" Friday: Our weekly review Saturday: In "Studio 49" the Aceh Liberation Movement here and the new Institute for Living History Sunday: In "Sounds Nordic" Jennifer Brown and fashion (SCDX/MediaScan June 26 via DXLD) ** TAIWAN. RTI Global Exchange Competition RTI Mailbag Time's Global Exchange segment is a fun and interesting way to exchange ideas and experiences from various cultures. Every month, we pose a new question to listeners, and every week we choose a few listener's answers to read in Mailbag Time. These listeners will receive souvenirs from RTI and some answers will be shared in Taipeiwave, the English Service newsletter. So join our global exchange and write us at natalie@cbs.org.tw Here are our July topics: JULY: What is your favorite summer time activity? Central Broadcasting System, No. 55 Pei An Road, Taipei, Taiwan. R.O.C. http://www.cbs.org.tw (via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, DXLD) ** TURKS & CAICOS. See CUBA non: R. Martí on new 1020 from here? ** U S A. June 26, 2003. Today at 1850-2020 GMT, there was propagation across the Atlantic from Canada/USA to the UK on Band 2 FM. At 1900 UT, Paul Logan in Lisnaskea, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland recorded the top-of-the-hour ID from WHCF Bangor, Maine on 88.5 MHz (Mark Hattam, Real DX et al. via DXLD) More under PROPAGATION ** U S A. THE TICK - WWV BOUGHT BY CLEAR CHANNEL http://www.mindspring.com/~lownoise/wwv.html (via Jef Jaisun, via Bruce Portzer, IRCA via DXLD) ** U S A [non]. David Vitek of South Australia via Chris Hambly in Melbourne, reports a new AFRTS outlet on 7507 kHz USB. Well heard here in NZ at 0845 UT and possibly the Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico site ex-6458.5 as the latter is unheard. Cheers, (Paul Ormandy, ZL4TFX EchoLink Node 87378, Host of The South Pacific DX Report, http://radiodx.com DX LISTENING DIGEST) Is KTBN-7505 a problem? (gh) ** U S A. RESCUE RADIO: NEVADA POLICE RADIO SYSTEM MAY BE A BUST According to information forwarded by listener Mike Morris, WA6ILQ, the new Nevada Highway Patrol radio system may have to be scrapped. The system, which has already cost more than $15 million, has been either in planning or under construction for more than 10 years. It was to be a state of the art system to help troopers communicate with both their dispatch centers and local authorities statewide. But a new the manager put in charge of the project has discovered a serious problem. It seems that nobody in the state ever filed with the Federal Communications Commission to reserve the necessary spectrum to operate the system. Now there is almost no chance of getting those licenses because most of those frequencies are taken. Also, the FCC wants public agencies off the 150 MHz radio band where the new Nevada state wide system was to be built. If the system is scrapped, it will mrean that $14 million in highway fund money and $1 million or more from the state`s general fund will have gone down the drain. The full story is on the web at http://www.nevadaappeal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20030513/NEWS/305 (WA6ILQ) RESCUE RADIO: NEW ALABAMA EMERGENCY RADIO SYSTEM FACING UNCERTAIN FUTURE But Nevada is not the only place that has made a this kind of a mistake. A posting to the Land Mobile Radio group says that the State of Alabama Department of Public Services is poised or already has made purchase of a multi-million dollar VHF Trunked system, but has no frequencies to put it on. The thought was that local municipalities and other agencies would join in and donate their frequencies, but this has not happened. Now Alabama DPS will have to hire consultants to try to locate unused existing frequencies for a system that may well be outdated by the time they are ready to use it. (WA6ILQ) (Amateur Radio Newsline June 27 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. Lost in the [Tucson] Arizona forest fire was the Cactus Intertie System's repeater equipment. The towers and repeaters were located very close to where the fire got its start atop Mount Lemmon. Also burned was the Zia Connection site, some 150 yards up the ridge from the Cactus site (ARRL Letter June 27 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. ARRL's 2002 Annual Report is currently available to members free of charge upon request. The report offers an overview of League activities for the year, messages from ARRL President Jim Haynie, W5JBP, and Chief Executive Officer David Sumner, K1ZZ, along with ARRL's complete audited financial statements for 2002. Send requests - - including your name, call sign and mailing address -- to Media Relations Manager Jennifer Hagy, N1TDY, jhagy@arrl.org. Due to the large number of requests for the 2002 Annual Report, individual replies to everyone who e-mailed may not be possible. All requests will be honored in the order they were received at ARRL Headquarters. The report also is available on-line as a PDF document: http://www.arrl.org/announce/annualreport/02ar.pdf (ARRL Letter June 27 via John Norfolk, DXLD) Also available to non-members, since I just brought up the 35-page document (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. TNN RELEASES AFFIDAVIT BY SPIKE JONES JR. ON THE NAME `SPIKE' By SAMUEL MAULL, Associated Press Writer, June 23, 2003, 7:29 PM EDT NEW YORK -- Lawyers for television network TNN filed an affidavit Monday by Spike Jones Jr., son of the legendary music satirist, saying it is "frightening" that filmmaker Spike Lee is trying to claim exclusive ownership of the name "Spike." Lee won a court injunction June 13 that stopped Viacom, the nation's third-biggest media company, from changing TNN's name to Spike TV on June 16 as had been planned. Lee, who direct "Malcolm X" and "Do the Right Thing," claimed the rebranding was a deliberate attempt to hijack his name and reputation. . . http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/ny-bc-ny--spikelee-spiketv0623jun23,0,1059152.story?coll=ny-ap-regional-wire (via Tom Bryant, WTFDA Soundoff via DXLD) ** U S A. MEDIA MONOPOLIES -- The Senate Commerce Committee voted June 19 to overturn parts of a Federal Communications Commission decision freeing media companies from decades-old ownership limits. The proposal would revise changes allowing individual companies to own television stations reaching nearly half the nation's viewers and combinations of newspapers and broadcast stations in the same city. Many media companies said old restrictions limited their ability to grow and provide better services. Broadcast networks say the changes can aid free TV by helping them compete with pay services for quality programming. The original rules were adopted between 1941 and 1975 to promote diversity of opinion in the media and encourage competition. The Republican-controlled FCC relaxed those rules June 2 with a 3-2 party-line vote, despite opposition from a diverse circle of critics, including media moguls Ted Turner and Barry Diller, consumer advocates, civil rights and religious groups, writers, musicians and unions. The proposed legislation, which passed by a voice vote, would only allow a company to own TV stations reaching 35 percent of U.S. households instead of 45 percent. The bill would reinstate a ban on newspaper-broadcast cross-ownership. However, it would allow state regulators to recommend FCC exemptions for small communities where a merger could support media outlets in financial trouble. It would clarify the FCC's authority to strengthen as well as relax media ownership restrictions. The bill would also require the FCC to hold at least five public hearings on ownership rule changes before voting. Many legislators say they will try additional legislative methods to overturn the changes. "The airwaves belong to the people", said Senator Byron Dorgan. "The FCC ignores that requirement and advances corporate interests at the expense of the public's interest." Even without new legislation, legal challenges are expected from consumer groups seeking tougher restrictions and media companies demanding further deregulation (AP via SCDX/MediaScan June 26 via DXLD) ** U S A. FCC Pirate bust: BRIAN N. BLOOM. Issued a monetary forfeiture in the amount of $10,000 to Brian N. Bloom for operating a radio station in Orlando, Florida on the frequency 93.9 MHz without Commission authorization. Action by: Chief, Enforcement Bureau. Adopted: 06/24/2003 by Forfeiture Order. (DA No. 03-2068). EB http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-03-2068A1.doc http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-03-2068A1.pdf http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-03-2068A1.txt (via Fred Vobbe, NRC FMTV via DXLD) ** U S A. WNED proves that smaller is better 6/27/2003, By ANTHONY VIOLANTI WNED-AM 970 is the media outlet that wouldn't die. The public radio news station has survived major staff cutbacks, a life-threatening funding crisis and is continually burdened by its past glory when it was known as WEBR. Maybe that's why WNED's performance in this month's New York State Associated Press Broadcasters Association awards was so gratifying. The station received three first place awards - more than any other local radio news station - and also a special-mention honor. . . http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20030627/1037805.asp BUFFALO BROADCAST PIONEERS http://www.buffalobroadcasting.com Another interesting site....interesting flash intro with sound (Fred Waterer, Ont., DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. BATTLING FOR BEETHOVEN --- CROWDED CLASSICAL MUSIC MARKET PUTS STRAIN ON RADIO STATIONS = Barbara Pinckney, The Business Review The Capital Region has more classical radio stations than most areas of the country, including New York City. WMHT, 89.1 FM; WBKK, 97.7 FM and, to a lesser extent, WAMC, 90.3 FM, all play classical music. "Even the New York Post said that if you want variety in classical music stations, you have to go to Albany," said Mike Schaus, general manager of WBKK. This is a good thing for the classical music fan -- who, according to a 2002 survey by the Portland, Ore.-based John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, would rather listen to the radio than buy a CD or go to a concert. It is not such good news for the three stations. The Capital Region has a well-educated populace and ample access to the classical arts, but are there enough classical music fans to go around? . . . http://www.bizjournals.com/albany/stories/2003/06/23/story1.html (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) {Apparently WBKK does not webcast, and its site http://www.wbkk.com is rather outdated} ** ZAMBIA. ZNBC Radio 1 is active again on 4910. Noted on 25 June at 1803 tune in with news in English. At 1812 ZNBC Radio One ID and into local language. Decent signal (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I heard last night good signals of Zambia, thus not identified but many mentions of Lusaka in vernaculars. It's nice to see if they set back to 60 meters after being few years on 49 mb; reception on 4910 is much better. 73 (Jarmo Patala, Finland, June 26, dxing.info via DXLD) A recent scan of the 60m band turned up these items of interest. 4910, 2157-2202*, 6/25, Afropop music at tune-in w/ talk over by a male announcer. ID as "Radio Nacional" Pips at 2200 followed by choral music; presumed NA; until s/off. Fair signal w/ occasional outbursts from the "Sweeper". The only listing I can find is via PPWBR for ZNBC, Zambia but I don't recall any logs for this frequency. Any ideas? Later: ZNBC, 4910, 0347-0411, 6/26. Checked this frequency again to hear Afropop music followed by a group of OM and YL with light banter and laughter. Brief music before 0400, when a tentative "Radio 1" ID was noted. Music and talk resumed w/ male and female announcer with "Radio Zambia" mentioned. Thanks to Jari Savolainen's prior HCDX log helping to confirm my log, later in the day (Scott R Barbour Jr., Intervale, NH, DX LISTENING DIGEST) TB fans opgelet : Het is toch niet alles kommer en kwel wat TB stations betreft. De binnenlandse dienst van Radio Zambia is na enige jaren in de 49m band vertoeft te hebben nu weer terug op de oude stek: 4910 kHz. Vanavond gehoord met goed signaal. Lokale taal. ID om 2000 UT. SIO 333. Hopelijk is dit meer dan een tijdelijk uitstapje. Greoten, (Aart Rouw, Bühl, Duitsland, June 26, BDXC via DXLD) G'Day List, Noted this morning June 27th our time (2100 UT June 26th) Radio One, Zambian NBC has returned to 4910 kHz. A big signal noted in Zambianglish! Time check in English as 23 hours (making it UTC +2). Male announcer repeatedly gave out the phone number in English for requests and call ins as : 01 25 18 81. I think its a couple of years since it was here. Cheers (Chris Martin, Brisbane, where the weather is excellent, June 26, ARDXC via DXLD) ** ZANZIBAR. Zanzibar on 11734.1 and 585 now has an English news bulletin at 1800. It may well have been going for some time, as I very rarely check Zanzibar at that hour. But I've not seen it reported anywhere else and I've never known Zanzibar to broadcast in English before. Regards, (Chris Greenway, Kenya, June 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Wonder if news be direct from Z or originate in DES? (gh) {direct} ** ZIMBABWE. STATE REPORTEDLY TO TRANSFER TWO RADIO STATIONS TO NEWS AGENCY | Excerpt from report by Zimbabwean newspaper Zimbabwe Independent web site on 27 June Information minister Jonathan Moyo intends to widen the state propaganda base by transferring two ZBC [Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation] radio stations to his troubled New Ziana project, the Zimbabwe Independent has been told. The move is part of a restructuring exercise which seeks to extricate the state broadcaster from debt by streamlining operations. The dismal failure of the much-touted restructuring exercise, dubbed Vision 30 in November 2001, has driven the ZBC into further debt, leaving management and the board without any option but to try another reorganization which could result in more retrenchments and staff transfers. ZBC Chief Executive Officer Munyaradzi Hwengwere confirmed yesterday that the corporation would soon implement a restructuring exercise, but claimed "not a single worker will be retrenched". Last September, the ZBC retrenched 435 workers under its Vision 30 restructuring exercise. The workers claim they have not received their terminal benefits. Hwengwere refused to give details on the transfer of stations to New Ziana. The New Ziana project was launched last year to replace the poorly-funded [state] news agency, Ziana. Under the project, community radio stations as well as newspapers would be established to improve the dissemination of information to grassroots communities. However, a general lack of funding has so far delayed the launch of the project. Happison Muchechetere, head of the electronic division at New Ziana, said he was not aware of the transfer of the stations. "I am not yet aware of that," he said. "That is news to me, but I would appreciate it. We will have radio and television services. We have already invited tenders for the provision of equipment to be used by the stations." As part of the streamlining of operations, sources at Pockets Hill this week said two out of the four radio stations under ZBC would be transferred to New Ziana. The other two would become autonomous entities, which Hwengwere said would be registered as separate companies but continue to operate under the state-run broadcaster. The four stations under ZBC have failed to operate as commercial entities as advertisers have fled from the airwaves in droves. Sources at ZBC this week said the decision to restructure followed a series of meetings held by the board and management over the past weeks. Morale is reportedly at its lowest ebb at ZBC, with suspensions and dismissals now frequent. The restructuring, sources said, was aimed at reducing the workforce and generating income through the various stations and services offered by the corporation. The sources added that ZTV [state-owned] Zimbabwe TV] would also become an independent company, as well as the corporation's Production Services. "We have always been telling the world that we are implementing a continuous restructuring exercise," Hwengwere said. "In other words, we are still implementing Vision 30. This time we want to establish the commercial viability of the corporation. Our plans are to create six companies from the radio and television stations, which will be legally registered and stand alone as independent entities," he said. Hwengwere refused to comment on the transfer of two radio stations to New Ziana. "We can't engage in such talks now," he said. "Aren't we talking about ZBC? How does New Ziana come in?" Insiders said the restructuring process would affect at least 150 of the 500 workers currently employed by the corporation. "They want to reduce the workforce, but at the same time they are trying to avoid paying retrenchment packages. We wonder how they are going to achieve that," said a senior ZBC employee. [Passage omitted] Source: Zimbabwe Independent web site, Harare, in English 27 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) WHICH two? The ones not on SW? (gh, DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ WRC 2003: AN UPDATE The work of the World Radio Conference continues in Geneva. Discussions have taken place on most of the topics of greatest interest to radio amateurs, but there have been few firm decisions taken as yet. Colin Thomas, G3PSM, who is attending the conference as an advisor to the UK delegation, reported that agreement in principle had been reached on Article 25.5 - the Morse code question - but some of the other items in Article 25, the amateur radio regulations, had yet to be discussed. There was also apparent deadlock over the question of realignment of the 7 MHz band, although there were increasing calls for compromise and for the topic to be completed at this WRC rather than postponed to the next Conference. To advance this aim, a drafting group under the chairmanship of Fred Johnson, ZL2AMJ, had been formed to produce a proposal. Colin points out that nothing is certain until the final day of the conference, as agreements made in Drafting Groups, Sub-Working Groups, Working Groups and Committees could still be overturned up to and including the final Plenary session. While this was unlikely, it could happen, particularly with contentious issues such as that of 7MHz realignment. The World Radio Conference is scheduled to conclude on Friday, the 4th of July. For late updates, look at the ARRL website at http://www.arrl.org (GB2RS) (Amateur Radio Newsline June 27 via John Norfolk, DXLD) WHAT TIME IS IT? WELL, NO ONE KNOWS FOR SURE --- As the Earth spins slower, methods of telling time diverge. Experts warn this could end in disaster David Adam, science correspondent, Thursday June 26, 2003, The Guardian Working Group 7A of the International Telecommunication Union's Study Group 7 may sound like an anonymous international committee like any other. But this is no quango of grey bureaucrats in greyer suits arguing over the desired colour of toilet paper. At the heart of this group's discussions is something of fundamental importance to anyone who has ever taken a second to fall in love or to score a goal: time itself, and how to define it. . . . . .It includes the leap seconds added until the GPS clock was set in 1980, but has ignored those added since. This means GPS time is now running 13 seconds ahead of coordinated universal time - which includes all added leap seconds and to which most clocks on Earth are set - but is some 19 seconds behind international atomic time, which is based on atomic clocks and ignores leap seconds. . . http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,3604,985020,00.html (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ ON THE HORIZON: HD RADIOS STILL SET TO ROLL OUT THIS SUMMER Ibiquity Digital radio says that the HD Radio receiver roll out will begin as scheduled this summer. This, this despite s major codec algorithm setback. According to a CGC Communicator editorial, the algorithm has been an ongoing puzzle for iBiquity. Broadcasters were told at the recent NAB convention that all parts of the HD Radio system were progressing well except for some details with PAC algorythm that could impact on both AM and FM fidelity. CGC says you can find more about this on-line. Its in cypbespace at http://www.rwonline.com/dailynews/one.php?id=3187 (CGC via (Amateur Radio Newsline June 27 via John Norfolk, DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ TRANS-ATLANTIC RECEPTION - MORE !! At 1900 UT, Paul Logan in Lisnaskea, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland recorded the top-of-the-hour ID from WHCF Bangor, Maine on 88.5 MHz. I have started a dedicated webpage detailing the trans- Atlantic FM reception this evening. http://www.dxradio.co.uk/transatlanticfm.html June 26, 2003 Today at 1950-2000 GMT, FM dx-er David Hamilton in Ayrshire, Scotland recorded CBTB-FM from Baie Verte, Newfoundland on 97.1 MHz via multi-hop Sporadic E propagation. There are two clips accessible via my website - http://www.dxradio.co.uk In particular, the fisheries broadcast in clip 1 is hosted by John Murphy http://stjohns.cbc.ca/fisheries/hosts.jsp This show goes out at 5.30 pm in Newfoundland, which in summer is 2000 GMT (Mark Hattam, UK, amfmtvdx et al. via DXLD) This noon our time (mid-evening U.K. time), several FM broadcast stations in the Canadian Maritimes and northeast U.S. were heard in Scotland and Northern Ireland. See this link [as above] for more information, including audio recordings. Stations definitely heard were CBC Radio 1 from Baie Verte, Newfoundland (97.1 CBTB); Roddicktown, Newfoundland (92.9 CBTR); and an unidentified transmitter on 88.5 probably Gaspé, Québec. Also, CKLE (92.9) Bathurst, New Brunswick; and WHCF (88.5) Bangor, Maine. Recordings of the WHCF identification announcement and the opening of the "Fisheries Broadcast" on CBTB are on the above link. There have been vague reports of transAtlantic FM BC reception before but none anywhere near this well documented. Listeners in New England and the Canadian Maritimes should pay attention to this path. It should certainly be possible to work it in the other direction. (Doug Smith W9WI, Pleasant View (Nashville) TN EM66, June 27, MT messageboard via DXLD) Well, I wouldn't have expected a day like this. Today has been a mindblowing day for DX. it started early in the morning with half of Europe coming in on E skip, but mixing with some good tropo to France, Belgium, Germany and Holland. So what wasn't available in one mode might have been available in the other! Then in the late afternoon TA started with signals coming in here on A2, quickly moving up to A3, A4 and A5. Then the unimaginable happened. Two of our members had transatlantic conditions on FM. Congratulations to Paul Logan and David Hamilton. You'll doubtless have some info elsewhere about this from Mark so I won't dwell on it here (just jeallous that's all!!!). My query is about another CTV ID I had. This time it was on A3 this evening. Regrettably I didn't get the recorder going in time but I clearly heard a "here on CTV" ID at the top of the hour (2000 UT). Just prior to this was a comedy show which finished and there may have been some adverts, which included a mention of Calgary Alberta. The audio for CTV was on zero offset, listening in narrow FM, which should narrow it down a little. The offset for video was approx. 61.249.996. There were 6m ham paths open from the UK to many eastern parts of Canada and the US, but also several more westerly locations almost to the west coast. I've checked the w9wi page for CTV stations on A3 and can only find 3 zero offset stations listed - in Ontario, Alberta and British Colombia. I'm ready for some more of this! Maybe FM here next time. What a day! Good DX (John Faulkner, UK, June 26, WTFDA via DXLD) STARING AT THE SUN --- An explanation for the sunspot cycle JUNE 26TH 2003 IN 1843 Heinrich Schwabe, a German astronomer, realised that sunspots, the black blotches that disfigure the solar surface, come and go in cycles of around 11 years. Subsequent work has shown that other solar activities, such as flares and coronal mass ejections, follow the same cycles. Since such "solar weather" affects the weather on Earth, and also plays havoc with satellite-based communications, the cause of these cycles is of more than just academic interest. That cause, however, has proved elusive. One hypothesis invokes a "deep meridional flow" in the sun -- a current of gas supposed to travel from the poles to the equator at a depth of about 100,000km. This would drag the spots around with it. Its principal competitor theory involves something called a "simple dynamo wave" on which the spots would surf. David Hathaway and his colleagues at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Centre, in Alabama, believe they have resolved the argument. As they told a recent gathering of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society, in Laurel, Maryland, it's the flow wot does it. Sunspots form near the poles as a result of magnetic anomalies. Once formed, they drift towards the equator. The question is why. Using observations from Britain's Royal Greenwich Observatory, which go back to 1874, along with more recent pictures taken by the American air force, Dr Hathaway was able to count the number of sunspots at various solar latitudes over the years, and thus to measure the drift in detail. Unexpectedly, he found that the maximum drift speed of the sunspots in a given cycle predicts the intensity not of the next cycle, but rather of the next but one. This implies that the sunspot cycle has a "long memory", which is compatible with the meridianal-flow hypothesis, but not the dynamo- wave hypothesis. And the details of Dr Hathaway's trawl through the archives match computer models of the meridianal flow precisely. Although similar observations have been made before, Dr Hathaway's are the first, he claims, to provide an unambiguous explanation of what governs the sunspot cycle. See this article with graphics and related items at http://www.economist.com/printedition/displayStory.cfm?Story_ID=1875206 (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) This looks a little like Art Bell stuff to me, but I just came across a web site that claims someone (military) is purposely causing tropospheric ducting by spraying aerosols high in the sky over Ontario. About half way down the page linked below, you will find a section under the heading "Black Projects?" There are also photos and other accounts if you follow the links on the page. http://www.holmestead.ca/chemtrails/chem4programs.html Here is a quote from the page: "This 'ducting' problem was solved by releasing an aerosol, a mixture of barium salts into the atmosphere over the United States. Thus, they can make an atmospheric radio frequency "duct" with a base of barium aerosol released from aircraft." ! I have no idea if this page is legit or not. I merely offer it as a place for the more suspicious of you to look around. If it is true, I see a great opportunity. Before the CQ VHF contest, for instance, we could call up our MP and ask for a few days of ducting... ;-) (Brent Taylor VE1JH, Doaktown, NB, ODXA via DXLD) ARNIE CORO'S DXERS UNLIMITED'S HF PLUS LOW VHF BAND PROPAGATION UPDATE AND FORECAST Geomagnetic conditions to be disturbed, actually the three hourly K index was up to 5 early morning local time in Havana Tuesday. And the A sub P or planetary geomagnetic disturbance indicator was above 20 also. I really have had not much time to monitor for sporadic E events since Friday, but during the few checks that I have made, no signs of openings were detected, although we are certainly now at the peak of the summer solstice sporadic E season. Expect rather nice night time HF propagation on frequencies as high as 18 megaHertz, and that means that both the 20 and 17 meters amateur bands could provide some nice evening QSO's. A bandscan of the 19 meters international short wave broadcast band late evening Monday showed a significant number of DX stations present with pretty nice signals. For those of you wanting to work round the world Dx, here is your friend's Arnie Coro advice: Set your alarm clock for around 5 o'clock in the morning your local time, as minimum ionospheric absorption conditions to the South and West of your location will be happening between roughly 5 AM local time and sunrise (Arnie Coro, RHC DXers Unlimited June 24, via Bob Chandler, ODXA via DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-113, June 25, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3f.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn WORLD OF RADIO 1188: WBCQ: Wed 2200 7415, 17495-CUSB, Mon 0445 7415 WWCR: Thu 2030 15825, Sat 1030 5070, Sun 0230 5070, Sun 0630 3210 ... RFPI: Fri 1930, Sat 0130, 0800, 1400, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230. . . 7445, 15039 WRN: Rest of world Sat 0800, Europe Sun 0430, North America Sun 1400 WINB: Sun 0030 12160 WRN ONDEMAND [from Fri]: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1188.html ** AUSTRIA [non]. Estimados Amigos: Como ustedes saben, el 30 de junio terminan las emisiones en español y francés de ORF Radio Austria Internacional. Por tal motivo, el sábado 28 de junio a través del programa "Antena de la Amistad" por Radio Corea Internacional los oyentes podrán escuchar las voces de Isabel Miró y Jaime Carbonell como así también parte del mensaje final del Jefe de Redacción del Departamento Español de ORF, Manuel Aletrino. El siguiente es el esquema actual de KBS Radio Corea Internacional (UT, frecuencias y áreas de destino): 1000-1100 15210 Khz p/Europa; 9580 Khz y 9760 Khz (vía Sackville- Canadá) p/América del Sur 2000-2100 15575 Khz p/Europa y 0100-0200 11810 Khz p/América del Sur (El programa se transmite a los 10' de comenzada cada emisión, después de las noticias.) En el aire por Internet entrando a http://rki.kbs.co.kr en los siguientes horarios UTC y canales: 2000-2100 - CH1 2100-2200 - CH2 0100-0200 - CH1 1300-1400 - CH2 También en audio por demanda entrando en http://rki.kbs.co.kr (click en Select Language/Spanish, luego Antena-Buzón y elegir la fecha aludida). El programa se carga uno o dos días después de su emisión. Están disponibles los siete (7) últimos programas emitidos. Gracias por su difusión (Rubén Guillermo Margenet, Argentina, June 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BAHAMAS. Does anyone know the call sign and coordinates of 94.9 "More FM" in the Bahamas? Got a positive ID! (Shawn De Cesari - Providence, RI, June 23, WTFDA via DXLD) What's the format? Something is under WHOM here at the office in Southboro, MA? (Steve Solomon, ibid.) Just in case anyone's interested, I called More 94 in the Bahamas to find out the legal call sign and their legal call sign is MORE. LOL Just so someone else will know should they catch that station. (Shawn De Cesari - Providence, RI, FM DXer and Roadgeek Extraordinaire! Ibid.) I really want to thank Shawn for this tip. I came home around noon for a quick lunch between jobs and read the posts, then shut down the computer and decided to check FM before I left. There was plenty of tropo to the northwest, but I swung the antenna down south and flipped to 94.9 and heard it!. Mostly weak, but toward the end it went into stereo. Sounded just like a US station except for the Caribbean music and DJs. IDed as More FM and at 12:30 "The Hot Lunch on All New More 94 FM". Outside of that I only heard one skip station on 92.1 briefly. As far as call letters, doesn't the Bahamas use Z (zed). I remember a station on 1540 I used to hear on AM years ago which used calls beginning with Z (Mike Bugaj, Enfield, CT June 23, ibid.) BAHAMAS FM STATIONS 89.9 - Splash FM - Spanish Wells BS 93.5 - Radio Abaco - Abaco BS 94.9 - 94-More FM - Nassau (New Providence) BS |--------- 96.1 - Cool FM - Freeport (Grand Bahama) BS.. ac 97.5 - LISTEN LIVE Love 97 FM - Nassau (New Providence) BS ac/news 100.3 - 100 Jamz - Nassau (New Providence) BS 102.9 - Island 102.9 FM - Nassau (New Providence) BS 104.5 - Power 104.5 (ZNS FM) - Nassau (New Providence) BS 107.1 - ZNS-1 - Nassau (New Providence) BS 107.9 - ZNS-2 - Nassau (New Providence) BS http://www.tvradioworld.com/region1/bah/Radio_Tv_Frequencies.asp (From TV Radio World via Mike Bugaj, WTFDA via DXLD) My 'South of the Border' appendix (which I have added to my new FM Atlas & includes Mexico, the islands and Central America by frequency) shows 94.9 BM Nassau 'More FM' with the calls of ZBM-FM. Incidentally, the letter Z is assigned to all British Stations in the Caribbean and Atlantic Islands, which includes the Bahamas and Bermuda. (Jim Thomas, wdx0fbu, Milliken, Colorado, ibid.) What`s the URL??? Jim, From researching on the Internet, ZBM-FM is actually 89.1 in Hamilton, Bermuda. Perhaps the stuff I'm seeing is wrong? (Shawn, ibid.) Depends on where you're looking :-} I can say with certainty, however, that "MORE" is NOT a government-assigned call, despite what the station personnel may think or say. If there is a government-assigned call it would be a "ZB-" call. Did you try the FCC's AM Query ? (Russ Edmunds, Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL ), ibid.) Thanks Shawn for CORRECTLY pointing that out. I was quickly rifling through my directory and thought that was their listing. MORE FM is Officially recognized as their assignment, however, they do have a Z-- assignment. It seems to be lost though. Mike, I still haven't helped you out. (Jim T, wdx0fbu, ibid.) The Bahamas are now an independent nation; the old British Z-calls are no longer official. Doesn't necessarily mean they aren't using them |grin|. Their officially-assigned prefix block is C6A-C6Z. Some official sources do show calls in those blocks assigned to (AM) broadcast stations - for example, if I recall properly the former ZNS-3 is now officially C6B3. I've seen nothing on the FM stations though. It's not at all impossible that they *don't have* callsigns assigned. I just log them by slogan (Doug Smith W9WI, Pleasant View (Nashville), TN EM66, ibid.) I'm well acquainted with the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas, and have visited all of their facilities at various times, and am personally acquainted with several staff members. Here's an extract from the official ZNS web site http://www.znsbahamas.com/index.php that those following this thread will find interesting. ------- HISTORY ZNS are the call letters for the National Radio and Television Broadcasting System. These letters were assigned when the fledgling radio station was recognized and accredited by the American Federal Communications Commission (F.C.C.). The letter Z was assigned to all British Stations in the Caribbean and Atlantic Islands, including Bermuda. The words attached to the call letters ZNS are Zephyr (Balmy Breeze) -- Nassau -- Sunshine. It was in 1936, when broadcasting commenced in The Bahamas from a studio atop the ``Snappy Hat Shop`` at the corner of Shirley and East Street in Nassau. In 1938, Room was made for the broadcast service to move into the telecommunications building where it remained until the new ZNS building was opened in Centreville. Radio Station ZNS was the broadcast medium of the then Telecommunications Department, the forerunner of today`s Bahamas Telecommunication Corporation. At first, ZNS was on the air for a period of four hours each day, on an assigned frequency of 640 kilocycles AM, and a shortwave frequency of 6090 kilocycles with a transmitting power of 500 watts. Mr. Harcourt (Rusty) Bethel served as General Manager from 1944 until 1970. `Rusty` Bethel`s voice was synonymous with early broadcasting in the country and his famous ``If It`s O. K. Flour, It`s O.K.`` commercial is still fondly remembered by many. In 1947, the medium wave frequency of 640 kilocycles per second on which ZNS had operated from its inception, was taken over by Cuba. Under the term of the North American Regional Broadcasting Agreement, the new frequency of 1540 was assigned to The Bahamas. From the inception of Broadcasting in The Bahamas, and up to 1950, the daily operational costs were borne by the government in the form of an annual grant. Because of an expressed desire for more radio involvement and more entertainment, the decision for commercial broadcasting was made. On August 1950, ZNS became self-supportive, as the station went full- fledged into commercial advertising. In the early years, the primary purpose of ZNS radio was to broadcast information to people living in the distant or ?out of islands? of the Bahamas which includes shipping reports, mail boat departures and arrivals, and urgent personal messages for those without telephone service. ------- This URL http://www.tvradioworld.com/region1/bah/Radio_Tv_Frequencies.asp gets you to a section showing all broadcast operations. I believe there is some mis-information. For example ZNS-3 (810 AM in Freeport, Grand Bahama) runs 10 kW [note...this operation *may* have been cut back to 5 kW] using 3 towers to achieve a cardioid east/west pattern. Many listings imply that there are two channel 13 transmitters...one on New Providence (Nassau) and another on Grand Bahama (at Freeport). To the best of my knowledge the Freeport transmitter has never been built, however there is a "ZNS-3 TV" on cable channel 13 on Grand Bahama Island only. It originates some local live programming but mostly carries feeds from the Nassau facilities. At least one of the non-call letter FM stations in Nassau is a ZNS- owned and operated facility --- and I wouldn't be surprised if there might be a similar arrangement in Freeport. It's an intriguing operation ---and was even more fascinating prior to television and FM. I also came across another URL http://bahamasmedia.com/resources/media-profile-main.htm that might be of interest to those seeking information on Bahamas stations. It repeats some of the information found in the previous section, but has more detail on on the overall media scene in the country. Even MORE ZNS history at [sic --- see below] ache:iGqzDZWc5cAJ:www.znsbahamas.com/history.htm+ZNS-3+&hl=en&ie=UTF-8 This is part of a previous site which had more complete history sections, but along the way has been severed from the home page and is apparently only in the Google cache library. [Later:] Hopefully this will fix the error in the last link in the previous post: http://216.239.39.100/search?q=cache:iGqzDZWc5cAJ:www.znsbahamas.com/history.htm+ZNS-3+&hl=en&ie=UTF-8 You may have to copy and paste it into your browser (Tom Bryant / Nashville, TN, ibid.) ** CANADA. AN RCI REVIVAL Thankfully, listeners -- both Canadian and international -- have never given up on Radio Canada International even on the alltoomany occasions when its prospects looked bleak. That steadfast faith appears to be paying off as RCI slowly but steadily emerges from its most recent near-death experience with a roster of developing programs that demonstrate a sharper and more consistent focus than in recent years. One program (though no longer on the schedule) already has earned international accolades: Wojtek Gwiazda`s documentary ``Refugees,`` from his Canada in the World series, received special commendation from the Asia Pacific Broadcasting Union. (The audio file of the program remains available from http://www.rcinet.ca ) RCI`s in-house productions now bring a strong, welcome, and much- needed Canadian focus and perspective to major areas of interest to international listeners. After all, if RCI doesn`t do it, who will? Current features on the schedule include Business Sense (Canadian products, businesses and practices), Media Zone (Canadian journalists` forum), Sci-Tech File (Canadian research and innovations), Spotlight (Canadian arts and culture), and The Maple Leaf Mailbag. The daily magazine Canada Today also appears in two editions, including a new live edition hosted by Gwiazda for the Americas and India. Full details for RCI`s service to the Americas in English are included in each month`s SWG (John Figliozzi, Program Highlights, July MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) ** CANADA. Toronto's CFRX is back on the air on 6070 kHz. Heard today (June 24) loud and clear from about 2150 UT, with its usual CFRB 1010 relay (Sergei Sosedkin, IL, June 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. ABORIGINAL RADIO NETWORK SEEKS TO EXPAND Adrienne Lamb, The Arts Report http://www.cbc.ca/artsCanada/stories/abor230603 EDMONTON --- An aboriginal radio network is hoping to add Montreal and Edmonton to its growing roster of stations across Canada. Mark McLeod, director of licensing with the Aboriginal Voices Radio Network, said he believes they have a good chance in Edmonton. "It's very irresistible for the commission," said McLeod, who's leading the delegation before the CRTC. "They mention in their speeches about how proud they are that they've licensed an aboriginal broadcasting company in Canada." Margo Pariseau, vice-president of the Institute for the Advancement of Aboriginal Women, said the station would have a tremendous impact for aboriginal women in Edmonton. "Many of the women who made a difference - going back to school or deciding what to do with their lives - got the information through the radio. It's the radio that reaches them. "Within five years of operation, the Aboriginal Voices Radio Network has been able to get licenses in Toronto, Calgary, Vancouver, Ottawa and Kitchener-Waterloo. The non-profit station broadcasts live via the Internet. The goal is to extend its reach to 27 major urban centres across Canada. Charmain Logan, founding director of the Northern Styles Native Arts Society, said she has been trying to sell music by aboriginal artists for years. "We have a wealth of aboriginal musicians and I know that it's been a struggle for them to have their music put into mainstream," she said. For more arts news, listen to The Arts Report weekdays at 7:12 a.m., 8:12 a.m. and 5:55 p.m. on CBC Radio Two. Copyright 2002 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation - All Rights Reserved (via Bill Westenahver, Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** CZECH REPUBLIC. RFE ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL DISCUSSES MOVE IN PRAGUE | Excerpt from report in English by Czech news agency CTK Prague, 24 June: The US administrative council of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty [RFE/RL] met to discuss moving the radio's headquarters and paying for the move in Prague today. RFE/RL spokeswoman Sonia Winter said that various aspects were discussed as part of moving. According to information obtained earlier, the US Congress must approve of funds to be used for the move. Winter did not say where the council will ask for the funds to be approved after today's meeting. According to some estimates, the move could cost as much as 20m dollars. RFE/RL President Thomas Dine recently confirmed that the radio will move from the former Czechoslovak federal parliament building in the centre of Prague to another site in the city. The rental agreement signed with the Czech government ends next year. The radio is currently negotiating with several possible locations. [passage omitted] Source: CTK news agency, Prague, in English 1619 gmt 24 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** ECUADOR [and non]. 1610.10 kHz, Ecos del Portéte, Girón (Ecuador). 16 juni 2003 - 0200 UT. 1610.10 kHz, "Radio Sabor", QTH desconocido (probablemente Perú). 16 juni 2003 - 0200 UT. Estimados amigos de ``Conexión Digital``! Realmente es un gran placer para mi participar en su muy conocida ``mailing list``. Mi colega sueco Henrik Klemetz y los otros miembros de SWB han recibido información, junto con grabaciónes, por medio de ``SWB América Latina`` durante el mes de junio tratando de ``Ecos del Portete``, Girón (Ecuador) en 1610.10 kHz y ``Radio Sabor``, QTH desconocido (probablemente Perú) tambien en la frecuencia de 1610.10 kHz. Grabaciónes de las dos emisoras pueden escuchar en la página web: http://homepage.sverige.net/~a-0901/ Por el momento está Radio Sabor en 1610.11 kHz con el mismo tipo de programación, música non-stop sin hablar. Ecos del Portéte se ha movido a aproximadamente 1614 kHz – mejor calidad de sonido en AM, difícil usar SSB. Antes 0100 UT tiene normalmente Portéte programa religioso y a partir de 0100 UT normalmente música non-stop, rocolera ecuatoriana y cumbia es común. 73s de (Björn Malm, La Prensa 4408 y Vaca de Castro, Quito, Ecuador (+593 2) 2598 470, JRC 535 – HF 150. MFJ 616 – MFJ 1025. 12m LW + 24m LW + Longwire Magnetic Balun, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HUNGARY. Effective June 15 Radio Liberty relay via new transmitter site Jaszbereny: 0300-0400 Tajik on 9760 JBR 250 / 075, ex LAM 100 / 075 0400-0500 Russian on 11710 JBR 250 / 055, ex WOF 300 / 075 0500-0600 Russian on 11885 JBR 250 / 055, ex WOF 300 / 075 1600-1700 Armenian on 9505 JBR 250 / 108, ex WOF 300 / 102 73 from (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, June 24 via DXLD) ** IRAN. 'HARMFUL' ELECTRONIC JAMMING OF WESTERN TV SIGNALS INTENSIFIES | Text of report in English by Iranian newspaper Iran Daily web site on 24 June Local stations transmitting powerful electronic signals to distort foreign satellite TV programs has increased over the past few weeks, an expert said. Mohammad Reza Molavi, a faculty member at the Post and Telecommunications University, told the student news agency ISNA that these signals have been intensified since the start of the recent student unrest in the capital city. Medical experts maintain that such signals are harmful to public health and can cause cancers and infertility. Molavi added that unknown groups sending such signals will have to lease a satellite for distorting foreign satellite TV programs. Source: Iran Daily web site, Tehran, in English 24 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) Meaning, carrying out jamming FROM a satellite?? What satellite operator would coöperate with that? (gh, DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. Hello again from New Zealand. Here are some recent loggings. USA. 7460. KSRI. Radio Sedaye Iran. 0230. Fair in Farsi. Has anyone had a verie from this one? I have been using their online message format but no luck with a reply except for their automated response (Ian Cattermole, New Zealand, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. AZERBAIJAN / IRAN [non] The clandestine station Voice of Southern Azerbaijan on 9375 kHz is indeed broadcast from a transmitter in Azerbaijan. The Azeri version of the text quoted in DXLD 3104 http://www.cehreganli.com/xeberler/radiok1.txt directly refers to the Azerbaijani Ministry of Communications. (NB. This text is written in simplified Azeri ortography without special Azeri characters. The station name is spelled "Güney Azerbaycanin sesi"). The Azerbaijani state radio is already transmitting twice daily to listeners in "Southern Azerbaijan" (i.e. northern Iran) via the MW transmitter in Pirsaat on 1296 kHz (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, June 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ISLE OF MAN. ISLE OF MAN SET FOR INTERNET FIRST The first ever live Webcast from the Isle of Man will take place on 7 July. Manx Radio http://www.manxradio.com Manx Telecom http://www.manx-telecom.com, Greenlight Television http://www.greenlight-tv.com and the government's information systems division are all collaborating to bring the Tynwald Day ceremony to the world. Tynwald, the Isle of Man parliament, is claimed to be the world's oldest democratic parliament, and has already celebrated its millennium, though the exact date of its establishment is open to debate. Tynwald Day is an ancient ceremony marking the original annual gathering of Monarch, nobles and commoners which developed over the course of centuries to become today's elected House of Keys. This year, HM Queen Elizabeth II will preside over the day's events. The subcommittee responsible for coverage of the event decide to provide a big screen to permit as many local people as possible to follow proceedings, and from that followed a suggestion that the same video feed could be streamed on the Internet. Manx Radio Managing Director Stewart Watterson said: 'The Manx Radio website will carry live video coverage of the whole proceedings with what will be the Isle of Man's first major live webcast. Manx Radio will take its video feed from Greenlight Television's production unit which will be sited near the Royal Chapel. Greenlight TV production crews will commence coverage at 0845 UTC until the fireworks finale at aroud 2200 UTC. In addition to the live narrowband webcast by Manx Radio, Manx Telecom will be providing edited highlights of the event from the government website and its own http://www.manx.net (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 24 June 2003 via DXLD) ** ITALY. 5775. IRRS. 2000. Fair in English religious on this frequency change from 5780 recently announced (Ian Cattermole, New Zealand, June 25, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** JAPAN. Hola amigos: Aquí una información sobre RADIO JAPON: Escuché a un locutor de Radio Japón en Español que anunciaba el inicio de programas de la NHK en Español via internet y dio la página y aquí se las paso para los interesados: http://www.nhk.or.jp/daily/spanish (CESAR PEREZ DIOSES, CORREO CENTRAL, CHIMBOTE, PERU, June 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Nunca antes? ** KOREA SOUTH. See AUSTRIA [non] ** MEXICO. Looking for XEXQ-OC, 6045, as reported by HGB, UT June 25 at 0345 I could detect only a very weak signal amidst the splash from 6050/6055, and T-storm crashes. At 0356 all I could make out were the words ``onda corta`` and could not even detect the Mexican NA as reported for sign-off around 0400. At 1312 again a very weak signal faded up slightly and seemed to be in Spanish (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NEW ZEALAND. A LITTLE REST --- SUMMERTIME EASY LISTENING Close your eyes and imagine this. (On second thought, I guess you`ll have to read this first and then imagine it again from memory.) How about a warm, breezy moonlit evening. The windows and shades are thrown wide open. The room is dark but for the green pulsating circle of the tuning eye and soft orange glow reflecting off the dial of that old Grundig-Majestic tube table model with the rich, deep audio. (It could be your favorite portable, but this is my dream sequence, thank you.) You`re stretched out on the couch (or the rug, or the recliner, on the screen porch --- whatever!) That grand radio is playing a familiar classical piece; or is it a string of hits from the `60s? (It could be either or both.) The sound is steady, even strong; but with a hint of air in the signal telling you that it`s coming from quite a ways away. This is how a lot of midweek summer evenings are spent at my house. The station is Radio New Zealand International, which historically has come in very solidly and quite reliably on 17675 kHz during the high summer months, even here in upstate New York. The programming originates from National Radio, the primary domestic network. It`s midafternoon in New Zealand; but just after sunset the previous (?!) evening where I`m listening. Midwinter there; midsummer here. Regardless, it works seamlessly in both places. After the ``1:00 news`` (0100 UT) and nationwide weather report, it`s Cadenza. Cadenza, an hour of shorter classical music pieces – spanning the spectrum but mostly mainstream – offering a thoughtful, pleasant background for your nighttime musings. It`s produced and presented by Peter Fry, who serves as a friendly but unintrusive guide. Following the news and weather ``at 2`` (0200 UT), the pace changes some with Wayne`s Music, the first hour of In Touch with New Zealand. Wayne is Wayne Mowat, National Radio`s afternoon host, and there isn`t a more relaxed and relaxing host than the warm-voiced Mowat. The National Radio online guide says it best, ``Wayne aims to settle you into cruise mode right away with an oasis of nostalgia, Wayne`s Music....This is a delightful part of the day, whether you`re thirty- something or eighty-wards inclined – a chance to reacquaint yourself with the hits of your era, from the 1920s to the 1970s, and everything in between. Each week Wayne takes us back to a different decade to reawaken some of those sleeping memories. From Fats Waller to Abba, Doris Day to the Beatles, Alberta Hunter to Dean Martin, Duke Ellington to Supertramp...`` In my opinion, this is the most refreshing and relaxing two hour block on shortwave radio. After a hard day at the office, I find myself looking forward to two hours with RNZI. I only wish reception was as good in our winter months as it is in the summer. But then again it`s that ``limited time only`` availability that makes it all the more special. Tune in Monday-Friday 0100-0300 on 17675 kHz. Radio New Zealand International -- The Saturday Comedy Zone (Sat. 0130) and Play It Again (Sat. 0930) originate from the domestic National Radio service. Both programs feature a random selection of humorous series and programs – the former usually of Kiwi vintage and the latter often old BBC chestnuts. For frequencies, consult the MT Shortwave Guide and, until August, r e l a x with good listening! (John Figliozzi, Programming Spotlight, July MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) ** PALESTINE. PALESTINIAN INFORMATION MINISTRY CLOSES THREE UNLICENSED RADIO STATIONS | Text of report by Palestinian news agency Wafa web site Ramallah, 25 June: The Palestinian Information Ministry said today that the decision to close Al-Manar, Alwan and Al-Aqsa radio stations, which broadcast from the Gaza Strip, was made because they do not have the necessary licences. The ministry stressed that closing these radio stations is not related to media rights, freedom of opinion and expression or peoples' right to obtain information; neither does it reflect any new tendencies on any level in the competent PNA [Palestinian National Authority] institutions against freedom of opinion and expression or pluralism. Rather, it is an administrative measure related to the implementation of relevant laws and regulations which fall within the Palestinian government's interest in safeguarding the supremacy and implementation of the law to secure the peoples' and homeland's safety. The ministry affirmed to Palestinian journalists and media men its interest in serving them and facilitating their tasks. Source: Palestinian news agency Wafa web site, Gaza, in Arabic 25 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** PERU. 1610 kHz, R. Sabor: see ECUADOR ** PERU. En la mañana del dia de hoy entre las 1035 y 1050 UT tuve la oportunidad de captar en los 4825 kHz a la peruana La Voz de La Selva, con una identificación musical que mas o menos dice así: " Por mas de un año llevando la alegría LVS tu radio digital" Este archivo sonoro está a la orden de los colegas diexistas. Atte: (José Elías Díaz Gómez, Venezuela, June 25, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** PERU. 4890. Radio Macedonia. 0600. Very good some days prior to PNG on this frequency. Later mixed with PNG. Regards from (Ian Cattermole, New Zealand, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** RUSSIA [non?]. OLD ``GERMAN NUMBERS`` BROADCAST RESUMES The Northern Hemisphere spring brought a return of balmy weather, blooming flowers, and – German-speaking numbers? Yup. Years after German unification caused a huge decline in these transmissions, a weird, machine-edited, male voice was heard speaking German on 5315 kHz. Something similar was heard on another frequency. On 5315, the initial callup was ``Sieben Drei Zwo,`` ``732`` in German, being repeated mechanically. This was followed by several repetitions of ``964,`` and finally a message in 5-number groups. The particular human voice being assembled by machine into the transmission was unfamiliar to veteran ``numbers`` listeners. Also, upper sideband (USB) was being used instead of the former amplitude modulation (AM). Everything else, though, suggested the return of a station not heard since late 1995. Among other things, there was the same distinctive hum in the audio, as if the same circuits had been put back into use, and the same use of ``Null`` for ``zero.`` Both of these suggest the old ``German Man`` transmission from Russian intelligence. The recordings reveal a great similarity to the same agency`s ultra-loud transmission to the United States. This one substitutes a voice in English, but the format is otherwise very close. Once again, we see a good reason never to take old ``numbers`` stations off the lists (Hugh Stegman, HF Communications, July MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) ** SEYCHELLES [non]. INTERNATIONAL(non): Updated A-03 schedule of FEBA Radio: [with kW powers / azimuth degrees] NORTH INDIA, NEPAL, TIBET 0015-0030 Sun NEPALI 12045 ARM 250 / 129 0015-0030 Mon/Tue CHATTISGARHI 12045 ARM 250 / 129 0015-0030 Wed MARWARI 12045 ARM 250 / 129 0015-0030 Thu HINDI 12045 ARM 250 / 129 0015-0030 Fri URDU 12045 ARM 250 / 129 0015-0030 Sat PUNJABI 12045 ARM 250 / 129 0030-0045 Mon-Thu BANGLA 12045 ARM 250 / 129 0030-0115 Fri-Sun HINDI 12045 ARM 250 / 129 0045-0115 Mon-Thu HINDI 12045 ARM 250 / 129 0115-0130 Sun-Thu MARATHI 12045 ARM 250 / 129 0115-0130 Fri BHILI 12045 ARM 250 / 129 0115-0130 Sat BHOJPURI 12045 ARM 250 / 129 1200-1230 Daily TIBETAN 15525 DHA 250 / 085, ex 15605 SAM 1230-1245 Sun BHILI 15525 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1230-1245 Mon/Tue MUNDARI 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1230-1245 Wed MARWARI 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1230-1245 Thu-Sat BHOJPURI 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1245-1315 Sat KUMAUNI 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1245-1300 Sun KANGRI 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1245-1300 Mon-Fri PUNJABI 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1300-1315 Sun/Mon/Wed/Thu ORIYA 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1300-1330 Tue/Fri GUJARATI 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1315-1330 Sat-Mon/Wed/Thu GUJARATI 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1330-1345 Tue-Fri CHATTISGARHI 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1330-1345 Sun/Mon NEPALI 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1330-1345 Sat MAGHI 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1345-1400 Daily BANGLA 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1400-1415 Sun-Thu URDU 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1400-1500 Fri/Sat HINDI 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 1415-1500 Sun-Thu HINDI 15225 SAM 250 / 129, ex 15605 SOUTH INDIA, MALDIVES, SRI LANKA 0015-0045 Sun/Thu KANNADA 15425 TCH 250 / 230, ex 15580 0015-0030 Mon/Wed/Fri/Sat KANNADA 15425 TCH 250 / 230, ex 15580 0015-0030 Tue TULU 15425 TCH 250 / 230, ex 15580 0030-0045 Fri/Sat BADAGA 15425 TCH 250 / 230, ex 15580 0030-0130 Mon-Wed TAMIL 15425 TCH 250 / 230, ex 15580 0045-0130 Thu-Sun TAMIL 15425 TCH 250 / 230, ex 15580 0130-0200 Daily TELUGU 15435 DHA 250 / 105, ex 15580 TCH 1400-1430 Mon-Wed MALAYALAM 7460 IRK 250 / 224 1400-1445 Thu-Sun MALAYALAM 7460 IRK 250 / 224 1445-1500 Thu-Sun TELUGU 7460 IRK 250 / 224 1430-1500 Mon-Wed TELUGU 7460 IRK 250 / 224 1500-1600 Daily ENGLISH 7460 IRK 250 / 224 1600-1615 Sun-Tue SINHALA 7460 IRK 250 / 224 1600-1615 Thu-Sat DHIVEHI 7460 IRK 250 / 224 1600-1615 Wed MALAY 7460 IRK 250 / 224 PAKISTAN, AFGHANISTAN, IRAN 0030-0045 Daily ENGLISH 9465 MOS 500 / 090 0045-0115 Sun PUNJABI 9465 MOS 500 / 090 0045-0100 Mon-Sat HINDKO 9465 MOS 500 / 090 0100-0115 Mon/Tue/Fri/Sat PUNJABI 9465 MOS 500 / 090 0115-0130 Tue/Fri-Sun URDU 9465 MOS 500 / 090 0100-0130 Wed/Thu URDU 9465 MOS 500 / 090 0115-0130 Mon POTHWARI 9465 MOS 500 / 090 0130-0145 Fri-Sun SINDHI 9465 MOS 500 / 090 0130-0145 Mon-Thu SIRAIKI 9465 MOS 500 / 090 0145-0200 Wed-Sun BALUCHI 9465 MOS 500 / 090 0145-0200 Mon/Tue BRAHUI 9465 MOS 500 / 090 0200-0215 Daily PASHTO 11995 DHA 250 / 045 0215-0245 Daily DARI 11995 DHA 250 / 045 0245-0300 Daily HAZARAGI 11995 DHA 250 / 045 0530-0715 Fri PERSIAN 9660 DHA 250 / 345, ex 0530- 0700 1530-1630 Daily PERSIAN 9650 ARM 100 / 150, ex 9495 1300-1400 Thu-Sun URDU 9495 NVS 250 / 195 1300-1415 Mon/Wed URDU 9495 NVS 250 / 195 1300-1345 Tue URDU 9495 NVS 250 / 195 1400-1415 Thu-Sun BALTI 9495 NVS 250 / 195 1345-1415 Tue PUNJABI 9495 NVS 250 / 195 1530-1600 Daily PASHTO 9415 ARM 100 / 104 1600-1630 Daily DARI 9415 ARM 100 / 104 1630-1645 Daily HAZARAGI 9415 ARM 100 / 104 1645-1700 Tue-Thu TURKMEN 9415 ARM 100 / 104 1645-1700 Fri-Mon UZBEK 9415 ARM 100 / 104 MIDDLE EAST 0345-0430 Daily ARABIC 15530 MSK 250 / 169 0500-0530 Fri SINHALA 6125 DHA 250 / 300 0530-0630 Fri MALAYALAM 6125 DHA 250 / 300 1100-1245 Daily ARABIC 15530 ARM 250 / 188 1245-1300 Daily ENGLISH 15530 ARM 250 / 188 AFRICA, ETHIOPIA, SUDAN 1515-1530 Daily NUER 12070 MEY 250 / 007, ex 11885 1530-1545 Daily DINKA 12070 MEY 250 / 007, ex 11885 1545-1600 Daily MAKONDE 12070 MEY 250 / 032, ex 11885 1600-1630 Thu-Sun AMHARIC 12070 MEY 250 / 019, ex 11885 1600-1630 Mon-Wed GURAGENA 12070 MEY 250 / 019, ex 11885 1630-1700 Daily AMHARIC 12070 MEY 250 / 019, ex 11885 1700-1730 Fri-Sun OROMO 9590 DHA 250 / 230 1700-1730 Daily SOMALI 11690 KIG 250 / 030 1730-1800 Daily TIGRINYA 11690 KIG 250 / 030 1830-1900 Daily FRENCH 15130 ASC 250 / 070 Tx sites: KIG=Kigali/Rwanda ARM=Armavir/Russia NVS=Novosibirsk/Russia ASC=Ascension Island MEY=Meyerton/So.Africa IRK=Irkutsk/Russia SAM=Samara/Russia DHA=Al-Dhabayya/UAE MOS=Moosbrunn/Austria MSK=Moskow/Russia TCH=Tchita/Russia (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, June 24 via DXLD) ** SPAIN. Hello GLENN, I have been reading your pages for years now and was waiting for a chance to help with some news. Now I have found time to check up all schedules I have found. SPAIN REE on nf 11890 to 0654 close down. Probably from 0500. Listed on 9710 but not audible here. 21610 is active today at +1130 past 1300. Listed 0700-0900 for A03. During B02 they was active 0700-1700 in Spanish By the way all above are in Spanish. I may come back with full times later on. 73´s (Rikard Johansson, Malmoe, Sweden, June 25, DX Listening Digest) {As I recall, Rikard was an active maritime mobile DXers some years back; good to hear from him!} ** TAIWAN. UNDERGROUND RADIO STATIONS SAID DISRUPTING AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL | Text of report in English by Taiwan News web site on 23 June Evidence recently compiled by the government indicates that air traffic control communication channels of both Taipei's Sungshan Airport and Taoyuan's Chiang Kai Shek International Airport are adversely affected by signals from pirate radio stations during weekends, according to Chinese language media. The report surfaced after two air incidents over the past five days, in which a civilian aircraft and a helicopter flew near restricted airspace over the presidential office Wednesday and yesterday respectively. According to the report, Sungshan Airport's air traffic control channel experienced problems at 2.10 p.m. [local time] Saturday, and Taoyuan's CKS International Airport's communications were affected 20 minutes later. After tracing the signals, the telecommunication authorities suspect that the cause of the disruption in both cases were both from underground radio stations. However, telecommunication professionals doubt the telecommunication authority's suspicions. Lin Kun-tong, deputy chairman of the Chinese Taipei Amateur Radio League, explained that signals of the nation's some 80,000 underground radio stations are traceable and stationary. "The capacity for underground radio stations to influence air traffic control channels is very small," Lin said. Wang Ruey-de, adviser to the CTARL, concurred with Lin, explaining that the frequencies used by underground radio stations are not strong enough to affect air traffic control channels. Wang, meanwhile, said that the nation's telecommunication authorities have failed to enforce existing regulations that ban pirate radio stations. He specified that illegal radios used by taxis drivers are one of the sources of disruption. Under current regulations, those found illegally transmitting radio signals could be fined between 10,000-50,000 new Taiwanese dollars. Source: Taiwan News web site, Taipei, in English 23 Jun 03 (Via BBCM via DXLD) 80 thousand pirates???!!! WTFK? Straying above 108 MHz? (gh, DXLD) ** UGANDA. SOROTI MPS WANT RADIO BACK ON AIR http://allafrica.com/stories/200306240399.html The Monitor (Kampala), June 24, 2003, Posted to the web June 24, 2003 Kennedy Lule, Kampala Members of Parliament yesterday asked the government to re-open the Catholic Church-owned radio station that was closed by the army and police on Sunday. Radio Veritas FM in Soroti went off air on Sunday after security operatives and Soroti RDC, Mr Edward Masiga, stormed and searched its offices. The station earned the wrath of the government for defying a minister's directive not to broadcast news about rebel attacks in the area. But several MPs from the Teso sub-region yesterday said that the decision to close Radio Veritas should be reviewed. "I was shocked by [the] closure. It is an attack on media freedom yet it is the same government which has been boasting about it," Mr Francis Epetait (Ngora) said. Epetait said that the station was not being used to propagate the rebel Lord's Resistance Army propaganda but to alert the public about the dangers posed by the rebels. "Veritas in Latin means truth. The radio station was basically doing that," he said. According to Mr Patrick Amuriat (Kumi), the station was still closed by yesterday afternoon. He said that the radio was doing a good job in mobilising the population both against the war and for development. "How will our people be informed when and where to run in case the LRA attacks?" Amuriat wondered. The Soroti woman MP, Ms Alice Alaso, said that closing the radio would be like killing a messenger who delivers a bad message (via Mike terry, DXLD) ** U K. A new book about the BBC "ON AIR - A HISTORY OF BBC TRANSMISSION" http://www.onairbook.co.uk/ The BBC's services were broadcast by its own transmitters from 1922 until 1997 - a lifetime. Thousands of people were involved in the process of researching, planning, designing, specifying, acquiring, making, operating, maintaining and managing the facilities needed to transmit the programmes and hundreds of millions of people benefited through the information, education and entertainment that they received. This book celebrates a lifetime of achievement in the world of broadcast transmission engineering and includes many anecdotes from the lives of people involved. The idea for ON AIR arose in 1997 when BBC Transmission was privatized and two new companies were formed: now called Crown Castle and Merlin Communications. It was the end of an era and a natural point for reflection on past achievements. The result is a book of some 80,000 words contributed by over 50 people, edited by Norman Shacklady and Martin Ellen. We would like to thank the BBC, Crown Castle, Merlin Communications and over 50 contributors for their help in creating this book. If you have any comments concerning the book or BBC Transmission then we would be pleased to hear from you. Email: editors@onairbook.co.uk The book is now available in paperback and the hardback version is due by the end of June 2003. To order please click Order Form above. Staff with BBC R&D or BBC World Service should check for internal distribution arrangements. Martin Ellen will have books for sale in the reception area of Crown Castle's building at Warwick between 12:30 and 14:00 on 10 July 2003 (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U K / U A E. BBC WORLD SERVICE BEGINS FM BROADCASTS IN UNITED ARAB EMIRATES | Text of press release by BBC World Service on 24 June BBC World Service has begun transmitting on FM in Abu Dhabi, the United Arab Emirates capital and plans to launch a second FM frequency in the UAE in Dubai, one of the Middle East's major business centres, this summer. The new 24-hour FM frequency in Abu Dhabi, on 90.3 MHz, is the fifth new FM frequency to be launched by BBC World Service in the Middle East since March. Last month BBC World Service announced it had begun FM broadcasts in Arabic and English in the Iraqi cities of Baghdad, Basrah and Al-Amarah. "BBC Arabic is pleased to add Abu Dhabi to its growing number of FM frequencies across the Middle East. Abu Dhabi and Dubai, where we plan to launch another FM frequency later this summer, are both important commercial centres and listeners and business people there will benefit from high quality FM transmissions," said Jerry Timmins, head of Middle East and Africa region at BBC World Service. BBC World Service now has FM facilities in all Gulf Cooperation Council States with the exception of Saudi Arabia. BBC Arabic is also available on FM in Amman (Jordan) reaching Jerusalem and other West Bank centres, in Ajloun (Jordan) for Damascus, northern Jordan, southern Lebanon, and northern Israel, in Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar and Khartoum and Wad Madani in Sudan. Around the world BBC World Service is present in FM in 140 capital cities. BBC Arabic is the oldest of BBC World Service's 42 language services and also broadcasts throughout the Arab World on shortwave frequencies. Source: BBC World Service press release, London, in English 24 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** U S A. ARYAN NATIONS PLOTS A COMEBACK AT IDAHO CAMPOUT BUT CRITICS SAY CIVIL SUIT MADE RACIST GROUP IRRELEVANT By Karl Huus, MSNBC FARRAGUT STATE PARK, Idaho, June 22 --- Amid a stand of pines in the Idaho panhandle, Richard Butler sits slightly hunched in a camp chair, a large swastika affixed to the wall of the campground bathrooms behind him. He is surrounded by a loyal coterie of men, some in full Nazi uniform, others in skinhead garb. At 85, the founder of the Idaho-based Aryan Nations is frail, but still influential in racist circles, and extremely tenacious. ``What you're seeing today is the prelude to the awakening of the white race,`` he says. But others say it's more like the death rattle for the umbrella organization of white-supremacy groups. . . Hal Turner: A surprise guest from New Jersey, Turner is a talk show host who does a daily broadcast of fiercely anti-immigrant, anti- Jewish and anti-federal rhetoric via shortwave radio [WBCQ] and the Internet. Turner has the cachet of show business and draws easily on the politics of the day to support his case. . . . http://www.msnbc.com/news/927968.asp?0cv=NB10 (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) Same story: http://www.msnbc.com/modules/exports/ct_email.asp?/news/927968.asp (via jm, Media Network, DXLD) {a spoofer? NOT Jonathan Marks} ** U S A. Following item is similar to one in 3-109 which only mentioned NMC in passing (gh) COAST STATIONS NMC, KPH AND KFS WILL RETURN TO THE AIR USING MORSE CODE For the first time since 12 July 1999 listeners around the world will have the opportunity to hear three historic US coast stations on the air using Morse code. On July 1st, Coast Guard Communications Area Master Station Pacific (CAMSPAC), Pt Reyes will retire the historic "Sparks" from the Telecommunications Specialist Enlisted Rating Badge, as the Coast Guard restructures its work force replacing that specialty with two others, the Operations Specialist and the Information Technology Specialist. As a special part of the ceremony surrounding this change NMC will return to the air using Morse code (CW) and possibly radioteletype (RTTY). These services, once the mainstays of Coast Guard communications, have been retired for several years but will be reinstated for this ceremony. At present the frequencies known to be authorized for NMC are 8574 kc and 500 kc with the possible addition of 488 kc. Additional HF frequencies may be authorized by the time of the event. Those wishing the latest information about NMC frequencies and times of operation should write directly to TCCM Loren R. O'Banion at LObanion@d11.uscg.mil . The public is invited to visit NMC to participate in this event. The unit's Receiver Site, located at 17000 Sir Francis Drake Blvd on the Pt Reyes National Seashore will be open to the public between the hours of 9 am and 3 pm [PDT = UT -7]. Persons wishing to attend must RSVP to (415) 669-2004. KPH will activate its HF and MF transmitters to participate in this historic event and to give listeners the opportunity to hear three US coast stations on the air - possibly for the last time. KFS will also return to the air on a single frequency. KPH will transmit on 6477.5, 8642.0, 12808.5 and 17016.5 on HF and on 500 and 426 kc on MF. KFS will transmit on 17026.0 kc. These frequencies have been made available through the generous cooperation of Globe Wireless, the current owner of the KPH and KFS licenses. KPH and KFS operators will listen for calls from ships on 6276.0, 8368.0, 12552.0 and 16736.0 on HF and 500 kc on MF. Reception reports for NMC may be sent to: USCG CAMSPAC Pt. Reyes ATTN: LCCT O'Banian 1700 Sir Francis Drake Blvd. , POB 560 Point Reyes Station, CA 94956-0560 USA Reception reports for KPH and KFS may be sent to: Ms. DA Stoops P.O. Box 381 Bolinas CA 94924-0381 USA (viennawireless yahoogroup via Alan Bosch, DXLD) ** U S A. FCC EXPERIMENTAL LICENSES The United States Federal Communications Commission has long granted special licenses with callsigns that look amateur. However, they`re from the specially reserved ``X`` block. The first letter of the callsign suffix, immediately after the number, is always an X, for experimental. It`s assumed that some new type of device or application is being studied for research or the development of new technology. Some pretty ambitious commercial operations have started out with these amateur-style calls. When WLW in Cincinnati wanted to build a 500,000-watt AM broadcasting station, they first tested it as W8XO. In New York City, WQXR started out as W2XR (``Experimental Radio``), when FM broadcasting really was experimental. One Los Angeles TV station began as W6XAO, broadcasting snowy test patterns to a handful of experimental receivers. Today, however, the experimental calls all seem to come from the ``2`` area, and ordinary amateurs have been given X calls with the other numbers. In the last year or so, some rather interesting test licenses have been granted by the FCC. These promise more funny noises ahead on the high-frequency (HF) band. Right up there in the noise department would be WD2XAX, with transmitters in Florida, and licensed to the Department of Marine Science at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. The operation`s purpose is not immediately evident from the FCC`s sketchy description, but a quick look at the frequencies gives it away fast. These authorized frequencies are 4470, 4550, 4800, and 4900 kHz. This frequency range is one of three commonly used by HF coastal radar stations for basic research and development. Maybe you`ve heard the dweep, dweep, dweep sound, as their pulsed carriers make an upward sweep of 50 to 100 kHz from the assigned frequency, once or twice per second. Sure enough, a quick trip to the university`s web site turns up a research contract for development of HF sea surface radar in Florida and North Carolina, both for surveillance and current mapping. The technical parameters sound like the SeaSonde system, made by Codar Ocean Sensors. This company was started by the original developers of Codar (Coastal Ocean Dynamics Applications Radar), who left the US weather service to market it commercially. It`s not a major interference machine, with its small transmitters and simple antennas. But if reception gets dweepy on these frequencies, again, here`s one guess who`s doing it. (More on p.35) [below] Another experimental license in the North Carolina area is WD2XBI, granted to Thales Mackay Radio. Frequencies are listed as 2142.4, 4916.5, 7422, 9973, 10423, 13423, 15711.5, 18178.5, 23007, and 27547 kHz. The purpose is for ``test and development of communications technology.`` Thales, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Thomson-CSF in France, supplies a lot of the transmitters and receivers used by the US Navy. They are typically remote-controlled rack units, with sophisticated user interfaces and Automated Link Establishment (ALE) operation. They are also rated for Link-11, the multitone, HF, tactical data link which allows participating military units to exchange target tracking data. The only really ominous test license, though, is to WC2XXK, Ameren Energy Communications, Inc., for operation ANYWHERE from 1705 kilohertz to 30 megahertz – the WHOLE band! This is another of those new schemes for sending high-speed data through power lines, presumably getting our newly deregulated electric companies right into the broadband communications business. In April, the FCC issued a Notice of Inquiry soliciting comments on the effects of these systems on radio users. FCC has gotten a real earful. According to ham radio organizations which have examined the technical data, there is no way such a system could be deployed throughout the entire power grid without radio waves leaking out and buzzing HF from one end to the other. The American Radio Relay league`s technical expert predicts ``a significant increase in noise levels.`` This one is really worth watching, as it could be yet another of those seemingly yearly threats to the whole radio hobby (Hugh Stegman, HF Communications, July MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) ** U S A. ALL AT SEA WITH CODAR This month we focus on CODAR or Coastal Ocean Detection And Ranging, a form of radar that is appearing increasingly on HF frequencies throughout the world. Back in the late 1960s a scientist named Donald E. Barrick pioneered much of the theory behind the use of HF radio for the purposes of measuring and monitoring ocean currents. While at NOAA (the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration), Barrick and others in the Wave Propagation Laboratory successfully developed HF-based radar theory and systems to measure sea wave height, period and flow. CODARs make use of a phenomenon called Bragg scattering, something that happens to any electromagnetic radiation (radio signals or light) when the wave encounters fluctuations or turbulence which are small compared to the wavelength of the signal. To an HF radio signal, any sea is a turbulent surface with waves of many different heights and periods (the distance between peaks of waves), and when the signal falls on that sea, it scatters in many directions. According to Bragg, the radar signal will return directly to its source only when it scatters off a wave that is exactly half the transmitted signal wavelength, *and* that wave is traveling in a path directly away from or directly towards the radar. In this case, the scattered radar signals add together and produce a strong returning ``echo`` at a very precise wavelength. You can read more about the theory of CODAR at the website of the firm that Barrick started after leaving NOAA, and which supplies the majority of CODAR systems, Codar Ocean Sensors. Most modern CODARs use a variety of HF frequencies from 3-50 MHz to do their work and can therefore use a variety of sea waves for scattering: 25 MHz radar = 12m radio wave can observe 6m ocean waves 10 MHz radar = 25m radio wave can observe 15m ocean waves 4 MHz radar = 75m radio wave can observe 37.5m ocean waves Suffice to say, with these basic facts and a lot of sophisticated signal processing, today`s CODARs are able to measure sea wave length, period, travel direction and speed. And, by using two or more transmitting stations aimed at the same area of water, their reflected signals can be combined to produce information about the overall surface current direction. Figures 1 and 2 shows some typical output (surface flow and wave height) from Rutgers University`s CODAR on the New Jersey coast. Listening in on CODAR The best time for hearing these radars is at nighttime, when many drop to their lower frequencies. At Digital Towers here in the northeastern US, we are able to hear several CODARs during any evening as we slowly tune the receiver from 4 to 5 MHz. There are also regular daytime signals in the band 13400 to 13600 kHz and 23000 to 25000 kHz. The signals have an unmistakable metallic ``schwip, schwip, schwip...`` as the radar signal is swept across a narrow range of frequencies, typically about 20 or 50 kHz. By the time you read this article, there should be a clip of CODAR audio available from Leif Dehio`s excellent website (see Resources). In our case, it`s quite likely that we`re hearing the established set-up of the University of Rutgers Institute of Marine and Coastal Science`s project COOL, operating from its sites in New Jersey and Florida. Here are the data from the FCC website. Figure 3 shows the sites for WA2XXF. Experimental license WA2XXF : Short-range CODAR (70 miles): Brigantine, Brant Beach, Tuckerton, NJ Long-range CODAR (200 miles): Wildwood, Loveladies, NJ Frequency Bands: 4800 to 4900 kHz (50 kHz sweep) 24700 to 25900 kHz (150 kHz sweep) Experimental license WD2XAP monitors the ocean off the West Florida shelf: Short-range CODAR (70 miles): Venice, FL Frequency Bands: 4400 to 4900 kHz (50 kHz sweep) The Rutgers project will soon be running a new CODAR based in Nantucket, MA. With today`s sophisticated digital signal processing (DSP), most CODAR systems use relatively modest levels of power from about 50 W to maybe 1 kW. The transmit and receive antenna systems are also small as Figures 4 and 5 show. For those listeners on the West Coast of the US, Scripps Institute of Oceanography at UCSD San Diego operates CODARs from Point Loma, Imperial Beach, and La Jolla under callsign WC2XYM. Similar to the Rutgers systems, the frequency ranges are quoted at 25000 to 25700 kHz but with a larger 500 kHz sweep. Scripps also provide a video camera controllable from the Internet, that looks out over the wonderful stretch of California coastline monitored by this CODAR. Until next month, enjoy your listening. Resources: Codar Ocean Sensors http://www.codaros.com Rutgers Project COOL http://www.marine.rutgers.edu/mrs Scripps Project SDCOOS http://www.sdcoos.ucsd.edu/index.html CODAR Clip http://www.rover.vistecprivat.de/~signals/ (Mike Chace, Digital Digest, July MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) ** U S A [and non]. NEW YORK VOLMET RETURNS As mysteriously as it had vanished, New York VOLMET suddenly came back onto the air several weeks later, with a very nice signal on 3485, 6604, 10051, and 13270 kHz USB. It had been down to very low power, or no transmissions at all, for at least a month. VOLMET means ``flying weather,`` and it`s one of those repeating broadcasts of weather observations and forecasts for airports in a particular region. Pilots had been heard asking about the disappearance, indicating that, even with all today`s fancy data systems, someone`s still using these. The schedule stays the same, with 20-minute broadcasts on the hour and half hour. The two other ten-minute periods, at 20 and 50 minutes after the hour, are used by Gander Radio in Newfoundland, Canada (Hugh Stegman, HF Communications, July MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) ** U S A. WHAT? WE HAVE TO FILE?! Have you heard about the Nevada Highway Patrol system that has been operating illegally for the past three years? After 10 years of planning and construction and expenditures of more than $15 million, the project`s new manager came to an awful realization: no one ever filed with the Federal Communications Commission to reserve the necessary radio frequencies to operate the system. ``Never in my wildest dreams did I think to ask, `Are we legal?``` said NHP Col. Dave Hosmer. ``We are licensed for no frequencies at this time.`` The highway patrol`s new Motorola system was intended to enable its officers to communicate with each other, the dispatch centers and some other law enforcement agencies, especially rural systems operating on 150 MHz. Though the system began operation in 2000, the highway patrol did not apply to the FCC for the frequencies until mid-2002, when it sought a temporary permit. When that permit expired, the patrol never moved for permanent approval. The FCC ordered the state to abandon the frequencies it has been using by June 9 and return to a conventional system. Some of the 150- megahertz frequencies being used are dedicated to railroads, which have complained that highway patrol traffic interrupts their communications. Christopher Perry, a highway patrol officer, has been assigned to find the answers needed to meet the June deadline and to find a longer-term solution to keep the system going. The patrol, he said, apparently had been operating illegally on 140 channels. The governor`s office and FCC are also working with the NHP on a permanent solution. The patrol operates on a 150-megahertz system. The FCC says there is a limited number of these channels available, and they prefer law enforcement groups to use 700- or 800-megahertz frequencies. However, in some rural counties, the highway patrol trooper is backed up by the sheriff`s office and vice versa. If the highway patrol converted to the Nevada Transportation Department`s 800-MHz system, not only would it mean replacing most of the equipment in the present system, but rural counties fear that would hurt their law enforcement efforts. The governor`s office said there is a possibility that converters could be purchased to upgrade the systems and alleviate those concerns. The patrol said its study on the mistakes will be sent to the state attorney general`s office to determine whether criminal charges should be filed. Meanwhile, all are hoping the FCC will not levy the billion dollars in fines that could potentially be owed for the illegal operation. Stay tuned. As Col. Hosmer reportedly said, ``It`s buffoonery at its finest.`` (Communications, July MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) ** U S A. RADIO/TV TOWERS LOST IN AZ FIRE There are two sites in the Catalina mountains. Mt Bigelow is where there are several TV stations, and the University FM. Radio Ridge, on Mt Lemmon, is mostly public service, a couple of FM and TV translators, and a "Booster" or two. KGMG is perhaps the only "main" there, all several hundred watts. Power wiring was cut, and two of the towers on Radio Ridge are reported down. No AMs are anywhere near the sites. (Barry Mishkind - Tucson, AZ - http://www.broadcast.net/~barry Visit The Broadcast Archive http://www.oldradio.com NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. KFHX 1620: I was in the Fountain Hills area (AZ) and KFHX is alive and well. I don't know why I could not get a peep out of it Sunday. I could hear it way down in the mud on 1620 from my QTH, about 20 miles North and West of Fountain Hills, AZ. I monitored the frequency mobile and it started to fade-in about 8 miles east of F. H. As I wound up the pass into the McDowell Mountains that separate F.H. from Scottsdale/Phoenix, the signal came up rapidly. I heard the station well as far as 8 miles into the desert east of Fountain Hills. (At that point, I turned around to head for home.) I heard the station mid-afternoon local. They were playing a mix of oldies pop and rock with no announcer, though there were two clear canned ID's heard at 2317 and 2330 UT. So, yes, they are still on the air. Ok, 73, (~ Rick Barton, AZ, June 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. WTIR NOT GONE, JUST CHANGING FREQUENCY Travel network getting boost from wattage Bob Mervine, Staff Writer From the June 20, 2003 print edition of the Orlando Business Journal KISSIMMEE -- A plan for a statewide travel radio network aimed at tourists is edging closer to reality. "The idea has always had great potential," says Dick Kane, a Florida Department of Transportation spokesman. Yet for the past four years, the Travel Information Radio Network, a venture between a local broadcast entrepreneur and the state's transportation department, has tuned in mostly static. Economic conditions, bureaucratic delays and fickle financing all have delayed the project. Now, though, with AM radio stations signing onto the idea, tweaked technology, a new Web site and marketable programming, the Travel Information Radio Network appears poised for growth. Roadblocks Four years ago, the state announced it was teaming with a private broadcaster, Joe Gettys, to create the network. The former marketing director for Kissimmee's Old Town had launched a more rudimentary version while working at the Osceola retail complex. The state's transportation department was interested in developing the network, if for no other reason than as part of its Intelligent Transportation Network, an information system designed to keep traffic slowing {sic!} smoothly. Plans called to provide a 24-hour statewide radio network broadcasting tourism information, weather reports and travel advisories. Roadblocks appeared almost immediately. The local AM station that was the prototype for the network -- WLAA-AM 1680 -- operated on an old frequency with what Gettys describes as "a big hole" in their broadcast coverage area. Extensive engineering fixes failed. Marketing the fledgling information network to passing cars was the network's single biggest cost: erecting thousands of official blue roadway signs engineered to withstand 200-mph winds, which needed to be placed along rights of way along the state's highway system. The delays, though, have actually helped, says the highway department's Kane. "During the delay, Joe has had a chance to develop a wonderful, very listenable format," he says. Tuning in More important, the network is making changes aimed at ensuring that motorists will be more likely to hear that format. The network is switching over its Orlando radio station from the old 1680 frequency to a better-located, powerful transmitter in Ocoee, WTIR-AM 1300. An improved signal from WTIR's more powerful 10,000-watt AM should be on the air any day, says Gettys. He believes that by Aug. 1 the upgraded one-station "network" will add two more affiliates from Valdosta, Ga. (910 AM), and a new station, (1410 AM) from Alachua, near Gainesville. Three more stations covering Jacksonville, St. Augustine and Daytona are expected to be operational by Sept. 1. Gettys says, "By Labor Day, we will be able to reach the 33 million out-of-town motorists visiting the area on those three highways from Savannah to Palm Bay." And 158 roadside signs are already in place along Central Florida's major highways, Interstate 95, Interstate 75 and Florida's Turnpike, as well as Interstate 4 in Central Florida -- all directing visitors to listen for traffic and tourism updates. Programming appeal The network program content is a 10-minute "wheel" of repeating information, regularly updated by the network and by the local station. Six of the 10 minutes are produced for a statewide audience and will include everything from slickly produced 30-second features to a minute of traffic updates and lane closures on state roads, as well as reminders about seat belt and child seat laws in the state. In addition to the minute of programming, the state also can take control of the entire network in the case of emergencies and natural disasters. The other four minutes are locally produced and contain two minutes of local advertising. "We've found that the content needs to be short," Gettys says. "If anything is too long, people just change the channel and we lose them." The appeal to potential radio advertisers is raw numbers. Many Florida tourists now are traveling the state in cars as an alternative to the lengthy waits and crowded planes of air travel. Of the 37.4 million people who plan to travel 50 miles or more from home just on the Fourth of July weekend, AAA reports 32.6 million plan to go by motor vehicle, an increase of 2 percent -- while air travel plans have declined by 2 percent. There are still hurdles. Certain technical upgrades at the new tower are not finished and the station can't be heard in much of Orlando -- including the travel network's offices on John Young Parkway. Thus, the sophisticated Web site newly developed for the network http://www.tirn.com can't stream the network's audio programming. Marjorie Dobbins, media director for Fry Hammond Barr points out, "There's no way to measure any of that tourist media to determine whether it's reaching the right audience." Dobbins holds a glimmer of hope for future ad buys with the network, but notes "there's a lot more work to do first." Gettys, though, remains upbeat -- if only because the network offers the struggling AM radio market a rich source of listeners. "There are about 700 AM stations out there losing money," he notes. "There's been no lack of broadcasters dying for a niche format like this one." (via Patrick Griffith, N0NNK, CBT CBNT, Westminster, CO, USA, NRC-AM via DXLD) I am not sure what he meant by a "big hole in their coverage", I thought their 10 kw non-DA did pretty well and I used them to get a handle on I-4 road conditions when there. I just saw one of their blue signs a couple of days ago. The "tune to 1680 AM" was pasted over with "1300 AM". on what I think is a long- standing sign. I checked 1300 when I saw the sign, last Thursday. Just a weak Tampa WQBN in Spanish with something else underneath. This is not replacing something else in the Orlando area on 1300 AFAIK, but is a totally new assignment. Unless in the LPRT category, shouldn't there be a CP for it? (Bob Foxworth, ibid.) Nope - this is the 1300 Cocoa license, ex WXXU if memory serves. 5000 day, 1000 night, DA-2. s (Scott Fybush, NY, ibid.) He started out on 1220 in Kissimee. Last I knew, it was Spanish speaking. Used to do the Saturday Nite Cruise from Old Town. (A tourist trap similar to South of the Border, on I-95 at the SC/NC line. It is just south of Disney on the other side of I-4 (Paul Smith, FL, ibid.) ** U S A. CLEAR CHANNEL WANTS TO MEND SOME FENCES W. Scott Bailey Clear Channel Communications Inc., the dominant player in the radio- station market, is attempting to improve its public relations efforts in the aftermath of a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) ruling that relaxed ownership rules for television and print -- but not radio. Some observers say the move is not as much about the San Antonio-based company protecting its future growth opportunities as it is about holding on to what it already has. On June 2, the FCC announced a ruling that essentially left radio ownership restrictions as is but allowed more room for television and print to explore expanded ownership opportunities. Clear Channel initially lashed out at the FCC ruling, characterizing the decision as a "re-regulation" of the radio industry. Company President and Chief Operating Officer Mark Mays went so far as to accuse the FCC of choosing politics over public interest. But there are recent signs that the communications giant is actually working to lower the volume on its disputes with politicians and the media, replacing some of that harsh rhetoric with a more informative, proactive approach. Clear Channel has been under fire for a number of controversial issues for quite some time. They include participation in industry consolidation, an alleged monopolizing of the market and, more recently, the practice of voice tracking -- which has replaced some local disc jockeys with voices and programming emanating from other locales. Andy Levin, senior vice president of governmental affairs for Clear Channel, was asked if his company's embattled image -- deserved or not -- has hurt its standing with regulators and the public. "I believe that's what has happened," he said from his Washington, D.C., office. "I definitely think that is what we are up against." Levin said that image or reputation has been self-perpetuating in part because of the sheer size of the company, and because it has not moved quickly enough in the past to adequately explain its position on a number of key issues. "Our company, as large as it is, is going to have vocal opposition," explained Levin. "In our case, we grew very large very quickly. I think that made us a lightning rod for criticism." Levin said a number of Clear Channel's image woes can be traced back to the company's failure to be more proactive. "I think we could have told our story better and earlier," he admitted. "They've had a really bad run of publicity," says John Dunbar, a director with the Center for Public Integrity, a Washington, D.C.- based organization that tracks media and governmental issues. Dunbar, who has stated recently that politicians on both sides of the political spectrum are working to distance themselves from Clear Channel as fast as they can, tells the Business Journal: "You don't have to be a genius to know that there has been a backlash against radio in general and Clear Channel in particular." He says any new proactive PR strategy by Clear Channel -- especially in Washington, D.C., -- can likely be attributed at least in part to the fact that the company wants to avoid a run-in with some detractors possessing strong political muscle. "There are people that really don't like that company," Dunbar says. "Some of them are in a position to pass laws that could hurt them in a big way." Setting it right Levin said there are too many misconceptions about Clear Channel that simply need to be clarified. One, he added, is consolidation. "We think people are under the mistaken impression that the radio industry is consolidation run amok," Levin said. "The opposite is true. But some folks, who had a political agenda to keep TV from being further regulated used radio -- especially Clear Channel -- as the scapegoat." Levin added, "It is true that Clear Channel owns about 1,200 radio stations and that's a very large number. But it needs to be put into perspective. There are about 13,000 stations in the U.S. We're only 9 percent -- and only 20 percent of the revenues. That's not a monopoly, yet we've been unfairly targeted." Levin also pointed to voice tracking as an area that Clear Channel needs to address. "We think it's better programming. We're using technology to bring high-quality entertainment to smaller markets that could not otherwise afford it," he explained. "If we stop doing that, a lot of people are going to be unhappy." Levin added, "We certainly need to do a better job of educating people on what this is all about. It's just syndicated programming that's one step better because it is more localized." But has voice tracking led to a generic sound or message throughout the cities where Clear Channel owns radio stations? "I'm not sure the perception is true," Levin said. "If you look at the playlist in Austin versus Washington, D.C., for example, they're very different." Robert Unmacht, a partner in Nashville-based media consultant iN3 Partners, says he has tracked Clear Channel for more than 15 years. He says what Clear Channel is doing is house cleaning. "They've taken so much flack for the way they've operated from so many sides," Unmacht contends, "ultimately, the negativity plays into advertising, where some may rethink their relationships." He adds that any lingering image problems could also haunt Clear Channel in future regulatory decisions and legislation. "I do have high praise for some of what they've done, and there is nothing wrong with them wanting to operate like a business," Unmacht says. "But because of who they are, how big they are, the world demands more from them. "When it comes to radio, people are passionate. It's not a shoe store (Clear Channel is) running," he says. "I'm not sure they understand that yet." Perceptions Said Levin about Clear Channel's detractors, "When people make false accusations, they tend to stick over time. We may have made a mistake in not dealing with that earlier on. Perception becomes reality. We're trying very hard now to show the good that we do for communities." He pointed to the $20 million Clear Channel raised to help victims of the Sept. 11 disaster as an example. "We have not done a good job of taking credit where credit is due. Our image has suffered because of that," Levin said. Has this awakening led to some significant changes in the way Clear Channel is now addressing its public image? "There's no question," said Levin. "Absolutely. We're now much more focused on explaining how our business works." Asked why a communications giant with a global reach perhaps has not been more in tune with the media and the public up to now, Levin explained, "I suspect the company was in a high-growth mode and was busy trying to build and improve its business and its culture. But maybe now attention needs to be paid to reputation and image. We can't turn the clock back. But we can move forward." Dunbar believes Clear Channel's new outreach was prompted, at least partially, out of fear that Congress could put a hurt on the company if politicians continue to feel enough heat from the public to take another look at the radio industry. But is the broadcast company reaching out to its detractors and others more now in an effort to better position itself for future gains or to avoid the possibility of losing some of what it already has? Dunbar believes it is the latter. "There is a vulnerability for them right now," he contends. "If either the public or Congress chooses to get really nasty, Clear Channel could eventually be forced to let go of some stations. What they are doing isn't as much about what they want to add as much as what they want to protect." Levin said pending legislation over the FCC's recent ruling isn't likely to change things for the radio industry one way or the other. He added that there could be a repeal of some of the changes regarding television, however. On the radio side, Levin said, "Deregulation has been good for radio and good for consumers. We're not the evil empire people would like to make Clear Channel out to be." That said, Levin knows hurdles remain. The biggest? "Clearly, it`s image," he said. "We have to get the word out better about who we are and what we do. We are extremely proud of our company and what we do. We will continue to work as hard as we can from this point to please each community where we do business." (From the June 20, 2003 print edition of the San Antonio Business Journal via Patrick Griffith, N0NNK CBT CBNT, Westminster, CO, USA, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. AS UNIVISION LOOKS TO RADIO, A DEBATE OVER HOW BIG IS TOO BIG June 23, 2003, By MIREYA NAVARRO http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/23/business/media/23UNIV.html?ex=1057544316&ei=1&en=426cf0f2e4286ca4 A fixture of Spanish-language media in Los Angeles is the 6 p.m. newscast of KMEX-TV Channel 34, delivered from an ultramodern all- digital studio and including such features as job listings for cooks, car alarm installers and bilingual Brink's armored truck drivers. The station's owner is Univision Communications, the nation's largest Spanish-language media company and a dominant force not only in broadcast television but in cable, music, the Internet - and soon, if regulators allow - in radio. Univision, which owns 53 television stations around the country, is seeking approval from the Federal Communications Commission to add more than 60 radio stations to its properties by merging with the Hispanic Broadcasting Corporation of Dallas, whose biggest shareholder is the radio giant Clear Channel Communications. Univision officials said the move would help them compete more evenly with big English-language media companies like Viacom Inc. and Disney for ad dollars. The Justice Department has already signed off on the $3 billion merger, and the F.C.C. is expected to rule within a few weeks. The handicapping in Washington favors approval, with the Republican chairman, Michael K. Powell, and his two Republican colleagues on the commission voting for the deal. But, the two Democrats on the F.C.C. are expected to oppose the merger, just as they voted against the commission's recent sweeping relaxation of longstanding limits on media ownership. Opposition to the $3 billion merger is also coming from consumer groups, Congressional Democrats and competitors, including the Spanish Broadcasting System, a 29-station radio chain that lost out to Univision in the bidding for Hispanic Broadcasting. The opponents argue that the threat of stifling competition and viewpoints is more onerous in the Hispanic market because it has fewer media outlets. In contrast to the thousands of television and radio outlets in English, the Spanish market has only about 145 television stations and 630 radio stations nationwide. Dominance in the Hispanic media business is increasingly valuable, as the nation's Latino population continues to grow. Last week the Census Bureau released estimates indicating that the Hispanic population had overtaken black Americans as the nation's largest minority group. In Los Angeles, the largest and one of the most competitive Hispanic media markets in the United States, Univision would own 5 of the 20 Spanish-language radio stations, including the top-rated KSCA-FM (101.9), if the merger comes through. The company already owns 2 of the 6 Spanish television stations in the Los Angeles area. Univision officials say the company should be viewed as part of the overall broadcasting market, although they concede that there is no company as dominant in English-language media as Univision is in Spanish. By the company's own account, its television network - the nation's fifth largest in overall prime-time audience - captures 80 percent of prime-time Hispanic viewers with a combination of programming from Latin America, including blockbuster prime-time soaps, or telenovelas, and some original productions, including its popular newscasts. Telemundo, Univision's closest competitor, has failed to gain ground in ratings despite joining forces last year with NBC, which bought the network for $2.7 billion. Both NBC and Telemundo are owned by the General Electric Company. Galavision, Univision's cable network, draws more than three times the audience of Telemundo, the company says, adding that Univision.com is the most-visited Spanish-language Web site in the United States. In addition, the Univision Music Group, a recording and publishing company, captures 36 percent of the Latin music market. And last year, Univision began Telefutura, a broadcast network whose programming is in Spanish but which is aimed at bilingual Latinos who watch television in English. With radio, Univision would expand into a medium that is particularly powerful in the Latin market because Spanish speakers tend to rely on radio for information and entertainment more than other groups, and listen longer, according to research from Arbitron, the commercial rating service. (The company has a 30 percent ownership interest in Entravision Communications Corporation, whose radio stations are Hispanic Broadcasting's main competitor in many Latino markets, but the Justice Department has required Univision to sell most of that stake as a condition not to oppose the merger.) Ray Rodríguez, president and chief operating officer of Univision Networks, said in an interview that Univision needed the competitive advantages that the F.C.C. recently granted when it relaxed media ownership limits, though Congress has begun hearings to possibly to restore those restrictions. He said his company could attract more ad revenue by combining with radio - either by selling radio and television advertising packages or by wooing nervous newcomers to the Spanish-language market with radio's cheaper rates. "This is what we need to do to continue moving forward," Mr. Rodriguez said. But what is good for business may not necessarily be so for audiences when they are left with fewer choices, critics of the merger argue. They say they worry about the pitfalls of too much media control, such as biased coverage in newscasts and the overplay of artists signed with Univision's labels on Hispanic Broadcasting Corporation stations. Robert Menéndez, a New Jersey congressman who is the House Democratic Caucus chairman, said he was concerned about what he saw as Univision's favorable coverage of President Bush's controversial judicial nomination of Miguel Estrada, a Latino opposed by Hispanic Democrats in Congress for his conservative views. "At the end of the day," Mr. Menéndez said, "is it good for the Hispanic community to have a humongous Univision or a series of competitors?" (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** U S A. Re 3-112 WILM: Allan Loudell regularly joins us at the Winter SWL Fest each year -- and was a luncheon speaker in 2002. He's a neat guy, and firmly believes in WILM's mission and vision. Allan is also a SW DXer and an international broadcasting enthusiast (Richard Cuff / Allentown, PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Is there a good explanation of radio station call signs and how they are assigned anywhere? The reason I ask is that I've always thought that U.S. radio stations start with a W east of the Mississippi River and K west of it. However, there are glaring exceptions like KDKA in Pits burg. Also, while most stations have four-letter calls, there are some three-letter ones like KOY in Phoenix and WLW in Cincinnati. So, since this is probably common knowledge to most of the old-timers, I was wondering if there was a good document which explains this in plain English? Thanks (Adam Myrow, NRC-AM via DXLD) There sure is, written by a fellow named Thomas White. You can find it here: http://earlyradiohistory.us/recap.htm (note the new address, for those of you who have it bookmarked at his old ipass.net URLs...) s (Scott Fybush, ibid.) UNIDENTIFIED [non]. Hi Glenn. Re DXLD 3-112 unidentified 4995: I believe it was RFE/RL in Kazakh transmitted via Tajikistan transmitter. IBB schedule lists it 1500-1700 but RFE/RL schedule as 1400-1500 daily and 1500-1600 We. The audio quality has been "not too good" (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ NO MORSE CODE CONTROVERSY AT WRC-03 NEWINGTON, CT, Jun 24, 2003 -- Whatever else happens at World Radiocommunication Conference 2003 (WRC-03), there's no mystery about the delegates' direction regarding the Morse code requirement. Morse code proficiency will disappear as a treaty obligation for high- frequency access when the International Telecommunication Union (ITU)- sponsored gathering under way in Geneva concludes early next month. "One matter on which there appears to be no disagreement is the Morse requirement," said International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) Secretary (and ARRL CEO) David Sumner, K1ZZ, in a report on the second week of activity at WRC-03 at http://www.iaru.org/rel030623.html "It is clear that the outcome will be to leave it to administrations' discretion whether or not to have a Morse receiving and sending requirement. No administration participating in the sub-working group spoke in favor of retaining the Morse code treaty requirement." Sumner reports that the wording to modify Article 25.5 of the international Radio Regulations on June 24 cleared Working Group 4C, which is dealing with this and other proposals relating to Article 25. It says, "Administrations shall determine whether or not a person seeking a license to operate an amateur station shall prove the ability to send and receive texts in Morse code signals." Sumner said it's possible but unlikely that the text would be tinkered with further at the committee level or even in the Plenary, which considers items for adoption. Sumner said delegates continue to wrangle over other aspects of Article 25, which defines Amateur Radio operation. In other Amateur Radio-related items, revisions to Article 19 of the Radio Regulations to provide more flexibility for administrations to assign amateur call signs were among the first to make their way through an initial reading in the Plenary. Administrations would be able to assign amateur stations call signs with suffixes containing up to four characters--the last of which would be a letter. The prefix would be the national identifier and a single numeral (the "call district" in some countries) specified in the Radio Regulations. For special events, the revision provides for even more than four characters for temporary use. The issue of an allocation for satellite-borne synthetic aperture radars (SARs) in the 70-cm band (432-438 MHz) also appears well on the way to resolution. "While it appears very likely that there will be an allocation, it will be secondary," Sumner's report explains. It also will be subject to limitations spelled out in an ITU Recommendation (ITU-R SA.1260-1), designed to protect the Amateur and Amateur-Satellite services, among others. "The IARU has maintained its opposition, but the tide is running against us," Sumner said, adding that if the allocation is secondary and the limits in SA.1260-1 are mandatory, the interference potential should not be that great. Two other agenda items with a potential to have significant impact are the drafting of an agenda for the next WRC, scheduled for 2007 and the revision of footnotes to the Table of Frequency Allocations. A member of the IARU core team has been assigned to follow each of these five i tems, but the greatest focus is on 7 MHz, Sumner said. Full reports on WRC-03 activities are available on the IARU Web site at http://www.iaru.org/iaru-index.html#wrc2003 (ARRL via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) DRM +++ I bought the DRM software over the weekend and got the license key yesterday. I didn't have time to build a 467 kHz oscillator, so I used my old HP 606 signal generator as an LO. I opened my Icom R100 and installed a coax cable from the 455 IF, using a coupling cap... I brought that out to a minicircuits GRA-1 mixer that I bought on eBay. Using the signal from the 606 and the 455 IF, that produced a signal centered at 12 kHz that I fed into my sound card. I put on Radio Canada on 9.795 MHz yesterday afternoon at 1930 or 2000 UTC (I don't remember) and listened to the sign on tune, they mentioned the DRM technology and then I just heard the white noise. Next thing I look at the computer and the sync light came on, then data and audio. Showing a signal to noise raio of 18 dB. Sound quality was real good. But instead of fading and jamming and stuff, there were little twangs in the audio every so often. Maybe from a fade or something in the RF.. I used to work for Sirius Satellite Radio and know the digital side as well as the RF, but digital AM over shortwave... I never thought it would happen, but it's here. Regards, Bob http://members.fortunecity.com/w2eny (Robert Langston, W2ENY, hard-core-dx via DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ MORE TRANS-ATLANTIC TV DX Some more TA DX on band 1 today, but nothing that could be ID'd, only a brief spell of very weak audio too. Mind you, the MUF here in the Midlands did get up to A5 this time. The opening lasted at more than an hour but no mega signals like last time. Offsets were: 1237 A2 ? 55.250.010 Had YL audio very weak at zero offest, N American English then female singer. Weak/fair 1240 A2 ? 55.240.034 Wk/fair 1255 A5 ? 77.251.028 V weak 1402 A4 ? 67.251.108 Weak (also rx'd by David Hamilton) 1410 A2 ? 55.260.033 Weak BUT ... IT GETS MORE INTERESTING ... Our member David Hamilton in SW Scotland believes he may have received TA FM on 88.3. He has placed a recording of the DX on his website at http://www.geocities.com/tvdxrools Actual recording ... http://www.geocities.com/tvdxrools/TA1.mp3 (313k) [unfound when I checked --- gh] This was at 1430 UT and was only very brief, but possibly with a program about ancient civilisations with a YL presenter or interviewee? I think the only two European possibilities (BBC R3 and RTE-1) have been ruled out. Maybe someone might recognise the presenter??? Tim Bucknall has been checking through the stations listed for 88.3 and has come up with a suggestion of CBLJ Wawa ON, a CBC affiliate. Any clues/help appreciated. Don't forget to checkout the BFMTVC listing of band 1 European offsets at http://www.blaggard.nildram.co.uk/offset.txt Cheers and good DX !! (John Faulkner, Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottinghamshire Icom PCR1000 & HS 4 element beam john.fa-@skywaves.info [truncated] http://www.skywaves.info IRC Chat: #bfmtvc June 23, WTFDA via DXLD) After listening to David's tape a few times I am unsure whether this is an NPR announcer or a CBC announcer, but I suspect other members may be more familiar with her voice. If NPR this would be a US station, off course. 73 KAZ (Neil Kazaross, IL, ibid.) Hi Glenn, Further to your report [of Miami etc. in 3-112]. A major SpE event occured here in Australia between 0320 & 0530UT on June 25, 2003 with probably my best mid winter SpE FM DX yet in terms of signal strength, number of stations received, area received & duration of DX. Several one watt stations heard on 87.6 & 87.8 & with stations heard up to 107.9 MHz from NSW & QLD (Ian Baxter - Australia, DX LISTENING DIGEST) FORECAST OF SOLAR AND GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY 25 JUNE - 21 JULY 2003 Solar activity is expected to range from very low to high levels during the period. Region 391 (N15, L=163, class/area Dao/110 on 24 June) is currently in a growth phase and may produce low to moderate activity early in the period. On 27 June, old Region 375 is due to return and may have major flare potential. There is a chance of a greater than 10 MeV proton events at geosynchronous orbit in connection with a major flare when old Region 375 returns. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux is expected to reach high levels on 30 June – 03 July, 06 – 07 July, 13 – 14 July and again on 17 – 19 July due to recurrent coronal hole high speed streams. The geomagnetic field is expected to range from quiet to major storm levels during the period. Unsettled to major storm levels are possible on 29 – 30 June and again on 10 – 16 July due to coronal hole high speed streams. Minor storm levels are possible on 25 – 26 June, 03 - 07 July, and again on 18 – 20 July due to smaller recurrent coronal hole high speed streams. :Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt :Issued: 2003 Jun 24 2211 UTC # Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Environment Center # Product description and SEC contact on the Web # http://www.sec.noaa.gov/wwire.html # # 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table # Issued 2003 Jun 24 # # UTC Radio Flux Planetary Largest # Date 10.7 cm A Index Kp Index 2003 Jun 25 115 20 4 2003 Jun 26 115 20 4 2003 Jun 27 115 15 3 2003 Jun 28 120 15 3 2003 Jun 29 120 30 5 2003 Jun 30 125 30 5 2003 Jul 01 125 25 5 2003 Jul 02 125 15 3 2003 Jul 03 125 20 4 2003 Jul 04 130 25 5 2003 Jul 05 135 25 5 2003 Jul 06 140 25 5 2003 Jul 07 145 25 5 2003 Jul 08 155 20 4 2003 Jul 09 150 15 3 2003 Jul 10 145 12 3 2003 Jul 11 135 20 4 2003 Jul 12 130 20 4 2003 Jul 13 120 15 3 2003 Jul 14 120 40 6 2003 Jul 15 120 40 6 2003 Jul 16 115 20 4 2003 Jul 17 115 12 3 2003 Jul 18 115 20 4 2003 Jul 19 115 15 3 2003 Jul 20 115 20 4 2003 Jul 21 115 20 4 (http://www.sec.noaa.gov/radio via DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-112, June 24, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3f.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1187: RFPI: Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1430 7445, 15039 WWCR: Wed 0930 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1187.html WORLD OF RADIO 1188: WBCQ: Wed 2200 7415, 17495-CUSB, Mon 0445 7415 WWCR: Thu 2030 15825, Sat 1030 5070, Sun 0230 5070, Sun 0630 3210 ... RFPI: Fri 1930, Sat 0130, 0800, 1400, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230. . . 7445, 15039 WRN: Rest of world Sat 0800, Europe Sun 0430, North America Sun 1400 WINB: Sun 0030 12160 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1188h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1188.html UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIALS Dear Glenn, I just came back from the DX camp of East and West Radio Club (EAWRC, Germany). While at the camp, I was very glad to hear `The World of Radio` on Saturday June 21 at 0752 UT on 15039 kHz via RFPI. I especially wanted to thank you for mentioning my name on the air! It was a special pleasure for me to catch this at a DX-camp. By the way, can you issue a QSL for `World of Radio`, if I send a proper report to you? I mean, not for RFPI but for the program itself? I realize how busy you are, but perhaps once you could do this? I would appreciate it very much (Robertas Pogorelis, Belgium) I always leave QSLing to the stations which carry my program. I don`t have any QSL cards printed, and don`t even have a letterhead. Not that I doubt your reception in the least, but since WOR is available on multiple platforms, only one of which is SW, one need not even hear it on the radio to quote program details, and thus cannot offer any proof one heard it on a particular station; so I don`t see of what value a QSL (or for that matter, any QSL) would be. (Some QSLers would choose to take the above wording as a QSL in itself.) Furthermore, unless I happened to be listening myself at that very time, I have no positive way of knowing whether the station was actually on the air on the frequency quoted and whether the program aired according to schedule, and have no access to any station`s log. Hope you understand (Glenn) Glenn, thanks for the effort you put into each DXLD. I know I don't have time to visit all the newsletters, mailing lists, and websites; I have often found interesting news and information via DXLD that I would have otherwise missed. I see that others find it difficult to sort through items that aren't of interest to them, but I frankly can't complain: After all, your effort is a volunteer effort, and you don't charge subscription fees. If I were to filter out too much content, I might miss something I'd enjoy reading. It's a tradeoff I can live with. Thanks again for your efforts to spread the news international (and domestic) broadcasting! (Richard Cuff / Allentown, PA) Hi Glenn, Junk and nonsense, not from you. I like the way you comment matters and persons. Just go on with your excellent work for the DXing world. Best 73s (Ydun Ritz, Denmark) Glenn, Regarding the unsolicited testimonial in 3-111, I'm assuming from your "junk & nonsense" comment that you are aware Alex Dobrovitch is a fabrication. During less enlightened times, his name used to appear periodically in the "Australian DX News", sometimes to berate members for non-contribution. I think they even dug up a picture him and printed it once; an unflattering photo of someone in military gear, as I recall. Obviously EXDP management has decided to reprise the joke, lame as it may be (Craig Seager, Australia, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. Re 3-111: 4 x 250 kW transmitters on an island hosting a class "A" nature reserve and which is a popular eco-tourism destination? I think not. Additionally, the so-called Hutt River Province (nothing more than a wheat farm, once owned by an eccentric who was disillusioned with wheat quotas) would not be "adjacent" to Rottnest, as indicated in the item; the former is 517 km from Perth, the latter is a ferry ride away. I'm sure we would have heard something elsewhere if there was a grain of truth. The HCJB and Christian Vision operations received wide advance coverage in our local press, even though 99% of the population here has no experience or knowledge of shortwave broadcasting. I've been proven wrong before, but if this yarn by Bob Padula turns out to be fact, I'll eat my Icom! Hutt River Province is interesting, though. We don't hear much about it these days, but I think they even issued their own stamps and coins at one point. A good summary exists at: http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hutt_River_Province 73, (Craig Seager, Australia, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Thanks for the tip off Bob on the "The New Democratic Voice of the Zimbabwean People" station. Noted here today at 1700 sign on, using 9890, 6240 and 5905 kHz. Lovely African song in the interval signal. I'm not sure of the language though. Maybe Mr. [sic] Hauser can help us here. Nice signal too. (``Alex Dobrovitch`` Big Al, Australia, Crystal Set, EDXP HF Forum via DXLD) Alex`s profile: Hutt River Province, Australia. Occupation: Poet. Interests: Book Binding, Uphill Skiing and starting bushfires with old adxns (EDXP HF Forum via DXLD) EDXP credibility plunges ** AUSTRALIA. HCJB-AUSTRALIA FREQUENCIES I am working in close collaboration with HCJB-AUS Frequency Management, and serious problems have been identified for the two existing frequencies. The Indian service is 1230-1730 on 15480 (75 kW), and the Australian/S. Pacific service is 0700-1200 on 11770 (25 kW). 11770 has not proven to be very reliable, due to co-channel use by WYFR Florida 0800-1100 (to South America), causing terrible problems in New Zealand, where the Kununurra signal is almost obliterated by WYFR. In Australia, the WYFR QRM is not so intense, but across the eastern States reception is subject to fading and background QRM from WYFR. 15480 has become something of a disaster, due to co-channel China National Radio (Network 1) which also uses the frequency 0800-1300, BBC Woofferton 1700-1900, and Egypt 1230-1530. Further problems have occurred due to the impossibility of maintaining a reliable high quality service over a span of five hours for each frequency. Erratic propagation has also been causing havoc on 15480. Our discussions suggest that the timing for NZ (0700-1200) is not suitable for convenient reception for the last half of the release. Timing is similarly not suitable for many listeners in Western Australia for the fist half of the release, due to the early commencement of 0700 (3 pm in WA). Suggestions under discussion have included - breaking into transmission into two blocks, using two contiguous frequencies (to reduce co-channel and adjacent-channel QRM, and to combat adverse propagation) - introduction of an earlier service to NZ (0500-1000) - introduction of a short local morning service to NZ (two hours) (1900-2100) - introduction of a short local morning service to India (two hours) (0000-0200) There has also been some confusion as to the timing of the Saturday DX Partyline service to India. The correct time should be 1430-1500, and not 1230-1300 as previously advised. This confusion came about due to a mixup in the use of local Western Australian time (12.30 at night) in internal documentation. More details available in due course! (Bob Padula, EDXP World Broadcast Magazine June 22, used by permission, http://edxp.org via DXLD) DXPL is at 1430 on 15480 via HCJB Australia, heard it June 21st including Bob's EDXP Report, poor strength here though was fair to good when I last heard it at this time on 15480 May 31 (Mike Barraclough, Letchworth, UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. Fri June 27 2105 FEEDBACK* - listener letters and news about RA. [Ed. Note: The advertised follow-up program on digital broadcasting and DRM's prospects in Australia has had to be postponed for this week. Roger Broadbent offers personal apologies for any inconvenience to listeners. However, the transcript and audio file of the past week's program on DRM's official inauguration will be available by midweek at http://www.abc.net.au/ra/feedback/ and the DRM follow-up special will air in a subsequent week.] (John Figliozzi, RA previews, swprograms via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. ABORIGINES FIND A VOICE ON AIR By Carolyn Webb, June 22 2003 From Sunday's Age newspaper: Victoria's first Aboriginal radio station goes to air tomorrow after four test broadcasts and seven years of campaigning for a permanent licence. 3KND's (Kool 'n Deadly) program manager, Vicki Armstrong, said the station would showcase the diversity of the indigenous population, with programs for punk rockers, gay men, sports fans, elders, gastronomes and recovering drug addicts. 3KND - 1503 on the AM band - will broadcast seven days a week, 24 hours a day, from studios in Preston. Ms Armstrong said she hoped 3KND would bring Aborigines who had been cut off from their roots "back into the fold" and inform listeners about available services. Musician Kutcha Edwards, who will host a "blackfella music" show, Songlines, on Thursdays, said: "It gives us a voice - our voice." 3KND's $400,000 annual funding is from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission and the Community Broadcasting Foundation. Its parent company, South Eastern Indigenous Media Association, was one of four groups granted community radio licences in 2001. This story was found at: http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/06/21/1056119516365.html (via Matt Francis, ARDXC via DXLD) ** AUSTRIA. REPORT FROM AUSTRIA TO REMAIN ON THE AIR Radio Austria International has announced that when the new programme structure takes effect on 1 July, eliminating broadcasts in French and Spanish, the weekday English programme Report from Austria will continue to be broadcast at approximately the same times as at present. However, the programme will be much shorter - 15 minutes as opposed to the current 28 minutes. The weekly programme Insight Central Europe, co-produced with international broadcasters in neighbouring countries, will continue to be broadcast on Saturdays with a repeat on Sundays (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 24 June 2003 via DXLD) ** BELARUS. Re 3-111: Finn Krone's log of "R. Stalica" on 6010 kHz: the transmitter in Brest for Belaruskaje Radyjo 1 doesn't carry its own regional programming. Instead, it relays Radyjo Stalica (FM) during the morning regional block 0340-0400 (and during the evening block as well). Also other transmitters without regional feeds have the same schedule (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, June 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BELARUS`. Por um capricho da propagação, em 20 de junho, às 0200, sintonizei, aqui em Porto Alegre (RS), a programação em inglês da Rádio Minsky, em 5970 kHz. Normalmente, nesta freqüência, quem aparece é a Rádio Itatiaia, de Belo Horizonte (MG). A emissão consistiu em noticiário de 10 minutos de duração; músicas folclóricas e informes sobre temas musicais. No fim da emissão, o locutor informou o sítio e endereço eletrônico da emissora (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX June 22 via DXLD ** BOLIVIA. 5952.5, 0209-0230, R. Pio XII Jun 22. Heard male announcer several times in Spanish and into some rather different music. Unusual instruments were used. Very weak, difficult at best. Broadcast being swamped by co-channel interference. Female announcer with tentative ID heard at 0228. Then a male announcer with ID also which I did hear this time as Radio Pio. Then to what must be the IS for the station. And off at 0230 (Bob Montgomery, Levittown PA, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. Once again, our location in L'Ago, easternmost section of the Ligurian coast, a few kilometers inland, surprised us with a very unusual MW station. 1570, June 21st, 0330, Rádio Sociedade Espigão, Espigão d'Oeste, Rondônia, Brazil. Complete ID taped, with tentative call ZYJ 308 "mil watios de potência". Many thanks to Samuel Cássio, in Brazil, who listened to our real audio file and promptly sent his illuminating opinion. Muito obrigado Samuel (Andrea Lawendel, Rocco Cotroneo, L'Ago, Italy, Aor 7030, Ic R75, K9AY antenna, MWDX yahoogroup via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. 4885, R. Clube do Pará, Belém PA, 2302-2315, Jun 13, ID and news program "A Voz Municipalista." 55333. 4885, R. Difusora Acreana, Rio Branco AC, 0013-0023, Jun 06, football match report and ads; mixed with R. Clube de Belém do Pará - "A Poderosa." 42442 (Carlos Gonçalves, Portugal, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) Carlos, I am very happy you were able to ID both stations on this frequency which always constitute an ID-problem for most non- Portuguese speaking DX-ers! Thus both are active (Ed. Anker Petersen, Denmark, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. And now another question, perhaps requiring a broader audience. The night from June 21 to 22, at the EAWRC camp site near Cologne, Germany, there was very good propagation from Latin America, especially Brazil. Quite a few Brazilian stations were audible, one of them on 4765 kHz. WRTH lists three Brazilians here, two of which transmit with 10 kW power: Rádio Integração and Rádio Rural. I would like to ask you to help me identify which of these two stations I received, based on the following details. Listened to it between 2314 and 0004 UT. [WRTH indicates that R. Rural stops at 2400; this one did *not*]. Reports about life of (presumably) indigenous population: the host talking to young women in a didactic style, and the women replying. A mention of ``Rádio Educação`` (or perhaps `radioeducação`). This piece did not sound explicitly religious. However, there were some short pieces of Christian preaching from time to time (about five minutes every half hour), clearly separated from the rest of the program. Another report seemed to be more political, as I heard `fascismo` mentioned, and I also heard an interview with someone introduced as `publicist`. At times very nice slow songs were played, each of them to the end (not interrupted). Unfortunately, I did not catch any clear ID. I listened carefully for any mention of `Rural`, but I did not hear any [I assume `Integração` is easier to miss]. However, I know R. Rural is a religious station, and this program did contain some religion. I would appreciate any help (Robertas Pogorelis, June 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. A Rádio Guaíba, de Porto Alegre (RS), transmite, nos sábados, entre 0100 e 0245 (no horário UT já é domingo!), o programa Guaíba Classe Especial. São apresentadas reportagens e comentários sobre o movimento cultural de Porto Alegre. A apresentação é de Mário Mazeron. No programa de 29 de junho, Rodrigo Rodenbush abordará a vida e obra do ator francês Alain Delon. Em ondas curtas, a Guaíba poderá ser captada em 6000 e 11785 kHz (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX June 22 via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. HCJB may establish transmitter in Fortaleza: see ECUADOR ** CHINA [non]. 9625, Fang Guang Ming Radio, 2116-2200*, Jun 18, Mandarin, musical program without announcements, only at s/off by YL, 45444, (Nicolás Eramo, Argentina, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CONGO DR. 6030, R. Okapi, Kinshasa, 2207-2220, May 24, French announcement, Congolese pop music. 33333. Südwestrundfunk signed off 2205* with carrier off 2210. Heard best in USB due to splashes from R Budapest 6025 (Anker Petersen, Denmark, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) A couple of nights ago Okapi was surprisingly strong on 6030 here (Harald Kuhl, Germany, Jun 11, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) ** CUBA. Hoy quiero comentarles un poquito sobre la información que dimos la semana pasada sobre la nueva radio que fué inaugurada en el Municipio Manatí, Provincia de Las Tunas, en Cuba. Escuchando hoy el programa" En Contacto" de Radio Habana Cuba, se hizo un comentario sobre dicha emisora, la misma se identifica como Radio Manatí, tal como habiamos informado desde un principio, y su slogan es "La Voz del Faro" tal cual como nos lo dijo el colega y amigo José Alba Z en correo de Conexión Digital cuando ampliaba información sobre la emisora. Queda entonces confirmado que la nueva emisora cubana es: Radio Manatí 92.9 FM...La Voz del faro. Por cierto, he grabado la identificación de la emisora, la cual transmitieron en el programa "En Contacto" y este sonido está a la orden para los colegas que lo soliciten. Atte: (José Elías Díaz Gómez, Venezuela, June 23, Noticias DX via WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DXLD) ** ECUADOR. Radio HCJB hat sich doch noch entschieden für dieses Jahr eine QSL Serie herauszugeben unter dem Titel: „Vulkane in Ecuador". Es gibt vier Karten für jeweils drei Monate. Zur Unterscheidung von den Karten 2003A-F des deutschen Dienstes, sollen die internationalen QSL Karten mit folgenden Kürzeln bestellt werden: IR-A Volcano Tungurahua - 5020 meters IR-B Volcano Cotopaxi - 5898 meters IR-C Volcano Sangay - 5320 meters IR-D Volcano Guagua Pichincha - 4790 meters (IR steht für International Radio [oder informe de recepción, aber nicht Iris Rauscher? -- gh]) (Iris Rauscher, ntt aktuell via DXLD) see also MALTA Em entrevista a Eunice Carvajal, no programa DX HCJB, o diretor da emissora Curt Cole informou que estão investigando a possível criação de um centro transmissor na cidade de Fortaleza (CE). Segundo ele, a HCJB só emitirá em português, espanhol, quéchua e inglês para missionários que vivem no Sul do Brasil e no Paraguai. Alguns programas em inglês foram transferidos para a Austrália, que é um departamento totalmente independente de Quito. As informações são de Rubens Ferraz Pedroso, de Bandeirantes (PR). (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX June 22 via WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DXLD) See also USA: WINB ** EL SALVADOR. Eric, nice radio find on the book. RV was the El Salvadoran clandestine run by the Frente Farabundo Martí de [para la?] Liberación Nacional (FMLN--Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front) Arce Zablah brigade during the Salvadoran civil war in the 1980s. My biggest memory of the station was the consistent cat and mouse game that the Salvadoran government used to play with the station. When ever the station would pop up on the air (usually around 6500-6700 kHz), the government station would come up on top of them or near them. Then with a blink of an eye, RV would change frequencies about 20 or so kHz up or down from where they where before. It was quite a spectacle. Enjoy the book! (Ulis Fleming, Maryland, http://www.RadioIntel.com swprograms via DXLD) ** ETHIOPIA [non]. All logs below via Javaradios in Europe CLANDESTINE from CIS to ETHIOPIA: 12120. R. Justice (Fthi) --- Per the TISJD website this is a new program that they launched on May 25th, with a "the new station [that] has a powerful signal than the previous one." Schedule is Sundays from 1700-1800, so R Fthi seems to be the station broadcasting in this slot rather than Netsanet Radio as reported elsewhere. From what I can tell, Netsanet is still on the web and on AM in Washington, D.C., but has been off shortwave for a year now due to lack of funding. As for the TISJD and R Fthi, this new program and new site seem to be a replacement for the Radio Solidarity program that was via DTK-Julich for some time. June 22 1658 test tones, 1700 ID as R. Fthi by woman and flute music. Weak signal. A bit of fanfare and then talk by same woman. 7520, Medhin Radio (Presumed) *1800 June 22, flute address, ID as Ye May-de-hin Dim-sa-now a few times. Short announcements by man mentioning Europe. Per their website this service is for Europe and the USA. Also quickly checked their 12120 at *1830 and found it on, website says this service is for Ethiopia and other parts of Africa (Hans Johnson, Cumbre DX via WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DXLD) ** FINLAND. I checked Scandinavian Weekend R. several times on Jun 7, but none of the announced broadcasts were heard. I use to catch some of these, so I asked SWR what had happened (Anker Petersen, Denmark, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) They answered: ``Dear Anker, SWR was on the air QUITE normal way. Conditions might been a little bit difficult. And actually we have had a little problems with our gage-dipole on 48 mb. So we have had to use a little bit reduced power. Anyway station has been heard some times of day all around Finland! Our schedule was changed a little. We were on 6170 two hours more, that was 0500-1500 and after that on 1500-1700 on 5990. These were rapid changes because these frequencies had best audibility (and no interfering stations here). Now our aerial has been fixed and also put to a higher position than before, so perhaps next time reception is possible also there in Denmark. I wish to have many listeners next time (i.e. Jul 05. Ed) during our 3rd Birthday transmission...`` (Alpo Heinonen, Jun 11, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) ** GERMANY. Wolfgang- Who is this? Does 1 mean Sat or Sun? 15650 1445-1500 39,40 110 100 1 1506-261003 JUL 100 PAB 15650 1500-1515 39,40 102 115 1 0106-261003 JUL 100 PAB 15650 1530-1545 39,40 208 100 1 2206-261003 JUL 100 PAB 15650 1545-1600 39,40 110 100 1 0106-261003 JUL 100 PAB (Hans Johnson, via Wolfgang Bueschel, June 22, WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hi Hans, I don't know YET ! ??? PAK PBC PBC. But make no sense, a SUNDAY broadcast from a Muslim country. 1= means SUNDAY, like in HFCC tables. 39 Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Israel, Jordan, Arabian Pen. 40 Iran, Afghanistan. PAB put into Yahoo-UK search machine result in a private Pennsylvania Broadcaster Association ... 73 (Wolfgang Büschel via DXLD) All the start dates are Sundays; looks like someone carrying out tests (gh, DXLD) ** GREECE. Don`t you believe the VOG English schedule given on this week`s RVi Radio World June 22, apparently taken from their website. It`s years out of date, and if there is English at any of the times given, I`ll be very much surprised. Why don`t people avail themselves of searching DXLD or several websites of English schedules kept up to date? (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HUNGARY. Page of the Hungarian transmission provider Antenna Hungária about maintenance breaks of MW transmitters and substitute arrangements: http://www.ahrt.hu/en/services/CB23EC4643834D2F8DC64055A5F24768.php (Kai Ludwig, June 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ICELAND. 13855, AFRTS Keflavik, 0625-0650, Jun 16, English, back on shortwave after weeks absence, news from ABC-News and CNN Radio Update, IDs as ``This is the American Forces Network`` or just ``AFN``, weak but no interference. USB-mode. 14333 (Bjarke Vestesen, Radby, Blommenslyst, Denmark, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) Thanks to Bjarke, I heard it the same afternoon at 1205-1400 in USB, but also with weaker signals than a month ago: 24232 (Anker Petersen, Denmark, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) Decent here at 2230, Jun 16 (Jerry Berg, MA, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) Thanks to a tip off from Finn Krone in Hard Core DX, AFRTS Keflavik noted back on 13855 usb, 0715-0735 June 22nd with Sports Overnight America, fair strength (Mike Barraclough, Letchworth, UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 13855 USB, AFRTS Keflavik, 1740 UT June 22. They seem to have solved their xmtr problems. Hearing them at a decent level although with some fading at this time. Were interviewing Chet Raimo on his book "The Past- a One Mile Walk through the Universe". ID as "This is AFN" at just before top of hour, then music bridge to 1800 and into AP news. Tone at 1801 caused some QRM. This then broke into Morse Code at 1803, assume a Ute (John Sgrulletta, NY, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** INDIA. DISCORDANT NOTE BY RAILWAY BOARD DERAILS AIR PLAN Nivedita Mookerji & Jyoti Mukul New Delhi: More than a year after the Railways and public service broadcaster Prasar Bharati got talking about a unique news and entertainment platform, an old directive is playing spoilsport. While Prasar Bharati is keen to go realtime with its All India Radio (AIR) news, commentary and entertainment on select trains like Rajdhani and Shatabdi, the Railway Board is sticking to the rulebook. Apparently, the board had issued a directive a few years ago that only instrumental music could be played on trains. This directive, sources said, was triggered by protests from MPs (members of Parliament) of a certain community when devotional songs were played on a train. The AIR project is about offering its services on trains through the WorldSpace satellite platform. As opposed to terrestrial platform, satellite radio will offer nationwide reach and clarity of sound. One of the FM stations of AIR is already on the WorldSpace platform. But, if Railways insist only on instrumental music on train, the AIR proposal may become meaningless. Prasar Bharati officials, however, argue that AIR could be asked to air only news and maybe commentary, and no vocal music, making it a partial implementation of the project. But, there's no official word on it yet. While Prasar Bharati continues to pursue the venture, sources in the Railways said that, ``there is no technological hindrance in introducing the facility through use of direct-to-home (DTH) (satellite) technology``. WorldSpace is often referred to as direct- to-home in radio. Officials of the Railways and Prasar Bharati met recently to thrash out the tricky issues, but no formal solution has been found yet. During the meeting, Prasar Bharati was asked to send a detailed proposal to the Railways on what kind of service they can offer, an official said. Meanwhile, besides the instrumental music hurdle, there's another issue that Railways will have to grapple with. That is providing concealed wiring in coaches. And, that would be possible mainly in new coaches, railway officials confided. Talking of feasibility, only trains which have the public address (PA) systems would be able to implement the AIR-WorldSpace project. While the WorldSpace receiver needs to be connected to the PA system, two antennas would be fixed at the two ends of the train. The logic behind two antennas is that at least one of them will always be connected to the satellite, even when the train is passing through a tunnel, an AIR official reasoned. Last June, Railways had conducted trials on the Delhi- Thiruvananthapuram Rajd-hani for introducing the AIR service via WorldSpace satellite. At that point, Prasar Bharati had even indicated that Air India flights may also have similar services if the train project took off successfully (The Financial Express, 19 June, 2003) Regds, (via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, dx_india via DXLD) There`ll always be an India ** INTERNATIONAL. In an all day session at the receiver I managed to hear a total of 115 Countries on the Longest Day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. The list is too extensive to place here but can be found at http://www.shortwave.org.uk (Graham Powell, Wales, Editor - Online DX Logbook, June 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRAN [non]. 4635v, Voice of Mojahed (tentative), 0210, Jun 15, Jammers back jumping up to 4665 and also heard on 5370, 5650, 6455, 6770 and 7030. Weak talk in unidentified language also heard on 4640, 5370 and 5650. 22222 (Anker Petersen, Denmark, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) 7525/15650/15740, R. Yaran has not been heard since May 26 on any of these frequencies (Anker Petersen, Denmark, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. Satellite TV links Iranian expats in Los Angeles with protesters in Teheran. Of course, this story has been in several places - Sixty Minutes Two and in Kim Elliott's Main Street segment (Joel Rubin, NY, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Persian-language satellite television stations based in Los Angeles have mobilized Iranians seeking to topple the government. TV STATIONS BASED IN U.S. RALLY PROTESTERS IN IRAN -- By NAZILA FATHI TEHRAN, June 21 --- Jilla, a prosperous homemaker, has been trying to outwit the Iranian government's campaign to jam Persian-language satellite television stations based in Los Angeles. First she adjusted her satellite dish. Then she attached an empty can. She even tied a pot lid to a mop, and stood the lid upright facing the dish. No luck. . . http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/22/international/middleeast/22TEHR.html?ex=1057293605&ei=1&en=f6acd94a5ce70ae6 (via Rubin, DXLD) ** IRAQ [and non]. IRAQ MEDIA DOSSIER During the war in Iraq, we published a large number of media nx items, and these were in reverse chronological order so the latest information was always at the top of the page. We've now reorganised these reports into narrative form, starting on the first day of the war - and edited where appropriate in the light of subsequent information. We hope this will make it easier to follow the fascinating story as Saddam's media structure collapsed and was gradually replaced by a variety of new radio and TV stns. The story isn't over, of course, and we'll continue to add to it in the weeks and months ahead http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/features/html/iraq.html (Andy Sennitt-HOL, RNWMN NL June 20 via BC-DX via DXLD) ** IRAQ [non]. CLANDESTINE from SAUDI ARABIA to IRAQ: Voice of the Iraqi People. I have seen a few post-Saddam reports of this one still active on 9563 and 11710 kHz. Can't see much reason for them to be on with Saddam gone, but I haven't been able to confirm them off yet. Is anyone still hearing them? (Hans Johnson Jun 22, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Yep, they are still on the air. On 22 June at 1900 noted all 4785, 9563, 9570 and 11710 (in parallel) active (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, ibid., WORLD OF RADIO 1188) Thanks. I am getting a bit of a signal on 9563 kHz at 1955-2030, but it is just too weak to understand what they are talking about nor have I been able to catch an ID. If anyone wants to send me a recording, I sure would like to hear what they are saying these days (Hans, ibid.) ** ITALY. We are announcing a slight frequency change for our daily broadcast in the evening, European time (previously on 5780 kHz). Effective June 21, 2003 IRRS-Shortwave to Europe can be heard daily on 5775 kHz at 1900-2130 UT (2100-2230 CET), besides our operations on Sat & Sun only on 13840 at 0800-1200 UT (1000-1400 CET). The latest frequency schedule is available at: http://www.nexus.org/NEXUS-IBA/Schedules 73, (Ron Norton, NEXUS, BCLNews via WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DXLD) ** KUWAIT. New schedule for the 150 kW transmitter on 1593 kHz (beam 5 degrees) from 24/25 June: 1300-0600 (ex 24h Radio Farda). 2200-0100 VOA English, 0100-0600 R. Free Iraq (RL) in Arabic. --- 1300-1400 VOA Kurdish, 1400-1600 R. Free Iraq (RL) in Arabic, 1600- 1700 VOA Kurdish, 1700-2000 VOA Farsi, 2000-2200 R. Farda in Farsi (Source: IBB online schedule via Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, MWDX via DXLD) ** MALAWI. MALAWI'S STATE RADIO STRIKES SOUR NOTE WITH MUSICIANS By Associated Press Writer APws 06/17 1143 BLANTYRE, Malawi (AP) -- Malawi's musicians threatened to yank their songs from the airwaves if state radio does not pay up some four years of unpaid royalties. Musicians challenged the Malawi Broadcasting Corporation to try to function without them. "There can never be a radio station without music but there can always be music without radio stations," said Lucius "Soldier" Banda, Malawi's top selling artist. Music from local artists like Banda makes up almost 80 percent of MBC's programming. The Copyright Society of Malawi said it hopes such a bold move might force the MBC to pay up the 3 Million Kwacha ($32,000) it owes the nation's musicians. "We would like to see if MBC can do without our music," said Chimwemwe Mhango, a gospel singer and spokesman for the Copyright society. But state radio officials say they can't afford to pay royalties. "How can we pay them when we don't have the money?" said Owen Maunde, head of state radio. Malawi is among the poorest countries in southern Africa (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** MALTA [non]. Dear Friends, This month I have delayed my monthly letter to have better information about the future of our monthly DX Report via HCJB. I have just sent the new text to Allen Graham and it would be on the air next Saturday [28 June] at 0930 UT on 11770 and 1230 [sic] UT on 15480 kHz via Australian HCJB facilities. As you know Allen has worked very hard to grant his programme DX Partyline new frequencies after changes took place in Ecuador. So you may listen to the programme also via other stations. The EDXC always confirms correct reception reports for its broadcasts. In these last weeks after the last DX Report from Ecuador was aired we received a lot of reports from both sides of the Atlantic. In the meantime we managed to have a second opportunity - on the same 4th Saturday in the month - to talk to European DXers. The Voice of the Mediterranean in Malta have accepted our proposal of a south European edition of our DX report and they're going to air it next Saturday [28 June] on 9605 kHz at 1730 UT during their English programme. Developments about both broadcasts and the Conference are updated in our web site: http://www.edxc.org Best 73's, (Luigi Cobisi, EDXC SG, EDXC mailing list via BDXC-UK via WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DXLD) Sked in recent DXLD indicated 6185 for this 1730 broadcast; which is it? ** MAURITANIA. 4845, ORTM, R Mauritanie, Nouakchott: Jun 8 attempted coup in Mauritania was led by former Colonel Salah Ould Hnana against President Maaouya Ould Sid`Ahmed Taya (Anker Petersen, Denmark, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) ** MEXICO. 6045, XEXQ Radio Universidad [San Luís Potosí SLP] 1930, 22 de junio del 2003. Alrededor de las 1930 estaba moviendo el dial en la banda de 49 metros, cuando de repente sintonicé algo, que sonaba a un concierto, con flauta y violines. La señal fue mejorando poco a poco; alrededor de las 2030 escuchaba otro concierto de música clásica, ya con un SINPO de 34333. A las 2045 escuché un programa grabado en Radio Canadá de fábulas y cuentos, terminando a las 2100, cuando dieron su identificación XEXQ Radio Universidad... 1460 kHZ... con 250 watts... (dando después su dirección y teléfono) Arista 245, San Luis Potosí... telefono 8 26-13-48 ... Luego anuncios de la emisora, y después la locutora dando saludos a sus radioescuchas, y particularmente a los que los siguen en la onda corta... dando su frecuencia 6045 en la banda de 49 metros... De las 2100 hasta las 2200 transmitieron una zarzuela... El día de hoy 23 de junio, los volví a sintonizar alrededor de las 1230... con su identificación "XEXQ Radio Universidad... " y luego una barra de canciones infantiles. con un SINPO de 33443 con interferencia de al parecer una emisora, al perecer de habla china. Ya llevan un tiempo que Radio Universidad de San Luis Potosí está nuevamente transmitiendo su señal por la onda corta. Su señal se escucha muy bien modulada, hasta podría decir que mejor que Radio México Internacional. Receptor Radio Shack DX-398 con antena externa tipo L invertida de 5 metros de longitud (Héctor García Bojorge, México DF, June 23, Conexión Digital via WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DXLD) 6045, XEXQ Radio Universidad, 0345-0400, 24 de junio del 2003 UT, concierto de música clásica y antes de las 0400 escuché su cierre de transmisiones con el himno nacional mexicano. Con infterferencia moderada. A las 1230 he escuchado que empiezan sus transmisiones, con canciones infantiles. A la que ya no he vuelto a sintonizar por varias semanas es la emisora de Mérida en los 6105 kHz (Héctor García Bojorge, México DF, June 24, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Yes, XEXQ had been long inactive. The last I heard years ago, their SW transmitter was gone (gh, DXLD) ** NIGERIA. Hi out there, as my main occupation during the last few weeks should have been excerpting about 50 books for my exams, I spent many hours listening to Voice of Nigeria. It sounds like they are really struggling against all odds: 15120 had extremely low modulation for several days, but now it's louder but a bit dirty/distorted. Still, of course, audio quality coming from the studio, varies between all extremes. After delivering good signals in the morning, they seem to sign-off at 1100, not to be heard again before 1900, except once, when I heard them back at 1540. They still announced today 0500-2300 for this freq. But what is the alternative freq. then after 1100? It's not 11770. 11770 is somewhat better, but still undermodulated, and the French service produces relatively solid audio quality, compared to the English. Mostly good signals but only on air 1600 (or later) -2000. The French service announces only 7255 for the morning service, and nothing heard at 11770. The listeners' letters program today stated that Yoruba at 1100 hours would be also on 11770. There seems to be some confusion in the studio when French programs are produced. I often heard them playing music suddenly interrupting the news, or VON station tune played instead of VONSoir tune. 9690 should be observed between 1100-1900 as English is on none of the other frequencies; 7255 only audible early mornings and evenings, West African service. German service should start soon, said "Listeners Letters" this morning. Frequency schedule is still last year's (Thorsten Hallmann, Muenster, Germany, June 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** OKLAHOMA. Well... another QSL today. KQCV 95.1 Shawnee OK signed by Paul Sublett, GM and you will not believe the enclosures. Hat (okay -- - I can see that); POCKET KNIFE with "KQCV RADIO, OKLAHOMA CITY OK" inscribed into it. I`m amazed (Adam Rivers, WTFDA via DXLD) ** PAPUA NEW GUINEA. 3290, R Central, Boroko, 0955-1202*, May 30, Back after 5 months absence, programs in Tok Pisin, English and Vernaculars, 1000 relay of NBC news in English, South Sea music, National anthem at sign off. It was not yet heard on May 17, 18 and 19. 3355, R Simbu, Kundiawa, 1115-1202*, May 30, Tok Pisin public ann, international music and South Sea music, closing ann and National anthem. After a long silence was first heard on May 12, but is now regular. 25232 (Roland Schulze, Philippines, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DXLD) ** PARAGUAY. 9983.90, R America: Now 24 hours on this frequency beamed 270 degrees // 15185, 184 degrees, both 200 watts (Arnaldo Slaen, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) Nom. 9983, so who measured it? Does this mean you actually heard it? (gh, DXLD) ** PERU. Processando o arquivo de áudio, identifiquei a emissora que sintonizei no sábado, em 5.009,6 kHz, é a Radio Altura, do Peru. Segundo dados na Internet, esta emissora tem 1 kWatt de potência. O arquivo está em: http://planeta.terra.com.br/arte/sarmentocampos/Trechos.htm 5.009.6, 22/06 2220 R. Altura, programa espanhol, anunciantes, música, ``ofrecimiento musical``, noticias da província de Yanahuanca por telefone, muito ruído atmosférico 33222 (Sarmento F Campos, Rio de Janeiro - Brasil, http://radioescuta.aminharadio.com radioescutas via DXLD) ** PERU. 6020.29, Radio Victoria, Lima, 0439-0458, Jun 17, Spanish/ Portuguese, Religious program, Gospel Music, TC "Once de la noche cuarenta y cuatro minutos", IDs "seguimos por Radio Victoria en los 780 KHz" "en 780 KHz onda larga y en 6020 KHz banda internacional de 49 metros, transmitiendo desde sus estudios centrales en Lima, Perú, Radio Victoria, una radio...", 24342, (Nicolás Eramo, Argentina, WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 6020.30, 0852-0918, R. Victoria Jun 22 At tune in, religious service in progress in Spanish ID by male announcer as Radio Victoria at 0859. Excellent reception. At 0900 R. Gaucha, Brazil, signed on 6020 which produced difficult copy R. Victoria with an S 8 signal level prior to 0900 was crystal clear with little to no fading. News at top of hour from R. Victoria with comments on Afghanistan (Bob Montgomery, Levittown PA, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** PHILIPPINES. 9580v, PBS, R. Ng Bayon, Marulas, Valenzuela, was last heard on May 19 and is now inactive again (Roland Schulze, Philippines, May 30, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) ** PHILIPPINES. Received from FEBC: ``Following the completion of our High gain directional TCI antenna and three additional 100 kW transmitters installation (which have replaced our vintage WW [?] 50 kW/35 kW transmitter) in our site in Bocaue. We are now ready to explore new services to South India again. Something which FEBC has dropped for a number years. Could I ask you as well as to encourage your DX friends in South India to monitor the following for me. Test this week for 5 days from Wednesday 18th to Sunday 22nd June inclusive Full 100 kW for long distance sea path transmission: 1. 0100-0200 UT 15240 khz 100 KW Azi-278 HRS4/4/0.5 on BSW3. 2. 1530-1600 UT 12100 khz 100 KW Azi-278 HRS4/4/0.5 on BSW1 I will be appreciate if the report will include 1. Grading done with SINPO code and 2. Information of location and receiver 3. Date and time of monitoring. The results can be sent to the following email address: ismfebc@singnet.com.sg Should the test transmission is successful, FEBC will conduct more extensive testing in the middle of next month. Many thanks for your fellowship and interest.`` (Hsu via Victor Goonetilleke, Sri Lanka, Jun 17, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. 7436v, R. Krishnaloka, Orel, 0105-0315*, Jun 15 and 16, Indian string music and Krishna hymns, English speaking preacher with Russian simultaneous interpretation, cultural talks and conversations in Russian about the Krishna worship, ID: "Radiostantsia Krishnaloka", mentions internet address, closing with the name of the announcer in the studio and orchestra music. Frequency drifting up and down 7435.8 - 7437.0. 45444 fading down to 24222. One day occasional utility QRM (Anker Petersen, Denmark, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. RUSSIA SHUTTERS LAST INDEPENDENT TV STATION From News Services Monday, June 23, 2003; Page A22 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A21130-2003Jun22.html MOSCOW, June 22 -- With parliamentary and presidential elections coming soon, Russia's only countrywide independent television channel was yanked off the air today, rekindling a debate over how President Vladimir Putin views media freedoms. TVS, created from the ashes of two other television stations that came into conflict with state-connected companies, was replaced with a new state-run sports channel. Some employees learned the station had been closed while listening to the radio on their way to work. With parliamentary elections in December and a presidential vote next year, the demise of TVS gives the government overwhelming influence over what goes out on the nation's airwaves. The Press Ministry cited "the financial, personnel and management crisis" at TVS as the reason for "this not simple decision which became impossible to postpone," according to a statement obtained by Echo Moskvy radio and read on-air. The ministry said the decision was made in part to "protect the rights of viewers." No one at the ministry could be reached for comment. The closure was not unexpected -- debt-ridden TVS had been dropped this month by Moscow's main cable company over unpaid bills, depriving it of its largest group of viewers. The station's news director, Yevgeny Kiselyov, had warned Friday that the end might be imminent. Boris Nadezhdin, a member of the Union of Right Forces party in the Russian legislature, called it "the last TV channel that ventured to criticize Russian leaders." Echo Moskvy's editor in chief, Alexei Venediktov, said the closing of TVS gave the government a virtual monopoly on broadcasting. "It's like when all candidates are excluded from the election campaign, except for only one," he told the Interfax news agency. © 2003 The Washington Post Company (via Kraig Krist, DXLD) ** SOUTH AFRICA. On 22 June at 1820 tune in noted AWR in English on 3215 // 3345 with Wavescan program. 3215 was rather weak but 3345 had good signal. According to Sentech schedule both are from Meyerton. Sign off at 1830 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SPAIN [non]. RADIO ESPAÑA INDEPENDENTE Moin Moin, bin gerade dabei meine QSL neu zu ordnen. Versuche auch die jeweiligen Standorte den Frequenzen zuzuordnen. Bei der Station "Radio España Independiente" empfangen am 08. Februar 1972 um 16.00 UTC auf 12140 kHz brauche ich Hilfe. Hat vielleicht noch jemand ein WRTH aus dem Jahr 1972 und kann mir den Standort des Senders daraus ableiten oder kennt jemand den damaligen Standort anderweitig? (via Martin Elbe-D, June 20) In den 40ziger und 50ziger Jahren ueber Moskau Relay. Spaeter dann ab den 60zigern ueber die schmalbruestigen Anlagen in Saftica-Rumaenien, mit 18 oder hoechstens 50 Kilowatt. Die QSL stellt ein Repro der Picasso's Kreidezeichnung dar??? 12 und 14-15 MHz gingen in Mitteleuropa ganz gut ... (wb Apr 28) Dies Posting liegt zwar schon etwas zurueck, heute hat mir Karel Honzik aus Pilsen Folgendes in einer PM geschrieben: - - - - || from Karel Honzik-CZE: here is what I have found on REI: How to listen to the World, 7th Edition, 1973 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Broadcasting stations of clandestine, exile, intelligence, liberation, and revolutionary organizations - by Lawrence E. Magne, USA Radio España Independiente Nominally the station of the Spanish Republican Government (recognized only by Mexico), but effectively the station of the Spanish Communist Party (PCE), it has broadcast in Spanish, Catalan and Basque to Spain from various locations since 1939, making it the oldest station of its type still on the air. Currently, it broadcasts only from Cluj, Rumania, sharing facilities with R Free Portugal, but until 1972 it was also relayed via R Budapest, Hungary. [comment by wb: was rather broadcast from old Saftica site in Romania, G.C. 26.04E 44.34N, 18 to 50 kW transmitter] The station maintains an editorial office in the Paris Republican Government's headquarters, from where QSL cards were formerly sent. Now, however, verifications are being postmarked "Prague," suggesting the dissident pro-Soviet faction of the Spanish Communist Party headquartered in Prague is verifying the transmissions put by the governing "independents" in Paris. The station, like R Euzkadi, is jammed by Radio Nacional España broadcast transmitters in Arganda, which beep and growl. [HISTORICAL INFO 2 SESQUIDECADES OLD:::::::::] 0600-0655 on 7690v, 10110v, 12140v, and 14482-14505v kHz 1300-1355 on 10110v, 12140v, 14482-14505v, and 15507 kHz 1600-2315 on 7690v, 10110v, 12140v, and 14482-14505v kHz 2005-2025 (Tues-Sat) on 15185 kHz 1800-2300 (irr. Brief transmissions) on frequencies in the 25 and 19 meter bands. ANN: S: "Atención a las ondas volantes. Habla R España Independiente, Estación Pirenaica," [promoting the fiction that it was in the Pyrenees --- gh] and "Aquí R España Independiente". INT-SIG: Soft chimes, then first bars of "Himno de Riego," the National Anthem of Republican Spain. S/off: lively folk melody. V. by Picasso QSL card, probably the most beautiful QSL card in existence. Re. In Spanish, Fr and En to Box 359, Prague 1, Czechoslovakia. PUB: Various questions concerning Republican Spain can be answered by Srov. Manuel Martínez Feduchy, Chargé d'Affaires, Spanish Embassy, 9 Valle Londres, México, D.F., México. (via Wolfgang Bueschel, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SUDAN [non]. 12060, MADAGASCAR, RVOH, *0426-0457*, 6/22, English/ Vernacular. Carrier on at 0426, program starts 0427 with HOA [Horn of Africa] music and usual ID. mission statement loop. Tribal chorus with "Radio Voice of Hope", YL with interviews of male Sudanese at the Kakumoday (sp??) refugee camp. Last ten minutes of the broadcast was in Vernacular. Abruptly off at 0457. Fair, // 15320 with co-channel Radio Taipei QRM (Scott Barbour, NH, NASWA Flashsheet via WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DXLD) ** SWEDEN. "CQ CQ CQ DE SAQ SAQ SAQ" This year the Grimeton Radio/SAQ transmission will be on Sunday June 29 with the VLF Alexanderson alternator on 17.2 kHz. There will be three transmissions with the same message, at 0830, 1030 and 1230. The station will be open to public. QSL reports can be sent to - info.alexander.n.se - Fax: +46-340-674195, - via the SM-bureau - direct by mail to "Alexander - Grimeton Veteranradios Vaenner, Radiosten, Grimeton 72, SE-430 16, ROLFSTORP, SWEDEN - via amateur radio QSO with the call "SA6Q" on following freqs: 137.7 CW, 14035 CW, 14215 SSB at the following times: 0700-0800 0845-1015 1045-1215 1245-1400 UT. SAQ is now a member of the Swedish Amateur Association (SSA) and "QSL via bureau" is OK. QSL-cards to "SA6Q" also via bureau. Also see the Website www.alexander.n.se. (SM6NM/Lars via Chrisoph Ratzer, Austria in /BC-DX/A-DX via WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DXLD) I visited the station a couple of years ago as part of the EDXC Conference in Gothenburg, Sweden. A very impressive and well- maintained historical installation (Bob Padula, EDXP World Broadcast Magazine June 22, used by permission, http://edxp.org via DXLD) ** TOGO [non]. 12125, R. Togo Libre, *2000-2100*, Sunday Jun 15, Last day of tests of this new station. The French programs are produced in Togo by members and collaborators of National Dialogue of Civil Society (CNSC) at great personal risk. Finished programs are delivered via Internet to a satellite uplink, and the satellite signal is then used to feed the SW transmitters. Frequent ID's: "Radio Togo Libre: la Radio patriote, le combat pour l'alternance démocratique" or simply "RTL". Talks about various candidates at the elections in Togo, song to drums and flute, 24333 in Denmark, but 45444 in Bulgaria and France, cf. 21760. Broker for 12125, but not 21760 is TDP (Datzinov, Ivanov and Petersen, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) On Jun 12 I sent an E-mail, and some hours later I received an answer from Alexis Ayavon. Diastode (Togolese diaspora) who produced the program, is in Montréal Canada. M. Alexis Ayavon asked me also, if I can send money on a Canadian account, because Diastode needs money to run Radio Togo Libre (Christian Ghibaudo, France, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) 21760, R. Togo Libre, via Meyerton, *1258-1358*, Jun 09 and 11, French ID's, announced 12125 and 21760. 45434. Scheduled Mo-Fr 1300-1400, but not heard after Jun 13. On Sa Jun 14 Channel Africa was heard instead on 21760 with English (34333). Tests Mo-Fr Jun 06-13. Reports requested at: rtl@diastode.org or radio@togodebout.com Their French language website is: http://www.diastode.org/Nouvelles/actualites.html (Datzinov, Ghibaudo, Ivanov and Petersen, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) togodebout site had not been working, but OK June 23 at 1620 check --- You`re welcome (gh, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Tuned in WINB around 2330Z Saturday evening, the 12160 kHz signal was just above the noise level; by the time DX Partyline supposedly began at 0000Z the station was inaudible here in Michigan (with Grundig Sat. 800, 40M ham dipole). Regards (Ben Loveless, WB9FJO, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Explained to Ben as below and that until 2400 on 12160 it`s WWCR, not WINB (gh) Glenn, Thanks for the clarification; WINB has never come in well here. I listened to their '40th anniversary' broadcast last year on their 13 MHz frequency and that too was barely audible. When Allen Graham announced a US station for DXPL, I e-mailed him with the relative signal strengths of US shortwave stations here in the Midwest (WBCQ, WWCR, WYFR, WRMI, WHRI) but didn't even think about WINB due to their poor reception here. No great loss, as the Saturday morning DXPL reception from Quito has been quite good (Ben Loveless, MI, DX LISTENING DIGEST) WINB has a hard time getting things organized and carried out, but at least they are trying. The new Saturday evening DX-block, scheduled UT Sun June 22 at 0000-0130 for DX Partyline, WOR and AWR Wavescan in that order, actually went like this: frequency change from 13570 was not completed until after 0002. No DXPL, but gospel music fill. I forced myself to keep listening, and did hear at 0016 a couple of brief false-starts of the DX Partyline opening, but nothing more from that show, back to music. At 0029 instead of 0100, AWR Wavescan 442, the latest edition, aired in its entirety. 0057 music fill. Kept listening, and finally at 0106 instead of 0030, WOR 1187 started but was cut off at 0129 long before it was over. One can only imagine what could have caused such a three-way mixup. By 0000 UT Monday, quicker than usual, the latest DXPL audio file was OD from HCJB --- but download only. Why do they keep putting up the dead links for streaming? Like Wavescan, DXPL made a big deal out of being on WINB for the first time [not!]. Ken HacHarg, former DXPL host is back as a regular contributor, this time about banana plants --- which at great length eventually turned into: a ``Tip for Real Living`` devotional! (Glenn Hauser, OK, WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. 9329.65, WBCQ (ME), 2040-2100 21 June, Doomsday and Big Brothers watching you type program, a few ads before ToH, next program start and then stopped for ID by M at 2100. Talk about adding new frequencies. Strong. Instead of adding new frequencies, maybe they should get their current ones 'on' frequency (Dave Valko, PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) was it on LSB plus reduced carrier? (gh) ** U S A. RFA schedule in A-03, valid till Oct 26th, 2003. RFA currently broadcasts from 1100 to 0700; there are no transmissions between 0700 and 1100. Daily programming includes Mandarin for 12 hours, Cantonese increase from two to four hours, Uighur for two hours, and Tibetan for eight hours. Increase: RFA has introduced two new additional broadcast hours in Cambodian programing at 1130-1229 and 2330-0029, but seemingly on a test basis. These additional services are not figured out on their website http://www.rfa.org/service/index.html?service=khm http://www.rfa.org/service/schedule.html?service=khm J03=til Sept 6. S03=from Sept 7th, 2003. RFA uses IBB transmitterss in HOL/H=Holzkirchen Germany, IRA/I=Iranawila Sri Lanka, SAI/S=Saipan & TIN/T=Tinian N Mariana Isls. And Merlin relays TWN/N=Taiwan and UAE=Al Dhabayya-UAE, as well as irk=Irkutsk-RUS and uss=Ussuriysk-RUS relays. Additional transmitter sites have been researched but deleted from this list upon request of RFA to suppress this info, to avoid pressure from China upon the host countries. Are we to assume that China has no way to find out this sensitive info except through DX publications? [gh] RFA A-03 updated schedule of June 19th, 2003. 0000-0100 LAO 12015I 13830 15545T 0030-0130 BURMESE 11540-S03 13680T 13820I 15660 17525-J03 17835S 0100-0200 UIGHUR 9350 11520 11895UAE 11945UAE 15405T 0100-0300 TIBETAN 9365 11695UAE 11975H 15225T 15695 17730 0300-0600 MANDARIN 13670T 13760T 15150T 15665T 17495 17525 17615S 17880S 21690T 0600-0700 MANDARIN 13670T 13760T 15150T 15665T 17495 17525 17615S 17880S 0600-0700 TIBETAN 17485 17510 17720 21500T 21690UAE break 1100-1200 LAO 9355S 9545T 15560I 15635 1100-1400 TIBETAN 7470 11590 13625T 13830-S03 15510UAE 15695-J03 17855H-(from 1200) 1130-1230 CAMBODIAN 13730T 15535I 1230-1330 CAMBODIAN 13645T 15525I 15625 1300-1400 BURMESE 11540-S03 11765T 13745T 15680-J03 1400-1500 CANTONESE 9775T 11715S 13790T 1400-1500 VIETNAMESE 9455S 9635T 9930W 11510 11520 11535-S03 11605N 11765T 13775P 15705-J03 1400-1500 KOREAN 7380 11790T 13625T 15625 1500-1600 TIBETAN 7470 11510 11705T 11780UAE 13835 1500-1600 MANDARIN 7540-S03 9905P 11765T 11945T 12025S 13690T 15510T 15680-J03 1500-1600 KOREAN 648uss 9385S 13625T 1600-1700 KOREAN 7210irk 9385S 13625T 1600-1700 UIGHUR 7465 9350I 9370 9555UAE 11780T 13715I 1600-1700 MANDARIN 7540-S03 9455S 9905P 11750T 11795T 11945T 12025S 13690T 15510T 15680-J03 1700-1800 MANDARIN 7540-S03 9355S 9455S 9540T 9905P 11750T 11795T 11945T 11995S 13690T 15510T 15680-J03 17640T 1800-1900 MANDARIN 7530-S03 7540-S03 9355S 9455S 9540T 11520-J03 11740T 11945T 11955T 11995S 13680T 15510T 15680-J03 17640T 1900-2000 MANDARIN 7530-S03 7540-S03 9355S 9455S 9905P 11520-J03 11740T 11785T 11945T 11955T 11995S 13625T 13680T 15510T 15680-J03 2000-2100 MANDARIN 7530-S03 7540-S03 9355S 9455S 9850T 9905P 11520-J03 11700T 11740T 11785T 11935T 11995S 13625T 13670T 15515T 15680-J03 2100-2200 MANDARIN 7540-S03 9455S 9850T 9910P 11700T 11740T 11935T 11995S 13625T 15515T 15680-J03 2200-2300 CANTONESE 9355S 9955P 11785T 13675T 2200-2300 KOREAN 7460 9455S 9850T 11670S 12080T 2230-2330 CAMBODIAN 7455-S03 9490I 9930P 11570-J03 13735T 2300-2359 MANDARIN 7315N 7540-S03 9910P 11785T 11935N 11995N 13640T 13800S 15430T 15550T 15680-J03 2300-2359 TIBETAN 7470 7550-S03 9365-J03 9395-S03 9805UAE 9875H 15695-J03 2330-0029 CAMBODIAN 7490I 13735T 2330-0029 VIETNAMESE 9975-S03 11540-J03 11560 11580 11605N 11670T 12110I 13735S 15560P (various sources, updated on June 19th, 2003 by Wolfgang Büschel, DXLD) ** U S A. VOA SKED WEBSITE [not including RFA] http://sds.his.com:4000/fmds_z/schedules/cur_freqsked.txt http://sds.his.com:4000/fmds_z/schedules/cur_langsked.txt In winter change the z to w. These are auto-updated daily, but do not include very short term changes (Dan k4voa Ferguson, IBB, swl @ qth.net via DXLD) ** U S A. RADIO TUNED TO NEWS, NOT PROFITS WILM: A small station sticks to its award-winning coverage even as media restrictions relax, attracting more unwanted corporate suitors. By A Sun Staff Writer June 22, 2003 http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/printedition/bal-te.bz.wilm22jun22,0,2338870.story?coll=bal-pe-asection WILMINGTON, Del. - It's noon on Tuesday, and a shabby little downtown building is about to report the vital signs of Wilmington, Delaware, the United States and the universe to whomever is within 60 miles or so and has a radio tuned to 1450 AM. Sure, WILM does traffic, weather and Phillies and Orioles scores. But how many other stations devote a full hour to the noon news report? How many rely almost exclusively on their own producers, reporters and anchors to deliver the content, and how many schedule stories on Delaware River slots parlors and the Liberian war in the same show? The answer, of course, is few or none. In an age of media consolidation, syndication and robo-programs, WILM is fighting all three trends simultaneously. It spends gobs of airtime and revenue on locally produced programs. It respects listeners and is passionate about the news. It has not become part of a chain. And despite frequent, lucrative offers and new regulations that may increase bidders' interest, WILM owners E.B. Hawkins and Sally Hawkins say they won't sell out. "E.B. and I have just decided that for the time being, we're going to hang tight," said Sally Hawkins, 80, who is E.B.'s mother, the principal owner and the chipper champion of Wilmington broadcast news. "It's such an interesting way to make a living. I suppose the day will come. The problem is, once we're gone, nobody is going to do this. I mean, the money we spend - it's ridiculous! But if I can just get one more person to think about what's going on in the world ..." she trails off. 'Last of the Mohicans' This month the Federal Communications Commission again relaxed rules limiting the number of newspapers and radio and television stations that can be owned by one company. Although in some ways the regulations for radio stations are slightly more stringent than previously, many analysts predict a new wave of media mergers and continued buyer interest in WILM. "That's such a sweetheart station," said Valerie Geller, a New York- based programming consultant. "Everybody is rooting for the ones like them that are the last of the Mohicans. Every day you know those owners are getting offers for millions and millions of dollars." Mark Fratrik, a vice president with media consultants BIA Financial Network in Chantilly, Va., estimated that WILM attracts 8.7 percent of the commercial-radio listeners in its market and would sell for between $5 million and $8 million. If it were dollars the Hawkinses were mainly interested in, WILM would already be very different. One of the first stations to convert to a news and talk format in the 1970s when it became clear that FM broadcasters would dominate music and AM stations would have to do something else, WILM has ambitions and quality standards bigger than its market or its transmitter. "They have a pretty hefty staff, and that's a very special thing," said Michael Harrison, the publisher of Talkers magazine, a trade publication. "Pound for pound, when you look at their market size, they're a real powerhouse of journalism." At only 1,000 watts of power, WILM doesn't reach much beyond central Delaware and its 500,000 or so listeners. It is dwarfed by the likes of WDEL of Wilmington, at 5,000 watts, or Baltimore's WBAL, with 50,000 watts. Not just local news But WILM's newsroom counts 13 full-time journalists and almost a dozen part-time reporters and other staffers, according to news director Mark Fowser. The station employs full-time legislative and court reporters as well as journalists to rush to the latest crime scenes, outdoor festivals or whatever else looks interesting in Delaware. It also plugs listeners into the world. Program director/anchor/reporter Allan Loudell runs up huge phone bills calling seldom-quoted experts and on-the-spot witnesses (including, frequently, reporters for The Sun) for national and global news events. During the Iraq war, Loudell put a Baghdad hotel clerk on the air as bombs fell, and after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks he talked with Pakistani journalist Hamid Mir about his interview with terrorist Osama bin Laden. This sort of coverage happens every day. Last Tuesday, the WILM Noon News Update, broadcast from an underground studio graced by dented acoustic tile, plywood desktops and stained carpet, offered self- produced reports on a proposed slots parlor, affordable homes in Wilmington and new accountants for New Castle County. But it also included interviews with a Newsweek reporter about the CIA, with a Swiss journalist about the latest Middle East violence and with an Arizona radio journalist and the U.S. correspondent for the Irish Times about the fatal hit-and-run traffic accident allegedly involving Phoenix Roman Catholic Bishop Thomas J. O'Brien. Many honors Practically every wall in WILM's studios and offices is plastered with awards. This month, the station captured 11 prizes, including best newscast, best election coverage, best investigative journalism, best sports reporting and best arts and culture reporting, at the meeting of the Philadelphia chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. "I've been here 15 years because I can do stuff that I couldn't do in Baltimore or Philadelphia," Loudell said. Wilmington has no locally based TV news team except a small public broadcasting operation. The city also has relatively few locally based radio stations, which may help WILM survive as an independent. "One of the great things about the Wilmington market is there are not a lot of radio stations in this market," said Pete Booker, president and chief executive of Delmarva Broadcasting, parent of WDEL, which has a news/talk format but a smaller news operation than WILM's. "As a result the revenue pie doesn't get sliced that thinly." Of WILM, Booker adds, "you're not going to find another station around that makes more efficient use of their resources than they have." If "efficient" means profitable, it's the wrong word. E.B. Hawkins, who runs WILM's day-to-day operations, declined to disclose financial details other than to say the station takes in "a couple million bucks" in revenue but "never enough. It is a constant struggle." Asked about profitability, he says the station has "broken even for 50 years," since his late father, Ewing B. Hawkins, acquired it in 1948. 'An expensive format' Fratrick, the media consultant, estimated WILM had $1.9 million in revenue last year, which ranked it seventh out of 13 stations in the Wilmington market. In listenership, WILM ranks fourth, Fratrick said. "This station does do decently in that market," Fratrick said, particularly for its size. But WILM's news and talk format "tends to be an expensive format to program." WILM could boost profits by doing what hundreds of other stations have done: pare staff and pipe in cheap, syndicated programming. Alternatively, the Hawkinses could simply sell out to a corporate owner that would probably cut costs, but they show no signs of doing that. "We're really not a big money-making concern," said Sally Hawkins. "I mean, I've got 40 people on my payroll at a 1,000-watt AM, for God's sake. It gets to be a cause, you know. I hate to say it. I never thought I'd get so carried away. Nobody else does what we do." Radio-station brokers representing potential corporate buyers keep calling. "What they really want is the cash flow so that they're in a better position to go public or to produce a return to shareholders," E.B. Hawkins said. "They certainly don't have an interest in the news. None. "The brokers say, 'I'm not sure you understand how much they'll pay.' And I say, 'I'm not sure you understand how much I'll turn down.'" Copyright © 2003, The Baltimore Sun (via Brock Whaley, Mike Cooper, DXLD) {Follow-up: 3-113} ** U S A. RULING SPIKES TNN'S NAME CHANGE, FOR NOW --- By John Maynard, Washington Post Staff Writer, Friday, June 20, 2003; Page C07 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A14764-2003Jun19.html Spike TV will remain on ice at least for the rest of the summer. Film director Spike Lee won Round 2 yesterday in his battle to stop the TNN cable channel from changing its name to the more manly Spike TV. A five-judge panel of the New York State Supreme Court's appellate division denied the network's request to lift a lower court's temporary ban on use of the name. TNN lawyers argued this week that the network had lost nearly $17 million because of the preliminary injunction Lee won on June 12, blocking last Monday's scheduled name change. "This case is far from over," TNN said yesterday in a statement "We think today's ruling perpetuates a flawed and perplexing decision with far-reaching First Amendment implications that go well beyond the significant financial damage our network has incurred." TNN's next step will be to meet Monday with Manhattan State Supreme Court Justice Walter Tolub, who granted the preliminary injunction, to set up the parameters for a trial. The cable network also plans to appeal the temporary injunction in a hearing scheduled for early September. "We intend to appeal vigorously and still expect to be vindicated ultimately," the TNN statement said. "We firmly believe we have an absolute right to use the common word 'spike' as the name of our network." In his ruling, Tolub stated that TNN "sought to exploit Mr. Lee's persona, most notably Mr. Lee's reputation for irreverence and aggressiveness." TNN President Albie Hecht announced the name change in April, saying that "spike" was chosen to fit in with the "unapologetically male" nature of the network. TNN still plans to debut new male-oriented programming this summer even without the new moniker. A block of racy cartoons, including "Stripperella," with Pamela Anderson voicing a crime-fighting stripper, will premiere Thursday. Trademark lawyer Doug Wood of the New York-based firm Hall Dickler said the case will come down to whether an individual is so well known that any association with that name carries a secondary meaning. "Is Spike Lee that famous? That's going to be the question," Wood said. © 2003 The Washington Post Company (via Kraig Krist, DXLD) You've probably read about the injunction preventing "The New TNN" from launching it's new name and image as "Spike TV". For more info see: http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/06/18/1055828361675.html Personally, I thought "Spike" was a really stupid name for a male- oriented network. "MACHO" would have been much more to the point. It's also my opinion that Spike Lee's suit is frivolous, and that an injunction should probably not have been issued. After all, there are railroad SPIKES that hold the rail to the ties --- and there are plenty of dogs named SPIKE. On second thought, since this network will probably be a dog, maybe Spike IS fitting (Tom Bryant / Nashville, WTFDA Soundoff via DXLD) ** U S A. The FCC has come up with a really fun new website that details the history of TV from a technical viewpoint: http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-235548A1.doc No plans have been announced for a radio version! (John Broomall, Christian Community Broadcasters, WTFDA via DXLD) ** U S A. NEW LOWBAND TV STATION --- I got a letter from Bill Draeb on Friday relaying a report from a Milwaukee 2m repeater to the effect that WBIJ-4 Crandon, Wis. is on. http://www.northpine.com reports they're carrying FN religion. Apparently the station is causing problems for people in the area whouse channel 4 to connect their VCRs to their TVs |grin|... It's only 1.7 kW/123 m but that's enough to "skip out". Crandon is in central Wisconsin, not too far from Wausau. – (Doug Smith, W9WI June 21, WTFDA via DXLD) ** U S A. I don't know how the Tucson TV stations are doing about reporting this fire on the air, but their websites aren't much good |grin|. All four stations (KVOA, KGUN, KMSB, KOLD) mention the fire, though some of them are using the same AP copy you probably read in your local newspaper. KOLD mentions that the fire has burned many Mt. Lemmon businesses and mentions that TV transmitters are up there, but it doesn't say whether the transmitters are among the facilities burned. A story titled "Saving Hi-Tech" simply says there are transmitters on the threatened mountain - it doesn't even say anything about saving them! I suppose Summerhaven - where people actually live - is probably the bigger local story. I found *one* mention of the effects of this fire on broadcasters. KMSB's site says their Mt. Bigelow translator on channel 50 is off the air because the power to the site has been cut. This translator is on the KUAT-6/90.5 tower so presumably KUAT is also off, as is K43CW which is also on the KUAT tower. (Kevin R., can you normally receive KUAT?) (Doug Smith W9WI, June 21, WTFDA via DXLD) COMMUNICATORS TOTING UP LOSSES IN MILLIONS http://www.tucsoncitizen.com/local/6_21_03fire_communicate.html Smoke billows over Radio Ridge on Mount Lemmon on Thursday. Yesterday, the Aspen fire whipped through the area, which includes communications and electronics installations (foreground). GARY GAYNOR/Tucson Citizen [Caption] OSCAR ABEYTA and IRWIN M. GOLDBERG, Tucson Citizen, June 21, 2003 As Dale Eaton drove down 22nd Street last night, he saw a brilliant flash of light on Mount Lemmon and figured his radio communications facility on Radio Ridge had met its demise. "It had to be one of those propane tanks going up," said Eaton, owner of Rapid Communications, which had a $95,000 facility there. Eaton said he likely won't rebuild. Rapid provided two-way radio communications for private contractors such as plumbers and electricians. "I'm one of the lucky ones," Eaton said. "I can absorb the loss and go on. It will not affect my life." He's lucky in more ways than one. Eaton and his wife had considered buying a cabin on Mount Lemmon but discounted the idea when she slipped on ice. With Radio Ridge consumed by the Aspen fire atop Mount Lemmon, companies and agencies with communications facilities there have had to make plans to keep their operations going. Replacement costs could total more than $1 million. Towers near the Mount Lemmon Observing Facility threatened by fire include those for Pima County; Coronado National Forest; U.S. Army; U.S. Air Force; the Arizona Department of Public Safety; the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal Damage Control; Air National Guard; Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms and Explosives; Bureau of Land Management; FBI; Pima Community College; Saguaro National Park; State Department; Postal Inspector Service; U.S. Secret Service; Department of Energy and Qwest. TV towers on Mount Bigelow are on backup power and are unaffected, as are TV towers on Soldier Peak. Tucson-based Action Communications' antenna provided two-way radio service for private companies and some public agencies. Company president Brian Baxter said clients lost service when Trico Electric Cooperative was asked to kill power to the mountain Thursday. He said it would take about a month to replace its $400,000 facility if it were consumed by fire. Chris Bonifasi, facilities manager for Scottsdale-based Antenna Sites Inc., said its antenna was running on a backup generator powered by a 1,000-gallon propane tank. Bonifasi said the tower primarily carries two-way radio and paging services and is a translator for KJZZ-FM 91.5 in Phoenix. It would take about three months to rebuild the $400,000 tower, he said. Verizon Wireless had prepared contingency plans to reroute its paging communications, said spokeswoman Jenny Weaver. Border Patrol spokesman Rob Daniels said the agency had a plan for rerouting traffic from its antenna. Communications were not interrupted by the power cut. Pinnacle Power has two towers and a building on Radio Ridge. Spokesman Mike Carter, contacted before fire reached the area, said the company would be likely to rebuild. Arizona Public Service and All American Pipeline also had Radio Ridge towers. Officials could not be reached last night. Most of Tucson's TV stations lost main power to their Mount Bigelow transmitters and are using backup generators. Without access to the facilities to refuel, some stations could lose their signals. Jack Parris, director and general manager of KUAT-TV Channel 6, estimated there is enough diesel fuel to last about four days. The station's equipment is valued at about $4 million. Steve Somerville, chief engineer for KGUN-TV Channel 9, said its transmitter facility has about 2,500 gallons of diesel, enough to last up to 14 days. Its equipment is worth about $1 million. KVOA-TV Channel 4 also has its main transmitter on Mount Bigelow. KVOA officials could not be reached. Cable and satellite TV service is not interrupted because stations feed signals directly to providers. About 70 percent of Tucson households subscribe to cable or satellite service. Citizen reporter A.J. Flick contributed to this report (via Curtis Sadowski, WTFDA via DXLD) ** U S A. WSM SIGNS ANNOY TDOT By JEANNE A. NAUJECK, Staff Writer Cumulus Media's publicity stunt called 'a distraction' Cumulus Media meant it in fun, but yesterday's publicity stunt of plastering roadways with signs featuring newly acquired 95.5 WSM-FM didn't amuse the state's Department of Transportation. ''It's totally illegal,'' TDOT spokeswoman Kim Keelor said. ''If our people had known about it earlier we would have ripped them out immediately. It's a distraction to drivers, and they turn into litter when people don't follow up with cleanup.'' . . . http://www.tennessean.com/business/archives/03/06/34147623.shtml?Element_ID=34147623 (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** U S A. Hello Glenn, I heard your program a couple of nights ago via RFPI. I noted with interest a report of a new MWBC station operating out of Fountain Hills, AZ on 1620, KFHX. I have been monitoring the frequency since, with no joy from various locations within a maximum of 20 mile distance from F. H. I'm not sure they are on the air still. I will be in Fountain Hills itself tomorrow, I will let you know if it turns out to be a low power local. If I don't hear it IN Fountain Hills, it isn't on the air anymore. I appreciate your contribution to the radio hobby, BTW. Best signals your way, 73, (~Rick Barton, AZ, June 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** UZBEKISTAN. New email address of R Tashkent (Foreign Service): ino@uzpak.uz (Direct station info via Alexander Polyakov, Uzbekistan via Trutenau in Dxplorer via June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) Do they actually ID with ``International``? That gets tacked on to a lot of stations not actually saying it, e.g. Netherlands, Sweden (gh) Radio Tashkent International A03 schedule: Arabic 1700-1730 9715, 7285, 6190 1900-1930 9715, 7285, 6190 Dari 0130-0200 9715, 7190 1520-1550 9715, 7285, 6190 English 0100-0130 9715, 7190 1200-1230 17775, 15295, 9715, 7285 1330-1400 17775, 15295, 9715, 7285 2030-2100 11905, 9545, 5025 2130-2200 11905, 9545, 5025 Farsi 1630-1700 9715, 7285, 6190 1830-1900 9715, 7285, 6190 German 1935-2030 11905, 5025 Hindi 1300-1330 17775, 15295, 9715, 7285 1430-1500 17775, 15295, 9715, 7285 Chinese [i.e. Mandarin, alphabetically!] 1330-1400 5060 1430-1500 5060 Pashto 0200-0230 9715, 7190 Turkish 0600-0630 15200 1700-1730 9530 Uighur 1400-1430 5060 Urdu 1230-1300 17775, 15295, 9715, 7285 1400-1430 17775, 15295, 9715, 7285 Uzbek 0230-0330 9715, 7190, 5025 1550-1630 9715, 7285, 6190, 5025 1730-1830 9715, 7285, 6190, 5025 (Imran Hassan Qureshi, Pakistan, Pak DXers NL, June 19 via BC-DX via DXLD; English only: WORLD OF RADIO 1188) ** VENEZUELA. Reactivada en frecuencia de 5000 kHz la señal del Observatorio Naval Cajigal, luego de haber estado varios dias fuera del aire. A las 2318 UT del dia Domingo 22 de Junio la tengo sintonizada (José Elías, Venezuela, June 22, WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DX LISTENING DIGEST) La estación YVTO volvió este pasado fin de semana al aire, pero con una sobremodulación bárbara. Los "beeps" se oyen hasta 20 kHz, tanto hacia abajo como hacia arriba. Saludos (Adán González, Catia la Mar, Venezuela, June 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VIETNAM. VOICE OF VIETNAM STARTS NEW ETHNIC MINORITY SERVICE According to its Web site, Radio the Voice of Vietnam has commenced a new service for the ethnic minority groups of Ede, Gia Rai, K'Ho, Ba Na and M'Nong. The Web site says the service operates daily at 2200- 1600 UT on mediumwave 819 kHz and shortwave 6020 kHz (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 24 June 2003 via DXLD) WRTH SW Guide shows 6020 as VOV 4/1/2, whatever that means, 20 kW at 0400-0500, 0930-1600, 2200-2400 in Vietnamese/Rade/Sedana (gh, DXLD) ** ZIMBABWE [non]. See AUSTRALIA UNIDENTIFIED. Last night I heard an interesting station on 4995 kHz. Open carrier was heard from 1355 till 1400 when a programme seemingly of news or actualities was heard. Language is not known to me but maybe mid-eastern. Every so often a brief English passage was heard, once mentioning intelligence services and Saddam Hussein. Have not reviewed the tape yet. Signal was fair-poor level, seemed to be somewhat overmodulated and every so often there was a brief tone on line as if it was recorded off a land line. Modulation was AM. Any ideas? (John Schache, Australia, June 23, ARDXC via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. 15525: came across to a test transmission of Merlin, this morning between approx. 06-07 UT. Outlet was going away, when I checked the channel at 0701 again. Endless loop playing cello-guitar music and the text given by male announcer: "You are listening to a test transmission by VT Merlin Communications. A leading provider of international broadcast services. If you would like to find out more about us, please visit http://www.VTPLC.com/merlin [former http://www.merlincommunications.com to relink, I guess] But my URL access failed so far, this morning. Server not found (Wolfgang Bueschel, Germany, June 24, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ CLANDESTINERADIO.COM TO RELAUNCH IN SEPTEMBER ClandestineRadio.com is undergoing a complete redesign and redevelopment and is not being updated for a temporary period. We expect to be back online with faster updates and more robust services by September 2003. In the meantime, please refer to Clandestine Radio Watch for up-to-date and current information on clandestine broadcasting (via Johnson Jun 22, Cumbre DX via DXLD) EPHEMERIDES Um interessante site que em principio é meteorologico é o Wunderground. http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/hdfForecast?addfav no entanto, em cada cidade procurada e econtrada, podemos achar a latitude e longitude, horários do nascer e pôr do Sol , duração da luz do dia e outras informaçoes que podem ser interessantes também para o rádio (Samuel Cássio Martins, Sao Carlos SP, Brasil, @tividade DX June 22 via DXLD) POWERLINE COMMUNICATIONS ++++++++++++++++++++++++ Status on Powerline Communications (PLC) in Germany PLC so far has not been a commercial success in Germany, simply because ADSL is a better and already wide spread solution, and the power companies do not see a market for PLC. It might be a different story with small PLC-solutions. They call home-PLC: ``These are small units for distributing Data within the household using power lines; You can just buy and use them as you want``; I have seen lots of these during this year´s CeBIT fair in Hannover. Different versions are available, some are using VLF "only", others most parts of the shortwave range. If your neighbour decides to try this, your shortwave listening might come to an abrupt end :-( (Harald Kuhl, Germany, June 18 DSWCI DX Window, June 21 via DXLD) This is a big deal. I urge everyone who has an interest in shortwave radio to file a comment with the FCC. It's fast and easy: http://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/ecfs/Upload Click docket #03-104. Express your concern for interference to existing HF services, including shortwave broadcasting. It takes 30 seconds and could make a difference (Damon Cassell, swprograms via WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DXLD) FREQUENCY MANAGEMENT ++++++++++++++++++++ NEW TRANSMISSION PERIOD The B03 season starts on October 27, 2003. Already, broadcasters are submitting their tentative schedule plans to the relevant coordinating authorities. Here in Australia, the Australian Communications Authority has invited all HF broadcasters to furnish detailed schedule proposals for B03, for validation, which will then be submitted to the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union in Kuala Lumpur for coordination with other broadcasters, and for integration into the master schedule for participating administrations. Requirements have also been sought by the ACA from Australian broadcasters for operational schedules for the A04 period, starting at the end of March 2004. CURRENT PERIOD A03 Schedule changes continue to be made by many broadcasters, and it is virtually impossible to keep up to date with much of this, either from the hobbyist or professional perspective! Whatever our level of interest, it behoves us to maintain our monitoring, and keep proper records, or else we'll be left far behind! I see the increasing reluctance of many broadcasters to inform their listeners of current schedules, which makes it so much harder to track down a favourite station. Now that DRM is with us, it will be so much harder to find things, and even with the advantages of the Internet, many broadcasters still seem unable, or unwilling, to post their operational schedules in a style which is readily understood or easily located! (Bob Padula, EDXP World Broadcast Magazine June 22, used by permission, http://edxp.org via DXLD) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ ATTENTION INTERNATIONAL OPERATORS: INTERFERENCE IMPACTING AERO- NAUTICAL AIR TRAFFIC FREQUENCIES CAUSED BY ILLEGAL HIGH POWER CORDLESS TELEPHONES. The Miami air route traffic control center (ZMA ARTCC) has experienced radio frequency interference (rfi) on frequencies 134.2, 134.6 MHz resulting from the unauthorized use of high power cordless telephones in the Bahamas and on frequency 133.85 MHz from the use of high power cordless telephones in Miami. The Cleveland air traffic control center artcc (ZOB) operations were also impacted due to rfi on frequency 134.65 MHz, from the unauthorized use of high power cordless telephone located in Harrison, Michigan. High power cordless telephones are being used illegally in the U.S. and the Bahamas. These phones can interfere with the frequencies used for air traffic control worldwide and can pose problems to atc navigation and communications. The FAA is working with other government agencies within the United States and other countries to curtail illegal use of these phones and is approaching vendors to cease distribution and production of units that operate in or cause interference to critical aeronautical radio spectrum. Users operating on these frequencies should be aware that navigation and communication could be severely impacted due to rfi of these high power cordless telephones. Users of aeronautical radio navigation and communication services who experience this type of interference should report any event immediately to the air traffic facility providing air traffic services. If this immediate report is unachievable, the users should make a report to the nearest air traffic facility at the earliest time possible after the rfi event. (Milcom mailing list June 22 via Terry Krueger, WORLD OF RADIO 1188, DXLD) DRM +++ SANGEAN DRM RECEIVER An email received from Sangean Electronics Inc. from Taiwan in relation to a question I ask them regarding when a DRM receiver would be available to the consumer, they said they are currently working on a DRM chip and a receiver will be available by mid 2004 (Mike Stevenson, June 22, EDXP via DXLD) MAYAH DRM2010 RECEIVER Hi, I belong to a Yahoo radio group that is discussing DRM radios, and we were curious as to the price of the MAYAH DRM 2010 receiver. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks a million (Jim Dickey, Austin, Texas, DX-398 yahoogroup via DXLD) Thank you for your interest in Mayah products. Presently, this is only a pre-production product announcement with production delivery to be in Q4/2003. A prototype is planned for IFA Berlin in August and has a target price of approx. US$850.00. Please check the Mayah website for the latest info about the DRM2010... Thank you again... Regards, Sonotechnique PJL Inc. http://www.sonotechnique.ca http://www.mayah.com (via Dickey, ibid.) Someone on the 2010 list received a response from Mayah on the DRM2010. The $850 US price point quoted is at least an improvement over the reported $1800 per unit price of the first generation "all in one" unit from Coding Technologies (John Figliozzi, DX LISTENING DIGEST) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ ARNIE CORO'S DXERS UNLIMITED'S HF PROPAGATION UPDATE AND FORECAST SUMMER SOLSTICE typical propagation in progress. HIGH DAYTIME absorption of HF signals due to the very much ionized D layer typical of this season, while nighttime MUF or Maximum Useable Frequencies are higher than during the winter. Sporadic E season now in full swing, and openings may be happening at any time, even late in the evening!!! Solar flux near 120 units, but geomagnetic disturbances continue to make short wave reception not too good, as the A indexes are still very high. Expect some interesting AM medium wave broadcast band DX conditions to your SOUTH if you live at locations higher than 40 degrees North latitude (Prof. Arnaldo Coro A., CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited June 21 via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via DXLD) THE K7RA SOLAR UPDATE SEATTLE, WA, Jun 23, 2003 -- Low sunspot numbers and geomagnetic disturbances in the over-the-hill portion of the solar cycle continue. There are enough sunspots to support some good HF propagation, but we are about three years past the cycle peak and about three and a half years ahead of the next sunspot minimum. Complicating the situation is continued high solar wind and flares, causing constant disturbance to geomagnetic conditions. HF operators generally want stable geomagnetic indices, such as a K index at three or below and daily A index of 10 or less. A chart in the recent NOAA Preliminary Report and Forecast of Solar Geophysical Data [ http://www.sec.noaa.gov/weekly/pdf/prf1450.pdf ] shows the enhanced geomagnetic activity following the peak of a solar cycle. The last page of the report includes bar graphs for severe storm conditions, expressed as a planetary A index over 100. Note the [sic] for a few years after high solar activity the geomagnetic indices are higher. Another report from last week [ http://www.sec.noaa.gov/weekly/pdf/prf1449.pdf ] projects our position in the current cycle. On the last page you can see a rising historical planetary A index. The previous few pages depict the smoothed sunspot and solar flux projections. The next solar cycle minimum appears sometime around the end of 2006. By the way, this publication--``Preliminary Report and Forecast of Solar Geophysical Data--The Weekly`` [ http://www.sec.noaa.gov/weekly/index.html ] is full of interesting information. William Hartman, N6FB, forwarded a question from the eHam.net forum about the relation between A and K indices. The K index is a measure of geomagnetic stability at various magnetometers around the globe. During periods of activity, the higher latitudes tend to have higher K indices. For mid-latitude K values, an index of 3 is normal. Below 3 is nice and quiet, and above is disturbed. Each point in the K index, published every three hours, represents a big change. It is a non-linear system. The A index is published daily, and is made up of the eight K indices over 24 hours. It is a linear scale, so a one point change doesn't represent a big jump in activity. For instance, if you had a constant K index of 2 for 24 hours this would produce an A index of 7. A constant K index of 3 is equal to an A of 15, and K of 4 equals 27. The K usually changes every three hours, so the A is somewhere in between the values shown here. There's a NOAA Web page [ http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/GEOMAG/kp_ap.html ] that shows the relationship. You can see recent mid-latitude, high and planetary A and K indices on this NOAA site [ http://www.sec.noaa.gov/ftpdir/indices/DGD.txt ]. Note that on June 17 and 18, 2003, we had planetary A indices of 50 and 54, which are very high. June 17 and 18 activity was significant, too, and Al Olcott, K7ICW, e-mailed to comment that the recent sporadic E skip on 144 and 222 MHz was of historic importance. He is in Las Vegas, and on June 17 on 222 MHz, he worked K7MAC in Idaho. K7MAC was S7, and on 144 MHz he was S9 into Nevada, a 544-mile path. The June 17 and 18 numbers were the result of yet another robust interplanetary shock wave that swept over Earth around 0500 UTC on June 18. It was probably from a coronal mass ejection hurled from sunspot 365 on June 15--the day this sunspot reappeared. In May that same spot released two X-class solar flares -- big ones. Mark Williams, KF6YU, wrote about an unusual experience on June 14 around 0000 UTC. He was vacationing in Payson, Arizona, and an AM broadcast station he was listening to in his truck abruptly disappeared. He switched to FM to listen to a Phoenix station, and instead heard one in Sioux City, Iowa, on that frequency. When he got back to his cabin, he listened to dead air on HF, and the whole phenomenon was over in about 30 minutes. [WTFK??? was the AM station at 5 pm local via groundwave, as seems likely? Would a CME disrupt non-ionospheric propagation? Sporadic E on FM over paths such as IA-AZ is hardly unusual during this, its annual peak, and may have nothing at all to do with the HF blackout --- gh] Someone questioned what substitute columnist Carl Luetzelschwab, K9LA, meant when he referred to ``IMF`` in last week's bulletin. IMF in this context doesn't refer to global banking or Third World debt, but the Interplanetary Magnetic Field. When a strong solar wind or interplanetary shock wave from the sun blasts Earth, the IMF tends to point south. This has been covered several times in this bulletin over the past year. A good place to review the IMF and its significance is on the SpaceWeather.com site http://spaceweather.com/glossary/imf.html In addition, in last week's bulletin we hoped to come up with some images showing the effects on the spectrograph at Project JOVE during an X ray event on June 9 [ http://radiosky.com/wccro_spec_030609.html ]. Jim Sky, KH6SKY, sent the link. The strip charts were produced with Radio-Skypipe software [ http://radiosky.com/skypipeishere.html ] Average sunspot numbers dropped nearly 37 points from last week to 112.7 this week. Solar flux was also down. Not surprisingly given the conditions and all the reports, average planetary A index increased from 21 to 30. Space weather was remarkably mild on Thursday, June 19, with mid latitude and planetary K indices down to 2 or 3. However, the forecast shows more of the same enhanced activity over the next few days, with a planetary A index of 25, 25, 20 and 20 for June 20-23. Solar flux should remain around 125 on those days. On June 20 we should enter a solar wind stream flowing from a coronal hole, which should cause those high A indices. Sunspot numbers for June 12 through 18 were 168, 149, 91, 111, 91, 80 and 99, with a mean of 112.7. The 10.7-cm flux was 163.5, 151, 133.5, 128.7, 122.6, 121.9 and 120.4, with a mean of 134.5. Estimated planetary A indices were 11, 11, 32, 20, 32, 50 and 54, with a mean of 30. Amateur solar observer Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, Washington, provides this weekly report on solar conditions and propagation. This report also is available via W1AW every Friday and an abbreviated version also appears in the ARRL Letter. Readers may contact the author via k7ra@arrl.net (ARRL via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) COMMUNICATION BREAKDOWN: HOW THE LOSS OF SOHO COULD IMPACT EVERYDAY LIFE --- By Robert Roy Britt, Senior Science Writer, posted: 07:00 am ET 23 June 2003 Earth's first line of defense against massive communication failures is expected to go offline this week, raising the very real possibility that should a giant solar flare occur, the disruptions of media broadcasts as well as consumer and military communications dependent on satellites could rise sharply. . . http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/technology/soho_impact_030623.html (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) SPORADIC E IN PROGRESS Another large opening is going on as we close this issue, 1638 UT Tue June 24, thru NBC-6 Miami, also from Mexico (Glenn Hauser, Enid OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-111, June 21, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3f.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1187: RFPI: Sat 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1430 on 7445, 15039 WINB: Sun 0030 [NEW} 12160 WWCR: Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 9475 WJIE: Sun 1030, 1630 7490 13595 [maybe] WBCQ: Mon 0445 7415 WRN: Rest of world Sat 0800; Eu only Sun 0430; NAm Sun 1400 [not 1430] WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [from early UT Thu] [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1187.html Re: 3-110: Wow, I never thought WINB would get confused with WJIE as in the latest DXLD- ``WJIE: Sat 1731 13570, Sun 0030 [NEW] 12160`` (Hans Johnson, DXLD) Oops; at least I got the frequencies right (gh) UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIAL I used to watch the DX Listening Digest web site for news but I found that there was too much junk put in there by Glenn [sic] Hauser. Even though I have retired, I don't have time to read all that nonsense. I don`t want to spend my dying days trying to find news by [sic]Hauser. (Alex Dobrovitch, Hutt River Province, Australia, June 7, EDXP via DXLD) Ah, how easily I alienate readers! Junk and nonsense: Read on! (gh) ** AUSTRALIA. I have heard that planning proposals are being prepared for a new HF facility to be set up at Rottnest Island, which is adjacent to the Hutt River Province, Western Australia. I understand that there will be four 250 kW transmitters there, targetting southern Africa, under the banner of the "The New Democratic Voice of the Zimbabwean People". The station will also be made available to other broadcasters for relay purposes I believe (Bob Padula, Mont Albert, Vic, Australia, June 8, EDXP via DXLD) {N.B.! above item is a HOAX; see next issue} ** AUSTRALIA. Bob Padula has repeatedly given the schedule for DX Partyline on the Asian service of HCJB as 1230 UT Saturday on 15480, while HCJB and all other sources show it as 1430. June 21 at 1255 I caught the last bit of DXPL on Pifo 15115, so quickly checked 15480 --- whatever was on there, was not the same as on 15115. By 1430 the signal on 15480 was too poor to identify anything (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. 2300 UT, 21740 kHz, Radio Australia with news of Iraq wheat harvest and the old equipment they are using and discussion of how the government needed to get off their backside and fix it with help from Australia. Good signal s8dB. With all the rain we have been getting with thunderstorms, flooding, etc., DX conditions are finally turning around at my QTH (Robert kd5lvi Thompson, TX, nrd535d with many mods. Inv "V" trap dipole nw x se 40 ft at apex, June 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. BITTER EXPAT RADIO ROW FOR CONTROL OF AIRWAVES June 20 2003 http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/06/19/1055828434526.html GBRadio and WorldAudio are fighting for control of two narrowband licences in a struggle that has reached two Supreme Courts. David Elias reports. The accents are distinctly English, not the modulated tones of the old BBC but regional and chatty with plenty of what's-on information from the Old Dart. The radio station GBRadio broadcasts to a target audience of British and Irish expatriates in Melbourne's eastern and south-eastern suburbs on the 1620 AM band. It is radio on the cheap using an over-the-counter medium-frequency licence that broadcasts at the top end of the AM band where some older receivers cannot pick it up. It is also radio by remote control, operating from an unstaffed studio at Bayswater in the shadow of the Dandenong Ranges, where a computer takes the British program feed from the internet, inserts its own advertising into the commercial breaks and puts it to air. Station chief Roger Thomas has staked his future on the concept. He hopes to network it across Australia and repeat it in other countries with large British and Irish populations. He says he can provide British travel authorities and other travel-related advertisers in Britain with keenly sought outlets throughout the British Commonwealth and elsewhere. But first the former anti-terrorism specialist must extricate his embryonic station from a nasty dispute full of twists and turns worthy of a radio soap opera. Mr Thomas, who first came here more than 20 years ago to demonstrate bomb-disposal electronics to security forces, has been sucked into a desperate race against time to get a new national radio network set up before a Federal Government deadline in November. His company, GBRadio (Australia), and a listed company, WorldAudio, operator of Sydney's Radio2, are both claiming prior rights to use disputed AM narrowband licences in Melbourne and Sydney. The web is so tangled that aspects of the row have been aired in the Supreme Court of Victoria, the Commonwealth Administrative Appeals Tribunal and the NSW District Court. Next week it all goes before the Supreme Court of NSW. Mr Thomas says his fight to secure and retain control of the two licences has cost him $750,000 in legal fees and has required him to remain in Australia away from his wife and children in Britain for more than three years. "I want to go home to my family and resume my life," he says, "But I will not leave Australia until I get this business up and running. I have invested so much time and money in this I have to stay." The licences are the key to his ambitions but are also central to WorldAudio's plans to challenge the supremacy of established broadcasters. WorldAudio has raised $13.5 million in two public issues since its backdoor listing early last year on the strength of its plans to establish a national radio network that will eventually use digital technology. The company has claimed that it has enforceable rights to the use of the 1611 AM band in Sydney and the 1620 AM band in Melbourne, and it has issued a Supreme Court writ in NSW demanding that Thomas's GBRadio (Australia) transfer its licences to WorldAudio. Thomas denies this and claims that WorldAudio has repudiated an agreement with GBRadio. He is alleging that Radio2 is broadcasting illegally and is using an unauthorised transmitter. Thomas's lawyers have written to Communications Minister Richard Alston, the Australian Securities and Investments Commission and the Australian Communications Authority, seeking an investigation into the allegedly illegal broadcasts and omissions in WorldAudio's prospectuses. Thomas says he is suspicious of WorldAudio's links to the Sydney licensed clubs industry and believes the company has a long-term agenda to set up a radio casino using interactive digital technology when it becomes available. A WorldAudio company announcement this week acknowledged Thomas's complaint to the ACA. It said the directors, having received legal advice, were of the view that the company was authorised to broadcast under its agreement with the registered holder of the relevant licence. However, WorldAudio's annual accounts last October carried a qualification from auditors Grant Thornton warning of uncertainty over legal actions in connection with its use of the Sydney broadcast licence and the possible effect on the company's status as a going concern. The long story began with a partnership dispute and an amazing bureaucratic bungle by the ACA, the government body responsible for issuing and policing medium frequency narrowband area service licences under the 1992 Broadcasting Services Act. The bands between 1606.5 and 1705 kHz had been abandoned by their former military users and the government sold 270 licences to more than 50 commercial users to work on emerging technologies. In 1992 they were out of reach of the AM dial, but as many new radios can now pick up signals above 1606.5, narrowcasting has become a cheap and viable alternative for commercial radio. WorldAudio is one of only four licensees with Australia-wide rights if they can acquire local permits to link up a national network. Originally sold over the counter for a nominal fee these licences are tradeable on the open market and, as Thomas's dispute with WorldAudio has shown, they can fetch at least $500,000 each. Responding to concerns raised by the commercial radio industry, Senator Alston put the brakes on new licences last October and introduced a "use it or lose it" grandfather clause on existing licence holders, who must have their services up and running by November. Thomas formed a partnership in 1992 with British migrant Pieter Marchant to establish an expat radio network using three FM licences and two of the new narrowcast licences. The ACA issued the Sydney and Melbourne permits to P Marchant GB Radio in 1995 and then transferred them without fee to the business when GB Radio was registered in 1998. But after the two men fell out Marchant wrote to the ACA in June 1999 complaining that he had been "conned" out of the licences, and the ACA transferred them back to him in his own name. The ACA's letter of explanation to GBRadio was described by Justice Barry Beach of the Victorian Supreme Court as "a masterpiece of bureaucratic humbug worthy of the best of Yes, Minister". It told GBRadio its original transfer application had not been made on the appropriate form and it had not paid a transfer fee. Justice Beach granted GBRadio an injunction in May 2000 restraining Marchant from selling, transferring or otherwise dealing with the licences, but Marchant, unbeknown to Thomas, had already leased the Sydney licence for $500 a week. It had then been subleased for $3000 a week to Kinloba, a private company associated with North Sydney Leagues Club chief executive Jim Henry. Then in the face of Justice Beech's injunction and under pressure from an ACA inquiry into possible unlicensed broadcasting on 1611 kHz in Sydney, Marchant signed a letter on December 1, 2000, authorising Kinloba to use the Sydney licence to broadcast "so long as a court of law does not determine that such lease is invalid". The Kinloba lease was used initially to fire up the radio station Club Radio but documents filed with ASIC show that in September 2001 Henry, the federal president of the Club Managers Association sold Club Radio and Kinloba to WorldAudio Communications. According to documentation of a charge against WorldAudio Communications, which last year became a subsidiary of the newly listed WorldAudio, the price was $1 million. However, when WorldAudio opened its initial public offering for $6.5 million in April 2002 prospectuses revealed two use agreements that gave the broadcaster leases on the Melbourne and Sydney licences at $2000 a month for 10 years and options to buy them in 2011 for $1 million. In one, Henry was to receive $800,000 of the purchase price and Marchant $200,000. In the other GBRadio would receive the money if it won its appeal in the AAT for the return of the two licences. Thomas said he struck the deal with WorldAudio because it agreed to broadcast his programs on its network, but even before GBRadio won in the AAT, the agreement began to unravel amid allegations from Thomas that WorldAudio's disclosure documents were misleading. Thomas says: "I would have been happy with the arrangement if WorldAudio had stuck to the deal but instead they wanted it all their own way. Now they are trying to use the court to take my licences from me." (Melbourne The Age, via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** BELARUS`. 'New' to the hobby again I was delighted to hear Radio Stalitsa in Bielorussia today for the first time on 6010 kHz. The DBS2003 doesn't mention it for this hour of 0342 when strong ID as 'Radio Stalitsa'. Gone 0400, but signal faded back a bit later - maybe with other program? (Finn Krone, Denmark, June 21, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** BOTSWANA. Regarding QSLing Radio Botswana, I have received a beautiful QSL : The reception report was sent on January 31st 2003; QSL Received on April 22nd, 2003. V/signer: Ted Makgekenene. QTH : Postal Bag 0060, Gaborone, Botswana. No US $ were sent, only a rtp [?] (César Pérez Dioses, Perú, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** CHECHNYA [non]. LITHUANIA AGAIN SHUTS DOWN CHECHEN REBEL WEBSITE | Text of report by Russian news agency ITAR-TASS Vilnius, 21 June: The Chechen separatist website Kavkaz-Tsentr has been shut down following demands from the Lithuanian State Security Department. A Vilnius-based company, Elneta [Elnet], has been its Internet service provider since 26 May. An independent commission of experts found that information posted on this website "can be seen as advocating terrorism, nationalism and inciting ethnic strife". After receiving the commission's findings, the State Security Department confiscated the Chechen separatists' server and the information it contained, the department's spokesman, Vytautas Makauskas, told an ITAR-TASS correspondent. Criminal proceedings have been launched. Lithuanian laws ban propaganda about terrorism or about ethnic, religious or any other strife. Makauskas also said that one of the main authors of the information posted on Kavkaz-Tsentr was wanted by Interpol for terrorism. "We do not have any information about his presence in Lithuania," Makauskas said. This is the second time Kavkaz-Tsentr has been shut down in Lithuania. [Since the start of 2003, Kavkaz-Tsentr website has been hosted by a Lithuanian and then by an Estonian and American ISP. It last moved back to Lithuania in late May.] Source: ITAR-TASS news agency, Moscow, in Russian 0739 gmt 21 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) LITHUANIA SHUT DOWN CHECHEN WEB SITE DUE TO RUSSIAN PRESSURE, WEB SITE SAYS | Text of Kavkaz-Tsentr report published by Chechenpress news agency web site 21 June: On Friday [20 June] Lithuanian special services blocked the work of Kavkaz-Tsentr agency's server, citing as the reason the need to check the contents of the server for materials that contravene Lithuanian law. Earlier, on Monday and Thursday the Lithuanian special services twice called for a conversation the leaders of the Internet service provider and gently suggested to the provider that they stop serving the Kavkaz-Tsentr server. Both times the provider refused, suggesting to the Lithuanian State Security Department that they submit the necessary documents for closure. The leadership of the Lithuanian State Security Department said they were making their insistent requests, because Russia was expressing its dissatisfaction with the activity of Kavkaz-Tsentr and because the Chechen agency "might print some provocative article" (!!!) [punctuation as published by the web site]. At the end of the working day on Friday, at approximately 1600 local time [1300 gmt], representatives of the special services appeared at the Elnet Internet service provider and confiscated the server, having prepared in advance a protocol on confiscating a computer. When they found out what had happened, several deputies of the Lithuanian Seimas tried to hinder the illegal actions of the special services, but the deputies did not manage to contact the leadership of the Lithuanian State Security Department, as the head of the department had switched off his telephones. It is also known that at 1700 [1400 gmt] on Friday one of the deputies of the Lithuanian Seimas appeared on Lithuanian TV and called on the special services to stop breaking the laws of Lithuania, to return the Kavkaz-Tsentr server and not to hinder the activities of the Chechen agency. The deputy said that all the actions of the special services should be based on the law and not on the desires of Russia, which is demanding that Lithuania close the site on its territory. On Tuesday, at the request of the group of deputies supporting Chechnya, the Lithuanian Seimas is expected to examine at its sitting the illegal actions of the Lithuanian special services in blocking the work of Kavkaz-Tsentr. Source: Chechenpress web site, Tbilisi, in Russian 21 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** CUBA. Hola Glenn, Efectivamente desde hace unas tres semanas sintonizo a Radio Rebelde en 25 metros, 11655 kHz. Casi siempre entre las 1600 y las 1730 UT, aproximadamente. Muy buena señal. En realidad no la había reportado porque pensaba que siempre había usado esa frecuencia. Al parecer no. Saludos, (Adán González, Catia La mar, VENEZUELA, June 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** EGYPT. Re Good News 4 Me: Domain Names: GOODNEWS4ME.COM and GN4ME.COM Business Address: Good News Network, 2 Abdel Kader Hamza, Garden City, Cairo 11511 EGYPT. Tel +20 2 7924040, Fax: +20 2 3449104 (Network Solutions via Andy Sennitt, DXLD) Sounds like I got the URL wrong. It should be http://www.gn4me.com and the e mail for their media section which is called good news 4 media is media@gn4me.com (Tarek Zeidan, Cairo, via Sennitt, DXLD) URL above converts to http://www.gn4me.com/gn4me/index.jsp but it`s blank, and least without Arabic script installed. Oh, far from blank when the source is viewed, full of javacript, starting with: META content= "News, arabic, arabian, gn4me, prayer times, TV, entertainment, finance, business, mobile, health, e-commerce, arabic press, chat, vote, technology, horoscopes, Islam, religion, events, discussions, gn4msnbc, banks, e-mail, dreams, diet, receipe, weather, stock riders, services, travel, elshal, Egypt, world, Cairo, Newyork" [sic] I guess that covers it; Coptic/Christian not mentioned (gh, DXLD) ** GERMANY. DEUTSCHE WELLE STEHT AN IHREM 50. GEBURTSTAG VOR VERAENDERUNGEN VON JUERGEN HEIN, dpa Koeln/Berlin (dpa) - Ihr 50. Geburtstag beschert der Deutschen Welle einen Umzug. Aus einem Asbest belasteten Hochhaus in Koeln zieht der deutsche Auslandssender in einen Neubau nach Bonn. Am 27. Juni werden Geburtstag und Ortswechsel der "DW" feierlich begangen. Hinter dem Sender liegen zahlreiche Umwaelzungen: deutsche Einheit, Personal-Abbau, Herausforderungen durch die Krisen auf dem Balkan, in Afghanistan und Irak. Jetzt signalisiert der Umzug einen Neuanfang. Auch die Mitarbeiter muessen auf weitere Veraenderungen gefasst sein. Intendant Erik Bettermann laesst keinen Zweifel: Die Deutsche Welle mit ihren Radio-, Fernseh- und Internet-Angeboten in mehr als 30 Sprachen werde nach wie vor gebraucht, fuer die Aussendarstellung Deutschlands und als Informationsquelle fuer Menschen in totalitaeren Staaten. "Die Erwartungen an Deutschland sind viel groesser, als das hier in Deutschland selbst wahrgenommen wird", sagt Bettermann. Juengstes Beispiel ist der Irak-Krieg. Wieder einmal machte die DW Krisenradio und -fernsehen, lieferte Informationen aus der Region in die Region, ergaenzt um die deutsche Einschaetzung. "Man erkennt einmal mehr, wie wichtig die DW als Bruecke zwischen dem Westen und anderen Teilen der Welt ist", sagt Khaoula Saleh vom Arabischen Programm. Dieses Ziel verfolgte die DW auch schon bei frueheren Krisen, in den Sprachen Paschtu und Dari fuer Afghanistan oder auf Serbisch, Kroatisch und Albanisch fuer den Balkan. Immer wollen die DW-Macher auch Multiplikatoren und Entscheider in den Regionen erreichen. Dabei gehe es aber nicht um platte Werbung fuer Deutschland, sagt DW- Sprecher Johannes Hoffmann: "Das A und O ist die Glaubwuerdigkeit." Bei ihrer Arbeit steht die DW seit Jahren unter Sparzwang. Die Zahl der Mitarbeiter sank von 2200 auf 1500. Der Etat, der aus Steuermitteln finanziert wird, schrumpfte in den vergangenen fuenf Jahren von 320 Millionen auf 277 Millionen Euro. Kritiker fragen nach dem Sinn eines nationalen Auslandsrundfunks im Zeitalter von Internet, Satelliten-Fernsehen und europaeischer Einigung. Die Hoerfunkprogramme kommen aus Koeln und demnaechst aus Bonn. In Berlin machen 500 DW-Mitarbeiter Fernsehen. Ihr Chef Christoph Lanz widerspricht vehement der Ansicht, es reiche doch, die ARD oder das ZDF weltweit zu verbreiten, statt zusaetzlich die DW zu betreiben. "Nehmen Sie nur die Bundeswehrreform als Beispiel", sagt Lanz, "bei den Inlandssendern steht natuerlich im Vordergrund, welche Kasernen geschlossen werden. Das interessiert international aber niemanden. Weltweit ist vielmehr die Nachricht interessant, dass sich die Bundeswehr noch mehr auf Auslands-Einsaetze einstellt und vorbereitet. Damit haben wir unsere Sendungen natuerlich aufgemacht." Auch wenn das Deutsche-Welle-Gesetz die Zukunft des Auslands- Senders sichert, wird sich die DW weiter aendern muessen. Bei den Mitarbeitern loest das auch Sorgen aus. Einerseits sollen sie auf Krisen in der Welt mit gezielten Programmen r%agieren. Andererseits koennen zum Beispiel afghanische Redakteure nicht ploetzlich Programme fuer arabische Laender machen, wenn sich dort ein neuer Krisenherd auftut. Ausserdem sei Bestaendigkeit wichtig, betont Hoffmann: In Afghanistan habe die DW nur deshalb so viel Resonanz, weil sie schon lange vor dem 11. September 2001 mit ihren Programmen praesent war. Eine Veraenderung laesst viele aber hoffen - die digitale Kurzwelle. Das Knistern verschwindet, die Programme klingen glasklar. Gesendet wird bei der DW schon in der neuen Technik, hoeren kann sie aber noch kaum jemand, denn dazu sind neue Radios noetig. In ein paar Jahren sollen sie nicht mehr teurer sein als heutige Kurzwellen-Geraete. Experten sagen, dies werde das Auslandsradio revolutionieren. (Internet: Deutsche Welle: http://www.dw-world.de) dpa kh eee ru (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** GERMANY. Bonn 774 kHz was not shut down as it was first suspected, but at present maintenance work at the transmitter site requires silence periods of a couple of days at once. This week Hessischer Rundfunk started to wind up the hr-chronos network. A small note at the bottom of the hr-chronos webpage http://www.hr-online.de/hf/chronos/index.shtml announces that since Monday (June 16) own programming is already replaced by a hr-skyline relay in the 0700-1000 and 1300-1500 periods. On June 30 all own hr- chronos programming except for the foreign language broadcasts (1700- 2000) and occasional live coverage of events will finally disappear. On the technical side the Rodgau-Weiskirchen transmitter near Frankfurt at present runs only at 50 kW after the transmitter was damaged by lightning. Probably the fault was fixed in the meantime, word is that they had some problems in obtaining the required spare parts (Kai Ludwig, Germany, June 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HUNGARY. Hi, new site in IBB frequency list, I guess. JBR Jaszbereny HNG G.C. 47N35 019E52 in Armenian [not Arabic!], Russian, and Tajik. Ex Woofferton-UK, Lampertheim-GER. 9505 1600-1700 RFE RL-2 AR JBR 01 108 degrees 9760 0300-0400 RFE RL10 TA JBR 01 075 11710 0400-0500 RFE RL-1 RU JBR 01 055 11885 0500-0600 RFE RL-1 RU JBR 01 055 (IBB June 17) 73 wb df5sx (Wolfgang Bueschel, Germany, June 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I read it in time to try 9505 Friday, and heard a loud signal there. Unfortunately, I didn`t log it my book, but from memory don't think it was Arabic --- would AR be Armenian? (Noel Green, England) Yes, it's indeed Armenian (Kai Ludwig, Germany) There are two listed 250 kW transmitters at JBR so the IBB has use of one of them, and a very nice site to serve the ME area (Noel Green) And Anténa Hungaria was able to sell some spare capacity. Actually not a big surprise, the Jászberény airtime is more or less a supplement service to Marcali 1188, just like the Voice of Russia slots at Jülich. By the way, I have a dim recollection that RFI used Jászberény for a short time, some ten years ago? (Kai Ludwig, all via Wolfgang Bueschel, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HUNGARY [non non]. Dear Kraig, Well, I got the word back from Gérald Théorêt, our frequency manager...and Radio Budapest is not using a Sackville transmitter. The 9590 kHz frequency for Budapest is from their Jaszbereny transmitter site, with 250 kW on a 306 azimuth. Hope this clears things up. 73- (Bill Westenhaver, RCI, via Kraig Krist, DXLD) ** ICELAND. Hi, 13855 kHz has AFRTS Keflavik very strong at this hour. 1620 had a feature about 100 years with the Ford Company, then about traffic and public announcements about Middleton a.o. 1630 timepeep and CNN Radio News (21.06.2003) 73's (Finn Krone, Denmark, hard-core- dx via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL WATERS [non]. ON THE AIR: MUSEUM SHIPS 2003 On the air, K3CLG says that the 2003 Museum Ships Weekend special event stations will be held on the weekend July 19th and 20th. Operations will encompass all modes including phone, CW, PSK31, APRS and even contacts via the Internet Radio Linking Project or IRLP. You can check on all the details at this easy to copy URL. It`s all at http://www.qsl.net/ww2dd/event.html (K3CLG, Amateur Radio Newsline June 20 via John Norfolk, DXLD)) ** IRAN [non]. Via Javaradio Sweden: CIS, 7480, Sedeye Payam E Doost (Bahai program for Iran) very strong and clear signal with talks in Farsi by the same woman announcer I have heard previously. 1816 June 18 singing by woman. Nice slow ID at 1819 (Hans Johnson, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. Via Javaradio Sweden: CLANDESTINE from FRANCE? to IRAN 17510, KRSI: checking for this but just a clear channel. Too close to France for 17 MHz reception? I think they are perhaps on 17525 again. I didn't hear a signal, but quite a bit of jamming here. 1643 June 20 (Hans Johnson, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Seda-ye Iran heard to start at 1529 on 17525 June 21st with usual "fanfare" tune and marching song followed by clear ID at 1532. A strong signal in Blackpool [NW England] and no jammers audible so far. 73s (Noel R. Green, England, ibid.) Thanks, Noel. I just tried on the Javaradio at Gatwick and I could get them. Fair signal, but no jamming, ID at 1603. (Hans Johnson, June 21, ibid.) ** IRAQ. IRAQ/USA: TWO NEW TV STATIONS FOR IRAQ OBSERVED ON SATELLITE | Text of report by Monitoring research on 20 June BBC Monitoring has observed two new digital TV stations, believed to be broadcasting to Iraq from Eutelsat W1, a European satellite located at 10 degrees east. The two stations, on 11106 MHz and 11100 MHz vertical polarization, broadcast in parallel from 1100 gmt beginning with a caption in Arabic which read, 'IMN Iraqi Media Network', followed by a mix of news, cartoons and films. Earlier, whilst the 11106 MHz again channel carried a film, the 11100 MHz outlet displayed a caption in Arabic which read 'Twin Rivers TV - VHF ch 11', and, 'Twin Rivers TV - UHF ch 37'. The Iraqi Media Network has now replaced the information ministry, which has been dissolved by Paul Bremer, the ruler of Iraq installed by the Bush administration, to run the media activities in Iraq. A radio station identifying as the Iraqi Media Network was first observed by BBC Monitoring in April 2003, broadcasting on a number of frequencies formerly used by the Republic of Iraq Main Service. Source: BBC Monitoring research in English 20 Jun 03 (via DXLD) IRAQ/USA: PAPER INTERVIEWS TV OFFICIAL ON IRAQI MEDIA NETWORK The Iraqi Media Network (IMN) has now replaced the information ministry, which has been dissolved by Paul Bremer, the ruler of Iraq installed by the Bush administration, to run the media activities in Iraq, begins a report by the Baghdad-based newspaper Al-Hilal. Al-Rikabi, a TV official, explained that the IMN was run by Iraqi cadres from inside Iraq in collaboration with foreign experts and coalition forces, pointing out that the organization is a free independent institution, financed by the interim coalition authority, continues the report. He condemned the dissolving of the information ministry as hasty, urging Bremer to find employment within the IMN for former ministry staff. Al-Rikabi pointed out that Iraq is now becoming a private media environment, creating competition within the industry. He said, "We are now trying to prepare the new generation of media men who have the ability and courage to say the truth without fear or courtesy". He promised to install new TV and radio networks in Iraq, adding that the inability to transmit news bulletins was due to a lack of studio and newsgathering resources. Source: Baghdad Al-Hilal in English 20 Jun 03 p 6 (via BBCM via DXLD) IRAQI MEDIA NETWORK TV ON AIR, CARRIES NEWS BULLETIN FROM BAGHDAD At 1545 gmt the Iraqi Media Network TV station was carrying a caption saying: Iraqi Media Network welcomes you in its test transmission. This caption was repeated several times afterwards. This TV station is received on the 11106 MHz frequency, horizontal polarization via Eutelsat W1, 10 degrees east. The TV station was relaying entertainment programmes such as songs from the Egyptian Dream TV. The TV station was trying to obscure, unsuccessfully, the Dream TV logo. At 1600 gmt, the Iraqi TV relayed a news bulletin [see below]. The female announcer said: I am Zaynab Salim. I greet you from Baghdad and present to you today's main news headlines. Then the male announcer said: I am Ra'd Nabil from the Iraqi Media Network. Then Salim and Nabil took turn to present the news headlines: 1. Two elements from Iraqi army who were participating in demonstrations were killed in Baghdad by coalition forces yesterday. Round-up of people's opinions complaining from lack of security and order. Video showing joint patrols composed of men from coalition forces and Iraqi security men. TV shows members of coalition forces holding children who lost their parents. One of the soldier is quoted as saying: we are among citizens and children and the way they deal with us facilitates our mission. 2. Report over video, with people's opinions, on lack of security and highlighting problems facing transport sector in Baghdad. 3. Hundreds of Iraqis demonstrate in Baghdad demanding jobs and calling for speeding up formation of Iraqi national government. 4. Report over video on problems faced by Iraqi citizens as financial institutions, shops and others are not accepting the 10,000-dinar banknote. Round-up of Iraqi people's opinions on this issue. Several people complain that they have been to various banks and shops but nobody is accepting the 10,000 dinar-banknote. 5. Report over video on port activities at Umm-Qasr harbour showing arrival of imported car from UAE. US officials are shown attending ceremony of arrival of first merchant ship carrying cars from UAE. 6. Oil Ministry source said oil to be pumped as of next month. Report over video. [From the contents and the tone of this TV station, it appears pro- American or American-backed]. The TV went off air at 1617 gmt. Source: BBC Monitoring research in English 20 Jun 03 (via DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH [and non]. After approximately 25 years of trying, I got --- an envelope in the mail from the "People's Democratic Republic of Korea" (i.e. North Korea) with another envelope inside it with a DPRK pin, a propaganda booklet (many color pictures of factories, mines, and hilarious titles for articles), a program schedule, a blank reception report form, and a letter referring to an "enclosed" QSL --- but after thorough inspection, there was no QSL! I probably also got my name placed in some Federal intelligence agencies file, as well. If it wasn't already there due to mail received during the cold war from various Communist countries, Iran in the late 80's, and Yemen last year. The QSL would have made it worth it!:) After this experience WMFQ came to mind very quickly, because once I realized that the QSL had not been included, I was repeating over and over in my mind the words to their call sign! The it occurred to me that this sort of experience is what probably inspired WMFQ to begin with! And WMFQ will send you an f'ing QSL, sometimes just for a log, and they won't send any f'ing propaganda books with pictures of factories! (Ross Comeau, Free Radio Weekly June 20 via DXLD) ** LEBANON [non]. Via Javaradio Sweden CLANDESTINE from CIS to MIDDLE EAST: 11645, Voice of Liberty, 1646 June 20 with IDs by woman as Itha'at Hurriya. Channel is a mess; someone running a carrier co- channel so it is hard to get clear reception (Hans Johnson, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** MOROCCO [non]. TWR STEPS UP PROGRAMMING TO ILLITERATES IN THE MIDDLE EAST TWR recently debuted a new 15-minute weekly Berber Rif program specifically designed to reach non-readers in Morocco. Since illiteracy is high among the Berber tribes in that country, the Rif language broadcast (as well as Tamazight, Sous, and Kabyle) is directed at this people group. The Kabyle program, which began last fall, is specifically for women. Because non-readers process what they hear much differently than readers, these programs often use storytelling as the vehicle to touch listeners' hearts. To learn more about TWR`s extensive ministry in the Middle East region, surf to http://www.gospelcom.net/twr/world/middle_east.php (TWR E-Snapshots June via Alokesh Gupta, DXLD) Not only does TWR propagate imaginary theological ideas, but they imagine Morocco be in the Middle East. Some of the `people groups` mentioned here are also found in Algeria (gh, DXLD) ** PERU. R. Willkamayu, Cusco, 10354.9, letter and postcards in 12 days. V/S: Julio César Tello Aguilar. E-mail: acv66_starmedia.com or acv2000@yahoo.com (Hideki Watanabe, Saitama, Japan, Radio Nuevo Mundo June 10 via DXLD) Date heard? Evidently no longer active; not reported longly ** PERU [and non]. When I heard Radio Gaúcha (Brazil) on 6020.3 kHz two days ago (19 JUNE) slightly after 0400 UT when REE closed down, I thought it would be a fine time to listen to this station on this clear channel. I heard a time announcement "1 y 3" and later I found the station fading out for the day at 0425... But this morning (21 JUNE) after 0400 UT I found Radio Victoria (Peru) on this frequency of 6020.3 kHz (exactly 6020.27) with a fair signal. I heard a time announcement "11:14" and an ID "Radio Victoria, La Voz de la Liberación", followed by religion produced by Iglésia Pentecostal. Quite nice signal still at 0500 and then at 0504 there was something like an announcement in Portuguese. Followed by a priest, by whom I was not sure if he was speaking Portuguese or Spanish - "espiritu santu... and so on...". It recalled those first broadcasts of Iglésia Pentecostal via Radio Táchira (4830) back in the middle of 90's or so, where brazilian priests (or the only one at the beginning?) were speaking more Portuguese than Spanish... Radio Victoria still heard before 0530, since 0530 I got a feeling I heard only a weak carrier and no modulation. Could not do anything with it because of bad QRM from Hungary on 6025 kHz... GOOD DX, (Karel Honzik the Czech Republic (Czechia), AOR AR-7030 30 m Long Wire, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** POLAND [and non]. I BELIEVE, THEREFORE NO? The Pope has clearly said he himself would vote yes to EU membership. But the divisions within the Polish Catholic Church remain. --- by Wojciech Kosc CRACOW, Poland -- ``This is Radio Maryja, the Catholic voice in your house,`` a woman`s voice announces, using the catchphrase of a radio station that, for some 5 million Poles, is not just any Catholic voice, but the voice of the Catholic Church. For many other Poles, Catholics included, it is a xenophobic channel that compromises Polish Catholicism. For yet others, it is simply a laughing stock . . . http://www.tol.cz/look/TOLnew/article.tpl?IdLanguage=1&IdPublication=4&NrIssue=46&NrSection=2&NrArticle=9714 (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** PUERTO RICO. News Media Information 202 / 418- 0500 TTY 202 / 418- 2555 Fax- On- Demand 202 / 418- 2830 Internet: http://www.fcc.gov ftp.fcc.gov Federal Communications Commission, 445 12th Street, S. W. Washington, D. C. 20554 This is an unofficial announcement of Commission action. Release of the full text of a Commission order constitutes official action. See MCI v. FCC. 515 F 2d 385 (D. C. Circ 1974). FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: May 29, 2002 John Winston (202) 418- 7450 FCC INVESTIGATION LEADS TO SEIZURE OF UNLICENSED FM RADIO EQUIPMENT Washington, D. C. – Today, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced that an investigation by the FCC's Enforcement Bureau led to the seizure of unlicensed broadcast radio equipment operated by Mr. Amil Lugo-González. The station had been operating on 99.5 MHz from Jayuya, Puerto Rico. The FCC San Juan Office, working in conjunction with the United States Marshals Service and the Office of the United States Attorney for the District of Puerto Rico, seized the broadcasting equipment on May 21, 2002. The FCC, on more than one occasion, had issued notices to Mr. Lugo- González directing him to cease operation of the unlicensed station. The operation of an unlicensed broadcast station is a violation of Section 301 of the Communications Act of 1934, as amended. Operators of illegal unlicensed broadcast stations may be subject to monetary penalties of up to $11,000 per violation, seizure by court order of all radio equipment involved in the operation, and court order directing that those persons cease operation of the unlicensed station. In addition, unlicensed operators may be subject to criminal sanctions, including fines and imprisonment. - FCC - Enforcement Bureau Contact: John Winston at (202) 418- 7450 TTY 1( 888) 835- 5322 (via Terry Krueger, FL, June 21, DXLD) ** RUSSIA. VOICE OF RUSSIA LEADS WAY IN DIGITAL RADIO | Excerpt from report in English by Russian news agency ITAR-TASS Moscow, 21 June: Golos Rossii (Voice of Russia) radio has become the first digital radio station in the country. Starting Saturday, 21 June, the radio station will broadcast to Europe four hours a day in a digital format. [Passage omitted] The radio station is using only one transmitter for digital broadcasts but all others are expected to go digital in the very near future to cover all continents by the end of the year. Voice of Russia carried out the first experiments with digital broadcasting in Irkutsk in 2000. According to specialists from the department of technical management of the Russian television and radio broadcasting network, Russia will finish the transition to digital beaming by the year 2015. Source: ITAR-TASS news agency, Moscow, in English 1420 gmt 21 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) WTFK? That info has appeared here before ** RUSSIA. ENGLISH-LANGUAGE VERSION OF PUTIN'S WEBSITE LAUNCHED An English-language version of Russian President Vladimir Putin's official website is now available on the Internet, Russian Mayak radio reported on 20 June. The link to the page is located at Putin's Russian-language website at www.kremlin.ru, the radio added. Source: Radio Mayak, Moscow, in Russian 1400 gmt 20 Jun 03 i.e. http://www.kremlin.ru/eng See him sail off Vladivostok (gh, DXLD) ** SRI LANKA [and non]. Ultimate item on this week`s On the Media (June 20) is about the V. of Tigers, LTTE station; penultimate is an interview with Nick Grace about clandestine radio in general. Details and audio links: Clandestine Radio Radio stations with a political agenda are virtually as old the medium itself. Throughout the 20th century, these gadfly stations have irritated governments of the nations that receive their signals. Recently, more and more underground radio stations have begun operating above ground. Brooke talks with Nick Grace, Managing Editor of clandestineradio.com, about the range and influence of clandestine radio stations worldwide. The Tigers' Roar The young cease-fire between the Sri Lankan military and the Tamil Tiger rebels is again in jeopardy, after the Tigers rejected the government's latest compromise proposal. Meanwhile, ethnic minority Tamils continue to tune into 'Voice of Tigers' - the radio station run by the guerrillas. Miranda Kennedy reports from Sri Lanka on the official broadcast outlet of the unofficial Tamil homeland http://www.wnyc.org/onthemedia/ (gh, DXLD) ** TAIWAN. Taipei Radio International (CBS) will change their name to Taiwan Radio International from July 1. Visit http://www.cbs.org.tw/ (Gaku Iwata, dxing.info via DXLD) No, the site says at http://www.cbs.org.tw/english/index.htm ``(2003/06/18) Starting July 1st, the 12 foreign languages of RTI will begin broadcasting with a new call sign: Radio Taiwan International.`` (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST, also via Swopan Chakroborty) ** TAIWAN. What's new in RTI programming for June and July! Check out these new programs and series coming to RTI in June and July! Tune in to "Stage, Screen and Studio" with Doris Owyang Beginning July 7th, Doris Owyang will host a new program called "Stage, Screen and Studio" which will air every Monday on Hour Two. From inspiration and creation to production and exhibition, she'll give you a sneak peak into Taiwan's galleries and theaters. See program schedule for broadcast time and frequency. New "Culture Express" Series beginning June 17! Beginning June 17th, Huang Wen-ling will run a serialization of ``A Stretch of Green`` by Pai Hsien-yung from Pai`s collection of short stories ``Taipei People``. The story tells of the transformation of a young woman from innocence to worldliness after a series of tragic events. See program schedule for broadcast information. Past Culture Express series include: ``The Orphan of Asia`` by Wu Chuo-liu (1900-1975) and ``The Dragon Sky Tavern`` by Wang Wen-hsing. "Instant Noodles" with Andrew Ryan beginning 6/18! It's delicious, and far from nutritious... it's Instant Noodles! Check out a new version of this old favorite with Andrew Ryan, which airs on Hour One each Wednesday. In Instant Noodles, Andrew looks at the wackiest news coming out of the Asia-Pacific region. See program schedule for broadcast time and frequency. Send us a wacky piece of news from your part of the world, and you could win a prize. If your news item is silly (or stupid!) enough to use in our program, you'll receive a prize in the mail. Submissions can be sent to PO Box 24-38, Taipei, Taiwan ROC. Or send email to: androo@cbs.org.tw Central Broadcasting System, No. 55, Pei An Road, Taipei, Taiwan. R.O.C. http://www.cbs.org.tw RTI Global Exchange Competition RTI Mailbag Time's Global Exchange segment is a fun and interesting way to exchange ideas and experiences from various cultures. Every month, we pose a new question to listeners, and every week we choose a few listener's answers to read in Mailbag Time. These listeners will receive souvenirs from RTI and some answers will be shared in Taipeiwave, the English Service newsletter. So join our global exchange and write us at natalie@cbs.org.tw Here are our June and July topics: JUNE What refreshing food or drink do you enjoy to cool yourself off in the summer? JULY What is your favorite summer time activity? ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Central Broadcasting System No.55 Pei An Road Taipei, Taiwan. R.O.C. http://www.cbs.org.tw Regds, (via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India; Swopan Chakroborty, Kolkata, India, DXLD) ** U K. BBC REQUESTS HELP OF GB2RS LISTENERS IN MAKING TV DOCUMENTARY The BBC has requested the help of amateurs, CB operators and listeners in the making of a television documentary. The BBC is making a programme on the 1984 to 85 miners` strike, which will be broadcast on BBC Two next year. At a local level during the strike, it is known that pickets were coordinated using CB radio. The BBC is hoping to find people who may have listened to these picketing arrangements being made, particularly those in the Doncaster area of South Yorkshire. If you think you can help, please contact Fiona Blair on 0208 752 7837 or e-mail fiona.blair@bbc.co.uk (Radio Society of Great Britain GB2RS News script June 22 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. GB2RS 5 MHZ BROADCASTS START NEXT SUNDAY GB2RS news will be broadcast next Sunday, the 29th of June, for the first time on 5[+] MHz upper sideband, as part of continuing propagation investigations. The news transmission will be at 12.30pm BST [1130 UT] on 5405 kHz. To commemorate the occasion, GB5RS will also be operating on 3645 and 7045 kHz, and will be gathering reception reports on the 5 MHz news broadcast. For a period of one month only short wave listeners and radio amateurs may obtain a special QSL card issued by the North Cheshire Radio Club. However, to qualify, 5 MHz reception reports must be sent in writing using the SINPO code format and quoting QTH Locator. Reports should be sent by post to G3LEQ, whose address is correct in the RSGB Yearbook, and an SASE must be enclosed if a QSL card is required in return. Due to the short time scale involved in this experiment, reports via the QSL bureau cannot be accepted. Queries, but not reception reports, may be made by e-mail to gb2rs@boltblue.com or via 01 565 652 652 (Radio Society of Great Britain GB2RS News script June 22 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [non]. New site in IBB list: Jaszbereny HUNGARY, q.v. ** U S A. THE WAY WE LIVE NOW SIGNALS FROM NOWHERE --- By WALTER KIRN http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/22/magazine/22WWLN.html?ex=1057165064&ei=1&en=7cc5f78334eb83ce I used to take a long road trip every year or two, usually in the middle of the summer, with no fixed schedule or specific destination, just a vague intention to try new foods and admire the changing scenery. And though I always took along an atlas, I rarely used it. I navigated by radio. You used to be able to do that in America: chart your course by the accents, news and songs streaming in from the nearest AM transmitter. A drawling update on midday cattle prices meant I was in Wyoming or Nebraska. A guttural rant about city-hall corruption told me I'd reach Chicago within the hour. A soaring, rhythmic sermon on fornication -- Welcome to Alabama. The music, too. Texas swing in the Southwest oil country. Polka in North Dakota. Nonstop Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath and Jethro Tull in the Minneapolis-St. Paul suburbs. What's more, the invisible people who introduced the songs gave the impression that they listened to them at home. They were locals, with local tastes. I felt like a modern Walt Whitman on those drives. When I turned on the radio, I heard America singing, even in the dumb banter of ''morning zoo'' hosts. But then last summer, rolling down a highway somewhere between Montana and Wisconsin, something new happened. I lost my way, and the radio couldn't help me find it. I twirled the dial, but the music and the announcers all sounded alike, drained, disconnected from geography, reshuffling the same pop playlists and canned bad jokes. What a miserable trip. I heard America droning. Recently, I found out whom to blame: a company called Clear Channel Communications. The mammoth buyer and consolidator of hundreds of independent local radio stations -- along with its smaller competitors, Infinity Broadcasting and Cumulus Media -- is body- snatching America's sonic soul, turning Whitman's vivacious democratic cacophony into a monotonous numbing hum. No matter where a person lives these days (particularly in Minot, N.D., where Clear Channel runs all six commercial stations in town), he's probably within range of an affiliate, if not three or four, since the company buys in bulk: pop stations, rock stations, talk stations, the works. Worse, quite a few of these stations don't really exist -- not in the old sense. They're automated pods, downloading their programming from satellites linked to centralized, far-off studios where announcers who have never even set foot in Tucson, Little Rock, Akron or Boston -- take your pick -- rattle off promos and wisecracks by the hundreds, then flip a switch and beam them to your town as if they're addressing its residents personally, which they aren't. They don't even know the weather there. What results is a transcontinental shower of sound that seems to issue from heaven itself, like the edicts of the Wizard of Oz. In a way that other media companies can only dream of (though a controversial recent F.C.C. rule change permitting concentrated corporate ownership of television stations may eventually make these dreams true), Clear Channel controls its portion of the airwaves as thoroughly as Britannia once ruled the oceans. Even the F.C.C. has faced this fact, which may be why, of all the broadcast media it is allowing to clump together for market share, it made one pointed exception: radio. Clear Channel holds no monopoly by any means -- its nearly 1,250 stations represent only 10 percent or so of the national total -- but considering that the company was founded only in 1996, its growth rate is astonishing. If given another 10 years to spread unchecked, Clear Channel might cover the dial from end to end, not just in some cities, but coast to coast. America would be one big Minot then, with literally nowhere to turn except Clear Channel. This prospect might not be so troubling if radio weren't the most intensely intimate of all electronic media, forging a bond between broadcaster and listener that feels, even though it's not real, like true companionship. Though TV news anchors like to fancy themselves as guests in their audience's living rooms, they sit behind an impenetrable wall of glass that no amount of feigned eye contact can overcome. Between TV and TV land there's always a fence, but radio creates a different landscape -- open, inclusive, neighborly. When a D.J. asks a trivia question and promises concert tickets to the fifth caller who answers correctly, my urge to pick up the phone is instantaneous, as is my urge to wait to hear who won, in case I know him, and very often I do. This sense of connection is fragile, though. Bounce it off an orbiting satellite, cut it with generic pretaped humor bits, then filter it through some distant corporate headquarters, and radioland will be a land of strangers. Clear Channel's critics -- who multiply each day, it seems -- tend to come from the political left. Their big beef is the network's supposed conservative bias, which, for attentive regular listeners, isn't supposition at all. The powerful syndicator of Rush Limbaugh and numerous other popular right-wing talk-jocks is truer and bluer than Oliver North's flag pin. But for me, that's a minor grievance, mere partisan grumbling. It's the creeping paralysis of our national vocal cords and the gradual atrophying of our eardrums that bothers me and would surely have bothered Whitman. That's why I'll probably skip this summer's road trip: I fear that I'll drive my car into a ditch. Radio from nowhere produced by nobodies eventually makes you nod off at the wheel. Walter Kirn is the author, most recently, of ''Up in the Air,'' a novel (NY Times Magazine via Joel Rubin, DXLD) ** U S A. SENATE BEGINS PROCESS TO REVERSE NEW F.C.C. RULES ON MEDIA June 20, 2003 By STEPHEN LABATON The Senate has started the process of reversing the recent decision by federal regulators to loosen media ownership rules. . . http://www.nytimes.com/2003/06/20/business/media/20RULE.html?ex=1057101714&ei=1&en=81876404ae2eaffe [registration required] (via Roger Chambers, DXLD) SENATE PANEL VOTES TO ROLL BACK FCC RULES DE-REGULATION OF MEDIA OWNERSHIP TAKEN TO TASK By MARILYN GEEWAX, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, June 19 WASHINGTON -- A bipartisan majority of the Senate Commerce Committee voted Thursday to roll back new regulations that allow greater concentration of media ownership. The legislation faces an uncertain fate in the full Senate and considerable resistance in the House. But the committee's approval boosted the hopes of those who want less media concentration than the Federal Communications Commission granted earlier this month. On a voice vote, the committee approved a bill by Sens. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) and Ernest Hollings (D-S.C.) that would reverse the FCC's move to increase the share of national audience a TV owner can reach from 35 to 45 percent. The panel added an amendment that would reinstate a rule barring companies from owning a monopoly newspaper and the dominant TV station in the same market. "This was a good day for us," Jonathan Rintels, a screenwriter who works with the Center for the Creative Community, a group representing writers, directors and other artists who want to restrain media ownership. Demands for Congress to get involved began June 2 when the Republican-dominated FCC voted 3-2 along party lines to relax media restrictions. Supporters said the decades-old restrictions had become obsolete in an age of cable TV, satellite broadcasts, the Internet and other technologies. Dissenters say the FCC went much too far, opening the door to mergers that could further concentrate control over information. They fear greater market control by media giants such as Viacom, Walt Disney Co., Fox parent company News Corp., AOL Time Warner, Gannett and Media General. A coalition of consumer advocates, gun owners, civil rights activists, religious groups, writers, musicians and others launched a letter-writing campaign to the FCC in support of tough ownership caps. Before the agency made its decision, it received nearly 750,000 public comments, with 99.9 percent opposed to greater media concentration. Congress members now clearly "think this is a serious issue" and will make something happen, Rintels, the screenwriter, said after the hearing. "I would like the FCC to start all over again," said Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas), who expressed concern about "potentially dangerous" newspaper-broadcast combinations. As an example of too little media diversity, she pointed to Cox Enterprises Inc., which owns The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, WSB-TV and several radio stations in the Atlanta market. Cox, parent company of Cox Newspapers, opposed the lifting of the 35 percent cap on national television ownership, but favored elimination of the cross-ownership rule for newspapers and broadcasters. Several lawmakers have suggested using various legislative tactics to reverse the FCC, such as passing a "resolution of disapproval" to overturn the new rules or prohibiting the use of federal money to implement them. The Stevens-Hollings bill takes a more direct approach. But supporters concede its chances for final passage may be slim because Rep. Billy Tauzin (R-La.), chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, supports the FCC's new rules. "It'll be a tough slog in the House," Rintels said. In addition, Commerce Secretary Don Evans has indicated the White House supports the FCC's action. But Thursday's vote could provide political momentum for some type of action. For example, Stevens also chairs the Senate Appropriations Committee. Later this year, he may be able to attach the 35-percent ownership cap as an amendment to a must-pass appropriations bill. If anyone were to question the ethics of that, he could note that the Commerce Committee approved the same legislation on a bipartisan vote. "Given our momentum, even Billy Tauzin may not be able to save the industry," said Jeff Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy, an advocacy group that opposed the FCC decision. (c) 2003 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. DIFFERENT KIND OF OLDIES SHOW UPDATE: I will be presenting the show live tonight, a busy work week and a swollen knee made it so I couldn't prerecord a show during the week. So while we can't be at the UGHA show tonight that honors the 50th anniversary of The Harptones, I will be playing the music of this fabulous vocal group tonight on D*K*O*S. Join us tonight on WBCQ for the first hour or via the web at http://www.doowopcafe.net/doowop.ram or http://www.live365.com/stations/15660 for all three hours ("Big Steve" Coletti, June 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. RADIO EUROSTAR: Glenn, Concerning the Eastern European pirate in the Chicago Area reported in reported on DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-108, June 17, 2003 on the frequency of 87.9 MHz. The station in question is Radio EuroStar and they broadcast in the Czech and Slovak languages 24 hours a day. They have been on the air at least since August of 2002. That is when I first heard them. I can hear them well at home in Chicago's western suburb of Wood Dale using an outdoor FM antenna. I can hear them on my car driving in western sububrs of Chicago as well. They are most likely located the northwest part of Chicago. I have noticed their signal to be best in the area of Irving Park Road and Harlem Avenue in Chicago. Incidentally, there is a quite a large Czech & Slovak community in that area. The station gives a phone number of 773-725-6039 (Christos Rigas, Wood Dale, Illinois, June 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Does the FCC care? Seems to be operating with impunity (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. From Greg Majewski: In FRW 386, there was a comment from George Zeller about a letter to the editor mentioning KIPM. As result of the comment, In FRW 387, Kirk Wines commented on KIPM programming and material. Here are my thoughts on the matter. KIPM material is very familiar to me. In the fifties and sixties, I read a lot of ``pulp`` science fiction and horror comics. Many of KIPM shows use the same themes as those stories. Yes, there is a dark side to some of them. The dark side of life has been a part of art. Here are some examples, The Scream. Sophie`s Choice is movie about a parent`s nightmare. The original Twilight Zone had its dark stories, that why it was not a prime time show. The KIPM QSLs (which are well made)have the look of an old horror comic book. There is only one show (The Adversary) that bothered me. The problem was it was too much like real life and the sick things that people can do and have done in the name of God. The issue may be when fiction/fantasy is too close to reality and the imagined fear becomes real. I enjoy the KIPM shows which are excellent productions (as George noted). The KIPM shows are part of the diverse listening that is available only on Free Radio, which I do enjoy. One of the reasons I listen for them (Greg Majewski, Free Radio Weekly June 20 via DXLD) And from Alan Maxwell, the final word: It looks like a good time for me to make a few comments on some of the statements regarding KIPM. First let me say how much I do certainly appreciate all the support and kind letters and emails that I have received not just in the last couple of weeks, but since first firing up the transmitter several years ago. First I would like to comment on the rumor that I have plans to retire KIPM in the near future, or that I might stop future broadcast activity unless I get a bunch of support mail. The fact is I do plan to continue transmitting on a limited basis in the future. How much is hard to say currently, based on many other demands for my time. Also the liability of transmitting is something that I have to continue to weigh. If all goes well, listeners should get a chance to hear new material a few times a year. But the idea that I will stop transmitting because a few folks don`t like what I do is complete rubbish! When I first started producing these shows, I realized that a significant percentage of the listening population would undoubtedly not be able to relate to my format. If I were not creating alienation among some of the listeners out there, I would feel like I`m not doing my job! In fact, I try and post some of the more amusing ``hate mail`` letters on the KIPM website. But I also expected that there would be many listeners that would very much appreciate the format and material. And after over 1000 positive letters and countless more emails, I`m glad to say that your mail has confirmed that what I do does have resonance among many listeners out there! For that I`m quite grateful. What I probably did a bad job of communicating to individuals in the recent past is that if there really was no one out there in the listening community that ``identified`` with what I do, then indeed, there would be no point in continuing to put the time and effort into these shows. But clearly that is not the case. While there will always be a significant portion of the market that do not enjoy what I do, there is a sizable group that feel the other way. I do make comments from time to time that I may give up pirate transmitting on the SW spectrum. This has nothing to do with the fact that listeners like or dislike what I do. It`s more a matter of weighing the size of the listening audience and the time involved versus the associated risk and liability of continuing to transmit on SW pirate radio. I really don`t give a damn what the majority of the listeners think about me, or what I do quite frankly. The day I worry about who or what is going to be offended or ``not get it`` will be the day I hang the whole thing up. I expect (most) of my shows to be controversial, and I would be disappointed if I simply transmitted formats, and ideas that one can get via normal media outlets. The thing that I do take exception with is the recent comments by George Zeller in the FRW that stated his surprise that anyone out there would actually ``identify`` with my format and material. Apparently I`m not the only one that disagreed. I received several emails over that weekend regarding that statement from others that found the comment a bit off the mark. I have no problem with the fact that George may not like what I do, or doesn`t enjoy it, but to make the comment that he is so surprised that there is someone out there in the listening community that identifies with my material is at best misinformed, and at worst mean-spirited. I assume that since George has a monthly column on pirate radio, he would have some idea of what`s going on in the associated community. Perhaps George only associates with a very select group of pirate listeners out there? Just as George has the right to say whatever he feels, soI (as a pirate op) have the right to reply to what I find to be an incorrect public statement. I may not be popular among the ranks that George spends time with, but that`s ok, I just don`t think his comment was completely accurate. Tell me my material sucks, or that my shows are crazy and a waste of a listener`s time, but to deny the fact that I have a large listener following is simply not accurate. I would think that one in George`s position would want to encourage and promote pirate radio, not serve up biting comments about the perceived size of an individual pirate operator`s audience. I`m not looking to start WW III here, but simply to go on the record that I disagree with the accuracy of this statement. That`s not to say I have not agreed with much of what George has said in the past. Another thing that I cannot take all the credit for is the amazing readings performed by the actors who participate in the dramatic episodes. The other actors are also folks from the pirate community, and not only do they not get paid for what they do, they don`t even get credit of having their name mentioned at the end of each show! To these folks I thank them for their incredible performances. My shows would not be what they are, if it wasn`t for the hard work of these individuals. In the end I hope individuals will formulate their feelings about KIPM based on what they experience directly, and not based on what other less informed 3rd party`s suggest as the facts. All I can promise is that shows that air in the future will continue to be just as controversial, different, and with the same strange ambiance that makes KIPM what so many have come to expect (Alan Maxwell, KIPM, Free Radio Weekly June 20 via DXLD) ** U S A. THEATER --- 'FREQUENCY' ZAPS SOCIETY'S BIZARRE OBSESSIONS By Peter Marks, Washington Post Staff Writer, Saturday, June 21, 2003; Page C01 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A17825-2003Jun20.html It's possible that even Dan Rather might get a kick out of "Kenneth, What Is the Frequency?," the gleefully malicious poison dart that Ian Allen and Monique LaForce aim at Americans' obsessions with TV anchors, crime-scene reenactments and the endless dissecting of the inane imbroglios of the famous. Recounted in the arched-eyebrow style of hip investigative films like Errol Morris's "The Thin Blue Line," "Kenneth, What Is the Frequency?" suggests that at heart we are a nation of armchair paranoiacs, eager to believe that in every unsolved mystery, the likeliest explanation is also the one that would be the hardest to accept. The title's bizarre query, of course, is the phrase an assailant was said to have muttered to Rather on a Manhattan street in 1986, moments before he pummeled the CBS anchor, for reasons that have never been fully clarified. (A convict, in prison for manslaughter, was later reported to have admitted to the attack, though the playwrights claim that in a recent communication, the inmate implied he wasn't responsible.) The mystifying episode, unfairly or not, has long fed a mythology about a kooky side of one of the nation's pre-eminent news readers: the Dan Rather of the alien gaze, the hillbilly lexicon, the icky sign off. (Remember "Courage"?) Though the newsman is rather wonderfully pilloried in this Cherry Red production by actor John Tweel, who captures both his telltale Texas twang and his oddly formal cadences, the play is only tangentially an easy-target parody. What the authors have created at Source Theatre, where the show plays at 11 on Friday and Saturday nights, is a clever, insightful mocu-drama about our idolatrous devotion to the shadows on the screen and the national conviction that their stories are more meaningful than ours. The piece, directed by Allen and LaForce, is chockablock with nifty notions, not the least of them a hilarious series of climactic scenes enacted with puppets. Still, "Kenneth, What Is the Frequency?" is best viewed as a piece in mid-construction. The authors, clearly smitten by their own conceits, allow too many of them to unfold at extravagant length, or to be repeated too many times. With snappier pacing and an unforgiving red pencil, the show could be pared from about two hours to a sleeker and more digestible 90 minutes. As the production also seeks to mock the melancholy slickness of a Morris documentary or the self-congratulatory tone of a film by Oliver Stone, the technical aspects must be crisp, or at any rate, much sharper than they appear to be now. And just as crucially, B. Stanley, who plays the central role of Narrator, needs to commit his lines to memory. He's got a lot of words to say, to be sure, but the sense of any pulsating urgency is lost when the omniscient presence at the core of the show has to resort to index cards. A more disciplined production need not blot out the show's aura of cheeky whimsy. Indeed, one of the play's charms is its rock-solid belief in its own ludicrous assumptions, starting with a kind of blind faith that "What Is the Frequency?" is the "Rosebud" of our time, a national riddle that keeps us all tossing and turning night after night. Mimicking the pulpy filmic impulse to return to the scene of the crime, "Kenneth" plays and replays that weird encounter on a sidewalk of New York. ("Where was Abraham Zapruder when we needed him?" Cherry Red's satirists seem to be asking.) The stentorian Narrator, looking a bit like Jeff Greenfield in oversize Swifty Lazar spectacles, examines the event with prosecutorial sincerity, presenting the arcane pieces of evidence with a DA's unwavering confidence that this all has to add up to something big. The seemingly nonsensical phrase at the center of the mystery -- a question that inspired a hit song by R.E.M. -- is methodically parsed, subjected to the authors' trial-and-error of absurd alternative scenarios. In a succession of funny blackout sketches, it is suggested that a shaken Rather, mistaken for someone else, misheard his attacker. "Where's the freakin' C, Kenneth?" an addled drug addict demands of Tweel's dumbfounded Rather in one skit. In another, a gay man, confusing the anchorman with a rival for his boyfriend, blurts out, "What, is this freak seeing Kenneth?" Over and over, the words are regurgitated, as if Rather were the hero of one of the unhappier Greek myths doomed to relive the episode throughout eternity. This being a modern fable, however, the space is outfitted with the contemporary tools of mythmaking. Tweel is often bathed in the cool blue glow of tube light; three televisions are perched on the edges of the stage, broadcasting chapter headings, à la Ken Burns, and embroidering the narrative with authenticating photographic details, nicely assembled by Rob Parrish. Naturally, the detective yarn has to come up with its own theory of the crime, and the one Allen and LaForce settle on is outrageously spurious, a conspiracy-spinner's tour de force. It's liberally adapted from a 2001 essay in Harper's by Paul Limbert Allman. The late novelist Donald Barthelme is ridiculously implicated, the clues dizzily excavated from his prose. "What is the frequency?" and a character named Kenneth do apparently make appearances in his fiction. Stanley's Narrator could take a little more pleasure in revealing these wildly flimsy corroborations; the joy here is in our collective media cynicism, our mutual understanding that the modern mechanisms for editing and processing information allow us to reorder facts with ease, often in scandalously misleading ways. The other performers, particularly a terrific Melissa-Leigh Douglass, impersonating several women who figure in the story, are playful pawns in this act of subversion; listen to the way they all put quotation marks around innocuous words, like "rather," in dramatizations of the suspect writer's short stories. Douglass even brings a funny brittleness to the female voices of the waggish puppets (the handiwork of Dawn Swartz and Kevin O'Meara) in scenes that bring the reams of questionable evidence to a coherent finale. The authors of "Kenneth, What Is the Frequency?" are actually assembling the pieces to a more enduring puzzle, about the desperate lengths we go to get to the bottom of everything. Why devote so much imagination and energy to such a silly cul-de-sac in the history of celebrity affairs? Well, yes, exactly. Kenneth, What Is the Frequency?, written and directed by Ian Allen and Monique LaForce, based on an essay by Paul Allman. Set, Kim Deane; lighting, Mike Daniels; costumes, Rhonda Key. With Kwame Wallace, Chalmers Hood, Marcus Lawrence. Approximately two hours. Through July 28 at Source Theatre, 1835 14th St. NW. Call 202-298-9077 or visit http://www.cherryredproductions.com © 2003 The Washington Post Company (via Kraig Krist, DXLD) ** U S A. 60-METER RULES ADD NEW RECORD-KEEPING REQUIREMENT When the five new 60-meter channels become available to US Amateur Radio operators at midnight (12 AM) local time on July 3, the rules will impose a new record-keeping requirement for hams. The requirement applies only to those using something other than a simple half-wave dipole for an antenna on the 5-MHz allocation. According to º97.303(s), a half-wave dipole on the 5 MHz allocation will be presumed to have a gain of 0 dBd. "Licensees using other antennas must maintain in their station records either manufacturer data on the antenna gain or calculations of the antenna gain," the newest addition to the FCC's Amateur Service rules says. Because the new rules also require hams to run no more than 50 W effective radiated power (ERP) on the new channels, the choice of antenna becomes an important compliance factor. The FCC rules stipulate, "For the purpose of computing ERP, the transmitter PEP will be multiplied with [sic] the antenna gain relative to a dipole or the equivalent calculation in decibels." If you use a half-wave dipole -- about 87 feet 3 inches for the "middle" channel according to the formula--setting your transmitter's power output power at up to 50 W peak envelope power (PEP) should ensure compliance. Under no circumstances may amateurs on 5 MHz radiate more than 50 W ERP in any direction, so those choosing to employ gain antennas will have to "do the math" and calculate their ERP. They also will have to keep a record of such antenna gain calculations on file. This might include documentation such as output from a computer modeling program for a homebrew antenna design. For example, an amateur using an array for 5 MHz exhibiting a calculated or modeled gain of 3 dB would have to cut power to 25 W PEP to comply with the new rules. Operating on 60 meters is the subject of the July 2003 QST "It Seems to Us . . ." editorial http://www.arrl.org/news/features/2003/07/01/1/ by ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ. "If we demonstrate that we can use [the 60-meter channels] responsibly, cooperatively and in the public interest, there is no reason we cannot seek expanded access at an appropriate time," Sumner wrote. "If your personal operating practices are inconsistent with that, please do yourself and everyone else a favor and confine your operating to the traditional bands." The FCC Report and Order in ET Docket 02-98 is available on the FCC's Web site http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-03-105A1.doc The ARRL has posted a list of frequently asked questions concerning 5 MHz operation on the ARRL Web site http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/faq.html#sixty (ARRL Letter June 21 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) See also UK ** U S A. RADIO LAW: HAMS PETITION TO OUTLAW HI-FI SSB On-air experimentation with so called High Fidelity or Enhanced Single Sideband transmissions could be outlawed if the FCC adopts a proposed rules change requested by two radio amateurs on opposite sides of the country. Amateur Radio Newsline`s Paul Courson, WA3VJB, reports from the nations capital: A petition for rulemaking was sent to the FCC and accepted by the agency May 27th. It was not immediately issued a Rulemaking Number so it was hard to find in the public record. However, Newsline has talked with two sources who have seen the proposal, and it calls for what many would consider severe bandwidth limitations on HF phone. The petition asks for a federally mandated bandwidth limit of 2.8 kilohertz for SSB, well below the extended bandwidth needed for what has been called enhanced audio. One of the two hams who submitted the petition told the FCC they are motivated by interference problems caused by two groups of single sideband operators. These groups are portrayed by the petitioners as, in both cases, having cast aside traditional voluntary limits on bandwidth of roughly three kilohertz. The petition therefore asks that these voluntary limits be made mandatory to provide a clear enforcement mechanism for regulators. The petitioners, Michael Lonneke, WOYR of Virginia, and Melvin Ladisky, W6FDR of California, said hams from one of the groups come on during radio contests, and are found tweaking their transmitters to splatter purposely to provide elbowroom on a very crowded band. The two men characterize the other group as those who experiment with High fidelity audio, apparently trying to replicate the sound of FM Broadcast stations. Newsline has recently reported on advisory letters sent out by FCC Enforcement Counsel Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, who wrote to several members of the enhanced SSB group telling them the agency had received interference complaints. The letters did not validate nor dispute the complaints, but warned the stations that if such complaints continued, the unresolved friction could trigger petitions for rulemaking. One such petition is now at hand. A Newsline reporter spoke with Lonneke, who declined to provide a copy of his petition for this report. He said he and Ladisky hold the same views on the matter of excessive bandwidth causing interference, and that they teamed up on the petition to add strength to their call for regulatory intervention. Lonneke declined further comment, and said the petition will speak for itself if the FCC chooses to assign it a rulemaking number and put it to public comment. Members of the enhanced SSB group have told Newsline they believe their experimentation with improved audio is totally in line with the spirit of ham radio, and that when conducted under appropriate conditions, is every bit as justified in bandwidth consumption as any other spectrum-intensive activity, including contesting. But the FCC`s Hollingsworth, reacting to such comments, disagreed, suggesting the mode of SSB was commissioned for the amateur service as a spectrum conservation mode, counter to the idea of high fidelity audio and the bandwidth it requires. Hollingsworth could not be reached to comment on the proposed Petition, and another FCC official declined to comment. The petition also mentions the legacy mode of AM, and said it, quote, does not create the same problems that the burgeoning use of so called `Hi-Fi Single Sideband` creates. Nonetheless, the petition asks the FCC to impose a 5.6 kilohertz bandwidth limitation on AM, with the restrictions asked for on all HF allocations below 28.8 megahertz. Previous regulatory proposals based on bandwidth have failed, including Docket 20777 from the mid 1970s. The conclusion then was that having Loosely defined technical standards allowed the greatest range of experimentation in ham radio, as long as such signals are clean. Indeed, many present day violations of splatter, overdriven amplifiers, and poorly administered audio lashups can already trigger enforcement action under existing FCC rules governing the purity of signal. Reporting for Newsline, Paul Courson, WA3VJB, in Washington. As we go to air, the ten page petition by W0YR and W6FDR has not been assigned a Rule Making number designation. More on this story in future amateur Radio Newsline reports (ARNewsline, W5YI, June 20 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. RADIO LAW: NY HAM CITED UNDER STATE SCANNER LAW A New York ham has been cited for having radio gear in his car even though the state law governing scanner radios exempts licensed Amateur Radio operators. On May 31st Richard C. Lalone II, KC5GAX, of Calcium, says that he was stopped while driving well under the posted speed limit by a New York State Trooper and given a ticket for having Icom IC 1500 and IC 706 radios in his vehicle. Lalone says via the http://www.qrz.com website that he did try to explain that that he was an Amateur Radio Operator and even provided his Amateur license for the officer`s review. Apparently, this was not good enough and the ticket was issued. Lalone appeared in court on June 10th to answer the summons. At that time he approached the judge with both his license and a copy of New York Traffic Law 397 a copy of PR Docket 91-36. But the Court Recorder immediately took the documentation from the judge and returned it to KC5GAX. The judge then conferred with the Court Recorder after which he told Lalone that he was entering a plea of innocent for him. He then instructed Lalone to seek an attorney and be present in court July 9th. They court then offered KC5GAX paperwork to obtain a public defender, and returned the citation with the new court date. Its not clear as to what will transpire on July 9th. Lalone`s posting did not state if this was a trial date or other type of preliminary hearing. If he is convicted of violating New York`s scanner control law Lalone faces a fine of $1000, 6 months in jail, or both (W6EM, qrz.com, Amateur Radio Newsline June 20 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. TUCSON FIRES --- BROADCASTERS OFF THE AIR http://www.fox11az.com reports translator station K50FV on Mt. Bigelow is off the air because the power to the site has been cut. K50FV is on the KUAT-TV (channel 6) tower; presumably KUAT is also off. Probably translator K43CW as well, as it too is on the KUAT tower. Several other Tucson TV stations are also on this mountain: KVOA-4, KGUN-9, KXGR-46, five other TV translators, the digital facilities of KVOA/KGUN/KXGR/KUAT, as well as the digital facilities of two other stations whose analog stations are elsewhere. Also presumably affected are KUAT-FM (90.5), KXCI-FM (91.3), and four FM translators. I have no idea what happens to a tower when a forest fire passes it. Hopefully these stations won't find out. Luckily there only seems to be one report of injury --- a firefighter with a broken finger (Doug Smith W9WI, Pleasant View (Nashville) TN EM66, June 21, MT Messageboard via DXLD) There is a tremendous fire on Mt. Lemmon near Tucson. This fire is dangerous and absolutely out of control at present. This mountain is just outside Tucson and has destroyed many houses. The Tucson stations MAY use this opportunity to run high power because of the emergency. Some Tucson stations: 580 KSAZ 690 KVOI 790 KNST 990 KTKT These are the most likely to be heard (Kevin Redding, Mesa, June 20, WTFDA Soundoff via DXLD) At least one radio tower is gone [on Mt Lemmon] (Shellee Smith, Tucson, NBC Nightly News, June 21 via DXLD) ** VENEZUELA. YVTO INACTIVA: Hola Glenn... Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA. YVTO, la estación horaria del Observatorio Naval Cajigal, lleva casi 4 semanas fuera del aire. En su lugar, en 5000 kHz, se captan WWV y WWVH, durante las horas locales de la noche y madrugada (2300-1000 UT). Saludos, (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, June 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VENEZUELA. Hoy en Sintonía DX --- Esto es parte de lo que tenemos pautado para hoy en Sintonía DX, el único espacio dedicado al diexismo en la radio venezolana. 1- Calendario Radiofónico con Ruben Guillermo Margenet. 2- Segundo Concurso Trimestral de Radio Korea Internacional, audio original tomado de la onda corta, pero que se oye muy bien. 3- Identificación del recuerdo de Ondas Porteñas, enviada por el colega diexista Henrik Klemetz. 4- Concurso "En Contacto 2003" de Radio Habana Cuba, sonido original tomado de la onda corta pero que se oye muy bien. 5- El colega Gabriel Iván Barrera con sus noticias, para todos los colegas diexistas, sonido bajado de internet a través del Programa Radio Enlace. 6- Radio Amazonas 4940 kHz, sonido grabado de la onda corta. 7- Recuerdos de la radio venezolana, aproximadamente 20 minutos con archivos sonoros que son una auténtica joya para los diexistas de Venezuela y el mundo, archivos que serán puestos de nuevo al aire a petición de radioescuchas que no lograron grabarlos todos. Ésta es una valiosa colaboración del colega Henrik Klemetz desde Suecia. 8- Contestación a la correspondencia de Radio Canadá Internacional, programa completo donde hay una entrevista muy bonita al diexista cubano Basilio Mendoza Santos, quien reside en Ciego de Ávila, Cuba. También se podrá escuchar la invitación que hacen los colegas que conducen este programa a los diexistas y radioaficionados para que les escriban contando sus experiencias con la onda corta, sus radios y antenas. 9- Desde los Estados Unidos el colega diexista Glen[n] Hauser con sus noticias para todos los amantes de la onda corta. 10- Sonia Cho y Ramiro Trost con los comentarios de las pruebas que se están haciendo con el sistema DRM, grabado de la onda corta el dia de hoy. 11- Radio Rebelde, grabación que hice por los 11655 kHz y donde me saludan, grabación de la onda corta de los dias 19 y 20 de junio del 2003. 12- Mundo DX, programa diexista de Radio Austria Internacional. Hoy dedicado a las transmisiones de Televisión por satelite. Este es el penúltimo programa antes de que Radio Austria cierre sus emisiones en español. Este programa es realizado por Francisco Rubio y la ADXB de Barcelona. 13- Programa Universo, enviado por KXCR El Paso, Texas. 14- Radio Reloj de Cuba, informa sobre la inauguración de La Voz Del Faro, en el municipio Manatí, provincia de Las Tunas. Por supuesto que hay muchas otras cosas relacionadas con la radio que extraemos de los diferentes boletines diexistas que nos llegan a través del correo electrónico. Trate de escucharnos entre las 00:00 y las 02:00 UTC [UT Sun June 22] en la siguiente dirección: http://intranet.unionradio.com.ve/intranet/audio/audio_principal_select.asp haga click en AM 640. Desde hoy hago una cordial invitación para que participen en el programa, enviando sus noticias en su propia voz, las cuales seran colocadas al aire. Atte: (José Elías Díaz Gómez, June 21, noticias dx via DXLD) ** VIRGIN ISLANDS US. CAXAMBAS GIRL A PIONEER OF THE VIRGIN ISLES By Betsy Perdichizzi 06/12/2003 http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=2256&dept_id=457701&newsid=8294508&PAG=461&rfi=9 Hazel Stephens Higdon was born in Caxambas on Marco Island during the year of the hurricane of 1910, when all the residents of Caxambas sought shelter in her sister's (Tommie Stephens Barfield) hotel up on the Heights, now called Indian Hill. Preston Sawyer, a child himself then, said the "hotel shook like a leaf." Hazel grew up in the little community of Caxambas, she lived at the Stephens boarding house run by her mother, Annie DeWilla Stephens; played in the water near brother-in-law, Jim Barfield's mercantile store; went to the island school; and attended basket dinners at the community building. Twenty-two years younger than Tommie, Hazel said, "Sister made sure we had everything we needed when growing up." When she wanted to strike out on her own, it was Sister Tommie, against her better judgment, who drove her all the way to California. Hazel knew she wanted "to do something" Hazel and her husband, Raymond Higdon, pioneered radio broadcasting in the Virgin Islands and Caribbean. He was the engineer and she was the petite redheaded businesswoman and sales person. Together they single handedly built the radio tower and established the first radio station, WIVI, now WSTX AM/FM. Hazel was to the Virgin Islands what her sister Tommie was to Marco Island. Now in her 90s, I am helping her publish a book about her experience. Her station, WIVI, known as the little radio station with the big voice, began broadcasting with 250 watts from a 150-foot tower in old Fort Louise Augusta on St. Croix. Over time and with permits, the power was increased to 1,000 watts from a 300-foot tower on top of Blue Mountain. The voice of WIVI was heard in Puerto Rico, Antiqua, St. Martin, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, St. Vincent, St. Kitts, Nevis, Trinidad, St. Thomas, St. Johns, as well as St. Croix. They celebrated the anniversary of their broadcast every May 15 after that. The FCC controlled the use of all radio frequencies. Applications and construction permits went through the commission with a six-month waiting period and were eventually issued. "When it became known that we were going to build a radio station, there was some opposition to the idea. There are almost always people who do not want to see changes and new ventures that have such a potential for affecting the community. Others felt it would destroy the atmosphere, making the island less attractive to tourists." One of the major objectors was the administrator of the island. Appointed by the United States government, he had a lot of influence and wrote to officials in Washington that the island didn't need a radio station. Hazel went to Washington and appeared before the FCC officials with her attorney. She explained the problem to the FCC. They agreed with her and over-rode the objections of the administrator. The FCC seemed to feel that it would be good to have a station built on St. Croix in spite of the administrators feeling that it would adversely affect the tourist business. Ray Higdon, now deceased, wrote of the struggle of bringing the two people's dreams to fruition. The Virgin Islands, a United States territory then, was just emerging from an economy based on a dying industry of sugar cane production. It was more like a third world country than part of the United States. Everything was primitive with little or no infrastructure. Manpower was used when they didn't have machinery to move heavy equipment. Some pieces weighed over 300 pounds. They had problems. A jeep rolled off a cliff into the ocean while workers were having lunch. A donkey fell into a six foot hole they dug for the tower base. Ray fell off the 300 foot tower, saved only by his safety belt, and he had to go back up the tower to finish the job. Next week: Hazel Higdon and Hurricane Hugo. Betsy Perdichizzi, a 14- year island resident, is president of the Marco Island Historical Society and past president of SWFAS Southwest Archaeology Society. She co-authored "A Girl Called Tommie, Queen of Marco Island," a book about Tommie Camilla Barfield (©Marco Island Sun Times 2003 via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** ZIMBABWE [non]. See AUSTRALIA UNIDENTIFIED. Re 1386 instrumental music station --- The music station (or Voice of Russia?) is monitored by TDP once per week at 1931 UT at the IBB RMS posts in Helsinki, Kiev & Moscow. Go to http://www.ibb.gov - monitoring - RMS - Europe/FSU - Washington server - Broadcaster TDP + Languages ALL + Locations ALL + Dates ALL - 1386 (Jan Michalski, June 21, hard-core-dx via Savolainen, DXLD) Interesting. But there seems to be only V. of Russia audible at 1931 in those soundfiles. This music station was not VOR. Both closed down at about 2100 leaving room for weaker but readable KBC Maralal [KENYA] The music station plays a "loop tape", I don't know how long it is, but I heard same songs in same order at least twice during my listening period 1940-2100. Thanks for info (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, June 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. 4870.88, 1857-2000 June 20. Talk and music like South East Asia. Strong signal. Little QRM from 4869.96 Wamena. Fair (NOBUO TAKENO, YAMAGATA JAPAN NRD-535D with 10 meters wire, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ POWERLINE COMMUNICATIONS ++++++++++++++++++++++++ UNDERSTANDING THE FCC'S BROADBAND OVER POWER LINE (BPL) NOTICE OF INQUIRY http://www.arrl.org/news/features/2003/06/19/2/?nc=1 (via Jill Dybka, MSIS, TN, June 19, DXLD) The article previously here, with illustrations and hotlinx (gh) A swing past the Enforcement Bureau section of the FCC site could be valuable before preparing your comments. Or, visit http://www.arrl.org and read one of the sections about FCC enforcement letters. It seems the Commission's special counsel for enforcement has been VERY busy dealing with electric utilities that fail to act when informed of line noise problems that are plaguing radio amateurs. IMHO that demonstrates that such utilities are on the record as not being able to keep RF out of frequency bands used in residential locations, even when they aren't *intentionally* generating any RF in those bands. They are most assuredly not qualified to intentionally carry RF! (Doug Smith, TN, NRC-AM via DXLD) DRM +++ DRM LAUNCH STATISTICS Mike Adams of FEBC Engineering Support has worked out that on launch day, 16 June 2003, there were a total of 195 hours of DRM broadcasts worldwide. These came from: 17 different broadcasters 15 different transmitter sites 19 different transmitters Listen to the speech by DRM Chairman Peter Senger and the official launch of DRM on 16 July 2003 (10'39") (http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/html/drm_latest.html 20 June 2003 via DXLD) MAYAH DRM RECEIVER The German Mayah company, otherwise dealing with professional audio coding equipment, announces a DRM receiver. Product description: http://www.mayah.de/content/products/drm2010/content.html A dealer announces that this set will be available around October / November. And the price: About 700 Euro (Kai Ludwig, Germany, June 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) News Flash! - A New "2010" - But . . . It's NOT a 'Sony' its a "MaYaH" DRM 2010 Receiver ! NEW "DRM2010" Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM) Radio/Receiver - - - 2nd Generation Multi-Band DRM & Analog Radio/Receiver - - - Offered by "MAYAH" Communications GmbH (Germany) Go to: http://www.mayah.com/index.html In the Left side Column Chick- On [Products] Scroll Down to "PORTABLE PRODUCTS" - - - DRM Receiver 2010 (... 2nd generation Multiband DRM Receiver) Click-On [DRM Receiver 2010] PRODUCT DESCRIPTION: This DRM Receiver is the 2nd generation receiver for the Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM) standard. It is the result of a joint development effort of MAYAH, Coding Technologies and AFG. The receiver is based on standard components and different to the first generation, it is smaller and lower cost. A DSP module performs all the DRM specific decoding functions. The software of the DSP module can be updated via the USB interface. The USB interface also provides the data from data application for further processing with a PC. The receiver can decode mono and stereo audio signals. The full stereo signal is available at the headphone outputs. The display indicates station name, used frequency, field strength and the number of service components of the received DRM signal. Additional information transmitted will be displayed if available. The station can be selected by directly entering the frequency using the numeric keypad. Beside the DRM standard the receiver also supports reception of analogue AM programs in the MW, LW and SW bands as well as FM programs. NOTE: NO PRICE WAS LISTED OR GIVEN. ~ RHF (ICF 2010 list via John Figliozzi, DXLD) I understand that the unit price for the first generation DRM receiver that is referred to here was approximately US$1800. Of course, there were no economies of scale achieved in that fewer than 100 units were produced and the receiver was not made available to the consumer market. jaf (John A. Figliozzi, NY, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ NEW WEBRECEIVER There is a new web receiver online, Visualradio Maryland. Url is : http://radio.teppodama.com/ (Bradford Wall, CA, June 21, EDXP HF Forum via DXLD) HEATHKIT - A GUIDE TO THE AMATEUR RADIO PRODUCTS If you`ve ever owned a piece of Heathkit amateur radio gear, or wish you had, the Second Edition of Heathkit: A Guide to the Amateur Radio Products, by Chuck Penson, WA7ZZE, is a must for your library. Greatly expanded and updated, this 328-page collection of facts, photos and Heathkit history offers a terrific trip down memory lane for anyone who has built or has owned Heathkit gear. Its published by CQ and available for order on-line at http://www.cq-amateur-radio.com or by phone at 1-800-853-9797 Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern US. time. (CQ) (Amateur Radio Newsline June 20 via John Norfolk, DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ Solar activity has remained quite high this week with a number of M and X class flares up to Jun 17. Solar wind speed was high all week due to coronal mass ejections and a coronal hole, causing the geomagnetic field to be at active to storm levels. Solar activity is expected to decline a bit, though recurrence suggests a continuation of high solar wind speed and coronal hole effects, meaning propagation will continue to be disrupted for the next few days. Prepared using data from http://www.ips.gov.au (Richard Jary, SA, June 20, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-110, June 20, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3f.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1187: RFPI: Sat 0130, 0800, 1400, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1430 on 7445, 15039 WWCR: Sat 1030 [NEW] 5070, Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 9475 WJIE: Sat 1731 13570, Sun 0030 [NEW} 12160 WBCQ: Mon 0445 7415 WRN: Rest of world Sat 0800; Eu only Sun 0430; NAm Sun 1430 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [from early UT Thu] [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1187.html WORLD OF RADIO ON WWCR: New time replacing Sat 0600: Sat 1030 on 5070, effective immediately (Tammy Bishop, WWCR, DX LISTENING DIGEST) WORLD OF RADIO ON WINB: Glenn- Plan is to air DXPL at 0000, WOR at 0030, and Wavescan at 0100, all UT Sun. We hope to air you tomorrow at 0030 as well as the afternoon time this week. We'd then like to switch the time from afternoon to the evening one, so you'd air once a week on Saturday evening. This would be on 12160. Wavescan would also leave Sunday 1430 (Hans Johnson, WINB, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ALASKA. REPORT FROM NICK HALL-PATCH. [I've] been away at sea, working up to 1000+ km offshore. Got to DX. Nothing earth shattering, though many more DU than I expected. May provide a few targets for Graylanders. 73, Nick 530 ALASKA, Adak, "ADK". 1316 5 Jun. "strong" with code ID but only S5 on the meter. (NHP 50N 145W) 550 ALASKA, Anchorage, KTZN?. 1504 10 Jun. "Alaska's total country morning and afternoon", but calls hardly sounded like KTZN; poor-fair in noise (NHP 53N 141W) 560 ALASKA, Kodiak, KVOK. 2010 3 Jun. Ad for Bristol Bay cellular and mention of KVOK; man gave weather forecast, and another KVOK Kodiak ID. Fair strength in ship electrical noise, fairly consistent signal w/another station under. (NHP 50N 145W) 580 ALASKA, Petersburg, KRSA. 1930 2 Jun. "heard daily on KRSA" ID in buzz after mention of Back to the Bible, fair (NHP 50N 141W) 590 ALASKA, Anchorage, KHAR. 1454 9 Jun. KHAR ID out of the blue upon tune in. Good strength in noise (NHP 52N 145W) 620 ALASKA, Homer, KGTL. 2000 2 Jun. A flea market program poor to fair 1943, "KGTL Homer" ID poor in radar noise at 2000 after country mx (NHP 50N 141W) 650 ALASKA, Anchorage, KENI. 1349 7 Jun. "news radio, this is KENI Anchorage" ID at 1400; the other station trading places with it likely Hawaii; also noted 10 June 1342 (NHP 50N 145W 700 ALASKA, Anchorage, KBYR. 1500 9 Jun. "This is talk radio, AM 7 hundred KBYR Anchorage" ID; good strength, format change from last time heard a year ago. (NHP 52N 145W) 750 ALASKA, Anchorage, KFQD. 2000 3 Jun. KFQD ID at top of hour, fair signal in ship's radar noise (NHP 50N 145W) 770t ALASKA, Valdez, KCHU. 1358 9 Jun. NPR mentions, then NPR news // 670 (NHP 52N 145W) 890 ALASKA, Homer, KBBI. 2059 2 Jun. "PRI" mention after what sounded like BBC programming; ID ("KBBI 8-90 Homer" ) on hour by woman followed by wx for Homer and marine forecasts (NHP 50N 141W) 930 ALASKA, Ketchikan, KTKN. 1923 2 Jun. "Ketchikan's news and information station AM-930 KTKN" ID by woman after light pop music, fair (NHP 50N 141W) 1140 ALASKA, Soldotna, KSLD. 1529 10 Jun. "Top of the World... rocking Kenai, this is KSLD" Female announcer between slabs of rock music, fair becoming poor strength (NHP 53N 141W) 1230 ALASKA, Sitka, KIFW. 1743 2 Jun. "you're at work AM 12-30 KIFW", fine signal in broad daylight. This one puts one a good signal into the Pacific (NHP 50N 141W) (Nick Hall-Patch on CCGS John P. Tully at various points in the northeast Pacific Ocean using 60' horizontal wire, matching transformer and Drake R8 driven by laptop, IRCA Soft DX Monitor via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. 1638 tentative, Sydney, 2ME. 1316 9 Jun. Arabic sounding talk, poor-fair (NHP 52N 145W) 1683.24, Sydney. 1318 9 Jun. Ethnic vocal mx, poor; also noted 3 June at this time, along with weak audio 1665, 1638, 1629, 1620, 1611. (NHP 52N 145W) 1701.17, Brisbane, R. 1701. 1152 14 Jun. Rather murky talk by woman, though fair strength, didn't seem EE. Definite Middle Eastern singing followed. Another coastal inlet surprise. (NHP-Rivers Inlet) (Nick Hall-Patch on CCGS John P. Tully at various points in the northeast Pacific Ocean using 60' horizontal wire, matching transformer and Drake R8 driven by laptop. IRCA soft DX Monitor via DXLD, excerpting only the Oz x-banders) ** AUSTRALIA. I was interviewed last night by Roger Broadbent of Radio Australia for this weekend's "Feedback" program about this very subject [DRM]. The program airs 2105 Fri, 0605 Sat and 0305 Sun (all days and times UT). I asked to be introduced as a writer on international broadcasting and shortwave programming for Monitoring Times magazine here in the States (to try and give the mag some worldwide publicity |g|). Feel free to pass this info on to anyone you think might be interested (John Figliozzi, NY, June 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRIA. Alo amigos, Recebi uma correspondência realmente entristecedora da Rádio Austria Internacional, confirmando uma notícia já a muito veinculada aqui na lista, mas que sentimos a dureza da realidade quando temos um contato de maior proximidade. Apresento em seguida a mencionada correspondência: ********************************************************************** Estimado Adalberto, Le agradecemos la gentileza de escribirnos enviando el informe de recepition y el interés que ha mostrado por los programas de Radio Austria Internacional. Le enviamos con la presente uno de los últimos QSL y así nos vamos despidiendo. Esperamos que nos siga acompaãndo hasta el final de las emisiones en español el 30 de junio próximo. Com saluda cordialmente, Departamento de Correspondencia Rádio Austria Internacional, Vanesa Suvalski ********************************************************************** Na minha opinião, quando chegamos a um determinado tempo de nossa vida, devemos comessar a nos preparar para irmos perdendo os apegos materiais que nos fixam a esta vida. Acredito que quanto mais perdemos, estaremos em melhores condições de fazermos esta passagem, pois não teremos quase nada a que nos agarrar nesta vida material. Porém vejo na prática uma realidade muito diferente do comportamento racional que temos... perder é algo muito difícil... é quase inaceitável. Não pretendo nem fazer o informe da confirmação recebida, pois acho que este QSL representa muita tristeza. É só isso que posso falar sobre este episódio. Um abraço a todos, (Adalberto, Barbacena- MG, PY4WTH via Cumbre DX via DXLD) Estimados colegas y amigos: Aquí podrán leer, meditar y publicar la angustiosa despedida de MANUEL ALETRINO, Jefe de Redacción de Radio Austria Internacional en Español, remitida personalmente por Vanesa Suvalski, personal de ORF. Otro adios, otra emisora que deja un hueco en nuestro dial... Rubén Guillermo Margenet Viena, junio de 2003 Estimados oyentes de Radio Austria Internacional, queridos amigos: Pocos días antes de que se reestructure esta emisora, lo que implica la desaparición de programas en español y francés, quiero despedirme yo personalmente de todos vosotros. Todo en la vida cambia, instituciones vienen y se van, personas nacen y fallecen. Esta vez le ha tocado a una institución que para muchos, oyentes y redactores, es algo que va mucho más allá de ser una mera entidad de radio. Ha sido para nosotros y para muchos de ustedes oyentes casi como un asunto de familia. Y despedirse es "morir un poco", dicen los franceses. Yo comencé a trabajar en ROI en 1970 - soy, por tanto, el más veterano de los que trabajamos en el departamento de español. Lo que no es ningún mérito, más bien señal de cuánto me ha gustado siempre este medio y este trabajo. Y ahora me toca cerrar las puertas y apagar las luces. Queríamos hacer un programa informativo y entretenido. Me he dado cuenta, y quién no lo supondría, de que los programas de entretenimiento - Buzón y Música en Austria - han sido los programas mejor acogidos. "El mensaje se presenta con jarabe", se dice en algún país de Oriente Próximo, y espero que esta mezcla haya gustado. Os agradezco la gran simpatía que nos habéis deparado en varias generaciones de audiencia: ya nos escuchan nietos de nuestros primeros oyentes en los años ´70. A partir del 1 de julio de 2003 deja de existir este departamento. Yo seguiré hasta haber hecho las últimas "diligencias". Ya no contaremos con un servicio de oyentes. Las cartas que lleguen no podrán ser respondidas sino en medida muy limitada. Sin vuestra correspondencia, una emisora de onda corta es como un pez en tierra firme: no puede respirar. Gracias a todos por vuestro cariño y vuestros comentarios, en fin, por todo. No olvidaremos tampoco vuestro apoyo en los últimos trances de nuestra lucha por sobrevivir. En resumen, y como despedida, ¡HASTA SIEMPRE! Os abrazo. Manuel Aletrino Jefe de redacción Radio Austria Internacional en Español (via Ruben Guillermo Margent, Argentine, June 20, DXLD) I wonder if the English staff are also saying such goodbyes to listeners? (gh, DXLD) ** BAHAMAS. Glenn, I have just returned from Nassau in The Bahamas. A new station started broadcasting this month, JOYFM. It is on 101.9, and broadcasts from Nassau. It is intended to cover the island of New providence, where Nassau is located. It is a gospel/inspirational station. Naturally, reception was very good in Nassau (Gerwyn Roberts, Wales, June 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOLIVIA. 6155, R. Fides, 0105-0130, 6/19, Spanish. OM with fútbol match, "Goal" at 0119, several quick mentions of "Coca-Cola" throughout, leads me to believe they are sponsors? "Jingle" ID at 0124, fair signal with QRM splatter until wiped out by co-channel RTE Overseas s/on at 0130 (Scott R. Barbour, Jr., Intervale, NH, Sangean ATS 818, RF Systems MLB-1, RS Longwire w/ RBA balun, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** BOTSWANA. Hi Joe, try this email address: rbeng@info.bw or Rbeng@info.bw You may be able to get some info from the Botswana Telecom web site http://www.bta.org.bw 73 (Sean, G4UCJ Gilbert, hard- core-dx via DXLD) ** CANADA. Re RCI Report: Yeah, right, we've heard that one before, as RCI gets cut even beyond the bone, and is left with the choice of filling time with domestic CBC programs or becoming the propaganda arm of Canada's version of the Ministry of Truth. 73 (Mike Brooker, Ont., hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. Caracol 1140 captada en 5958.56 kHz, a las 0944 UT, con noticias. 19/06 (Adán González Catia, La Mar, VENEZUELA, June 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CONGO DR. BUNIA REBELS RESTRUCTURE RADIO, NEW RADIO TO START OPERATING | Excerpt from report by Congolese radio from Bunia on 19 June The national press and information secretary, HE Mathieu Amboko Bebedu [phonetic], yesterday, Wednesday 18 June 2003, presided over an important meeting - as previously planned - for managers of local radio stations and RTNC [National Congolese Television and Radio] journalists present in Bunia. The meeting was first about making an inventory of fixtures in these stations after the deliberate destruction by evil forces. It is interesting to indicate the birth of a new radio station at Katoto called "Radio reveil des paysans", which will be officially inaugurated at the end of this month. Secondly, the meeting examined the administration of RTNC-Bunia which is characterized by the absence of several journalists. The media professionals were briefed on the UPC-RP's [Union of Congolese Patriots for Peace and Reconciliation] policies, before being informed about the restructuring of the RTNC, which was carried out by the national information and press secretary [Passage omitted] Source: Radio Candip, Bunia, in French 0500 gmt 19 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** CUBA. Hola Glenn, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA. -He captado a Radio Rebelde hoy 19/06, a las 0847 UT, en la frecuencia de 15074.97 kHz. Transmitía salsa y nueva trova cubana en el marco del espacio "A Esta Hora". Una locutora daba a conocer la programación televisiva del día y el tema de La Mesa Redonda: "Los Rosemberg". Despedida del espacio, a las 0857. SINPO 35322. Fe de erratas: la poderosa estación en los 15075 kHz, a partir de las 0202 UT, es All India Radio. Nada que ver con el mundo árabe. Nota: hay algo que me llamó la atención de Música Beat, la extraña emisora de FM en 19 metros. En casi media hora de escucha, no transmitió ni un solo comercial. Si consideramos que las estaciones, por lo general, hacen cortes comerciales cada 15 minutos, el caso de 96.7 MHz, Música Beat, es muy extraño. ¿Será una estación cubana? 73's y buen DX (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, June 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Adan, En realidad, 96.7 es la frecuencia de R. Rebelde en La Habana -- --- entonces todas las captaciones en 15075v deben tratarse de la misma... ¿La sintoniza en 11655 también, alrededor de 1000-1300, como nos informa José Elías? 73, (Glenn to Adán via DXLD) ** CUBA. Hoy fué inaugurada una nueva emisora cubana en la provincia de Las Tunas, la misma lleva el nombre de: Radio Manatí. La información fué transmitida en el programa: Haciendo Radio que se transmite a traves de Radio Rebelde. Hay que averiguar la frecuencia. Mientras en Radio Rebelde anuncian a Radio Manatí como la nueva emisora inaugurada el dia de hoy en Las Tunas, en Radio Reloj informan que se llama: La Voz del Faro. Atte: (José Elías, Venezuela, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. CUBA'S CASTRO APPARENT VICTIM OF RADIO PRANK By Frances Kerry MIAMI (Reuters) - Cuban President Fidel Castro or someone sounding very much like him fell for a trap laid by Miami radio pranksters on Tuesday, thinking he was talking on the phone to Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez and abusing the callers when he realized he was being duped. The radio station, Spanish-language station El Zol 95.7, delightedly and repeatedly broadcast the recording from its popular program "El Vacilón de la Mañana" (Morning Joker) in a city that is home to many anti-Castro exiles. There was no immediate way of telling whether it really was Castro on the line, but to Spanish speakers familiar with the Cuban leader's well-known voice it seemed to be him. There was no immediate reaction from government officials in Havana. The Vacilón hosts, Enrique Santos and Joe Ferrero, used the same technique they used in January to catch Chávez on the program, when they cobbled together real phrases spoken by Castro to make the Venezuelan leader think he was talking to his Cuban ally. This time, they used phrases spoken in a speech by Chávez. A presenter posing as a Chávez aide wound his way through a series of Cuban official switchboards -- receptive because Chávez is a strong Castro admirer -- with a story that Chávez needed to speak to Castro because he had lost a suitcase with sensitive documents on a recent trip both leaders made to Argentina. Finally, Castro came on the line and listened to the story of the suitcase. The Chávez "aide" asked Castro if he agreed to help by getting his security detail hunt down the suitcase and the Cuban leader said, "I absolutely agree." "Do you agree with the shit on the island (Cuba), killer?" the Chávez "aide" asked, quickly adding, "You fell for it" and announcing he was on the Miami radio program. "What did I fall for, you shit?" said Castro. "What did I fall for, bastard?," he said. He added a few more words of strong abuse before hanging up, as whoops of joy erupted at the Miami end of the call. 06/18/03 08:15 ET (AOL Canada news via Fred Waterer, DXLD) WXDJ/MIAMI MORNING HOSTS PRANK-CALL FIDEL CASTRO Miami DJs claim to have fooled Castro in phone call By RACHEL LA CORTE, The Associated Press, 6/18/03 6:41 PM MIAMI (AP) -- Two radio show hosts who duped Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez into believing he was speaking by phone with Cuban President Fidel Castro now claim to have similarly tricked Castro. A recording provided by the Cuban-American radio announcers has a man they say is Castro responding for about four minutes Tuesday to snippets of a tape recording of Chávez, a Castro friend. He catches on to the prank after he is called an assassin and the conversation disintegrates into him denouncing the caller with a stream of obscenities. The call was played on Miami's WXDJ-FM on Tuesday; disc jockeys Joe Ferrero and Enrique Santos tricked Chávez in January. "This was a big, big fish that we were trying to get," Ferrero said. "Castro really has his people well-trained to avoid these kind of situations, but we were able to persuade all these people." In Havana, Cuban officials who did not want to be identified said Wednesday they did not know about the prank and could not comment. Venezuelan Embassy spokesman Andrés Izarra said he hadn't heard the recording and couldn't confirm whether the DJs actually got through to Castro. Regardless, "it's another prank by these people who are very irresponsible and unethical," he said. "We totally reject these types of jokes." (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) Joe Ferrero and Enrique Santos, hosts of WXDJ's El Vacilón de la Mañana, gained international notoriety in January for successfully conducting a phony phone call between Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez and what were actually recorded, random sentences from Cuban President Fidel Castro taken from an earlier conference with Mexican President Vicente Fox. This morning after their show, Ferrero and Santos called the Cuban presidential palace from a WXDJ production studio, and Ferrero posed as a Venezuelan military leader named "Lt. Camille." After 25 minutes, the duo reached Castro — who stayed on the line for several minutes chatting with what was actually Chávez's voice recorded from the duo's January stunt. "We can't believe it ourselves," Santos tells R&R. "We never thought we would be able to top when we prank-called Hugo Chávez." After several minutes, Ferrero and Santos ran out of phrases from Chávez and explained to Castro that there were problems with the phone line. Then, Santos asked Castro, "Are you happy with the crap you've done in Cuba?" A stunned Castro was then told that he was on the air and that all of Miami was listening to him. Clearly insulted after being repeatedly told that he'd been had, Castro called Santos a "faggot" and a "whore" and cursed at him by saying "shit on your mother" before abruptly hanging up. WXDJ will air the bit, which has already become the talk of Miami, at 5 pm today. The station also plans to air the bit on an hourly basis tomorrow (via Brock Whaley June 17,2002, DXLD) MIAMI RADIO DJS HOAX CASTRO HAHAHAHA! And you can hear it here: http://boss.streamos.com/wmedia/lamusica/fidel.wax Enjoy... (Mike Westfall, NM, NRC-AM via DXLD) 12 minutes; you may want to skip ahead to the last couple (gh) ** EGYPT. Glenn, 17775, Radio Cairo, June 20, 1400-1430+, Noted Interval signal at 1358 followed by quick ID at 1400 and start of programming, all in Arabic. Signal mixing with another Middle Eastern Station, possibly Tashkent, but not sure. Radio Cairo was at a fair level. Radio Cairo not listed in any of my references on this freq at this time (Bolland, Chuck, Clewiston, Florida, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hi Chuck, try page 174 of the new Shortwave Guide, where you will find Radio Cairo at that time on 17775 kHz. 73 (Sean (G4UCJ) D. Gilbert Editor: Shortwave Guide, hard-core-dx via DXLD) See PUBLICATIONS ** EL SALVADOR. I just picked up from my library: Rebel Radio; the story of El Salvador's Radio Venceremos, by José Ignacio López Vigil, 1991 It seems to cover the years 1979 to the early 1980s or so; and at a glance, it appears to have broadcast somewhere in the 1540 to 1580 range [maybe, but it was on SW around 7 MHz, and I remember it well - -- gh]. The book seems rather stridently written, so we will see how far into it I get . . . Anyone know anything else about this station? PS: it has a good review by (well-known DXer?) Noam Chomsky on the cover: "A tale of almost incredible courage and ingenuity...", an odd phrase for a linguist to use (Eric Floden, Vancouver BC, NRC-AM via DXLD) I work with several people who were in Salvadoran radio in the late 70's when this station started. In general, the rebel or guerrilla movement was financed and advised by Nicaraguan Sandinistas or Cubans. As the book says, the station was "portable" and moved around to avoid detection and the equipment was carried on donkeys. While that sounds quaint, one of my friends and associates was working at YSHH in Santa Ana when some of the same guerrillas broke in, shot him in the chest and took over the station; he left the country after his recovery... nearly half his family, none of whom were military or political, were killed by the rebels. Another friend was telling me his story just yesterday. He worked at another station in Santa Ana, and was twice attacked while on the air; the second time he was kidnapped with two other staffers and taken to a guerrilla safe house where they played Russian roulette several times on him. Again, he left right after... 2/3 of his direct family was killed in the conflicts, some for simply being on the wrong bus. I worked for a San Salvador FM in the early 80's and once had to wear a Kevlar vest around the station, so frightening was the environment. That should give you an idea why I do not find a station that called for random killing and violence something that is worthy of admiration (David Gleason, CA, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** HAWAII. 620, KIPA, Hilo, 5/19 back on the air // KKON-790 but with very weak signal, even weaker than 500-watt KUAU-1570 and much weaker than the old 1kw KAHU-1060. It's also only audible at night so this must be the Hilo-area tower and not one of the two West Hawaii sites that aired a synchronous signal. Now uses the pompous-sounding slogan "The Voice of Hawaii." (5P-HI) 790, KKON, Kealakekua-Hilo, 4/21 0801 noted reactivated; noted later in May with overmodulated signal and ABC's "Unforgettable Favorites" AdCon oldies service. Some dead air where local ads were supposed to air, corrected during 5/14 recheck. However, master station KIPA-620's West Hawaii relays are still off; sometimes I hear a KSKK-590/KZOO- 1210 mixing product. (5P-HI) 1060, KHBC, Hilo, 5/7 0240 woman named Ululani airing mix of AdCon from 60's to 90's plus Hawaiian and Hawaiian contemporary music, with no ads. Some mentions of "KHBC AM Stereo." At 0300 time check in Hawaiian/English sponsored by KTA Stores supermarket chain, ID "KHBC Radio, Hilo, Hawaii." So KHBC is now the legal call sign as well as a nickname. Ex-KAHU (5P-HI) (Dale Park, HI, IRCA soft DX Monitor June 21 via DXLD) ** HAWAII. REPORT FROM NICK HALL-PATCH --- [I've] been away at sea, working up to 1000+ km. Offshore. Got to DX. Nothing earth shattering, though many more DU than I expected. May provide a few targets for Graylanders. 73, Nick [see also ALASKA, AUSTRALIA] 590 HAWAII, Honolulu, KSSK. 1349 5 Jun. "30 stories above Waikiki KSSK AM-5-90 and 92-3 KSSK" followed by teletalk. (NHP 50N 145W) 690 HAWAII, Honolulu, KORL. 1359 5 Jun. Hyper R. Disney and AM 690 KORL ID, fair strength in noise (NHP 50N 145W) 900 HAWAII, Kahului, KNUI. 1303 10 Jun. KNUI ID upon tune in, fair signal, followed by Hawaiian mx (NHP 53N 141W) 940 HAWAII, Honolulu, KHCM. 1309 10 Jun. Big KHCM ID between country music selections (NHP 53N 141W) 990 HAWAII, Honolulu, ?. 1248 5 Jun. various "Hawaii's talk radio" IDs... but advertising the "Rich Hamada experience on KHVH 830". What's happening here? good signal; dominant (NHP 50N 145W) 1110 HAWAII, Kihei, KAOI. 1356 5 Jun. Mention of Sandalwood Golf Course, ."aloha" etc. "here in Hawaii" "in our islands" then a KAOI ID. Big bassy signal. (NHP 50N 145W) 1370t HAWAII, Pearl City, KJPN. 1300 11 Jun. Couldn't find ID at top of hour, JJ talk by woman, then by man. This one is about 20Hz high on channel? Also noted 1314 10 June. (NHP 53N 136W) 1460 HAWAII, Honolulu, KHRA. 1358 8 Jun. Musical interlude, good strength, followed by Radio Korea ID 1359 (NHP 50N 147W) 1500 HAWAII, Honolulu, KUMU. 1350 11 Jun. Finally, an ID (Music for Memories KUMU AM-fifteen hundred), poorish, and fading down, after lots of laid back mx. Much stronger 1/2 hour before and on other days (NHP 53N 136W) 1540 HAWAII, Honolulu, KREA. 1301 9 Jun. Man w/KK talk of P`yongyangish intensity at fair level voiced over female vocal operatic music followed by "this is KREA Honolulu ....." EE ID (NHP 52N 145W) (Nick Hall-Patch on CCGS John P. Tully at various points in the northeast Pacific Ocean using 60' horizontal wire, matching transformer and Drake R8 driven by laptop, IRCA Soft DX Monitor via DXLD) ** HONG KONG. REPRIMAND OF HONG KONG TALK SHOW HOST DRAWS COMPLAINTS By MARGARET WONG Associated Press Writer APws 06/20 0417 HONG KONG (AP) -- The Broadcast Authority said Friday that reprimands handed recently to a sharp-tongued radio talk show host drew hundreds of complaints from listeners worried Hong Kong's liberties might be endangered. Albert Cheng is well known here for voicing grass-roots gripes and sharp criticisms of government leaders in his popular weekday program, "Teacup in the Storm." The Broadcast Authority censured Cheng last week for failing to "take special care in the use of language" that it said could hurt the reputations of two recent guest speakers -- a top Hospital Authority official and a senior housing department official, whom he described as a "dog" -- a term Cheng uses often. The authority, which is in theory independent but whose head is appointed by Hong Kong's top political leader, Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa, said it acted after receiving 157 complaints against Cheng. But the reprimand drew even more complaints -- 563 so far, Broadcast Authority spokeswoman Mandy Au Yeung said Friday. Au Yeung said the authority planned to open more phone lines to handle the flood of complaints, which it will "take note" of, although it has no mechanism to do anything about them, she said. The fracas comes at a time of heightened sensitivities in this city of 6.8 million. The local legislature is debating anti-subversion legislation that critics fear could abridge civil liberties guaranteed to Hong Kong when Britain handed it back to China in 1997. The recent SARS outbreak and mounting unemployment have added to the anxieties. Some fear that independent Commercial Radio, which broadcasts Cheng's show,might lose its operating license when it expires next year. But Hong Kong's commerce secretary, Henry Tang, said the reprimands had nothing to do with licensing decisions. "The issue of renewing Commercial Radio's license is a very serious matter and we will not let one individual complaint influence such a serious matter," Tang said. Commercial Radio said it had no immediate comment. Saying he believed the reprimands signaled a crackdown on press freedoms, Cheng urged the broadcasting watchdog to be "transparent, fair and just." "What it should protect is the rights of the minority rather than the top officials," he said. Cheng is accustomed to controversy: Five years ago he was severely wounded when two assailants chopped him with meat cleavers outside the radio station in an attack he says was provoked by his outspokenness. But for now, he's had enough. Cheng said he's taking a holiday while he decides whether to stay on the job or retire (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** IRAN. 9910, Voice of David via VIRI. My letter to their address in Lebanon was returned as Post Office Box is closed (P.O. Box 113-718 Beirut, Lebanon) (Edward Kusalik-CANADA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. CLANDESTINE (Iranian) 7470 Radio Barabari (Forward): My report to their Vancouver address was returned back to me with written notice as 'wrong box' and 'Please let Post Office Clerk know if this name belongs to your box' Obviously, some one at the Post Office was doing some detective work. The address used was P.O. Box 47040 Vancouver, British Columbia, V6G 3E1 (Edward Kusalik-CANADA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** IRAQ. IRAQI JOURNALISTS MAKE THEIR POINT WITH SHORT-LIVED STRIKE FOR BETTER PAY --- By Sandra Jontz, Stars and Stripes, June 12, 2003 http://www.estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=15394&archive=true BAGHDAD, Iraq - Roughly 300 Iraqi journalists, who have worked for 35 days with no pay, went on strike Wednesday, getting their first taste of new-found democracy in Iraq and the negotiations process with the Department of Defense. "I'm happy to see this happen, it's a sign of democracy and though the show must go on, people have their rights," said Ahmad Al-Rilkaby, who heads up the newly formed Iraqi Media Network. "This is the first strike of the Iraqi media," he beamed. The strike was short-lived after Defense Department officials and a representative from DOD contractor SAIC met behind closed doors with a select few Media Network representatives to hash out details of the journalists' demands, which included a building of their own to work out of, overtime pay and incentive pay. One demand was met, and after promises that payment was coming Saturday, the journalists, some begrudgingly, returned to covering the news. "They have a very legitimate grievance," said Bob Reilly, the DOD's senior adviser to Iraq's former Ministry of Information, which is being reorganized by the U.S. government. "They've worked for no pay and we're addressing that as quickly as possible." The journalists, considered civil servants for the time being, will be paid on a salary scale based on job descriptions and years of service, Reilly said. When rumor got out that all journalists would be paid 100,000 Iraqi dinars, or roughly $70 a month regardless of experience, shouting matches exploded in the halls of the Convention Center in downtown Baghdad. Al-Rilkaby repeatedly quieted the crowd, not once raising his voice to do it. Though suffering from a headache, and being pulled in many directions, he found the day's events exhilarating. It's a dream come true, he said. In 1969, his parents were one of the first to oppose Saddam Hussein's climb to the top of the Baath Party and Iraq's helm, and fled the nation instead of being killed, he said. Al-Rilkaby, born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, 33 years ago, inherited that combative spirit. For the past five years, he has broadcast from London news about his homeland and the reigning government on Radio Free Iraq, a station picked up in Iraq on short- and medium-wave radio. To listen to it in Iraq was suicide, but people did it anyway, he said. He became a celebrity. "When I arrived here and I would introduce myself on the streets, people knew my name," he said. "They'd say they heard my radio broadcast and tell me about programs that I now don't even remember. It was amazing." He arrived in Baghdad two days after the April 9 fall of the regime, and immediately went to work setting up a free press. But he's constantly looking over his shoulder. There's a bounty on his head. "Some members of the Baath Party are irritated with me, for obvious reasons, and they'd like to see me gone," he said. Some rumors say he already is. "They say that I am dead and that my tongue was cut out," he said. He laughs. "Actually, the rumors work to my advantage. And some say that I am old, bald, with a white mustache. But these rumors help protect me." (estripes.com Jun 12, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) STRIKE THREATENED AT IRAQI MEDIA NETWORK Excerpted from: US Launches New Hunt for Suspected Saddam Loyalists Reuters, June 15, 2003 http://www.sabcnews.com/world/north_america/0,1009,60544,00.html In Baghdad, scores of media employees held a protest over wages and threatened a strike that would put two United States-backed radio stations and a television channel off the air. The employees of the Iraqi Media Network, set up by the United States-led administration after the fall of Saddam, said they had yet to be paid. "We are working 12 hours a day and we have received nothing but promises," said Eman Sadaq, a presenter (Reuters Jun 15, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) LOUDSPEAKERS SUBSTITUTE FOR PROTESTING IRAQI JOURNALISTS Excerpted from: Latest Operation Out to Rid Iraq of Larger Weaponry By Sandra Jontz, Stars and Stripes, June 16, 2003 http://www.estripes.com/article.asp?section=104&article=16091 BAGHDAD, Iraq --- U.S. military forces ramped up checkpoints and patrols Sunday as the two-week weapons amnesty period expired. The new operation, dubbed ``Operation Desert Scorpion,`` kicked off at midnight Sunday. Military forces throughout the country are on the hunt for weapons larger than 7.62 mm machine guns, rocket-propelled grenade launchers, grenades and other larger weaponry, officials said. Under U.S. imposed rules, Iraqis are permitted to keep rifles, such as the popular AK-47s, and handguns for protection, provided those weapons are kept in homes or places of business. The weapons also must be registered with local officials, said Army Sgt. 1st Class Brian Thomas, a V Corps spokesman. Citizens caught carrying weapons in public without the temporary weapons cards will be detained, their weapons confiscated and they will face fines and jail sentences up to a year. If weapons are found in cars, the cars also will be confiscated, Thomas said. The weapons cards are issued to individuals hired in jobs that require them to carry weapons, such as the police force or security details. Between June 1 and Saturday, locals were encouraged to drop the larger weapons at military checkpoints or local Iraqi police stations --- but that call for arms was met with little turnout. While the low turnout was anticipated by coalition forces, it was a disappointment nonetheless, officials said. In the two-week time span, Iraqi citizens turned in 123 pistols, 76 semi-automatic rifles or shotguns, 435 automatic rifles, 46 machine guns, 162 anti-tank weapons --- such as rocket-propelled grenade launchers --- 11 anti-aircraft weapons, and 381 grenades and other explosive devices, according to a news release. With the local Iraqi Media Network journalists on another strike Sunday, U.S. officials depended on loud speakers, interpreters and fliers to get the word out, Thomas said. Soldiers with the 1st Brigade, 1st Armored Division, for example, have increased the percentage of their patrol times searching for weapons, said Maj. Clifford Wheeler, the brigade’s executive officer. But Operation Desert Scorpion is more than a weapons roundup effort, Wheeler said. It includes programs to rebuild the country, delivery of humanitarian aid, and disposal of unexploded ordnance, he said. (estripes.com Jun 16, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) SADDAM LOYALISTS ALLY WITH ISLAMISTS By Paul Martin, The Washington Times [Moony], page 1A June 17, 2003 http://www.washtimes.com/world/20030616-113913-8670r.htm BAGHDAD - A shadowy group of Saddam Hussein loyalists calling itself al Awda, meaning "the Return," is forming an alliance with Islamist militants linked to al Qaeda for a full-scale uprising against the U.S.-led occupation in mid-July. The information comes from leaflets circulating in Baghdad, as well as a series of extended interviews with a former official in Saddam's security services who held the rank of brigadier general. Al Awda is aiming for a spectacular attack and uprising on or about July 17 to mark the anniversary of the Ba'athist revolution in 1968, the former general said. The Islamists have indicated they are willing to join forces to battle the Americans, even though they dislike Saddam and his secular Ba'ath Party ideology. A leaflet by Jaish Mohammed, one of two Islamist groups operating in Iraq, said it was willing to work with the Ba'athists despite Saddam's repression of Islamic fundamentalism. The leaflet, obtained by The Washington Times, makes a direct appeal for former intelligence officers, security personnel, Fedayeen Saddam members, Republican Guard troops and Ba'ath Party members to join forces. "The first act will be spectacular, possibly smashing an oil refinery near Baghdad," said the former general, who has been urged by al Awda to join the leadership of the planned anticoalition front. The former officer said the effort goes well beyond the sporadic shootings in the past three weeks that have left at least 10 Americans dead. Al Awda is well-financed, he said. It uses money stashed away by Saddam and his supporters well before the coalition's invasion, and its funds are enhanced by bank robberies and the removal of huge quantities of cash from the central bank early in the conflict. The former officer, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said he had agreed to join al Awda, though still may avoid full commitment, because "otherwise they'll come tomorrow and throw hand grenades into my house and at my wife and kids." Among al Awda's membership were a considerable number of former Iraqi commandos and well-trained soldiers, who now had no jobs or prospects of employment, the informant said. "The coalition pushed them into the Ba'athists' arms by disbanding the whole army and security services. "That left these men with despair and hatred and so easy pickings for Ba'athists with money and propaganda," he said. He claimed that his own growing contempt for the American occupation led him a week and a half ago to shoot a U.S. solider through the neck using a Russian-made sniper rifle. He said he was the third-best sniper in the armed forces in his younger days and that he believed the American solider died. Less-experienced fighters are being trained in guerrilla-warfare skills and assaults using abandoned buildings and remote locations, the informant said. "At first, they were offering between $500 and $600 to anyone killing an American. Now it's up to 1 million dinars [more than $700]," he told The Times. Copies of a handwritten, signed letter purported to have been composed by Saddam urging an uprising were scattered in several Baghdad neighborhoods yesterday. The two main Sunni Muslim Islamist groups are Jaish Mohammed, or "Mohammed's Army," in the north, which began operating in Jordan even before the war, and Islamic Jihad in the west. Each has similar commitment to the hard-line Wahhabi philosophy, originating in Sa`udi Arabia, that places them within the al Qa`eda sphere. One band from Jaish Mohammed was eliminated by U.S. troops through combined helicopter and land action, killing about 70 in an encampment on the Euphrates River last week. From the camp, soldiers captured handwritten pages from lined notebooks showing diagrams to make bombs and grenades. The papers, seen by The Times, bear the slogan "Either victory or martyrdom." They state that C-4 should be "mixed with RDX, half put into a can of [gasoline], and close it carefully." C-4 and RDX are plastic explosives. For grenades, the instructions say, "Place nails inside to have a bigger explosive effect, and strongly tighten the lid." Other scraps of paper urged fighters to change their names. "Get ready to take action. ... You have to seize the chance to gain intelligence," it advised, and elsewhere added the warning "Beware of traitors and hypocrites." That the Ba'athist al Awda has been wooing the Islamists in recent days is evident from some of the Islamic terminology it is using. It is referring in its underground leaflets to al Awda fighters as mujahideen, a term used for Muslim rebels in Afghanistan and in other conflict zones. The al Awda propaganda is venomously anti-Western. "Teach your children to hate all foreigners," and "all foreigners are enemies," said leaflets distributed in Fallujah and other Ba'athist strongholds. The Islamic groups have been spreading an even more vicious form of propaganda. In attempting to demonize the coalition, its adherents have been calling L. Paul Bremer, the chief administrator, "Bremer Hussein" and using the slogan "One dictator goes, another dictator comes." In a recent sermon in a Fallujah mosque that was packed with adherents and broadcast by loudspeakers to many more outside, a preacher demanded, "Fight the Americans. Don't deal with them. Don't shake hands with them. They are dirty." The preacher added that Mr. Bremer was encouraging Jews to return and reclaim their houses, and any Arab businessman helping this process should be killed. In Baghdad yesterday, a 12-year-old schoolboy asked his father if all Americans - as he had been told - were carriers of AIDS. He said adults had told him this was evident from blood seemingly coming out of the ear of a female U.S. soldier who had visited the school. A Western reporter saw a recent gathering at which men in Western garb sat in rows of white plastic chairs alongside others in white robes - another apparent sign that Ba'athists and Islamists were holding joint meetings. The reporter was unable to hear what was said at the meeting, which took place in the yard of a home near Baghdad airport. Both parties are portraying the uprising as a chance to regain the wealth of the country, its oil fields, from the American invaders. They also are exploiting widespread resentment at U.S. forces' raids on private homes, where doors have been kicked in and women's rooms entered, and this week's stringent stop-and-search policy at roadblocks. Few weapons have been found in these operations, locals say. So far, the uprising plans have been confined to Sunni Muslims and Ba'athist sympathizers. "If they can persuade the Shi'ite Muslims to join in, the Americans will not be able to survive two months," said the former general. The Shi'ites, who make up about 60 percent of the Iraqi population and have been treated the worst of all segments under the old regime, remain on the sidelines, he said. "They are also resentful, but their masters have told them to wait - so far," the former general said (Washington Times [Moony], Jun 17, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) See also QATAR ** ISRAEL. From Ha`aretz --- It mentions that they're cutting about 500 employees from all divisions, "Towards September" -- I don't know if that's a timeframe to look out for regarding Shortwave service... http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=305349&contrassID=1&subContrassID=4&sbSubContrassID=0&listSrc=Y Last Update: 18/06/2003 13:47 I IBA PULLS PLUG ON GOOD MORNING ISRAEL DUE TO BUDGET CUTS By Ronny Koren-Dinar The Israel Broadcasting Authority is pulling the plug on Good Morning Israel because of budget constraints. The dawn news show, from 6:45 to 8:00, hosted by veteran anchors Dalia Mazor, Daniel Pe'er and various others, has been aired for ten years now. Its average rating is 2%, after losing ground by the inauguration of Channel 10's competing morning news show. Instead of Good Morning Israel, Channel 1 will show reruns from the night for another two hours. It may maintain an emergency news staff, and show news flashes when events warrant it. The IBA management has tried twice before to ditch Good Morning Israel, back in the days of general manager Uri Porat. Sources at the authority say the show's budget in 2002 was NIS 10 million, but this year it got only NIS 6 million. IBA spokesperson Oren Helman commented that Good Morning Israel, like many other shows, is taking a two-month summer recess, partly in order to save money. The treasury's economic program has reduced the IBA's budget by NIS 200 million a year. Toward September, the IBA will be firing about 500 people from all its divisions. It plans to shut down Channel 33, and all the unprofitable Voice of Israel stations. That actually means all its stations other than Reshet Gimmel and 88FM. The list of doomed radio stations include the Kol Hamusika of classical music, Reshet Aleph, Reshet Heh of shortwave broadcasts to overseas, Radio Olim for immigrants and others. The Arabic station will merge with the Middle East channel (via Doni Rosenzweig, June 18, DXLD) ** ISRAEL. PM SAVES IMMIGRANT RADIO FROM CLOSURE By Lily Galili http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=307165&contrassID=2&subContrassID=1&sbSubContrassID=0&listSrc=Y [REKA is the Immigrants network. It broadcasts Amharic (the language that the Ethiopians speak) and Russian. Now if only Sharon would step in on the shortwave! D.R.] Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has personally intervened to try to stop the closure of Reka Radio - Israel Radio's Immigrant Absorption Channel. A statement from his office yesterday said, "the prime minister believes that Reka is a vital, most accessible, and sometimes the only tool for giving up-to-date and dependable information to the million Russian speakers living in Israel." Sharon has succeeded where many others before him failed and Reka will continue to broadcast. Israel Broadcasting Authority chief Yosef Barel wanted to close the channel, which transmits 10 hours a day in Russian and two hours in Amharic, as part of the IBA recovery plan. The decision angered the Russian community. "Immigrants aren't in fashion now," said one community member cynically. Many feel that since the last elections when Yisrael b'Aliyah got just two Knesset seats, the immigrant community has lost not just its political power, but its power as a pressure group. "I hear this from all the immigrant groups who have recently lost their power and status," said one active member of the Russian- speaking community. This sudden impotence was felt by ministers Natan Sharansky and Avigdor Lieberman, who recently met Barel to change his mind about Reka. The meeting with Lieberman was particularly strained - the minister's threat to "punish" the IBA in the Knesset Finance Committee failed to move Barel. Barel stood firm in his meeting with Sharansky, who is seeking to pass legislation to protect the channel from future attempts to close it. These high-ranking petitioners with a 60 percent rating share in the community all failed to convince Barel. But Barel failed to take account of a political campaign, led by Sharon himself, to stop the voters of the Russian community from straying and ensure their firm support for the Likud for years to come. Industry and Trade Minister Ehud Olmert, the minister in charge of the IBA, also supports this. He too threatened to veto Barel's plans to close the station. Two days before the IBA board was due to discuss the channel closure, Sharon pulled his weight and halted Reka's closure (via Doni Rosenzweig, June 19, DXLD) ** LESOTHO. 4800, R. Lesotho (Presumed), 2243-2258*, 6/18. Booming signal with Afropops at tunein, 2 OM with banter, laughter, YL joins via telephone, signal suddenly disappears at 2258. Continued listening, pips noted at 2300 followed by OM and YL in Mandarin, just audible. Presumably co-channel CPBS, China. Doesn't Lesotho normally sign-off at 2200? I was surprised to hear them at this hour (Scott R. Barbour, Jr., Intervale, NH, Sangean ATS 818, RF Systems MLB-1, RS Longwire w/ RBA balun, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** MADAGASCAR. Radio Madagascar heard this afternoon (19 June) on new (to me) 7105. Interestingly, it's a USB+carrier transmission. Heard from shortly after 1300 in parallel with 6135.07. During the middle of the day the station is on 6135 and 9688.86, and during the evening is on 3287.6 and 5010, so not sure how 7105 will fit into the pattern. Regards (Chris Greenway, Nairobi, Kenya, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MALTA [non]. FREQUENCY & PROGRAMME SCHEDULE SPRING SUMMER 03 - VOM I queried whether VOM still had a DX or Mailbag programme and this is the reply. It appears they do not - at least nothing is mentioned in their programme schedule. 73 (Dave Kenny, Jun 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ----- Original Message ----- From: "Joanna Scicluna" joanna.scicluna@vomradio.com Sent: Wednesday, June 18, 2003 11:25 AM Subject: FREQ & PROG SCH SPRING SUMMER 03 - VOM Dear Mr. Dave Kenny, Hereunder please find our current Frequency Table and Programme Schedule. As you can see the latter is about to be changed. The new Schedule which comes into force on 01 July 2003 will be duly inserted in our website. Thank you for your kind attention. Kind regards, Joanna Scicluna, F/Managing Director VOM FREQUENCY TABLE 30 MARCH TO 25 OCTOBER 2003 Time in UTC CET Mon to Sat: 6110 kHz SW 0530 - 0600 Arabic 0730-0800 6185 kHz SW 1700 - 1730 Italian 1900-1930 1730 - 1800 English 1930-2000 12060 kHz SW 1900 - 2000 English** 2100-2200 2000 - 2100 Arabic 2200-2300 ** Except on Friday Friday: 12060 kHz SW 1900 - 2100 Arabic 2100-2300 Sunday: 17570 kHz SW 0500 - 0600 Japanese 9605 kHz SW 0700 - 0800 Italian 0900-1000 0800 - 0900 English 1000-1100 0900 - 1000 Maltese 1100-1200 1000 - 1100 French 1200-1300 1100 - 1200 German 1300-1400 12060 kHz SW 1900 - 2000 English 2100-2200 2000 - 2030 French 2200-2230 2030 - 2100 German 2230-2300 VOICE OF THE MEDITERRANEAN PROGRAMME SCHEDULE - WEEKDAYS - April - June 2003 12060 kHz Monday : This week in history - Vincent Zammit Art focus - Louis Lagana' Travelogue - Albert Storace Tuesday : Cultural café - Tony Cassar Darien Insight - Richard Sladden Malta and Beyond - Victor Shields & Donald Arthur Wednesday : Showcase of Malta - Vincent Zammit Cultural notebook - Henry Frendo Malta - Remains of Atlantis - Francis Galea Thursday : VOM Bookshelf - Fr. Norbert Ellul Vincenti Malta's Ways and Music - Joe Izzo Saturday : The world of operetta - Lino Gatt More Malta Memories - Mike Roberts Random reflections - Godwin Scerri 6185 kHz Monday : Italian : Al corrente - Elsa Romei/John Suda Una finestra su Malta - Elsa Romei/John Suda English : Cultural Café - Tony Cassar Darien Bits and pieces/Today in History - Godwin Scerri Tuesday : Italian : Al corrente - Elsa Romei/John Suda Poeti e scrittori maltesi - Elsa Romei/John Suda English : Human dimension - Omar Grech et al Bits and pieces/Today in History - Godwin Scerri Wednesday : Italian : Al corrente - Elsa Romei/John Suda Racconto - Elsa Romei/John Suda English : Insight - Richard Sladden Bits and pieces/Today in History - Godwin Scerri Thursday : Italian : Al corrente - Elsa Romei/John Suda Cucina maltese - Elsa Romei/John Suda English : Contemporary Mediterranean writers - Karsten Xuereb; Bits and Pieces / Today in History- Godwin Scerri Friday : Italian : Al corrente - Elsa Romei/John Suda Ventaglio culturale - Elsa Romei/John Suda English : The wonderful world of opera - Lino Gatt Bits and Pieces / Today in History- Godwin Scerri Saturday : Italian : Al corrente - Elsa Romei/John Suda Malta ieri e oggi - Elsa Romei/John Suda English : Cultural notebook - Henry Frendo Bits and Pieces / Today in History- Godwin Scerri PROGRAMME SCHEDULE - SUNDAYS - April - June 2003 9605 / 12060 kHz Italian - Elsa Romei / John Suda Al corrente - rubrica di attualita' Angeli a Malta Onde radio - rubrica DX per radio amatori Ieri e Oggi Notizie della settimana English - Margaret Agius / Narcy Calamatta A Thinker's thoughtful think The Sovereign Palaces Malta Today Short stories with Maltese background Weekly news update Maltese - Marthese Brincat / Joe Vella Il-Lingwa Maltija Maltin illum Muzicisti Maltin Grajjiet kurrenti Stejjer ta' Charles Clews Ahbarijiet French - Charles Xuereb / Claudine Camilleri / Paul Camilleri Weekly theme [sics listed in English] Special report Tourist attraction News and view on current affairs German - Anette Butterweck --- The contents of this programme range from the 6,000 years of Maltese history to local customs, towns and villages, places of Interest, cultural themes such as art, interviews with interesting people living in Malta, news and useful tips to help visitors to make the most of their holidays here. 17570 kHz Japanese - Mayuko Vassallo Momosaka --- This programme is packed with information about Malta and its People. Events of the month, charming Malta, legends and folklore of Malta, towns and villages of Malta and Gozo, Malta and the European Union, listeners' letters etc., are among the many interesting features presented in the programme (via Dave Kenny, DXLD) ** MONGOLIA. 12085, VOICE OF MONGOLIA, 1013 12 June, AM Female announcer in EE with commentary. Short local Mongolian tune at 1016. Difficult copy of female with monotone voice. Another short tune at 1020 and back to female announcer. Another mx break which is the same tune played each time, at 1022. Talks about China at this time. This is not the same announcer hrd last fall. A change of staff once again. 1028, This is the end of our Program for today', then to freq schedules. Address given. 'Goodbye', then to IS played 3 times and language change at 1030 (Bob Montgomery, PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** NIGERIA. I could be the happiest man on earth today. I just received my first QSL full data cards from Radio Nigeria Enugu, Nigeria. It was for my report of 19th November 2002, on 10 kW 6025 kHz. It was signed by Engr. Nnamadi Louis, deputy Director (ES). My self addressed envelop was returned, but I guess my stamp was used for the reply. This again after almost ten years of faithful listening and numerous reception reports and follow ups. I also remember reporting late last year that I called up the station to complain about those QSL cards, and they promised to look into the issue. Apparently after many months of patience, there is finally good news. Finally I want to know if anybody has a QSL card from Radio Nigeria Enugu, and where should I classify this one. Nigeria or Biafra? (Emmanuel Ezeani, P. O. Box 1633, Sokoto, Sokoto State, Nigeria, June 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) To NASWA it`s Biafra; I should think a non-Biafran Nigerian would hesitate. Another Enugu QSL just reported in DXLD 3-102 and followed up in 3-104, so perhaps they are in a QSLing mood. Hmm, wonder if that`s where Kojo Nnamdi is from, WAMU talkhost (gh, DXLD) ** NIGERIA. 6050, R. Nigeria, Kaduna, 2134-2149*, 6/18, English. YL with news re government, DPR Congo and National Consortium, construction contracts. Drums at 2145, OM with signoff announcements, Pledge to Nigeria, NA? Poor, choppy signal (Scott R. Barbour, Jr., Intervale, NH, Sangean ATS 818, RF Systems MLB-1, RS Longwire w/ RBA balun, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** NORWAY. A discussion in a German web forum indicates that the Norwegian transmission provider Norkring also does some DRM transmissions in connection with the current WARC at Geneve. Many others report the times and frequencies in use from Sveiø; it appears that these details are known amongst the circle of DRM enthusiasts here in Germany. More interesting for me is a comment given today by one of those enthusiasts: He appreciates it that the Norkring test today contained the NRK P3 pop music network instead of "a boring foreign service". (Kai Ludwig, Germany, June 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PAKISTAN. 15065, R. Pakistan. June 16 at 1559(IS)-1616(S/off). SINPO 35433. IS and time pips for 1600, followed by news in English. Commentary at 1610 (Iwao Nagatani, Kobe, Japan Premium via DXLD) ** POLAND [and non]. POLNISCHER RUNDFUNKRAT RUEGT "RADIO MARYJA" WEGEN ANTISEMITISMUS Warschau (dpa) - Der polnische Rundfunkrat hat am Mittwoch den von dem Redemptoristenpater Tadeusz Rydzyk betriebenen Rundfunksender "Radio Maryja" wegen der Verbreitung antisemitischer Stereotype geruegt. Der Sender habe entsprechende Kommentare in Hoerersendungen unerwidert gelassen und durch mangelnde Reaktionen "auf diese Weise falsche Uberzeugungen bestaetigt", hiess es im Bericht ueber die Ergebnisse einer dreiwoechigen Uberpruefung der Programminhalte von "Radio Maryja". Ausserdem wurde den Programmberatern Irrefuehrung der Hoerer vorgeworfen. So sei behauptet worden, Papst Johannes Paul II. habe waehrend einer Audienz "Radio Maryja" sowie den ebenfalls von Rydzyk betriebenen Fernsehsender "Trwam" gesegnet. Recherchen der katholischen Nachrichtenagentur KAI haetten jedoch ergeben, dass dies nicht der Wahrheit entsprach. Die polnische Amtskirche hat sich in den vergangenen Jahren von dem Sender distanziert. Bei der vergangenen Parlamentswahl unterstuetzte "Radio Maryja" die rechtspopulistische "Liga Polnischer Familien" (LPR), die wiederholt mit nationalistischen und antisemitischen Aeusserungen fuer Skandale im polnischen Parlament sorgte. dpa (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** RUSSIA [non]. UKRAINE: Radio Krishna Loka was observed crash- starting at 0103 on 18th June on 7434.2 kHz, which had drifted up to 7436.3 kHz when checked at 0250 (nominal span 0100-0300). Reception only fair to poor, but "Radio Krishna Loka" ID quite clear when heard about 10 minutes into the broadcast - hear this on the Interval Signals Archive website at http://www.intervalsignals.net Regards, (Dave Kernick, June 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** TAIWAN Taipei Radio International (CBS) will change their name to Taiwan Radio International from July 1 (Gaku IWATA, Chiba, Japan Premium via DXLD) All other reports say Radio Taiwan International, but were not originally in English; was this? (gh) An announcement on the 0200 English broadcast on June 20 said that as of July 1, Radio Taipei International will be changing its name to Radio Taiwan International. I'm sure the diplomat types in Chinese Beijing are thrilled with that. ;-) Also, "Instant Noodles" is apparently back on the schedule, now being hosted by Andrew Ryan. "Instant Noodles", for those who didn't hear the previous incarnation (hosted, IIRC, by Shereen Wang) is a program of "news of the weird" from the Asia/Pacific region. Think of RA's "AsiaPacific" not taking itself seriously. (Sorry, John.) Here in the US, RTI can be heard at 0200 and 0300 UTC on 5950 kHz and 9680 kHz. In the northeast, you may also be able to catch the 2200 UT broadcast on 15600 kHz from WYFR in Okeechobee, FL, beamed to Europe, which is a repeat of the features from 0215-0300, although the news is updated (Ted Schuerzinger, June 19, swprograms via DXLD) ** TIBET. 4820, Xizang PBS, Lhasa, 2302-2330, 6/18 Chinese/English. Apparent language lesson with OM and YL in Chinese, lots of repetitive words and phrases. Brief music at 2320 with (presumed) ID by YL with echo effect. YL in EG at 2324 spelling "parrot" and "garden", OM repeats in Chinese. Signal begins to fadedout, gone by 2330. Good at tunein. Logged this one on 5/21, same time and format. WRTH lists CNR 1 relay. 6050, Xizang PBS, Lhasa, 2150-2215, 6/18, Chinese OM and YL with talks noted over co-channel HCJB after Nigeria signoff. Pips and (presumed) ID at 2200, different YL with news, jingles and talk at 2205, HCJB taking over by 2215 (Scott R. Barbour, Jr., Intervale, NH, Sangean ATS 818, RF Systems MLB-1, RS Longwire w/ RBA balun, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** TUNISIA. Hi folks, I hope you're OK. Thank you very much for your valuable DX activity. I wonder if there is any DXer who will visit Tunisia this summer or in the next months. Please, If you'll visit Tunisia, contact me on my personal e-mail. My FREE DXpedition has failed; no one accepted to participate. May be for security reasons. But, be sure that Tunisia is a very peaceful country. So, I'll try to make some single meetings with some DXers who will visit Tunisia, and this to increase DX activity here. Waiting for your answers. 73's from Tunisia (Achraf Chaabane, CRW North Africa Bureau (Tunisia) achraftn@yahoo.com June 19, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** U S A. IBC RADIO NETWORK ANNOUNCES DISCUSSIONS WITH INTERNATIONAL SHORTWAVE STATION SANTA MARIA, Calif. -- (BUSINESS WIRE) -- June 19, 2003 -- International Broadcasting Corporation (OTCBB:IBCS) announced today that it is in talks with Miami-based International shortwave station WRMI. The discussion involves several different topic areas and IBCS will keep the shareholders informed of the specifics as they evolve. Earlier this year, IBC Radio Network and its strategic partner, Lou Gentile's Paranormal Radio Network (LGPRN), began broadcasting limited programming on WRMI. Recent Network Studio Upgrades IBC Radio Network, a division of International Broadcasting Corporation, based in Santa Maria, CA, recently upgraded its technical broadcasting infrastructure. In a complete technical infrastructure merger with Lou Gentile's Paranormal Radio Network (LGPRN), IBC Radio Network now offers several independent FM radio-quality stereo Internet radio feeds customizable to the listener's Internet connection. These upgrades provide the necessary technical foundation for expanded distribution to AM and FM stations and satellite. IBC Radio Network is also proud to announce that it has expanded its studios and production facilities to two locations, one in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and another on Vancouver Island, Canada. The Canadian studio is the first step in establishing an International presence. About WRMI Since 1994, Radio Miami International has operated FCC-licensed shortwave station WRMI -- a commercial international radio station which transmits to listeners throughout the Americas -- from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego -- in English, Spanish and other languages. The WRMI staff has decades of experience in shortwave broadcasting. Jeff White is General Manager of WRMI. He began listening to shortwave radio as a teenager in 1972, and became a shortwave broadcaster in 1977. He has a journalism degree from Northern Illinois University, where he served as News Manager for the public radio station there for several years. Jeff has worked as a freelance journalist and/or audience researcher for a variety of international radio stations, including the BBC, Voice of America, Radio Canada International, Deutsche Welle, Radio Netherlands, Swiss Radio International, National Public Radio and many others. He co-founded shortwave stations Radio Earth and Radio Discovery, as well as WRMI (of which he is a co-owner). Mr. White currently serves as President of the National Association of Shortwave Broadcasters (NASB). About International Broadcasting Corporation International Broadcasting Corporation is a developmental stage company that endeavors to develop successful publishing, media, and broadcasting related businesses and ventures. The Company is focused on developing and providing online information and entertainment content through three units: IBC Radio Network http://www.ibcradio.com IBC News Network http://www.ibcnn.com and IBC Entertainment Group http://www.cultmoviesonline.com For more information about IBCS and all of the different services, visit the corporate website at http://www.IBCmedia.com. Statements in this press release other than statements of historical fact are "forward-looking statements." Such statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties including the demand for the Company's services, litigation, labor market, and other risk factors identified from time to time in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission that could cause actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements represent the Company's judgment as of the date of this release. The Company disclaims, however, any intent or obligation to update these forward-looking statements. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Contact: International Broadcasting Corporation Daryn P. Fleming, 805/938-5573 invest@ibcmedia.com (IBCS June 19 via DXLD) I guess there is some arcane legal reason why IBC has to beat around the bush. Presumably the ``discussions`` are about buying cut-rate WRMI at last. What else could this be about? (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. KCUV/1510 and KNRC/1150 are still running \\. But as they prepare to take KCUV dark, I noticed that at approximately :12 and :42 after the hour KCUV is inserting an amusing announcement right over the top of the program audio. It sounds like one of those irritating telephone operator reject messages starting with 3 rude tones. Then the operator says "The radio frequency you have tuned to has changed. The new frequency is AM eleven-fifty. Lock eleven-fifty into your AM dial to continue listening to KNRC and to avoid hearing this interruption again. Hear both sides talk. AM eleven-fifty, KNRC." (Patrick Griffith, N0NNK CBT CBNT, June 18, Westminster, CO, USA, NRC- AM via DXLD) ** VENEZUELA. Radio Amazonas, hoy 19/06, con señal bastante buena a las 0938 UT, en los 4939.69 kHz. Modulación distorsionada. Emitía música llanera. SINPO 45443 (Adán González Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, June 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. 1386 kHz: On 19 Jun at 1940 on 1386 I noted a station with instrumental music, good old tunes like "Twistin' Patricia" "Bésame Mucho" "Never on Sunday" etc. Non-stop, no announcements at the TOH 2000. During these disturbed conditions was overriding VOR in English on this channel almost completely. I have heard this station also some other days. Haven't been much on MW lately. Is there a game Lithuania vs. VOR going on here? As writing this at 2020 music goes on (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hello Jari and others, we (Ronny Forslund and Jan Edh) heard the same station with the same music twice some time ago (May 29th, June 3rd) at about 2100 and 2000 UT respectively. Both times there were extremely bad conditions, leaving the MW-band almost empty for e.g. German stations, leaving Italians and stations from Southwest Europe/Near East almost alone. We had the same thoughts about possible Lithuania (It was not Kaliningrad), but there were no identifications or other announcements. Best regards from (Jan Edh, Hudiksvall, Sweden, DX-ing from Freriksfors, ibid.) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ 2003 SHORTWAVE GUIDE A few weeks ago WRTH Publications issued their 2003 Shortwave Guide with A03 schedules. I have made an evaluation of it which you can read in my review on http://www.dswci.org/news/0306/shortwaveguide2003.html . . .during June 07-14, 2003, I again randomly selected 100 broadcasts in all SW bands and compared them with the details published in the SWG 2. Result: 95 of these broadcasts had all essential details! An increase in accuracy from 68% in WRTH 2003 to 95% in SWG 2 is a fantastic improvement and achievement! You cannot find a more correct Shortwave Handbook right now in the world! . . . Best 73, (Anker Petersen, Denmark, DX LISTENING DIGEST) POWERLINE COMMUNICATIONS ++++++++++++++++++++++++ UNDERSTANDING THE FCC'S BROADBAND OVER POWER LINE (BPL) NOTICE OF INQUIRY --- By Rick Lindquist, N1RL, ARRL Senior News Editor, June 19, 2003 Broadband Over Power Line (BPL) technology poses significant interference potential to HF and low-VHF spectrum use between 2 and 80 MHz. [Caption] Power lines used as conductors for RF signals at HF and low band VHF create the potential for interference from radiated emissions. The BPL NOI In a Nutshell On May 23, 2003, the FCC published a Notice of Inquiry (NOI) in ET Docket 03-104 asking how it should regulate the delivery of broadband services to homes and businesses using electrical wiring to conduct high-speed digital signals. The FCC calls this technology "Broadband over Power Line" (BPL)--a technology also known as Power Line Carrier or PLC. This article briefly explains the NOI and what amateurs should know so they can make informed comments to the FCC. BPL uses building and/or overhead power lines to conduct HF and VHF digital signals to network computers. There are a number of ways people can obtain broadband services--from cable modem to digital subscriber line (DSL) to satellite. The FCC views BPL as a competitive Internet access point, and the utilities view the technology as a means to use existing infrastructure to generate additional revenue from something other than power generation and distribution. The NOI asks how BPL should be regulated and states that the FCC wants to remove regulatory hurdles to its deployment. Present rules already permit BPL right now at significant power levels. Utilities would prefer that the FCC authorize even higher power levels. As of mid-June, nearly 1000 comments already had been filed. It is worth your time to become informed by reading the NOI itself and this article and to make your views known to the FCC. Amateurs should outline the important uses they make of Amateur Radio and the impact strong interference from BPL might have at HF and low-VHF amateur frequencies. Electric utility companies will operate many, if not most, BPL systems. ARRL members who have had experience dealing with power line interference and utilities' responses to complaints can describe those experiences in their comments to the Commission. Information on how to file comments is at the end of this article. An ARRL white paper, "Calculated Impact of PLC on Stations Operating in the Amateur Radio Service." provides a more detailed presentation on the technical aspects of this issue. The ARRL's Broadband Over Power Line resource page contains links to worldwide studies and resources to help Amateur Radio with BPL issues. How will the radiation from BPL wiring affect other systems, such as telephone or cable TV? What to Tell the FCC Amateurs filing comments to the FCC NOI might want to consider including words on these topics and points as part of their comments to the FCC: Amateur Radio is a valuable resource that must be protected. Describe the use(s) you make of Amateur Radio, especially those with a public service or emergency communication aspect. The present FCC Part 15 limits for this technology already can result in substantial interference potential to amateur frequencies. BPL systems that radiate on wide swaths of spectrum and that occupy entire neighborhoods have greater interference potential than localized systems, such as switching power supplies or electric motors. The FCC has promised to protect licensed users of the spectrum. We must hold them to that promise. A BPL Tutorial The BPL industry claims that the infrastructure to accommodate this technology already is in place. In many field trial areas, however, the BPL purveyors have had to run optical fiber cable throughout the service area to serve as the Internet backbone for the few hundred trial subscribers. Other BPL systems use overhead medium-voltage wiring, with digital "repeaters" installed every 2000 feet or so along the way. This widely spaced, unshielded wiring radiates a strong BPL signal to nearby areas. Still other BPL systems use IEEE 802.11- protocol wireless equipment to make the connection to homes and businesses. A number of BPL system types are in use or in development. Each employs different techniques and architecture, but all are carrier- current systems--a term describing systems that intentionally conduct signals over electrical wiring or power lines. There are two major categories of BPL: Access BPL and In-Building BPL Access BPL uses electrical distribution lines--overhead or underground--to deliver broadband Internet access to homes and businesses. Because the wiring is physically large and often overhead and extends across entire communities, access BPL poses a significant interference potential to over-the-air radio services. Access BPL uses a number of different techniques, from spread spectrum to OFDM (multi- carrier signals). In-building BPL systems are designed to use the electrical wiring within a building to network computers. In-building BPL can be used to interconnect PCs or other devices within a building by using that building's electrical wiring. Access BPL uses electrical distribution wiring to extend that connection to the Internet. [Caption] ARRL Lab Manager Ed Hare, W1RFI, is investigating the potential for BPL to cause interference to HF and low-VHF users. What Present FCC Rules Permit The NOI is not asking if BPL technology should be permitted. Under existing FCC rules, BPL systems may be built and used in the United States right now . The FCC is asking how the rules might be changed "to promote and encourage new BPL technology," in the words of the NOI. Present FCC rules say that carrier-current systems--this includes BPL/PLC--need to meet the general radiated emission limits for unlicensed "intentional emitters." An intentional emitter is one that transmits a radio signal as a part of its normal operation. At HF, BPL systems are permitted a radiated field strength of 30 uV/meter measured at 30 meters from the signal source. At VHF, they are permitted radiated emissions of 100 uV/meter measured at 3 meters from the signal source. In most cases, the source will be the electrical wiring within a building or the electric-utility lines that pass close to residences and businesses in the US. The FCC Notice of Inquiry The FCC NOI asks a number of specific questions about BPL and how it should be regulated and tested. BPL systems under development and in field trials right now use spectrum between 1.7 and 80 MHz, but the NOI is also asking whether BPL should also operate on other parts of the spectrum. Amateurs are encouraged to read the NOI in its entirety and answer those questions from an Amateur Radio perspective view. Many amateurs have significant professional credentials and experience and this represents an opportunity to use that amateur experience to help the Commission make a difficult decision. The NOI asks additional questions than we cover here, but these are the ones of greatest interest to most amateurs: What changes should the FCC make to existing rules to promote this technology, consistent with the Commission's objective of protecting licensed radio services? What spectrum should BPL use? Is there a need to define specific frequency bands for BPL to avoid interference to licensed services? How can the potential for interference be predicted? Will access BPL be compatible with other systems such as DSL or cable collocated on utility structures? Will in-building BPL be compatible with other devices plugged into the building electrical system? Are there any test results from BPL field trials that analyze or demonstrate the interference potential? Are existing Part 15 rules adequate to protect authorized users of the spectrum from new high-speed BPL technology? Does new high-speed BPL technology pose a higher risk of interference than existing unlicensed technology? What changes should be made the rules that describe how measurements should be made? How can the Part 15 rules be tailored to both ensure protection against harmful interference and to avoid adversely impacting the development of BPL technology? [caption] NTIA Administrator Nancy Victory has praised the FCC's BPL initiative but cautioned the Commission to take interference concerns into consideration. No Harmful Interference FCC Part 15 rules require that the operator of an unlicensed emitter not cause harmful interference to authorized radio services. The absolute emission limits and the non-interference rule work together to allow most unlicensed devices to operate without causing widespread interference. BPL is different from point-source emitters, however. Access BPL systems are not local in nature. They are expected to occupy entire communities. BPL systems do not create "birdies" on specific frequencies. They create radiated emissions at the FCC limits on entire swaths of spectrum. If interference occurs from localized "unintentional radiator" sources such as power line noise, solutions exist. For example, power companies can change cracked insulators. The FCC has been able to enforce these rules when necessary. Indeed, a number of electric utilities have received letters from the FCC, as have the neighbors of hams who own and operate noisy Part 15 devices. In the case of access BPL, if an amateur doesn't have the broadband system installed in his or her own house but experiences interference from signals radiated via the overhead electrical wiring, the only real solution could be to turn off the BPL system in entire neighborhoods. As a practical matter, that is unlikely to occur. BPL Field Trials A number of field trials have been conducted overseas. In many cases, International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) member-societies have carried out tests in the trial areas. In Austria, video recordings were made of some of the field trials. Field trials are just getting under way in the US. To date, none of them have specifically included Amateur Radio nor have any incorporated interference studies. Typical field trials include from a handful to a few hundred homes in suburban neighborhoods. ARRL has identified active field trials in Briarcliff Manor, New York; Cape Girardeau, Missouri; Cullman, Alabama; Emmaus, Pennsylvania; Hyde Park, Ohio; Manassas, Virginia; Potomac, Maryland; and Raleigh, North Carolina. In addition, the FCC has granted experimental licenses to BPL equipment manufacturers or utilities in a number of other states. To ARRL's knowledge, actual field trials have not started there yet. Immunity To ARRL's knowledge, no field trials have studied immunity. What will happen when amateurs operate their stations in areas where BPL is deployed? ARRL recently petitioned the FCC for a tiny amateur LF allocation in the vicinity of 136 kHz. The electric utility industry claimed in comments on the ARRL's petition that its PLC devices-- operating on an unlicensed basis on frequencies below 490 kHz--would suffer harmful interference from 1 W effective isotropically radiated power (EIRP) amateur stations. The FCC agreed and chose not to grant Amateur Radio the LF allocation it sought. Yet the same utility industry, in consortium with BPL manufacturers, is making the claim that on HF and low-VHF--frequencies where power lines make better antennas than they do on LF--BPL signals can coexist with amateur stations that may be running more than 10,000 W EIRP. Hams are generally very concerned about immunity, because they understand and appreciate the social problems that might result when a neighbor's broadband access doesn't work because the amateur is on the air. One technical issue involves the best method to bridging or bypass the typical step-down pole transformer to deliver BPL from the power grid into an office or dwelling. [caption?] File Comments The FCC now is accepting electronically filed comments via its Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS). Under ECFS Main Links, click on "Submit a Filing." In the "Proceeding" field, enter "03-104" and complete the required fields. Comments may be typed into a form or you may attach a file containing your comments. Comments also may be submitted via e-mail per instructions on the ECFS page. The FCC has created a Web page that offers more information about filing comments. There's also a mailing address for those wishing to file comments by postal mail. Supporting ARRL's Efforts on the BPL Issue The ARRL has initiated an important Spectrum Defense Fund campaign to support activities to educate government officials on the potential threat that BPL poses to Amateur Radio. "Although this technology is already allowed, the industry wants the limits to be relaxed--with greater interference to your ham radio operation," notes ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ, in an appeal that went out recently to ARRL members. "The staff at ARRL is already hard at work on this issue." To find out more, or to support ARRL's efforts in this area, visit the ARRL's secure BPL Web site. Author's note: ARRL Laboratory Manager Ed Hare, W1RFI, contributed extensively to this article (via Bill Smith, W5USM, DXLD) FYI, here is the actual document. Interesting reading. I for one hope that someone has some sense at the FCC, although money seems to be speaking louder than sense there lately. http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-03-100A1.doc (Bob Combs, KCA6RC, swl at qth.net via DXLD) I also filed a comment against approval. BPL probably would be devastating to all things HF: ham, swl, etc. Filing a comment is very, very easy. Just click Patrick's link and throw in a few sentences. If enough people filed a public comment I think this could have an impact. I encourage everyone on this list to take 30 seconds to do it. (Damon Cassell, ibid.) I filed the following: I am against Broadband Over Power Lines - this will negatively impact communications on MW and SW frequencies for both consumers and for commercial and governmental users. I am heavily involved in emergency communications in support of DOMS, FEMA, and other customers, and rely almost exclusively on MW and HF frequencies. To have any additional barrier in any form, including interference from Broadband Over Power Line emissions, will cripple our emergency services and Homeland Security resources. 73 de (Tomas, NW7US (AAR0JA/AAM0EWA) Hood, ibid.) DRM [and non] +++ ANALYSIS: DIGITAL SHORTWAVE LAUNCHED, US DIGITAL RADIO ON HOLD | Text of editorial analysis by Chris McWhinnie of BBC Monitoring's Media Services on 19 June On 16 June scheduled Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM) shortwave broadcasts began, replacing long-running test transmissions. DRM is a non- proprietary digital transmission system for shortwave, mediumwave and longwave. The venue for the launch was the International Telecommunication Union's (ITU) World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-03) in Geneva where DRM Chairman Peter Senger marked the occasion in front of guests at a reception at the Chateau de Penthes in Geneva. A wide range of well-known and not so familiar international broadcasters participated: BBC World Service, Christian Vision, Deutsche Welle, Kuwait Radio, Radio Canada International, Radio France Internationale, Radio Netherlands, Radio Vatican, Swedish Radio International, Voice of America, Voice of Russia and Wales Radio International took part in the event. What does it sound like? BBC Monitoring has listened to the latest broadcasts using a Franhofer DRM software enabled PC receiver coupled to an AOR shortwave receiver with an active whip antenna. The low bit-rate digital audio from DRM does exhibit slight evidence of the process of audio compression. Occasional drop-outs have been observed and the audio quality can degrade to an echo and then either recover or cut to silence for a short period. The audio quality on speech and music is good and all the signals heard so far have sounded less distorted than the lowest bit rates of 48 and 64 kb/s via DAB (Eureka 147 digital audio broadcasting). When one considers that the DRM signal is on shortwave and uses the same radio spectrum as a conventional AM signal, then the results are quite impressive. Regulatory issues There appears to be some uncertainty about exactly how DRM will be used. The improvement in shortwave quality for the main international radio stations is the main benefit. But DRM can significantly improve on mediumwave and longwave reception too. This would involve simulcasting analogue and digital signals, probably on different frequencies. There is also talk of short-range shortwave DRM being used for local programming. It has been said that that DRM and DAB are not not rivals but are instead complementary technology. However this fails to recognise that each is a system intended to deliver terrestrial digital radio signals in a robust fashion. A combined longwave/mediumwave/shortwave DRM receiver with an electronic programme guide, which is already being developed, seems possible and desirable. There are regulatory issues, and commercial broadcasters may cry foul when a foreign station can beam into a country in comparable quality to a local FM, DAB or DRM signal. In addition, if DRM becomes widely available, then suitable shortwave transmission facilities may become a sought-after resource. Rival US system on hold The USA radio industry decided that it needed a single digital radio system which was not DAB - seen as a replacement for FM broadcasting but requiring an additional set of frequencies - or DRM - seen as a replacement for AM only. Instead Ibiquity Digital Corp worked on the Perceptual Audio Coder (PAC) - a compression system which could be used on AM or FM utilizing existing broadcast allocations. This is known as IBOC (in-band on- channel) and the system is mainly referred to as HD (high definition) Radio. In early June, Radio World's web site reported that technical concerns had caused the temporary suspension of standard-setting activities for IBOC. Apparently the engineers wanted time to improve the compression algorithm for the lowest HD Radio bit rates, 36 or even 64 kb/s on the AM band. But a mono DRM signal on the other hand appears to be acceptable at even 20 kb/s, although a digital radio expert told Radio World that audio coding is perceptual and that the DRM and HD Radio compression systems each make different trade-offs. Even with the delay, chip-manufacturer Philips says it will announce the availability of the vital processing components for radio sets within three months. The promise of HD radio sets in US shops by summer 2003 seems optimistic but is ahead of DRM receiver production and roll-out in the rest of the world. HD Radio is politically unlikely to perform a volte-face and adopt AAC+, the DRM coding system, over PAC. So, a world digital AM- replacement standard may be unachievable at present. A question of development There are some questions raised by the development of digital broadcasting. Why did digital radio and TV develop seperately terrestrially, but together via some satellite systems? Will portable communication devices or mobile phones incorporate any of the digital radio systems or use internet protocol for broadcast media? How did the concept of developing separate digital replacements for AM and FM ever come about in the first place? This is in part related to the amount of spectrum available within each band but makes for incompatible chip sets and radios. Why has DAB taken so long to make an impact, and only significantly so in the UK? Why have the enormous spectrum savings afforded by DRM not swept aside the now ageing DAB system? 100 DRM signals of seemingly acceptable audio quality could fit between 106-108 MHz for example. Challenges ahead The challenge for digital radio may be the enormous number of analogue radio sets scattered around most homes and pre-installed in cars; no subscription system to subsidize the cost of new receivers and the reluctance of major manufacturers to commit production facilities to something consumers hardly understand and don't yet think they need. For DRM in particular, the ultimate selling point has yet to be determined because increased choice, rather than just new technology, appears to lead to successful new media systems. Is it significant that the digital radio systems which provide wider content and choice are those with the largest take-up? Sirius Satellite and XM satellite radio in the USA and the free-to-air radio element of the UK's Sky Digital system are all attracting an encouraging number of users. A European direct-to-home satellite system planned by Alcatel and WorldSpace hopes to repeat the success of the US satellite systems. It seems that any new digital radio system which merely duplicates existing choice but requires the purchase a new radio set, whatever the technical advantages, faces a long haul before it becomes the de facto radio system. Source: BBC Monitoring research 19 Jun 03 (via DXLD) see also NORWAY Glenn: Just thot I`d pass this along. Contacted RL Drake last week to ask if they planned a digital upgrade for the R8-B. They do not. Question: am I correct in saying that, if you can get a 12kHz output from the radio (which I have no clue how to do), you could use an outboard decoder to hear DRM programming? (Alan Bosch, DX LISTENIN DIGEST) I think so ... MUSEA +++++ VOA MUSEUM ACQUIRES RADIO ARTIFACTS By Jennifer Edwards, The Cincinnati Enquirer WEST CHESTER TWP. - One of the country's largest museum collections on radio history will leave Cincinnati and make its new home at the Voice of America Museum off Tylersville Road. West Chester Township leaders announced this week they have entered into an agreement with the Gray History of Wireless Museum, formerly located at the WCET Channel 48 (PBS) facilities in the West End, to establish displays and store its large collection at the VOA museum. "The Voice of America Museum is an ideal location for this prestigious collection of artifacts," said Bill Zerkle, West Chester's parks and recreation director. "The Gray Museum and the Voice of America Museum are connected in many ways and both will benefit from this agreement." The Gray History of Wireless Museum is rich in early radio gear, with many items from the beginning of the 19th century. There also are items relating to Powel Crosley, builder of the VOA facility. The Gray museum will remain an independent, nonprofit corporation with its own board of trustees and will retain ownership of the items in its collection. The first phase of a three-part re-creation of the 1940s VOA broadcast building as a public museum should be complete by the Fourth of July. The VOA Bethany Station began relaying news and entertainment around the world in 1944. After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, it closed in 1994, and the big radio towers came down in 1997. Now, West Chester owns the VOA building and is converting it into a museum to honor the facility's legacy throughout World War II, the Korean and Vietnam wars, and the Cold War era. "The Voice of America Museum is an ideal home for our collection, making it more accessible to the public and providing a larger display area," said William Strangfeld, president of the board of trustees of the Gray museum. "Eventually, we hope to provide a participatory museum experience for visitors." The Gray museum's transition to the VOA is expected to take place as soon as arrangements are made to provide secure areas for storage of the collections and additional display space. "The Gray museum allows us to take a big step forward in creating a museum that educates the public about the significance of the Voice of America and the history of radio technology and communications," Zerkle said. The first glimpse at the Gray museum here will take place at a display at Freedom Fest June 28-29 on VOA grounds. The VOA has been open for tours and special events for several months. Nearly 1,000 people have visited the historic building to learn more about its past - and future. This is the second year of fund-raising efforts to renovate the museum. So far, hundreds of thousands of dollars of in-kind contributions have been donated from West Chester businesses for renovations and access at the VOA. They include carpeting, paint and new entrance roads off Tylersville and Cox roads, said Trustee Catherine Stoker, who is heading up fund-raising with a veterans group and township staff. About $10,000 in cash contributions from various groups and individuals has been donated to the Veterans Voice of America group for the museum. Those funds have been used to promote the facility through mailings and brochures, she said. This year, Veterans Voice of America expects to raise at least $100,000 for the museum. It should be completely renovated within seven years with one full floor of displays plus modifications for museum offices on the second floor (Cincinnati Enquirer June 18 via Artie Bigley, DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ GEOMAGNETIC INDICES Phil Bytheway - Seattle WA - phil_tekno@yahoo.com Geomagnetic Summary May 20 2003 through June 16 2003 Tabulated from email status daily Date Flux A K SA Forecast GM Forecast Etc. 5/20 115 13 3 no storms no storms 7 21 117 13 2 no storms no storms 4 22 119 19 5 minor minor 9 23 118 26 3 minor no storms 6 24 118 15 3 minor no storms 7 25 117 21 5 minor minor 8 26 121 23 3 minor no storms 6 27 125 17 4 minor minor 9 28 129 25 6 strong minor 9 29 130 34 5 strong minor 8 30 138 76 7 severe strong 10 5/31 117 40 6 moderate moderate 7 6/ 1 113 20 2 moderate moderate 5 2 112 18 4 minor minor 7 3 121 26 4 moderate minor 7 4 115 26 5 minor minor 8 5 106 19 3 no storms no storms 5 6 114 11 3 no storms no storms 8 7 126 12 3 minor minor 7 8 133 22 5 no storms minor 9 9 153 22 4 minor minor 7 10 158 27 6 strong minor 9 11 177 29 4 moderate moderate 5 12 193 22 3 strong moderate 4 13 164 21 4 moderate moderate 5 14 151 21 5 minor minor 7 15 134 46 5 moderate minor 7 6/16 129 31 5 strong minor 7 ********************************************************************** (IRCA Soft DX Monitor via DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-109, June 18, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3f.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn FIRST AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1187: Wed 2200 on WBCQ 7415, 17495-CUSB Thu 2030 on WWCR 15825 Fri 1930 on RFPI 15039 Sat 1731 on WINB 13570 WRN ONDEMAND [from Fri]: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [from early UT Thu] [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1187h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1187.html WORLD OF RADIO VIA TELEPHONE Someone is putting recording of latest WORLD OF RADIO [complete?] on a phone line at (206) 333-5096 (George Thurman, DX LISTENING DIGEST) So they are, no permission from me, tho the more platforms the better, I suppose. That`s in Seattle. I wonder if Alex has something to do with this, as he used to provide ours and other DX programs via http://members.rogers.com/alexsradio/dxprograms.htm but that no longer works. If anyone knows or can find out who is doing this, please let me know (gh) ** AFGHANISTAN. The penultimate item on the Wed June 18 SOUNDS LIKE CANADA from CBC Radio 1 is: ``Afghanistan Radio -- Radio Rabi'ah Balkhi is located in a two-room apartment on a dusty, commercial street in northern Afghanistan. The purpose of the station is to bring Afghan women back into public life. The project is funded by a Canadian charity called the Institute for Media Policy and Civil Society. Tina talks to Jane McElhone, the project director.`` But it seems there is no audio archive, tho they will be glad to sell you a tape. It might be on the BEST OF show, at 8:05 pm local, the original airtime having been 11:32-11:43 am local as heard on CBW. Started with a recording of station; I never heard a frequency mentioned! (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. 4835, VL8A Alice Springs, 0825, June 18, Current events program until 0830, then a station promo mentioning "ABC Territory Radio" Fair to good copy (David Hodgson, TN, June 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRIA [and non]. ADIÓS A RADIO AUSTRIA... Gracias a la coalición centroderechista del gobierno austríaco y a la desidia de algunos dirigentes "eurocentristas", el próximo 30 de junio nos quedamos sin nuestra querida Radio Austria Internacional. Ya el mismo error lo cometieron varios países. Por ejemplo, Radio Budapest - en 1991- decidió suprimir sus emisiones en español gracias a la "borrachera" de ciertos personajes gubernamentales magiares, al "descubrir" que ya América Latina no les interesaba. La moda era "integrarse" al capitalismo salvaje y a lo que "vendía", y como el español no "vendía", lo eliminaron. En el caso de la ORF, la metida de pata es de dimensiones cósmicas: eliminar todo el servicio exterior de radio es la "moda". Eso no "vende". ¡Patético! Si algunos despistados aún se preguntaban cuál era la diferencia entre la derecha y la izquierda, ¡bingo!, hemos topado con una de ellas. A ciertas tendencias políticas no les interesa el internacionalismo y ¡mucho menos! la integración. Y no me hablen de dinero. Allí está el caso argentino: a pesar de la grave crisis económica de 2001, la Argentina todavía mantiene su servicio exterior de radio. ¿Entonces? Un adiós para Radio Austria que se convierte en un ¡hasta siempre! (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, June 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOTSWANA. In today's mail a returned reception report from Radio Botswana, mailed January 21st 2003. The address I used was: Mr.T. Makgekgenene , Director, Radio Botswana, Private Bag 0060, Gaborone, Botswana. This is the recent PWBR address as well as the address used on recent replies listed on the QIP. The envelope was marked "undeliverable" by the Botswana Postal Service. Try again, any ideas? 73's. (Joe Talbot, AB, June 17, Cumbre DX via DXLD) It is possible that the person you wrote to may no longer works there. According to the Commonwealth Broadcaster directory the current acting director of broadcasting is Mr Habuji Sosome Its probably best not to send reports to named individuals - just use the job title. 73s (Dave Kenny, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** CANADA. I checked yesterday and today for CFRX on 6070 at around 1500. Not heard here, I'm not sure if they are off, though even in poor propagation conditions I can usually hear them, nothing at all here (Steve Lare Holland, MI, June 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. Hi Glenn, Don't know if you're aware, but on June 11, the House of Commons Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage came out with a massive report on Canadian broadcasting (872 pages) called "Our Cultural Sovereignty" and among its 97 recommendations, one that RCI be strengthened. Details at: http://www.geocities.com/rciaction/HeritageCttee20030611.html What's a bit strange is that neither CBC, nor our own management has informed staff. This morning (Wednesday, 18 June) they'll get the news from the RCI Action Committee. If you need any details, don't hesitate to get in touch (Wojtek Gwiazda, RCI Action Committee - Comité d'action de RCI http://www.geocities.com/rciaction DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: PARLIAMENTARY COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS MORE RESOURCES FOR RCI Ottawa, 11 June 2003 - In a massive report on broadcasting in Canada called ``Our Cultural Sovereignty``, the House of Commons Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage described RCI as ``an essential international service.`` Among its 97 recommendations the Committee called on the ``appropriate department [to] review the mandate of Radio Canada International, with a view to identifying the necessary resources required to strengthen its services.`` In the two and a half pages devoted to RCI, the Heritage Committee reported that ``Two groups, the RCI Action Committee and the Canadian International DX Club, made passionate submissions to the Committee.`` Quoting from the brief of the RCI Action Committee, the Heritage Committee wrote: ``The RCI Action Committee told the Committee that the government`s support for an international service: ... must go further than just a general statement to ``provide an international service``. The Broadcasting Act must outline RCI`s mandate to ``attract an international audience`` and develop ``international awareness of Canada`` [the CBC`s Corporate Policy No. 14]. It must specifically oblige RCI to prepare such programming in both official languages, English and French. There should be sufficient guidelines in the Act to ensure most regions of the world are covered, and to ensure RCI broadcasts in major foreign languages, and any others deemed important or useful. Without necessarily enumerating each region and language, these directives must be strong enough to prevent anyone but Parliament from being able to change the mandate of RCI. At the moment, there is very little that prevents the CBC from cutting services back radically. This despite the fact that all of RCI funding comes from the Canadian Heritage Department.`` The Heritage Committee has requested that the government respond to its report. The entire report is available on the Heritage Committee`s Website LInk http://www.parl.gc.ca/InfoComDoc/37/2/HERI/Studies/Reports/herirp02-e.htm The text on RCI is in Chapter 7, in the section on International Services. http://www.parl.gc.ca/InfoComDoc/37/2/HERI/Studies/Reports/herirp02/08-Ch07-e.htm#3 [The Committee regards Radio Canada International to be an essential international service through which Canadian perspectives can be shared with the world. It agrees with the recommendation made by the Senate Committee and for this reason: RECOMMENDATION 7.6: The Committee recommends that the appropriate department review the mandate of Radio Canada International, with a view to identifying the necessary resources required to strengthen its services] DIFFICULT TIMES AT RADIO CANADA INTERNATIONAL The Committee`s recommendations come at a time when Radio Canada International is increasingly losing control over services, as it is integrated into the domestic service, CBC/Radio-Canada. Offices are being given away to personnel from the domestic service. There are even days were RCI conference rooms are so booked, that RCI personnel has to meet elsewhere. The master control room that coordinated all broadcasts coming in and out of RCI, has been dismantled. Broadcasts are now routed through the central control of the domestic service. Technical, adminstrative and support services are now all part of the domestic service. Production staff is still working with reduced resources, and a number of permanent positions have not been filled. RCI ORDER IN COUNCIL CHANGED On a legislative level, the Order-in-Council that defines RCI`s existence was changed in March of 2003 (for the first time since 1968). It has been shortened, is less specific in describing RCI`s mandate, eliminates the role of RCI`s Executive Director in dealings with the government, and is vague in the obligations of the domestic service CBC/Radio-Canada. CBC RCI BOSSES SILENT ON COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION Although the domestic service was quick to praise the Heritage Committee`s recommendations about its services, it was silent on the recommendation for increased resources for RCI. And even though RCI management was aware of the recommendation, it has not communicated the information to staff. Staff was informed today (18 June 2003) by the RCI Action Committee. If you have any comments, questions, or suggestions to help us, please contact the RCI Action Committee at rciaction@yahoo.ca (via DXLD) ** CANADA. "GO AHEAD, TOUCH THAT DIAL" --- CRTC TO HOLD HEARINGS ON APPLICATIONS FOR NEW STATIONS IN EDMONTON. NINE NEW STATIONS VIE TO SHAKE UP LOCAL RADIO SCENE Edmonton's FM dial will soon be substantially more crowded if proponents of an aboriginal network, a 24-hour urban outlet and various modern-rock formats have their way. Starting Monday, nine potential newcomers to the local radio scene will make their pitches to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission. The hearings, at the Shaw Conference Centre, are open to the public. . http://www.canada.com/edmonton/edmontonjournal/story.asp?id=789C11BA-C75F-46BC-8AE2-8FEEA7F4912A 73- (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** CHANNEL ISLANDS. Press Release received from Nick Creed re Island Sport, "high power RSL" on Guernsey 105.3 and Jersey 101.3 for Island Games 22 June - 4 July: 2,500 COMPETITORS, 23 ISLANDS, 1 RADIO STATION Guernsey is gearing itself up to host the 2003 Natwest Island Games. Held every 2 years since 1985, the Games can best be described as an "Olympics" for Islands and have grown into one of the biggest multi- sports event in the world. From the 28th June, Guernsey will welcome around 2,500 athletes and their supporters from 23 islands all around the world, including Greenland, The Falklands, Bermuda and Rhodes. Following the 2001 Games, which were held in the Isle of Man, Guernsey's commercial radio station, Island FM applied to the Radio Authority to run a special high power RSL (Restricted Service License) radio station to cover this year's event. After two years of planning, 'Island Sport - The Games Station' is ready to begin broadcasting. It will be a non-partisan, 24 hour a day service that will immerse itself in the events and become the soundtrack of the Games. A team of around 35 are needed to run the station and as well as using local freelancers, Island Fm is drafting in staff from other stations in the Tindle Group. "Island Sport has been an exciting project to be involved with" said Nick Creed, Managing Director of Island Fm. "This is the biggest event in Guernsey's history and we wanted to be a part of the action. The geography of the islands dictated that low power FM would not achieve the coverage required, so we are delighted to be able to broadcast a 'full power' service!" He added "There is a huge amount of interest both here in the Channel Islands and around the world and our mission is to reflect the fun and spirit of the Island Games." Island Sport will be broadcasting on 105.3 FM in Guernsey and 101.3 FM in Jersey. It will also be available online through the NatWest Island Games Website http://www.guernsey2003.com As well as results, news and travel information, Island Sport will broadcast essential information for those taking part. Each competitor will be receiving an FM radio in their welcome pack when they arrive in Guernsey. The station will begin broadcasting a preview service on 22nd June and continue until the Games closing ceremony on 4th July. ENDS 16th June 2003 For further information contact Nick Creed 01481 242000 (via Alan Pennington, BDXC-UK via DXLD) So what is the definition of ``high power`` or ``full power``? (gh, DXLD) ** CHINA. Today I received a reply from China Huayi Broadcasting from an address in Jiangsu. The envelope contained a nice-looking folder, of which I think it is NOT a QSL but just some advertisement for CHBC. It's entirely in Chinese and there also some restaurant coupons attached to it. Anybody with a similar reply or possibly with a genuine QSL? Anyway, I will try to have the text translated. Best 73's (Hans-Dieter Buschau, Hildesheim Germany, June 18, hard-core-dx via DXLD) I got a "real" nice looking QSL card from the station. On the backside half of it was in Chinese, not written in, and half of it was a printed QSL text in English with all details included and signed by Qiao Xiaoli. He also wrote "2003. No 3" in the upper right hand corner. 73 from (Björn Fransson, the island of Gotland, Sweden, ibid.) ** CHINA. Re Harris: Glen[n], This url appears to be wrong: http://www.bc.harris.com/product_portfolio/prod_media/dx200.pdf Did you check it out? I can't get it to work (Ben Dawson, DX LISTENING DIGEST) No, but I just did: it must be: http://www.broadcast.harris.com/product_portfolio/prod_media/dx200.pdf Just about the specs, not where they have been installed. The wrong URL probably caused by BC-DX`s insistence on replacing the cumbersome word ``broadcast`` throughout the text by ``bc``. Unfortunately, we copied the wrong URL also under ROMANIA and SAUDI ARABIA in last issue (gh, DXLD) ** CHINA. Continuous Chinese instrumental music (presumed CRI) heard June 18 as follows: 1500 on 15680, 15510, 15265, 13690, 13835, 11945 and 11765. 1600 on 15680, 15510, 15265, 13690, 13715, 11945 and 11795. 1700 on 15680, 15510, 13690 and 11945. Reception best throughout above periods on 13690 (Roger Tidy (UK), DX LISTENING DIGEST) You mean distinct from the crash-and-bang jammer service? (gh, DXLD) ** CUBA. 1900 kHz, (2 x 950), R. Reloj, 0750 June 18, 2nd harmonic from one of their outlets on 950 is still making an appearance right in the middle of the 160m amateur band. Both voice and Morse code ID. Good copy (David Hodgson, TN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. Yo también capté la Radio Rebelde esta mañana entre 1005-1008 UT por 5025 kHz con fuerte interferencia de 5030 kHz, y además, con un heterodino. Tanto la interferencia como el heterodino desaparecen usando detector sincrónico, y entonces la calidad de la escucha es buena, SINPO=44444. Pero noté que el detector pierde el ancla regularmente; posiblemente está intentando anclar en la señal del heterodino y en Radio Rebelde cuando el fading hacía más fuerte una o otra señal. El programa era el mismo "Haciendo Radio". ¿Cuánto dura este programa? Para la escucha usé el 7600GR conectado a una línea telefónica fuera de uso. Saludos (Elmer Escoto, Honduras, June 18, radioescutas via DXLD) Me alegra saber que estás captando a Radio rebelde en la frecuencia de los 5025 kHz, pero a mí me sucede lo mismo que a tí: en esa frecuencia hay demasiada interferencia de otras emisoras. Mañana debería tratar por los 11655, por donde se está copiando muy bien; lo que me extraña es que ningún otro colega la reportado. En cuanto al programa "Haciendo Radio" ellos dicen en sus promociones que empieza a las 5 de la mañana y termina a las 9 de la mañana, aunque a veces por los 11655, la señal se extiende un poco más y se puede escuchar parte del siguiente programa. Yo la comienzo a sintonizar luego de las 7 de la mañana (1115 UT) luego de dejar a mi hijo en el liceo. Por tu correo personal, te haré llegar archivo de audio para que tengas una idea de como la copio por aquí. Recibe un fuerte abrazo y los 73 cordiales. Atte: (José Elías, Venezuela, ibid.) ** CUBA. Si amigos! This is the mid week edition of DXers Unlimited coming to you from Havana, and now I want to ask those of you living in the Pacific Coast area of North America for a signal report of our new antenna array. It is now on the air on the 9820 kiloHertz frequency from 05 to 07 UT, that is from 9 pm to 11 pm Pacific Standard Time [sic]. Again, reception reports of the new 9820 Pacific Coast of North America antenna will be most appreciated; send them to arnie@r... [truncated] [By] the way, we start using 9820 kHz every evening at 00 UT in Spanish, with our Central North America beam, then at 01 UT we switch to English with the same antenna and operate until 05 UT with it; finally at the end of our broadcast day, we switch to the Pacific Coast of North America new curtain array until 07 UT. We do receive reports of the Central North America beam from the Pacific Coast, but everyone does seem to observe, as expected, a significant increase in signal strength when the beam is switched at 05. With the new antenna, I expect that the signals received in Northern Mexico, the Rocky Mountain States, California, Oregon, Washington state and British Columbia should be much better, but only you there can really say the last word!!! Send your signal report to arnie@r..., [truncated] or VIA AIR MAIL to Arnie Coro, Radio Havana Cuba, Havana, Cuba (RHC DXers Unlimited June 17 via Bob Chandler, ODXA via DXLD) ** ETHIOPIA [non]. CLANDESTINE from NORWAY? to EUROPE. 7520, Voice of Ethiopia. Checked a number of Javaradios in Europe during the 2000 hour on Sunday June 15. Couldn't hear this one for this listed service in English for Europe; is anyone else hearing them? Last audio file on their website is from June 1 (Hans Johnson, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL INTERNET. DJ TURNS THE DIAL BACK TO THE '60S ONLINE Boredom with current radio trends and nostalgia for early top 40 programming led Richard Kaufman to create his own Web-based radio station. By DAVE SCHEIBER, Times Staff Writer, © St. Petersburg Times published June 16, 2003 http://www.sptimes.com/2003/06/16/Technology/DJ_turns_the_dial_bac.shtml As a kid from New Jersey in the 1960s, Richard Kaufman spent countless hours tuning his AM transistor radio to rock 'n' roll. He loved the music, and the rapid-fire shtick of DJs like Big Dan Ingram and Barnie Pip. They inspired Kaufman to become a radio DJ, too. But he never made the impact or had the kind of free-wheeling fun he dreamed of as a youth. That is, until he traded a home on radio for a home online. On the Web, Kaufman morphs into Ricky the K and brings the '60s alive again. Kaufman's Solid Gold Time Machine site http://www.60sradio.com features old-school DJ chatter, more than 3,000 songs from 1955 to 1971 and classic commercials and jingles from the '60s. That vintage, reverb-heavy radio format faded from the dials with the advent of '70s album rock, and the trend toward more music, less talk FM stations. But now Kaufman, 52, who paid his dues in Florida, Georgia and Oklahoma, is trying to revive the long-gone sound. He's poured his energy and resources into a nostalgic venture beaming '60s radio to baby boomers over the Internet. Kaufman says he draws listeners from across the United States, Canada, England and Australia who pay a subscription fee of $12.95 a month or $119.40 a year. Operating from his home in Dallas, the native of Livingston, N.J., declines to reveal how many paying customers he has, but adds, "I'm making a good living. And it's only getting better." Clearly, Kaufman is targeting the truly hard-core oldies lovers with his play-for-pay site. "In order to make it on the Internet, you have to do something different than, better than and cheaper than (your competition)," he says. "Cheaper than, I cannot do. So instead, what you do is superserve a niche audience. I'm doing that with an audience that is not being served by traditional radio." Kaufman launched his '60s music project in 1998 at the advent of the Internet's popularity. But e-commerce hadn't evolved enough to make subscription payments convenient, and media player technology wasn't as advanced. Listenership was limited. Today, he uses the PayPal online billing system to process subscriptions. With faster computers and high-speed connections commonplace, Web radio links abound, and Kaufman says his station has thrived since last year. Still, making a radio network succeed on the Internet is no easy task, says Larry Magne, publisher of Passport to Web Radio: Music, Sports, News and Entertainment from the Hometowns of the World. "It's very much oriented to a part of broadcasting that's been ignored: the narrow, super-niche market," he says. "For that, it might work. You find a dozen stations can work this way and eke out a living." Magne says the biggest challenge is convincing listeners to shell out more than $100 a year for a subscription. "You can get an awful lot of stuff through cable for 40 bucks a month," he said. "But for one station - unless you've got your slicked-back, Wild Root hairdo - paying $10 or so a month is a lot when there's so much out there for free." As a Webcaster, Kaufman has to pay a fee to the recording industry, ASCAP and BMI, but he builds that cost into his subscription rates. He had thought about pitching his endeavor for radio syndication but wanted to maintain full control. "I didn't want to have it watered down," he says. "If I'm going to be the last dinosaur on Earth, I didn't want to be in a situation of dealing with radio people," he says. "These are the people who messed radio up. I wanted to go directly to the audience." To do so, Kaufman dons one of his many Hawaiian shirts and goes to work in his home studio. He records three five-hour shows - 15 hours of programming - and changes the files once a week. "This way it's convenient for anybody in any time zone to listen," he says. "You just download it when you want. And with all the songs in my library, I don't repeat a song for 12 weeks." Kaufman has gone to painstaking lengths to re-create the feel of the 40-year-old format. He uses much of the same sound equipment employed in the '60s: an RCA 77-DX mike (like the one adorning David Letterman's desk) that provides a big bass boost; tube compressor- limiters, refurbished with parts from 1964, that create a warm, dense sound free from digital distortion; a distinctive "plate" reverb setting; and 31 bands of equalization per channel. "Put it all together and that's the sound of '60s radio," he says. Well, part of it. The rest comes from Kaufman's frenetic, looney approach, which he learned as a youngster by listening to DJ heroes such as WABC's Ingram in New York and Pip of Chicago's WCFL. One of his ongoing routines, inspired by a Miami DJ, is a faux dialogue with Tonto (the late Jay Silverheels) of the Lone Ranger TV show. Kaufman dubbed hundreds of Tonto lines from Lone Ranger tapes to create a Tonto quip for virtually any situation. He recorded them onto separate cartridges and pops them in on the fly. "I have five boxes of Tonto carts, all by category," he says. "To do this kind of radio, you have to be able to find this stuff in about five seconds or less." Then there are the time-warp ads: some 200 old cigarette spots, dozens of soft drink and beer jingles (Reingold, Ballentine, Shaeffer), and movie promos from The Ten Commandments to The Graduate. Kaufman says it takes a lot of effort to do the job right, but he's having a blast as Ricky the K. Though he worked as a radio DJ, starting in 1968, he never thought he reached his true potential. "I wanted to be great, but I was always very average, and I never knew why at the time," he says. Kaufman attributes it to the direction radio moved in the late '60s and '70s, de-emphasizing the role of mega-personality music DJs. "There were maybe about 20 who were really good," he says. "It was very hard to do well, you had to talk about 45 times an hour, but in short bursts, and you needed a quick mind to make it all work. "Then a guy named Bill Drake came along and invented this format that keeps the music moving, and it kind of became the McDonald's of radio: The DJs would only talk over the intros to the songs and outros to commercials. It basically made radio mediocre. Even a great DJ would sound mediocre in a Drake format, and a bad DJ would sound mediocre, too, because less is expected." Kaufman worked at stations in Fort Walton Beach and Atlanta, but left radio disenchanted. He moved to Dallas to write jingles for seven years, producing some for KOMA in Oklahoma City, a 50,000-watt station heard at night in more than 30 states. The program director liked Kaufman enough to hire him as a DJ in the mid-1990s. He worked there for 2-1/2 years, adopting a more rambunctious style, and was encouraged by the response. That's when the idea dawned on him to create his '60s show. "The typical oldies station plays the same 300 songs over and over, and can't sell advertising to anyone over 49," he says. "So if you're over 49, you don't count. Most oldies stations aren't even playing any oldies pre-1968 now. "I play the real oldies, thousands of them. And I make it entertaining like they did when I was a kid." (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. FCC ASKED TO SPURN MURDOCH --- By Frank Ahrens, Washington Post Staff Writer, Wednesday, June 18; Page E04 News Corp.'s purchase of a controlling interest in the DirecTV home satellite service should be blocked because it will mean higher prices and could lead to collusion between News Corp. and cable companies, DirecTV's biggest competitor said yesterday. . . http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A7152-2003Jun17.html At this point why would FCC care? Especially, after recent FCC decision. 73, (-.. . Kraig Krist, KG4LAC, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. Myanmar TV International (MRTV3) has begun parttime service on Telstar 5 Ku for North America. It is located on the Pitcomm MUX at 12177GHz, 23000 s/r, 2/3 FEC VID= 4081 AID = 257. MRTV shares the channel with VTV4 Vietnam. (This same PITCOMM MUX is home to WRN and Voice of Turkey-TRT.) (T. Wood, June 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRAN. In case anyone's interested --- I was interviewed by the folks from VOIRI this week, it will be broadcast Sunday (not sure what time but they usually broadcast to N America and Europe 0030-0230 [UT Mon], they woke me up at 1 in the morning, my time!!! later, 73s, (Sue Hickey, Grand Falls-Windsor, Newfoundland, Canada, June 18, GRDXC via DXLD) ** IRAQ. GIVES WITH ONE HAND, TAKES AWAY WITH THE OTHER By Rohan Jayasekera, Index on Censorship June 11, 2003 http://www.indexonline.org/news/20030611_iraq.shtml Iraq's all-powerful civilian chief L. Paul Bremer III will not tolerate 'hate speech' from Iraq's newly freed media. To prove it he has assigned himself absolute power over the Iraqi press. Freedom of expression is in his gift and only the 'responsible' may enjoy it. Rohan Jayasekera comments. To the average Iraqi, almost nothing the Americans do makes sense. Each one is a schizophrenic beast, as likely to smile and hand out a sweet to a child as it is liable to open fire on a street protest or club a careless driver. The contradiction is in the mission; the US military came to Iraq to win a war, not wage a peace. The majority of US troops believe they came to Iraq as liberators. The Iraqis tend to think differently. The US authorities think their problem is their failure to get their message across. The Iraqis already get too many messages from the Americans, and almost all of them are contradictory. What kind of message did the US military send to the Iraqis when it seized "editorial control" of Mosul city's only TV station because of its "predominantly non-factual/unbalanced news coverage" - meaning the re-broadcasting of Qatari Arab satellite network al-Jazeera? "We have every right as an occupying power to stop the broadcast of something that will incite violence," Major General David Petraeus told reporters after being alerted to the offending broadcasts. "Yes, what we are looking at is censorship but you can censor something that is intended to inflame passions." According to a Wall Street Journal report, a US army major was relieved of her duties and removed from the base when she argued that the order contravened principles of free speech. After all, these are principles guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States, which every US soldier must "solemnly swear" to "support and defend". But these contradictions fly everywhere. Having invested $20 million dollars over three months in the rebuilding of Iraqi state TV & radio, renamed the Iraqi Media Network (IMN), the US officials in charge of the contract began balking at the new network's news output immediately it went on air. Managers were told to drop the readings from the Koran, the 'vox-pop' man-in-the-street interviews (usually critical of the US invasion) and even to run their content past the wife of a US-friendly Iraqi Kurdish leader for a pre-broadcast check. The station rejected the demands and dug in their heels. "As journalists we will not submit to censorship," Dan North, a Canadian documentary maker training Iraqis at the station, told Reuters. US civilian administrator L. Paul Bremer III, in charge of the occupying powers' Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA), was said to be infuriated by the conflicting strategies in place at the IMN, which has two TV stations, a brace of local and national radio stations and two newspapers under development. Even more annoyingly for the US chief, the country's Shi'a broadcasters had made much more use of much less extensive support from Iran to get their networks on air, for more hours with more news. Almost all of it was hostile to the US-British occupation forces. A daily drip feed of increasingly embittered media coverage is turning into a flood, with every political faction in the new Iraq opening up new newspapers in Baghdad, and using them to voice popular frustration at the rising crime rate and failing public services on the Americans' watch. Every day brings new allegations and abuse. The papers representing political parties hostile to the US post unattributed reports of all kinds, accusing the western forces of gang rape, robbery and numerous 'insults to Islam'. One of Baghdad's scores of scrappy publications has begun printing clips from the so-called 'Protocols of the Elders of Zion' - the anti-Semitic Russian Tzarist-era forgery that purports to reveal plans for Jewish world domination. But now the US authorities have declared 'enough'. Bremer wants tough new rules governing the Iraqi media to sort the mess out. All Iraqi media must now be registered. Licences will be revoked and equipment confiscated from media sources that break the rules. Individual offenders "may be detained, arrested, prosecuted and, if convicted, sentenced by relevant authorities to up to one year in prison and a $1,000 fine". Appeal is to Bremer only, and his decision is final. His nine point list of "Prohibited Activities" include incitement to racial, ethnic or religious hatred, advocating support for the banned pre-war Ba'ath party, and publishing material that "is patently false and is calculated to provoke opposition to the CPA or undermine legitimate processes towards self-government". Officials say the order is intended to stop 'hate speech' - the kind of hot language they say could trigger violence between Iraqis and westerners, or possibly Iraqi Sunni and Shi'a or Arab and Iraqi Kurd. "There's no room for hateful and destabilising messages that will destroy the emerging Iraqi democracy," former IMN official Mike Furlong told the Associated Press in June. "All media outlets must be responsible." This is a long way from the stand made by Furlong's IMN colleague Don North the month before. "This whole idea (IMN) was about starting the genesis of an open media," he said at the time, "so we will not accept an outside source scrutinising what we produce." No more. And Bremer's order was only the start. It also marks a transformation for the IMN - from independent broadcaster driven by First Amendment principles to something else again entirely. The IMN is to be transformed into a mini-ministry to replace the old Iraqi ministry of information, made world famous by wartime Saddam propagandist minister Mohammed Saeed al-Sahaf. Bremer will "reserve the power to advise" the IMN on any aspect of its performance, "including any matter of content" and the power to hire and fire IMN staff. Thus the man in absolute authority over the country's largest, richest and best equipped media network is also his own regulator and regulator of his rivals, with recourse to the US Army to enforce his rulings. Under the direction of former Voice of America chief Robert Reilly, the IMN was created in April 2003 by US defence technology giant Scientific Applications International Corp (SAIC) under contract to the Pentagon. SAIC's relevant speciality is what it calls "Information Dominance/Command and Control" - a nine point programme, according to its website, that begins with 'Battlefield Control' and ends with 'Information Warfare/Information Operations'. This kind of seamless link between military command and media management was what the Pentagon had in mind when it issued the contract to SAIC. A successor to the fuzzy TV broadcasts from USAF EC- 130E 'Commando Solo' psyops (psychological operations) planes and the radio broadcasts beamed from US army transmitters mounted on Humvee jeeps. It was the Pentagon that objected loudest to the resignation of the politically conservative Reilly as the director of the Voice of America, and welcomed his appointment as chief of the Defense Department's media programme in Iraq. Reilly fell out with the VOA board of governors over his 'ideological' views on what he and the Defense Department thought was the VOA's duty, to tell America's story to the nations it opposed. He famously called the fighting in Afghanistan a "war of ideas," with the VOA "on one side in that war". With Reilly gone the VOA joined a 'coalition of the unwilling' with the Pentagon in Iraq. "We are not in the psychological operation or propaganda business," VOA middle east chief Norm Pattiz told the Christian Science Monitor, citing the Pentagon initiatives. "Without the credibility of balanced, reliable, and truthful news, we would have no audience." "Under the last regime, it was illegal to criticise the government," Bremer told Iraqi journalists. "Now you are free to criticise whoever, or whatever you want." But, he added, "with freedom comes responsibility". Reilly says he hopes IMN will evolve into a "PBS-style" responsible public broadcaster. Even the censorious paratrooper Petraeus told the Washington Post that Iraq needed "something akin" to the Communications Regulatory Agency set up in Bosnia "to establish standards and procedures for cases in which those standards are broken." The issue is whether Reilly, and the IMN - a media network sired by Pentagon contract out of US Army psyops, soon to be Iraq's largest, most powerful and only truly national media corporation, topped by L. Paul Bremer III, a man with absolute power over its activities and its rivals - have taken the right route to these destinations. If Iraq needs media regulation, it should be independent. If it needs media at all, it should be more independent than this. (Index on Censorship Jun 11, 2003 via N.Grace-USA for CRW via DXLD) see also QATAR ** ITALY [non]. Volevo comunicare che da domenica 6 luglio, nella prima parte della trasmissione in lingua italiana di AWR - Adventist World Radio, irradiata dalle ore 0900 alle ore 1000 UT sulla frequenza di 11880 kHz (da Julich, Germania), andra' in onda, con cadenza settimanale, un programma di 20 minuti dedicato ai BCL, SWL e radioamatori dal titolo "Studio DX", da me curato e presentato. Tutti i rapporti di ricezione corretti saranno confermati con cartolina QSL speciale. Indirizzo e-mail : studiodx@e... . [truncated] Indirizzo postale : AWR, Viuzzo del Pergolino 4, 50139 Firenze. Buon ascolto, Stefano Mannelli, IZ5ENH (KC9AJF) http://www.smscluster.org http://www.awr.org http://www.rvs.firenze.net (BCLnews via DXLD) ** KOREA SOUTH. QUIZZES FOR PRIZES ON RKI It is the 50th anniversary of RKI and they have some quizzes, sent to regular emailers, (I have their complete CC which they stuck in), and on their web page. Email survey about RKI shortwave, and Webpage about AudioOnDemand and such. http://www.rki.kbs.co.kr (Daniel Say, BC, June 17, swprograms via DXLD) ** LAKSHADEEP ARCHIPELAGO. Details of my latest AIR QSLs received {a.k.a. LACCADIVE ISLANDS} AIR KAVARATTI (Lakshadeep) 1584 kHz 1 kW. Full data verification letter received in 1 month from Mr. R. Periasamy, Asst. Station Engineer, AIR Kozhikode who is in charge of this station. It`s my 101st AIR station to be verified. The Lakshadeep archipelago is a Union territory of India and these coral Islands lie in the Arabian Sea on the South Western part of India, off the coast of Kerala. Of its 36 islands only 10 are inhabited. Kavaratti is the capital which is only 3.6 sq km in area with about a population of 7000 (1987). It seems that it is counted as a separate radio country in some bcdxing circles also like in Amateur Radio. (If so mine is the first known QSL from this radio country). It is about 400 km away from my native place in Kerala and use the same mother tongue of mine i.e. Malayalam. The native people are Muslims who originally came from our state of Kerala. Special permission is needed even for Indian citizens to visit these islands. I used to monitor AIR Kavaratti whenever I go home every year. At first they had some local programs but now a days they relay AIR Thiruvanatapuram, the capital station of our Kerala State which broadcasts in the same language. They have local IDs at sign on and play some music also then. AIR Kavaratti started on January 1, 1994 and I picked up the inaugural broadcast by chance and was trying for its QSL till now by sending several reports to them. This time I contacted them on telephone and the in charge told me that the Station Engineer of AIR Kozhikode is in charge of their station and to try for the verification through him which ultimately worked. AIR Kozhikode by the way has daily broadcasts in the evenings for these Islands. Incidentally, I had visited Kavaratti by ship in 1989 and stayed there for 45 days taking part in the VU7 Ham Dxpedition. At that time this station was not there. Then I visited the 10 watt solar powered TV stations and LW Radio Beacons there at Kavratti & Minicoy Islands. The present monitored schedule of AIR Kavaratti is: 6:40-9:45 am (Sun 8.30 pm) IST [= UT +5.5] 12:00-3:00 pm 5:00-8:30 pm Reception Reports of AIR Kavaratti may be sent to Station Engineer, All India Radio, Kozhikode 670032, Kerala. It`s a difficult catch outside South India as many other AIR stations are also using the same frequency (Jose Jacob, dx_india via DXLD) ** LEBANON [non]. CLANDESTINE from CIS to MIDDLE EAST. 11645 (Presumed), Voice of Liberty (via Javaradio Sweden), 1603 June 16, fair signal, well produced program, but I didn't catch an ID. All in Arabic, mostly short items, such as one about a rocket attack on a television station in Lebanon, and plenty of music. Tuned out at 1630 (Hans Johnson, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** MADAGASCAR. I heard the tests from the Radio Netherlands relay mentioned in DXLD 3107, that is yesterday, 17 June, at 0400 on 4930 and at 1630 on 3215, and today at 0400 on 6040. There's still one more to come: tonight at 1630 on 4930. Programming appears to be continuous unaccompanied choral singing (I only did brief checks, not listen to the whole thing). The 4930 test was noticeably weaker than the signal at the same time from Radio Madagascar on nearby 5010 (Chris Greenway, Nairobi, Kenya, June 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I also checked the 6040 broadcast, and it was quite marginal here (gh, Enid, DXLD) ** MAURITANIA. ATTEMPTED SEIZURE OF STATE RADIO CRW with wire reports [Jun 8] Attempts to seize Radio Mauritania by Islamist soldiers seeking the overthrow of the drought-stricken West African nation's president appear to have failed. With intense fighting between the kalashnikov-toting rebels and pro-government troops breaking out in the capital city the radio station has largely remained off the air and is believed to have been looted. Its absence from the airwaves suggested to wire journalists - most of whom were reporting from neighboring countries - that state-run radio and television had been seized early on Sunday, June 8. An announcement by the mutineers, in fact, had been expected. When Radio Mauritania returned Sunday morning, however, it stated that Nouakchott was still "under the enlightened guidance" of the president and urged residents to "remain calmly in your homes." Forty five minutes later, Reuters dispatched, the station was again silent. An Agence France Press (AFP) stringer placed a call to Radio Mauritania's main telephone line and reached someone claiming to be a pro-government soldier. "There is no problem now," he said. "We are from the presidential army unit. The premises have been pacified." Residents, meanwhile, told AFP that the state radio and television compound and education ministry were "ransacked" by looting prison escapees whose guards had fled. Mauritanian President Maaouya Sid'Ahmed Ould Taya is considered a pro-Israel U.S. ally in Saharan Africa who has come under fire from Islamist and pro-Arab forces inside his country that rejected his support for Operation Iraqi Freedom and crackdown on Islamic extremists (N. Grace, USA, Jun 8, 2003 for CRW via DXLD) ** MOLDOVA. 5960, R. Pridnestrovia has just verified my reception report from December 2002 on their English broadcast. They wrote: ``The Direction of the Radio DMR has received your letter and is glad to learn that our English program is listened in Europe. We thank you for having given a detailed description of the edition heard by you. It is very important for us to learn that the Radio DMR has found its listeners in Europe and raised their interest. We have received letters from Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway and Sweden. We will be glad to get new letters from you. Feel free to express your opinions and wishes regarding our program. Best regards, Director of the Radio DMR : Arkady D. Shablienko Editor-in Chief and author of the English program : Antonina N. Voronkova Editor and translator : Ernest A. Vardanean And the narrator : Vadim A. Rudomiotov`` Their address is: Radio Pridnestrovia, ul. Rozy Luksemburg 10, 3300 Tiraspol, Republic of Moldova. They broadcast in English Wednesdays at 1600-1630 on 5960 (A. Petersen, Denmark, Jun 9, 2003 in DXplorer-ML via CRW via DXLD) ** QATAR. AL JAZEERA: "FAIR," "BALANCED," AND BOUGHT: IT TURNS OUT THAT THE ARAB TV NETWORK WAS ON SADDAM'S PAYROLL. SURPRISE! by Stephen F. Hayes, The Weekly Standard, May 28, 2003 http://www.weeklystandard.com/content/public/articles/000/000/002/736nibie.asp AS FIERCE FIGHTING in southern Iraq claimed the lives of coalition fighters in early April, Ali Moh'd Kamal, the marketing director for al Jazeera, defended his network's willingness to show British and American soldiers captured by the Iraqis. "This is the first time the Arab media have had the upper hand on the western media," he told the Mirror, a London newspaper. He was right, of course. On Tuesday, when al Jazeera fired its director general, Mohammed Jassem al-Ali, the world was reminded once again of one significant reason --- Saddam Hussein's regime infiltrated media outlets throughout the region, including al Jazeera. According to a dispatch from Agence France Presse, hardly a pro- American outlet, al-Ali was canned after the Sunday Times of London reported earlier this month on documents uncovered linking him and two other al Jazeera employees to Saddam's regime. Al Jazeera has confirmed the report of Al-Ali's dismissal, but denies that he was let go because of suspicions about his ties to the Iraqi regime. On May 11, 2003, the Mirror's Marie Coyle wrote: "A document headed 'Presidency of the Republic, Mukhabarat Service,' indicates apparent contact between the intelligence agency and Mohammed Jasim Al-Ali, the station's managing director." While Coyle reported that there was not yet evidence that al-Ali had been paid off, the documents directly implicated two other al Jazeera employees. According to one document, authored by an Iraqi operative working in the regime's embassy in Qatar, an al Jazeera employee Iraqi intelligence referred to as Jazeera 2 passed letters from Osama bin Laden to Saddam Hussein. "[Jazeera 2] has a distinguished stand in the co-operation with us, continuously providing us with the information we request. I made him aware of the appreciation of his efforts. He has been presented with a set of gold jewelry for his wife." The documents also stressed the importance of keeping quiet the contacts between al Jazeera and the regime for fear that any disclosure of the relationship could cause Iraq to "lose [Al-Jazeera] as an instrument employed by us." These revelations support claims in a CIA document first reported by The Weekly Standard earlier this month. That report, "Baghdad's Propaganda Apparatus," offers a detailed analysis of the regime's efforts to co-opt Arab journalists with cash and gifts. It also named Rahim Mizyad, a close associate of Uday Hussein, who coordinated Iraqi media, as one of the agents working for al Jazeera: "Saddam's son Uday . . . assigned a writer, closely associated to him, Rahim Mizyad, as the correspondent to the al-Jazirah satellite television channel. Mizyad also is head of several weekly newspapers in Iraq and General Press Coordinator of all Iraqi governates, but Uday oversees his work." The efforts of the regime to win propaganda were hardly limited to al Jazeera. The CIA report, along with firsthand accounts from Arab journalists, paints a troubling picture of the Arab media coverage --- or, as important, lack of coverage--of the Iraqi regime. The Iraqi Ministry of Information, under the guidance of Uday and Tariq Aziz, "focused on determining the stories to be pushed, and assigning Iraqi resources overseas to conduct media operations." The Information Ministry coordinated its efforts with the Iraqi Intelligence Service (the Mukhabarat), which, according to the CIA report, "participates in the internal decision-making process, recruits media and other assets, delivers propaganda material and instructions to them, and provides payoffs. A variety of reporting indicates that journalists in the Middle East and Europe have been recruited to assist Iraq." Some of the transactions were obvious --- like cash handouts to journalists at the Iraqi Embassy in Amman, Jordan. Others were hidden. Saddam "would award big contracts to newspapers in Jordan to publish all sorts of stuff, like Iraqi schoolbooks and other things," says Salama Nimat, a Jordanian journalist who investigated connections between the Iraqi regime and politicians and journalists in Jordan. "The contracts were worth millions, and no one ever found out if they ever printed the books. No one cared." These practices are not new. They were covered both before and after the first Gulf War. "For years, the Iraqi leader has been waging an intensive, sometimes clandestine, and by most accounts highly effective image war in the Arab world," wrote Wall Street Journal reporters Jane Mayer and Geraldine Brooks in an exposé published on February 15, 1991. "His strategy has ranged from financing friendly publications and columnists as far away as Paris to doling out gifts as big as new Mercedes-Benzes." Curiously, as the American press struggles with questions about its own credibility, editors here have taken a pass on what one might think is a major story overseas. The New York Times ran a 98-word item on the al Jazeera firing on May 28, and it got a brief mention on MSNBC. It may be that the news about the dismissal broke too late to include it in newspapers out Wednesday. But the broadcast networks have largely skipped the story and only a handful of reporters followed up on the previous reports of collusion between the Iraqi regime and al Jazeera. Will this time be different? (Weekly Standard May 28, 2003 via N. Grace, USA for CRW via DXLD) ** QATAR [non]. AL-JAZEERA OPENS BAGHDAD STUDIO NAMED AFTER KILLED REPORTER Qatari Al-Jazeera satellite TV announced the opening of a new studio in Baghdad during the 17 June episode of its daily Iraq After the War programme, broadcast from Baghdad. At the beginning of the programme, presenter Muhammad Kurayshan said: "Dear viewers, greetings and God's peace and blessings be upon you. We welcome you to the penultimate episode of this programme which has a special flavour. With this episode, we inaugurate, with God's blessings, our new Al-Jazeera studio in Baghdad. This is the first studio our TV station has outside Doha. Out of loyalty and gratitude, Al-Jazeera Satellite Channel has named this studio after martyr Tariq Ayyub, our colleague who fell here in the Iraqi capital as the martyr of freedom and truth more than two months ago [following US shelling of the Al-Jazeera offices in Baghdad]. Martyr Tariq Ayyub studio was built by an enthusiastic group of Iraqi and Qatari young people under the daily and direct supervision of producer Farid al-Jabiri and supported by our Baghdad Bureau Director Waddah Khanfar." The programme then went on to discuss the plundering of Baghdad Museum, particularly focusing on stolen and retrieved artefacts. Appearing as guests on the programme were the director-general of research at the General Institute of Antiquities and Heritage in Iraq, Dr Doni George, and Iraqi archaeologist Dr Bahnan Abu-al-Suf. Source: Al-Jazeera TV, Doha, in Arabic 1605 gmt 17 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. 7437A, R. Krishnaloka (Tentative) (via Javaradio Sweden) 0218 June 18 with music, hard to describe. 0223 man talking over music plus he had a bit of echo. Not really sounding like Russian to me but hard to tell with the echo and music. 0227 slight break and more of the same over some New Age type music. Whole thing reminding me of the Falun Gong broadcasts. 0235 more music, chorus of men, but sounding more Middle Eastern than 'Krishna' to me. 0240 more talk, much easier to recognize as Russian. Another talk starting at 0247 with signal improving at this time, although there were still some deep fades. 0255 Singing by woman and then going instrumental. 0301 fast announcement by woman, I heard the word "radio" but nothing sounding like Krishnaloka. Another instrumental, dead air at 0304, pulled plug a minute later (Hans Johnson, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** SOMALILAND. Radio Hargeysa must have replaced its transmitter over the past few months. Earlier this year it was more-or-less on channel (7530) and operating USB with a carrier, so OK to listen to in AM mode. Now it is on 7530.6 or so and the carrier is so heavily suppressed that listening in AM mode is impossible. Even in USB mode the audio sounds very rough. A pity, as the signal strength is reasonable. Regards from a rather wintry Nairobi, (Chris Greenway, Kenya, June 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ? How can it be wintry on the Equator? (gh) ** SWEDEN. RADIO SWEDEN--Coming up on Radio Sweden: Thursday: In "HeartBeat" -- a mother's cure for skin disease and Doctors Without Borders Friday: Midsummer Eve Special on food, religion and culture in the Nordic region Saturday: "Spectrum" visits two plays Sunday: "SONO" goes wild at an art exhibition and rapper Timbuktu has a bone to pick with the Prime Minister (rerun) We reported last time about our DRM broadcasts from Canada, and mentioned that we'd have our own test broadcasts from Sweden soon. Well, soon is now, as those broadcasts began on June 13. We're using a 10 kW transmitter in Hörby mornings local time on 6065 kHz. As these are tests, the schedule is irregular, and we're trying different directions (Anders Backlin, Radio Sweden) (SCDX MediaScan June 18 via DXLD) ** SYRIA [non]. CLANDESTINE from CIS to SYRIA. 12120, Arabic Radio (via Javaradio Sweden), 1500 June 18, with at least six time pips. Music, and then ID's with slogan of "Free Arab Syria." Sked given as 1500-1600 on 12120 and 12085 and 0430-0530 7510. Lots of comments, decent signal, some deep fades. Much weaker on 12085. No sign of any jamming. All in Arabic (Hans Johnson, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** TAIWAN. At http://www.cbs.org.tw/French/index.htm A compter du 1er juillet, Radio Taipei International devient Radio Taiwan International pour les émissions en langues étrangères de CBS. Le 1er janvier 1998, Central Broadcasting System change de statut, et Radio Taipei International représente alors la radio de Taiwan à l`international. Durant ces cinq ans, des auditeurs de différents pays ont appris à mieux connaître et comprendre Taiwan, et nous ont contacté, nous permettant de nous rapprocher d`eux dans le monde entier. Mais nous avons découvert dans les lettres des auditeurs que certains avaient du mal à associer ``Taipei`` à ``Taiwan`` ; beaucoup estiment par ailleurs préférable d`utiliser directement le nom de ``Taiwan``. C`est pourquoi à partir du 1er juillet 2003, les émissions diffusées dans les douze langues étrangères de Central Broadcasting System le seront désormais sous le nom de Radio Taiwan International, remplaçant ainsi l`appellation Radio Taipei International. Nous espérons que ce changement gagnera le soutien des auditeurs de RTI. Central Broadcasting System No.55 Pei An Road Taipei, Taiwan. R.O.C. http://www.cbs.org.tw (via Daniel Say, BC, DXLD) Naming for the country rather than the city would certainly be in order, but one excuse above is that dumb listeners are having a hard time making the connexion between the two! Interesting that we are still awaiting a report of this in English (gh, DXLD) Hola Glenn, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, Venezuela. El pasado sábado 14/06 (domingo universal), la locutora Bonnie Cheng (si mal no recuerdo) anunció que a partir del 1ero. de Julio del presente año, Radio Taipei Internacional pasará a llamarse Radio Taiwan Internacional. Creo que la idea no está nada mal. 73's y buen DX (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, June 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** TAJIKISTAN [non]. We are looking for someone that can translate from Tajik to English. This is a part time job. 15-20 hours a week from home. All work it to be done at your home and email docs to us (Chris Stallings 757-548-4959 cstallings@theresumezone.com June 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** TIBET. 7385, Xizang PBS, 1645 June 13, 44423 English program Holy Tibet [started at 1630?]. Over the previous 4 days I was in a journey for the 'Holy Spirit vacations' on the Mount Kerkini - Belles- 80 km NE from Thessaloniki for some relaxing as well as tripping across the area. Kerkini is one with fishes under preservation. We stayed in the very small village Ano Poroia, 900 m above sea , about 5 km from the Kerkini lake. The radio I used is Kchibo CC300 cassette sized PLL with digital readout and its own telescopic antenna. This radio shows good sensitivity across the upper bands (9, 11 13 and 15 MHz so that antenna needed not to be fully unfolded , but for lower bands full unfolding is necessary. Please notice that images can be heard in several bands. More info on this radio on my web page http://www.geocities.com/zliangas/ (please look at kchibo.pdf) (Zacharias Liangas, Greece, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** TOGO [non]. CLANDESTINE from CIS? to TOGO. 12125, Radio Togo Libre (via Javaradio Sweden) 2001 June 15 with IDs and talk by man in French. Perhaps it was news, but I didn't hear any place names. Fair signal, bad QRN. After some music, gave a number of ID's at 2020. No joy in hearing them via Javaradio Sweden at 1305 on 21760 today Jun 16 (Hans Johnson, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** U S A. http://www.winb.com/DxPgms.htm (Hans Johnson, June 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Glenn: Information about the WLC HF e-mail service for the Great Lakes is available at http://www.marinenet.net/WLC.htm I hope this isn't an old un-updated site. 73 (Kim Elliott, DC, DX LISTENING DIGEST) And also other MarineNet stations, frequency lists, etc. (gh) ** U S A. Hi. I thought the following might be of interest to some on the SWL list. While this came over the NDB list (longwave) they will also be using some shortwave frequencies. 73 de Phil, KO6BB DX begins at the noise floor! Merced, California 37.18N 120.29W CM97sh -----Original Message----- NDB List Information Page: http://www.beaconworld.org.uk/info.htm Hi All, Here's a chance to hear the loudest MF station in California. You may want to brush up on your 20 WPM code copying speed beforehand :O) GL de Mike KB6WFC --- Richard Dillman ddillman@igc.org wrote: To: KPH-OTA@mindspring.com, MF_Monitors@yahoogroups.com Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2003 21:46:58 -0700 Subject: [MF Monitors] KPH On The Air - Night of Nights IV HISTORIC MORSE CODE RADIO STATION WILL RETURN TO THE AIR Stations KPH and KFS To Be Heard Once Again In the fourth annual event that has become known as the "Night of Nights" historic Morse code radio station KPH will return to the air in commemoration of the last commercial Morse message sent in the United States. KPH, the ex-RCA coast station located north of San Francisco, will return to the air for commemorative broadcasts on 12 July at 1701 PDT (13 July at 0001 GMT), 4 years and one minute after the last commercial Morse transmission in the US. These on-the-air events are intended to honor the men and women who followed the radiotelegraph trade on ships and at coast stations around the world. Transmissions are expected to continue until at least midnight PDT (0700 GMT). For this fourth annual Night of Nights one frequency for equally historic coast station KFS will also be activated. Veteran Morse operators, including many former KPH and KFS staff members, will be on duty at the receiving station at Point Reyes, CA listening for calls from ships and sending messages just as they did for so many years before Morse code operations were shut down. The transmitters are located 18 miles south of Point Reyes in Bolinas, CA at the transmitting station established in 1913 by the American Marconi Co. The original KPH transmitters, receivers and antennas will be used to activate frequencies in all the commercial maritime HF bands and on MF as well. KPH will transmit on 4247.0, 6477.5, 8642.0, 12808.5, 17016.5 and 22477.5 kc on HF and on 500 and 426 kc on MF. KFS will transmit on 17026.0 kc. These frequencies have been made available through the generous cooperation of Globe Wireless, the current owner of the KPH and KFS licenses. Many of the transmitters will be 50s vintage RCA sets. Power output will be 4 to 5 kW. The transmitting antennas include a Marconi T for MF, double extended Zepps for 4, 6 and 8 Mc and H over 2s for 12, 16 and 22 Mc. Operators will listen for calls from ships on 4184.0, 6276.0, 8368.0, 12552.0, 16736.0 and 22280.5 kc on HF and 500 kc on MF. KPH and KFS will send traffic lists, weather and press broadcasts and commemorative messages, many of which will be sent by hand. At other times the KPH and KFS "wheel" will be sent to mark the transmitting frequencies. Reception reports may be sent to: Ms. DA Stoops, P.O. Box 381, Bolinas CA 94924-0381 USA Members of the public are invited to visit the receiving station for this event. The station will be open to visitors beginning at 1500 PDT (3:00 pm). The station is located at 17400 Sir Francis Drake Boulevard and is on the route to the Point Reyes lighthouse. Watch for a cypress lined driveway on the right about a mile past the entry to Coast Guard station NMC. KPH is operated by the Maritime Radio Historical Society in cooperation with the Point Reyes National Seashore, part of the National Park Service. Further information may be found on the Maritime Radio Historical Society Web site at http://www.radiomarine.org or by contacting Richard Dillman at +1 415-990-7090 (email: ddillman@igc.org) or Tom Horsfall at +1 510-237-9535 (email: wa6ope@hotmail.com). VY 73, RD Richard Dillman, W6AWO Member of the Maritime Radio Historical Society http://www.radiomarine.org Collector of Heavy Metal: Harleys, Willys and Radios over 100 lbs. (via Phil Atchley, swl at qth.net via DXLD) ** U S A. PLAN TO CLEAR THE AIR FOR POLICE RADIOS HITS SNAG By Paul Davidson, USA TODAY A proposed swap of airwaves to cut cellphone interference with dozens of police and fire radio systems nationwide has been held up by a less complex proposal from others in the industry. The rival proposals have vexed and divided the staff of the Federal Communications Commission as few issues have, in part because each plan would in some ways benefit the party proposing it. The impasse threatens to delay resolution of a problem that has been hampering emergency response capabilities since the mid-1990s. The FCC appeared headed toward approval of the airwave swap -- proposed last December by Nextel Communications and a coalition of public-safety agencies -- until Motorola and a group of wireless companies stepped in with an alternative plan last month. The root of the interference problem is that frequencies used by public safety agencies, Nextel and other mobile radio services are interlaced. As a result, the far more numerous antenna towers Nextel uses for its cellphone service sometimes drown out public-safety radios, resulting in ''dead spots'' in coverage in several dozen cities, including Seattle and Miami. In fall 2001, Nextel first proposed giving up spectrum that would allow creating an interference-free public safety block. In trade, Nextel would get contiguous airwaves in a band now reserved for satellite phone services. Nextel agreed to pay $850 million toward costs for public safety and private carriers to reprogram equipment or buy new gear. But mobile phone carriers say the plan unfairly hands Nextel prime spectrum that otherwise could be sold at auction by the FCC for billions of dollars. Critics of the Nextel plan also say the spectrum swap would disrupt about half the nation's 2,200 public-safety agencies, even though interference incidents are isolated. In addition, it would take nearly four years to complete, and it might not fully eliminate the interference. Last month, Motorola, which makes most public-safety radios, told the FCC it has developed a device that can filter out Nextel's signals while still receiving public-safety transmissions. ''We think there's a technical solution,'' says Motorola's Steve Sharkey. Public-safety agencies can get the device when they upgrade to new radios, which could take years, or they can retrofit existing radios. A group of wireless firms backs that plan in tandem with stronger interference protections. But the Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials calls the proposal ''reactive'' to interference events. And it's unclear who would pay for the upgrades under the alternative plan. ''You've got to fix the underlying problem,'' says Nextel's Larry Krevor. He says interference is more widespread than critics say, and it's growing. He says only a swap can cleanly address all the causes. Some observers suggest Motorola may be opposing a swap because that could open its market to rival radio makers. But others say Motorola would benefit from equipment upgrades in either case. (c) Copyright 2003 USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Co. Inc. (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. WARNING: EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM FULL OF HOLES; SAFETY EXPERTS PRESSING FOR HIGH-TECH UPGRADES --- By Mimi Hall, USA TODAY A truck transporting a toxic substance turns over on a highway near your house. A terrorist's radioactive ''dirty bomb'' goes off blocks from your downtown apartment building. A line of tornadoes is bearing down on your church. How will you be warned right away and told what to do? Chances are you won't. The nation's emergency alert system is broken. And despite frequent warnings from federal officials that terrorists could strike again -- possibly with chemical, biological or radiological weapons of mass destruction -- little has been done since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, to fix it. As a result, many Americans risk not knowing about a potentially dangerous situation until it's too late to do anything about it. ''If you get warned, it's as much luck as anything else,'' says Kenneth Allen, executive director of the Partnership for Public Warning, an organization of government emergency managers and industry executives. The partnership is raising concerns about the lack of a unified, coherent warning system. Most Americans have heard the three test beeps associated with the Cold War-era Emergency Alert System (formerly the Emergency Broadcast System) on their radio or TV. But experts say that system is functional in only a handful of states -- and outdated even where it works. It relies on television networks and radio broadcasters voluntarily turning over air time to government officials in an emergency. But decades after it was created, the system is hobbled by outdated equipment and lack of local participation. If the president needed to warn the nation of an impending nuclear attack, he would have access to thousands of TV and radio stations to do so. But for state and local emergencies, the system is spotty at best. Even if the president were to activate the system nationally -- something no president has done -- he would reach only those people tuned in to a TV or radio network. ''We live in a much more complex, diverse, mobile society, and we face threats that our grandparents never faced,'' Allen says. ''They didn't have chemical-truck spills or nuclear accidents or terrorists.'' His organization and members of a Federal Communications Commission advisory committee say the nation should turn to high-tech solutions to warn people about emergencies and suggest how to respond. Information could be delivered by telephones, cellphones, pagers and computers. Computer chips could be embedded in TVs and radios to make them turn on automatically when warnings are broadcast. ''We have the technology. We can do it,'' says Craig Fugate, director of Florida's Division of Emergency Management and chairman of the public-warning partnership's board. He says chips could be installed in all new TV sets for about 50 cents per chip. But that has never been done because industries worry that they would be held liable if the chips failed. Technological advances would make it possible to alert small groups of people to an emergency, such as those living in a 10-block area or on a suburban cul-de-sac. Warning just those affected would reduce panic that might be caused by a broad-scale alert. Weather radios that turn on automatically to broadcast tornado warnings are popular in some parts of the country. But less than 10% of the population owns them. By Wednesday, the FCC advisory group will vote on suggestions for a new high-tech system. Ira Goldstone, the Tribune Co. technology coordinator who heads the panel, says he hopes the issue will pick up momentum. But no federal agency has taken the lead. Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge has expressed support for a new national warning system, but it has yet to become a top priority. Michael Brown, the undersecretary for emergency preparedness and response, says the department isn't going to ''jump in with both feet.'' He says the public will rely on news media for information during major disasters. But he says new technologies will lead to better regional warning systems. Sen. John Edwards, D-N.C., who is running for president, says that's not good enough. The current system ''depends on television and radio that most people won't hear in the middle of the night when an attack could come,'' he says. ''Public warnings save lives, so we have to make sure they get to every American.'' The Senate tried to include $10 million toward that end in this year's budget -- a small amount by federal government standards but more than enough, experts say, to develop a decent public-warning system. But the money was stripped out of the budget. Some wonder whether the nation needs a new warning system in an age of 24-hour news coverage. On and after Sept. 11, for example, stations broadcast information from officials around the clock. ''If there was a national crisis, chances are that most radio stations and TV stations would put (the president) on,'' the partnership's Allen says. ''But if you're watching TNT (Turner Network Television) or the shopping channel, you might never know there was something going on. I've got 130 channels on my cable network. How many would broadcast a presidential alert? Maybe 10.'' Even if most channels broadcast government warnings, Fugate says, ''if there's a chemical spill in the middle of the night in your neighborhood, you're probably not going to be watching CNN.'' (c) Copyright 2003 USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Co. Inc. (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. BROADCAST BAND UPDATE by Greg Hardison THE OBVIOUS: By now, I don't have to tell YOU that the FCC orchestrated their historic ownership vote on June 3, etc., etc. The original Radio de-reg proposal would have allowed the mega-group owners to possess up to 10 stations in one market. The most significant radio-development was the move allowing Arbitron to define what constitutes a "market", in the bloodshot eyes of the FCC. It's been a while since I was thoroughly familiar with such flotsam, but ARB recognizes at least two markets in each area...the internal, primary example, and the "TSA", or Total Survey Area --- which in the case of Los Angeles, extends out to beyond Lancaster and Victorville. (The TSA designation is based on areas of basic Television service, as recognized by marketing-types circa 25 years ago. In central Texas, for instance, the Dallas/Ft. Worth TSA used to extend some 250 miles southwest toward San Angelo, and on beyond south toward I-10 --- as WFAA-TV (Ch.8), KTVT (Ch.11), and KERA-TV (Ch.13) were relayed via microwave to most Cable systems in that part of the state, well into the 1980s. Similarly, the Los Angeles TSA at least used to extend to the Nevada and Arizona state lines.) The June 3 vote now legalizes the NBC arrangement in Los Angeles, for example, spotlighting common ownership of KNBC-TV Channel 4, with Spanish-language TV outlets KWHY-TV Channel 22, and KVEA Channel 52. Firms in the "largest" markets (certainly NYC, L.A. and Chicago) can now own as many as three TV stations in one of these markets. Locally, Infinity no longer has to sell KFWB in order to remain sanctioned, and common (Tribune Co.) ownership of The Los Angeles Times and KTLA Channel 5 will go on as planned. Richard Wagoner writes an excellent weekly Radio column in the South Bay (Calif.) Daily Breeze. A brief sample of his thoughts from the June 13 column reads thus: "You can blame the FCC, but it really was Congress that started the whole problem with the passage of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. That is the act that opened the way for three large group owners to control an estimated 50 percent of radio listening in America. And it was Congress that formed rules forcing the FCC to evaluate media regulations every two years under an order to drop or change any regulations that couldn't be defended on a competitive standpoint. So it`s humorous to watch members of Congress trample over themselves to be the first to condemn the FCC on its latest action, loosening rules for cross-ownership and ownership caps for television stations and newspapers." -- Indeed, the surplus of ignorance among those who are designated to "lead", arguably stems from an overabundance of book-learning, without any real expertise in the ways of Real Life. Some of us remember (without fondness) the Electronic Communications Privacy Act of 1986, which prohibits U.S. residents from even tuning in frequencies used for Cellular operations --- despite the existence in 1986, of Digital- cellular technology. The Digital touch by design would prevent anyone except intended recipients from making any sense out of cellular transmissions. Ironically, this Digital technology was put into widespread use in the past five years (and remember, the actual technology dates back to around 1980), which means the 1986 bill was ALWAYS completely unnecessary for privacy, from the git-go! The original '86 bill would have prohibited use or possession of receivers capable of pulling in those high-UHF frequencies --- which happen to fall between Channels 74 and 83, on the U.S. UHF-TV band. Geez, that would have meant that 75% or more of the TV sets in use at that time (capable of tuning past Ch. 69) would have been illegal to own! (I've fantasized many times over what the collection/confiscation procedures would have entailed - -- they probably would've resembled the "Morlocks dinner call" scene from "The Time Machine", either the 1961 or 2002 versions!) Obviously, the bill was amended, but actual communications receivers which tune those same frequencies lost FCC-type acceptance (meaning approval for domestic sales), in the first quarter of 1994. Sound familiar? Think back to the days of the Cold War, when folks in the Soviet Bloc faced criminal sanctions for listening to Radio Free Europe or Radio Liberty. Some legislative model, no?? More news on the overall subject now, from All Access http://www.allaccess.com another superb source of info: - "Rep. BERNIE SANDERS (I-VT)'s bill to overturn the FCC's new media ownership bill is coming to the House on THURSDAY (6/12), and the Congressman told a VERMONT State House press conference that "what we are seeing now are people from across the political spectrum coming together and saying that American democracy means the flourishing of ideas, differences of opinion, and not a centralized media controlled by a handful of large corporations." The RUTLAND HERALD also reports that Rep. MAURICE HINCHEY (D-NY), a co-sponsor of SANDERS' bill, also plans to introduce a re-regulation bill in the future." -- Apparently, there is some thoughtful attention being paid to this mess by at least SOME members of Congress. The questions remain: who will pay off whom to overturn this effort, and will we ever know?? DIGITITIS: For the true Radio Phreaks among us, this marks the 70th year of the National Radio Club --- a splendid non-profit organization specializing in long-distance AM reception, and of course, covering many related topics. While I'm sharing a few of My Favorite Things (helluva song title, no?) with you, here's one more: Leonard Kahn's answers to AM technology. An article written by NRC member Fred Vobbe of Ohio, and published in the NRC'S "DX News" (volume 70, #26, page 22) summarizes some of Mr. Kahn's latest hijinks. His system is called Compatible AM-Digital, or Cam-DO for acronymic purposes, and is set to restore full 15 kHz audio response (equal to FM), to AM signals. (Several years ago, the National Radio Standards Committee arranged for all U.S. AM stations to roll-off the sound at 10 kHz, in an effort to reduce adjacent-channel interference. Those of us with Wideband AM receivers could definitely tell the difference --- age-related hearing losses notwithstanding!) Those using standard low-pass AM receivers would notice markedly improved sound under the Kahn setup; others with these Wideband rigs would jump for joy. Of course, the functional need for such receivers would be addressed by the development and marketing of Digital-AM sets, delivering CD-quality sound with full frequency response. The Kahn group is arranging tests, mostly on stations in the Midwest, to be conducted during both daytime and nighttime conditions, in order to evaluate the effects of fading, and other generally distance-related issues. Additionally, Kahn Communications Inc. filed a petition for rule-making with the FCC in January, which would require the agency to appoint a blue-ribbon panel of experts, who would be charged with revising review procedures involving new Broadcast technologies. The goal: to remove undue corporate/pork- barrel influences, from the FCC-approval process in general. One can dream, can't one? SIGN UP TODAY! A shameless plug for the aforementioned NRC follows: a one-year membership is available for U.S. addresses, for $28 ($38 in Canada and $52 elsewhere); just send check or money order to: RON MUSCO, P.O. BOX 118, POQUONOCK, CT 06064-0118 --- again, this is a wholly non-profit organization; their annual convention takes place each year over the Labor Day weekend. This time around, in Dallas, Texas. Until the next, Peace and Prosperity! (--GREG HARDISON, June 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. 1680, KTFH Seattle WA, P/d letter and business card in 7 days. Says they came on the air 5/21 at noon. Says the programming is Hindi from 1200 to 2400 and // with KKMO in SS from 2400 to 1200. [UT -7] V/s Monte Passmore, CE (Griffith-CO) expanded band QSL #40 2003 QSL #19 (Patrick Griffith, N0NNK CBT CBNT Westminster, CO, USA NRC AM via DXLD) ** U S A. WPTR TRIBUTE SITE: I stumbled across the below 1540 WPTR (Albany, NY) tribute website yesterday. I grew up listening to this station in the '70's and spent a nostalgic few minutes checking out airchecks, photos, music surveys, etc. Anyone remember screaming Shotgun Johnny Ringo? He DJ'ed at this station in the mid to late 70's. http://www.fifteenforty.com/ Regards, (Peter Jernakoff, Dupont Titanium Technologies, Wilmington, Delaware, NRC-AM via DXLD) I remember Shotgun Johnny Ringo; he sure was a standout. I listened from Lowell, MA. The 1540 signal practically burned my radio --- He aired lots of callers from the "counter-culture", straight from a Cheech and Chong casting call --- wished I airchecked his shows. They were different. My memory is a bit fuzzy, but the playlist gave me more of the impression they were AOR-leaning than Top 40. Or maybe they just played the AOR crossovers... it was cool for this early teen to listen to nonetheless. Led Zepplin and Deep Purple on AM radio... you gotta love it. Thanks WPTR. Thanks, Peter for posting the URL. There probably are a few folks who weren't aware of the WPTR tribute site. I found it from an earlier mention (Ron Gitschier, Palm Coast, FL, ibid.) ** U S A. TNN SAYS RULING IS COSTING IT MILLIONS Reuters Wednesday, June 18, 2003; Page C07 NEW YORK, June 17 -- Media giant Viacom Inc.'s TNN network told an appeals court today it had lost nearly $17 million since film director Spike Lee blocked the cable channel last week from changing its name to Spike TV. . . http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A7719-2003Jun17.html 73, (-.. . Kraig Krist, KG4LAC, DXLD) ** U S A. DOWNS STILL HAS PLENTY TO SAY --- By HEATHER RUTZ LIMA - Though he's no longer paid for it, Hugh Downs couldn't resist a little commentary Tuesday afternoon. After emceeing his 65th Shawnee High School class reunion, the Emmy-award winning broadcaster had plenty to say, especially about his own business. "Appalling," Downs said about Monday's Federal Communications Commission ruling easing rules governing ownership of newspapers, television and radio stations. The changes allow companies to own TV stations reaching nearly half the nation's viewers and to own newspapers and TV and radio stations in the same city, according to the Associated Press. Critics are already challenging the changes, saying they will lead to a few giant companies in control of the media. Downs, 82, who used to offer commentaries as part of his hosting duties on ABC's newsmagazine 20/20, was quick to agree. Downs said he ended his career partially because network lawyers had begun nitpicking his words while on the air. "It's not good for the public, which has trouble enough getting unbiased news," Downs said. Clear Channel, which controls 1,200 radio stations across the country, provided a recent example of how large companies control what information people receive, Downs said. "No matter what you think about the Dixie Chicks, a giant radio corporation, Clear Channel, banned them (after the band made anti-war statements)," Downs said. "Imagine a merger between AOL and Disney, and pretty soon there would be a big sign over the Capitol building. Then you get what these giants want you to hear." Downs' family moved to Lima when he was two years old. An Army veteran of World War II, Downs started in broadcasting at Lima radio station WLOK. He logged a 64-year career in broadcasting, including hosting the Tonight show, the Today show and 20/20. Downs retired in 1999 and now splits his time between Arizona and New York. These days, Downs is writing more books, lecturing and giving speeches. His latest book, Letters to a Great-Grandson, will be released in the fall. The book is for the public, as well as his own great-grandson. "What I wouldn't give for a document like that from my grandfather or great- grandfather," Downs said (via Fred Vobbe, Lima OH, June 15, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. TOWER WORKER DIES IN NEBRASKA Goehner, Nebraska (AP) -- Authorities in Nebraska say a faulty piece of safety equipment may have led to the death of a worker who fell 12- hundred-feet from a television transmission tower. The Seward County sheriff says Carlos J. Muñoz of West Monroe, Louisiana, was attached to the tower through a harness system moments before he fell. The sheriff says a piece of the harness system apparently hooked to the tower was found bent at what was termed ``a disturbing angle.'' Munoz was one of five employees of SpectraSite Broadcast Group of Irving, Texas, who'd been working on the 15-hundred-foot tower 30 miles west of Lincoln, Nebraska for the last two weeks. A spokeswoman for Cary (North Carolina)-based SpectraSite says the company is working with federal and local authorities to investigate the incident. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is being asked to help with the investigation. It was Nebraska's fourth death involving a tower accident in the last 14 months (via Bob Carter, amfmtvdx at qth.net via DXLD) What`s the station?? A 22-year-old man was killed yesterday afternoon when he fell 1,200 feet from a television transmission mast in Nebraska, USA. The man, who was working as a technician, fell from the mast and died immediately. The mast is used by KOLN/KGIN. The man was not employed by the station and the fall was witnessed by several fellow crew members. The fatal fall comes more than a year after a worker was killed working on a Nebraska Educational Television Network mast. Tim Culpepper, 29, was killed after being struck by falling debris when a hoisting rope snapped on top of a 1,524-foot mast in April 2002. His body dangled nearly eight hours before rescuers could reach him. Two Illinois workers died in September last year when a 1,965-foot tower collapsed (From Waveguide 18 June 2003 via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. Today is Idaho's 50th TV Anniversary; it was 50 years ago today KFXD-TV first signed on as Idaho's 1st TV station. It only lasted about 3 months, being one of the shortest lived stations in the US. On 7/12 KIDO (now KTVB) came on the air and they usually claim they were first (Frank Aden, Boise, June 18, NRC FMTV via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ PUBLICATIONS +++++++++++++ FIRESIGN THEATRE RE-RELEASES Back in March you (I think it's you) wrote: ``Sony Music/Columbia has done absolutely no followups to last year`s (or year before last--it`s hard to me to remember) CD reissues, which means that my favorite Firesign albums, ``The Tale of the Giant Rat of Sumatra`` and ``Everything You Know Is Wrong`` remains unavailable. Laugh.com has reissued these on CD; see http://store.yahoo.com/laughstore/firtheatsket.html And while has another DVD,``The Firesign Theatre`s All Day Matinee, Martian Space Party and The Yokes of Oznard`` in their computer, every time I try to order it it comes back as being unavailable. In case it is, the UPC number for that is 688321202527 (John Norfolk, OKCOK, DX LISTENING DIGEST)`` This has been axed, but will probably come out eventually (Brian Westley, firesigntheatre.com webmaster June 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ RDS SCROLLING Although scrolling text is broadcast in England I do not get it on my DX-398. My daughter has a Roberts R9917 which I assume is a badge engineered Sangean and it does do AF, TA and Station ID but not scrolling. In England scrolling seems largely relegated to car radios and Home Stereos but more and more portables are appearing with RDS features such as the Roberts R9917. Virtually all cars here have RDS radios (except the very, very cheapest-I have only seen one car without RDS). When I lived in Germany stations used more in the way of scrolling. I certainly do not use all the RDS features of but I do use the TA and AF functions in addition to station ID as they can be most helpful on journeys. On Sunday we went across England and listened to Classic FM (our first national commercial station) even though this meant several changes of frequency we did not have to adjust the car radio and traffic reports came in as they were broadcast even though they might be on another station. Somehow I think the `Bottom Line` (I must confess that this brings up the vision of a posterior :-0) would improve if people did not have to retune frequency, were able to get traffic reports whilst listening to their favourite station and knew what the station name was. ``Thar is gold in them thar hills``. For a good description of RDS go to http://www.rds.org.uk/rds98/whatisrds.htm (Brian Millson in Sunny England, DX-398 yahoogroup via DXLD) DRM +++ RECEIVER NEWS - THE "2010" LIVES [sic] Mayah Communications of Germany has introduced a DRM portable with an USB interface for firmware upgrades. Visit http://www.mayah.com "This DRM Receiver is the 2nd generation receiver for the Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM) standard. It is the result of a joint development effort of MAYAH, Coding Technologies and AFG. The receiver is based on standard components and different to the first generation, it is smaller and lower cost. A DSP module performs all the DRM specific decoding functions. The software of the DSP module can be updated via the USB interface. The USB interface also provides the data from data application for further processing with a PC. The receiver can decode mono and stereo audio signals. The full stereo signal is available at the headphone outputs. The display indicates station name, used frequency, field strength and the number of service components of the received DRM signal. Additional information transmitted will be displayed if available. The station can be selected by directly entering the frequency using the numeric keypad. Beside the DRM standard the receiver also supports reception of analogue AM programs in the MW, LW and SW bands as well as FM programs." (T. Wood, June 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) PROPAGATION ++++++++++++ BLACKOUT I was just listening to a station (WYFR) in the 19 meter band when it took a sudden dive and disappeared about 2250 UT. Checking WWV on the various frequencies shows absolutely nothing from either WWV or WWVH. This on both the SP-600 and Yaesu VR-5000 receivers and both antennas. At 2310 the SP-600 is starting to show some life from WWV on 15 MHz. While it's understandable on the SP-600/HC-10 combination, it is "just discernable" on the VR-5000 (with the DSP off). 73 de (Phil, KO6BB, Atchley, Merced CA, June 17, swl at qth.net via DXLD) There was an M6-class flare at 2255Z June 17, 2003. That is quite a flare. Knocked out HF on the sunlit side of Earth... 73 de (Tomas, NW7US (AAR0JA/AAM0EWA) Hood, swl at qth.net via DXLD) Talked with a ham today. He was working 2 meter E-skip to quite a wide area yesterday evening (6-16). Mainly NM, Mexico, AZ, TX and NV. While talking on 2 meters with Las Vegas, they decided to try 220 mHz. They CONTINUED to talk on 220 MHz until around 2300 MDT! Anybody see/hear any of this on FM/TV? BTW, 6 meters was open to Honduras, Japan, and east coast of Canada (Bill Frahm - Boise ID, June 17, AMFMTVDX mailing list via DXLD) [This may have nothing to do with propagation, but timing is close:] I was trying to listen to the BBC African service on 15400 kHz at 2200 UT on 6/17/03 and encountered an odd sort of noise that made listening very difficult. I was wondering if others heard it too and if anyone could identify it. I realize that this is listening off the back of the antenna, but usually that transmission at that time is fairly clear, even though somewhat weak, and definitely understandable here in St. Louis, MO. It's often better than reception in mid-morning of the Americas service on 15190! Anyway, what I was hearing was a sort of whining motor-like noise that accompanied the program audio. It wasn't present on other nearby frequencies, which were either clear with the usual atmospheric noise at a low level, or just about perfect reception of a strong signal on 15410 kHz. So I'm wondering if this is a known type of transmitter defect producing this machine-noise effect? If so, is there a standard term to use to refer to it? I suppose the closest I can come to describing it is like you were trying to listen to a radio while a lawn mower was running at about an equal sound level; the desired signal's understandability varied with time. The female announcer's voice came through much clearer than the lower-frequency male's voice. Thanks for any comments or explanations! 73, (Will Martin, MO, swprograms via DXLD) OUR EXCLUSIVE AND NOT COPYRIGHTED HF PLUS LOW BAND VHF PROPAGATION UPDATE AND FORECAST Solar activity may switch again into high gear, with former sunspot region 365 now well in sight. Many solar flares, and a huge coronal hole will certainly have an impact upon HF propagation during the next three to five days. As a matter of fact, it is expected that more aurora borealis and aurora australis events will occur during this week. Solar minimum is still expected to happen sometime between 2005 and 2007, with the most likely YEAR OF THE QUIET SUN happening circa 2006. Forecasters are predicting a solar minimum sunspot count of around 6 to 8 during the bottom of cycle 23, and as always they are expecting that sunspots from the new cycle are likely to appear very soon, perhaps by the very early months of 2004 (Arnie Coro, CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited June 17 via Bob Chandler, ODXA via DXLD) Major geomagnetic storm conditions this morning with estimated kp index of 7. Heavy auroral flutter on signals above 6 MHz. As is often the case with such conditions, there seemed to be an enhancement of lower band signals form the tropics. Thankfully, static crashes were at a fairly low level for this time of year (David Hodgson, TN, June 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) e.g., AUSTRALIA; CUBA FORECAST OF SOLAR AND GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY 18 JUNE - 14 JULY 2003 Solar activity is expected to range from low to high levels during the period. For the first half of the period Region 386 will have the potential for M-class and X-class activity. On 27 June, Region 375 is due to return and may have M-class potential during the second half of the period. A greater than 10 MeV proton event is possible early in the period because of the potential for a major event from Region 386. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux is expected to reach high levels on 21 – 23 June, 30 June – 03 July, and again on 06 – 07 July. The geomagnetic field is expected to range from quiet to major storm levels during the period. Unsettled to major storm levels are possible early in the period and again on 29 – 30 June due to coronal hole high speed streams. Minor storm levels are possible on 18 – 20 June, 25 – 26 June, and again on 03 - 07 July due to more high speed streams. :Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt :Issued: 2003 Jun 17 2211 UTC # Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Environment Center # Product description and SEC contact on the Web # http://www.sec.noaa.gov/wwire.html # # 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table # Issued 2003 Jun 17 # # UTC Radio Flux Planetary Largest # Date 10.7 cm A Index Kp Index 2003 Jun 18 125 30 5 2003 Jun 19 120 30 5 2003 Jun 20 120 25 5 2003 Jun 21 120 20 4 2003 Jun 22 120 20 4 2003 Jun 23 125 20 4 2003 Jun 24 130 30 5 2003 Jun 25 130 25 5 2003 Jun 26 120 25 5 2003 Jun 27 120 15 3 2003 Jun 28 120 15 3 2003 Jun 29 120 30 5 2003 Jun 30 120 30 5 2003 Jul 01 115 25 5 2003 Jul 02 115 15 3 2003 Jul 03 125 20 4 2003 Jul 04 130 25 5 2003 Jul 05 135 25 5 2003 Jul 06 140 25 5 2003 Jul 07 145 25 5 2003 Jul 08 155 20 4 2003 Jul 09 150 15 3 2003 Jul 10 145 12 3 2003 Jul 11 135 20 4 2003 Jul 12 130 20 4 2003 Jul 13 120 15 3 2003 Jul 14 120 20 4 (http://www.sec.noaa.gov/radio via WORLD OF RADIO 1187, DXLD) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-108, June 17, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3f.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1186: RFPI: Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 7445 15039 WWCR: Wed 0930 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1186.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1186.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1186h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1186h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1186.html FIRST AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1187: Wed 2200 on WBCQ 7415, 17495-CUSB Thu 2030 on WWCR 15825 Fri 1930 on RFPI 15039 Sat 1731 on WINB 13570 WORLD OF RADIO ON WWCR: WWCR confirms that something else has replaced WOR Saturdays at 0600 on 5070. A different time may replace this (gh) UPDATE ON JIM CONRAD Good news, everyone! Jim was discharged from the hospital today! He's making good progress and says he's feeling much better. Apparently he had surgery when he was admitted to the hospital. He's under doctor's orders not to lift anything for a while. If you'd like to send an e- card or message to Jim, his e-mail address is: jol677@yahoo.com (Evelyn Hampton June 15, via Joe Olig, DXLD) ** AFGHANISTAN. The Kabul transmitter on 1296 is 400 kW and is a solidstate Harris. It consists of a pair of DX 200 power blocks combined. Harris DX 200 mediumwave transmitter website: {corrected} http://www.broadcast.harris.com/product_portfolio/prod_media/dx200.pdf (via U. Volk, Germany, BC-DX May 23 / June 6 via DXLD) ** ANTARCTICA. 15476, Radio Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel, Base Antártica Esperanza, 1925+, June 16. Spanish. Very nice Argentina folk songs. Short talks about the Rio Negro province co[a]st and Viedma- Carmen de Patagones region. ID's as: "Saludamos a todos los que sintonizan la frecuencia de 15476 kHz en la banda de 19 metros. Radio Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel, Base Esperanza de la Antártida Argentina" and "Desde el Sector Antártico Argentino transmite LRA36 Radio Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel en la frecuencia de 15476 kHz, en la banda de 19 metros. Radio Nacional Arcángel San Gabriel".44444 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentina, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** ARGENTINA. Olá amigos, Esuctado hoje às 0519 Z a Rádio Continental em LSB, 5339.91 kHz, com abertura de programa noturno com apresentadora (YL), "6 grados de sensación térmica". SINPO 54444. Receptor FT-767GX, ant dip W3DZZ. Até mais! (Flávio Archangelo, Jundiaí - SP, radioescutas June 16 via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA [and non]. GOD TUNES INTO THE DIGITAL AGE [stupid headline] (Sydney Morning Herald 16th June 2003) By Deborah Cameron http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/06/15/1055615675929.html In Australia's new northern bible belt, happiness is a warm transmitter. From Darwin and Kununurra, two big Christian missionary broadcasters want to win souls in Asia and this week their on-air evangelism enters the digital age. "It will make a huge change in short-wave broadcasting because it will be as clear as an FM signal on a local station," said the director of ministries at HCJB World Radio, Dennis Adams. As anyone with a short wave radio knows, an analog signal is prone to fade, whistle or erupt into static. From this week short-wave licence holders can begin broadcasting in digital format. Mr Adams, who doubles as station manager of HCJB's six-month-old Kununurra transmitter, describes digital as a "real breakthrough", especially for radio missionaries. The other big broadcaster, Voice International, beams programs in Indonesian, English, Chinese and Hindi from its Darwin transmitter into a region with a population of 2.8 billion. The audience has grown most rapidly in Indonesia, says Voice International spokesman Richard Daniel. Partly this is due to the popularity of radio host Riady, who Mr Daniel describes as "an Indonesian John Laws" recruited by talent scouts in Perth. It is also because of a playlist that, though sprinkled with religious crooners, features Coldplay and Avril Lavigne. By comparison, HCJB (which stands for Heralding Christ Jesus's Blessing) plays country music, middle of the road classics and national folk songs. Both want to expand. In East Timor, Voice is setting up a Portuguese language broadcaster and has used its network to recruit 50 pastors from Brazil who are in East Timor building schools, Mr Daniel said. Mr Daniel, who hails from Broken Hill where he owns the secular 2BH and Hill FM and has a 26-year history in radio, signed onto Christian broadcasting last year. He says that for the modern missionary, radio, email and SMS go hand in hand with field work. Both organisations are phenomenally wealthy. They expanded to Australia after a 1999 law allowed broadcasters other than the ABC to transmit internationally. While they face obstacles with digital broadcasts because listeners need to have a digital receiver, both networks are so well organised and funded that they are understood to be prepared to provide receivers or at least subsidise their $100 cost (via Robert Williams, Australia, Jilly Dybka, TN, DXLD) There you go. HCJB is ``phenomenally wealthy`` --- so why all the cutbacks from Ecuador? (gh, DXLD) ** AUSTRIA. En el programa: El Buzón del Radioescucha que se transmitió hoy Domingo por esta querida emisora, informó la amiga conductora del programa Isabél Miró, que habían sorteado el radio Grundig prometido y la ganadora resultó ser: Monserrat Aminto Casanova, Ella vive en la provincia de Barcelona, en España. Así mismo nombraron a una cantidad de oyentes del programa que recibirán premios especiales. Nota: Yo pensaba que este sorteo iba a ser el próximo domingo, pero me llevé la sorpresa cuando nombraron al ganador el dia de hoy. FELICITACIONES. Atte: (José Elías, Venezuela, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Efectivamente José... Además, en este penúltimo programa "Buzón Internacional" de Radio Austria Internacional (te corrijo el nombre, veo que tú también tienes un amor muy especial por KBS) magistralmente conducido por Isabel Miró y Jaime Carbonel durante 20 años, aludieron a miles de cartas recibidas en las últimas semanas (la mayoría de entristecidos oyentes que referíann al cierre de las emisiones en español) y se repasaron las tarjetas postales y navideñas, los obsequios recibidos de muchos radioescuchas que han acompañado a la querida ORF durante su rica historia. Agradecimientos retrospectivos - de los años '80 y '90- se hicieron mencionando a varios nombres como los de Liliana Mabel Delfino y Jorge Castelli de Buenos Aires (a quienes Mable Miró conoce personalmente), Bruno Alcaráz, Lilián Rivero de Uruguay, Ramiro Giraldo Fernández de Colombia, Alfredo Santamaría de Costa Rica, Jesus Claros Zurita de Cochabamba, Bolivia, Juan Morales de España, Néstor Vargas de Venezuela, Sara Lagos de Francia, Ildina Guisandor de Rumania... Estos y otros miles de oyentes han quedado registrados, según afirmaron Isabel y Jaime, en la colección de correspondencias que guardarán para siempre como un documento testimonial de la sección española de Radio Austria Internacional cuyas emisiones terminarán el próximo 30 de junio de 2003. También el Ayuntamiento de Viena ha destinado regalos para muchos oyentes elegidos al azar como Daniel Lamberti, Oscar Scirocco, de Argentina, David Laiza Juamán de Perú, Jorge Callejo y Sara Arteaga López en España, David Salazar Guillén y Julio Trenard de Venezuela, John Freddy Castellón Gil y Gustavo A. Rodríguez de Colombia, Dennys Taboada en Honduras, Gianela Guzmán en Canadá, Paulo Jorge Ferreyra, Rogelio Kruguer, Leoniodas Dos Santos do Nascimento y Elio Brekenfel, todos de Brasil, Víctor Castaño en Uruguay, Ximena Bishman de Chile, Fernando Perera Jordán de Cuba y otros. El próximo domingo 22 de junio será la despedida del programa y todos son convocados para escuchar (y grabar!) esa media hora final. Radio Austria quedará en nuestro recuerdo y -sin dudas- mucho de nosotros formará parte de la historia de esta emisora que fue la mejor embajadora de la realidad austríaca en el mundo hispano. De mi parte gracias amigos de ORF!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (Rubén Guillermo Margenet, Argentina, June 16, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** BELARUS. 10 June, 4982 kHz, ~03:35, in Russian, commercials, following by morning exercises by radio. ID at 0340 "V efire Radio Stalitsa". Carrier was partially suppressed; therefore I had to use BFO. I think station that has been relayed before 0340 was the 1st program of Belarussian Radio. Unfortunately I was not able to check whether that all was parallel to LW 279 kHz, because LW band was very noisy at the moment (open_dx - Yaroslav Derevyagin, Odessa, Ukraine, via Signal via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. 4924.97, 2235-2320 [June 16] R. Emisora Rural, Tefé. Full ID in Portuguese at 2306, after usual Voz do Brasil slot. Fair signal and moderate QRM from co-channel RRI Jambi. Real Audio clip available upon request. To South European DXers: I'm monitoring the bands on a regular basis these days and almost daily tips are posted on my blog: http://www.faiallo.splinder.it Although written in Italian, I hope that some information (e.g. frequency, time and date, name of station) could be useful to non Italian-speaking DXers too (Renato Bruni JRC 525 - 60m longwire Parma, Italy, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** CANADA. Freq change for DRM test of Radio Canada Inter effective June 15: 2000-2400 NF 9795 SAC 250 kW / 268 deg, ex 9740 0000-0200 on 9765 SAC 250 kW / 268 deg deleted 1000-1200 on 6055 SAC 250 kW / 268 deg deleted 1000-1600 on 9730 SAC 250 kW / 268 deg deleted (Observer, Bulgaria, June 17 via DXLD) ** CHINA. Harris has two 600 kW units for China up. Harris DX 200 mediumwave transmitter website: http://www.bc.harris.com/product_portfolio/prod_media/dx200.pdf (via U. Volk, Germany, BC-DX May 23 / June 6 via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. 5973.5, 0742 May 20, R. Auténtica fair with Colombian pops, regular TC by FA every minute over music (Paul Ormandy, June NZ DX Times via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. 4955, 16.6. 0020- COL: HJCQ, Rdif Nacional, Bogotá. Various programmes, music and religious "horas". Off 0200 (Listeners: Pauli Holm & Jari Lehtinen. QTH: Maakeski, So. Finland. Receivers Racal RA1792 & Yaesu FRG-100. Antennas different 100-meter long wires, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Are you quite sure about this one? Has been inactive for decades (gh) ** COLOMBIA. MIDI examples of Colombian music styles, starting with national anthem: http://www.geocities.com/fjmejia/english.html (via Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. Saludos cordiales amigo y colega Glenn. Espero te encuentres muy bien. El motivo de mi correo es para informarte que estuve escuchando a Radio Rebelde con señal bastante por Venezuela en la frecuencia de los 11655. Exactamente a las 1313 UT la señal ha quedado fuera del aire; si retorna nuevamente te aviso. Como muestra te anexo el siguiente archivo que acabo de grabar cuando despedían el Programa: Haciendo Radio. Atte: (José Elías Díaz G., Venezuela, June 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Apparently they turn off 11655 as soon as the Haciendo Radio program is over, at this odd time, altho the final timecheck on the recording was ``9 de la mañana``, so was it really made at 1300, not 1313? (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Radio Rebelde, en la frecuencia 11655 kHz a las 1110 UT y hasta las 1255, cuando están transmitiendo resumen de noticias antes de salir del aire a las 1300; a veces la señal se queda un poco más en el aire tal como pasó el dia de ayer. Cuando redactaba esta información, salió del aire la Radio Rebelde, La Emisora de La Revolución, como dice su slogan. Atte: (José Elías, Venezuela, June 17, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** CUBA. Radio Cuba ¡ Todas las emisiones de Radio y Televisión desde Cuba en vivo ! Listen and watch to all live stream transmissions of Cuban Radio and TV! Hören und sehen Sie Radio und TV aus Kuba - live! http://www.geocities.com/casamalecon/radiocuba/ (via Curtis Sadowski, WTFDA via DXLD) Based in Switzerland? I found the reason behind the N logo Cuba uses (while watching Cubavisión via the web). At the top of the hour, they showed a large NTV on the screen, and in an animated sequence, the letters came together into the large version of the N logo they use at the bottom of the screen. The T forms the left part of the logo, and the V fits into the right side of the N. The program they had on before the hour was fairly amusing, consisting of a panel show (similar to the one I caught on channel 4 Sunday) about the terrorists in Miami (they used the word gusano quite a bit) working to subvert the present Cuban government. They used some clips of President Bush in the show, obviously taken off American broadcast television (one clip had a seven logo typically used by urban ABC stations). With luck, I'll be able to watch future offerings of this show via DX (Curtis Sadowski, Paxton, Illinois, June 16, WTFDA via DXLD) ** CUBA. Nice to hear from you amigo! TV Ch 4 is the new "CANAL EDUCATIVO" national educational TV network in Havana. The TV 5 is probably Santa Clara or Santiago de Cuba. The TV 6 is either Havana CUBAVISION or Camagüey CUBAVISION Now we have several new UHF stations relaying the CANAL EDUCATIVO educational network: Pinar del Rio city CH. 14 Pinar del Rio, Sierra del Rosario relay is on CH 19 Camagüey is on CH 18 And many more are now being installed as the third national network will cover all of Cuba soon. A fourth national TV network is expected to be starting broadcasts pretty soon too. 73 and DX, Your friend in Havana, Arnie Coro, CO2KK (via Jeff Kadet, WTFDA via DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. CASTRO FOE SWITCHES TO AIRWAVES [misleading headline] By Madeline Baró Diaz, Miami Bureau, Sun Sentinel Palm Beach edition Posted June 16 2003 http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/palmbeach/sfl-pdbrothers16jun16,0,2603377.story?coll=sfla-news-palm MIAMI --- José Basulto's television station can fit in a suitcase and be broadcast from a small plane. In his South Miami home, Basulto demonstrates his $4,000 worth of equipment, a camcorder, a transmitter and devices to measure and amplify signals. The shoestring operation, which Basulto has employed twice, was an attempt to show that if a couple of amateur radio aficionados could broadcast to Cuba, so could the U.S. government with its $10 million-a-year enterprise, TV Martí. "It's so crummy, so poor, so Radio Shack," he said of his amateur equipment. Such is Basulto's life these days. Basulto became nationally known as the head of Brothers to the Rescue, the group that patrolled the Florida Straits for rafters and was credited with saving thousands of lives. This year, however, he announced that the rescue mission of Brothers was kaput, an acknowledgement that now that U.S. policy mandates the return of most Cubans found on the high seas, the Brothers' rescue efforts were obsolete. Continuing them, he said, actually could lead to the repatriation of rafters who were trying to flee Cuba. Basulto, 62, hung up his rescuer's hat, but not his activist's hat, continuing his efforts to support the internal opposition in Cuba through non-violent means. Broadcasting was his latest high-profile pursuit, fueled by his belief that TV Martí, broadcast for a few hours every night, is an important venture but one that is not reaching the majority of Cubans. "I do not know one Cuban [on the island] who has ever seen TV Martí," he said. But in recent years Basulto has also rubbed some hard-line Cuban- Americans the wrong way by taking controversial positions such as supporting Cuban dissident Oswaldo Payá, whose effort to bring a referendum on civil reforms in Cuba has been viewed with suspicion by some exiles. "I don't think he has a major leadership role at this point," said Max Castro, senior research associate at the University of Miami's North- South Center. "He seems to be working hard to maintain some sort of relevance." Basulto was a young man hoping to free his country from Fidel Castro's grip when he returned to Cuba prior to the Bay of Pigs invasion in 1961. Basulto said he was trained by the U.S. government in weapons, explosives and communications. His mission was to tell his fellow Cubans that the United States would be there for them when they rose up against Castro. Basulto began publicizing his broadcast venture this year when he announced that Brothers to the Rescue was taking to the skies again to show that a broadcast to Cuba was possible, despite the U.S. government's contention that Cuba's jamming of the signal made that impossible. The first flight was on Feb. 24, the anniversary of the shootdown. Before the flight, Brothers to the Rescue were featured on a segment on TV Martí where they showed Cubans how they could fashion a TV antenna out of materials like a hanger, a broom handle and a toilet plunger. Basulto said their transmission, from 100 miles southwest of Marathon, near where the planes went down, was seen in Havana. On May 20, Basulto and a colleague, Osvaldo Pla, made another attempt but their amplifier failed. That same night the federal government used Direct-to-Home satellite service and a transmission system on a military plane to broadcast TV Martí, in an attempt to enhance the signal. TV Martí officials say they will conduct further tests before determining how to proceed. That was not enough for Basulto, who does not know whether his activities pushed the U.S. government to respond. "We are asking for 365 transmissions a year," he said. Basulto's exploits have caught the attention of the Federal Communications Commission, which sent him a notice of violation informing him that his ham radio license did not allow him to broadcast to Cuba. He did not mind, though; he had made his point. "I wanted to get a message to the White House," he said. "We have raised the veil of hypocrisy. Mission accomplished." Copyright © 2003, South Florida Sun-Sentinel (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** EGYPT. Dear Glenn, after doing some digging concerning these new stations on the FM Band in Cairo, I figured out that as I was expecting that they are not 100 % state owned stations. We have a new media company called Good News For Me http://www.goodnews4me.com and the are sharing the whole project of the 24/7 Arabic and English musical stations with the Egyptian Radio & TV Union. The share of Good news for me is 40% and 60% for the ERTU. Good news for me is having a cooperation with Radio 1 (a famous FM radio station in Lebanon) to operate the station; 2 British DJs are already in Cairo trying to set up the whole thing. They originally working for Radio 1, the station still broadcasting music and jingles, no shows; according to my source in Good news for me they soon will start having talk shows, night shows, request shows, etc. All the best, Glenn. Yours (Tarek Zeidan, Cairo, Egypt, June 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Website Cannot Be Found. ``Good News`` is a Christian catch-phrase --- I assume not the case here, even if Coptic? Frequencies? (gh, DXLD) ** EL SALVADOR. Hello Glenn, The same day I read DXLD log and comments regarding Radio Imperial reception and fax-only QSLs, I received this in the mail. Apparently they do QSL postal reports. Radio Imperial, 17835, Personalized, frequency only, photo-copy of "Otorga el siguiente certificado" and personal letter, in Spanish, in 52 days for $2 and an English report. v/s Nubia Ericka Garcia, Administradora. I used a free on-line translator which did a so-so job . The certificate is in "recognition of our signal which transmits daily" (Scott R Barbour Jr, NH, June 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. I received word that the German service of Deutsche Welle will start to broadcast from Bonn on August 4. Since today they use a back-up studio at Köln for continuation in order to free the previously used studio for dismantling. So much for today, (Kai Ludwig, Germany, June 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY [and non]. DEUTSCHE WELLE LAUNCHES DRM DIGITAL SHORTWAVE BROADCASTING | Text of press release by Deutsche Welle on 16 June; subheadings as published: Today, Monday, 16 June 2003, Deutsche Welle began daily radio transmissions via digital shortwave. This was the official launch of the new broadcasting standard for long, medium and shortwave developed by the Digital Radio Mondiale Consortium (DRM) under the auspices of the World Radio Conference of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) in Geneva. DRM chair Peter Senger has handed over the forward-looking system to the 192 member states of the ITU for use in their respective countries. DW Director-General Erik Bettermann says: "Thanks to the immense improvement in quality over analogue transmission," Deutsche Welle is expecting "a worldwide renaissance of radio and an increase in the numbers of listeners". DW will take full advantage of the great opportunities that this new mode of transmission offers, particularly in international radio. Test broadcasts have proven the advantages of DRM, which are not only to be found in better audio quality and reception. "In the long term, Deutsche Welle also expects the lower energy consumption of digital transmitters to lead to a drop in operating costs," Bettermann added. Twelve hours daily upon launch Deutsche Welle is starting its digital broadcasts with 12 hours daily to Europe and the Middle East in German, English and Arabic. "This will be the first step towards a new Deutsche Welle multilanguage European channel," according to Uta Thofern, editor-in-chief of DW- Radio. "For daily German programmes, we have chosen our current affairs magazine `Funkjournal' and alternating background information programmes such as the Nord-Sud-Forum and the European magazines. Initially we will be broadcasting news in English to the Middle East. In addition, to demonstrate the outstanding audio quality of DRM - we will offer musical programmes." Altogether over 100 programming hours are be broadcast daily in the DRM standard. Nine other radio stations are participating in the launch including BBC World Service, Radio France Internationale and Voice of America. The Swedish and Canadian international broadcasters were also involved from the start of the project as well as another German station DeutschlandRadio. By the end of 2004, the DRM Consortium expects to be broadcasting 300 hours per day in the new digital standard. Transmitters need only be modified Deutsche Welle is now continuing to modify its existing transmitters at relay stations in Sines, Portugal; Trincomalee, Sri Lanka; Kigali, Rwanda; and Antigua in the Caribbean for DRM operation. Negotiations for modification work on transmitters are under way with operators in Germany and Russia. After modification, the transmitters can be operated either in the digital or analogue mode, or in both simultaneously. The DRM Consortium has about 80 member stations from over 30 countries. Peter Senger, Director of Marketing, Sales and Engineering at Deutsche Welle, has chaired the steering committee since DRM was founded in 1998. At the official launch in Geneva he stressed that in future the listener will need just one receiver for all frequencies under 30 MHz, that is for short, medium and longwave. The DRM Consortium expects that the first receivers at prices consumers can afford will be on the market by the end of 2004 and that one million receivers will have been sold by the end of 2006. The intervening period, according to Peter Senger, will be needed to optimize transmitters for the target region. "The DRM standard", he explains, "only works if the frequencies used are properly calculated and coordinated. When scheduling frequencies for VHF-FM, DAB and TV you are more less assured of getting good results, but on shortwave you have to factor in the time of day, the season and sunspot activity." Digitalization opens up a wealth of new opportunities: it will no longer be necessary to search for the right frequency, station IDs lead the listener to the desired station and receiver will switch to the best frequency without interrupting programme reception. Information about the programme can also be transmitted at the same time as this programme itself. "Deutsche Welle will test each of the options and implement them if feasible," said Senger. Source: Deutsche Welle press release, Cologne, in English 16 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** HONG KONG. HONG KONG COMMERCIAL RADIO WARNED OVER TALK SHOW HOST'S REMARKS | Text of report by Radio TV Hong Kong audio web site on 15 June The secretary for commerce, industry and technology, Henry Tang, has spoken out in support of the Broadcasting Authority following its warning to Commercial Radio over comments by talk show host Albert Cheng. The authority said the host had used language that may have hurt the reputation of two government officials who appeared on his show. Commenting on the warning, Mr Tang said the Broadcasting Authority was impartial and fair and there was no need for him to take further action. Commercial Radio's licence comes up for renewal next year and Mr Tang said this was still under consideration. However, he would not comment on whether the warning would affect the renewal. Mr Tang said the government would inform the station one year in advance if it was decided not to renew its licence. Source: RTHK Radio 3 audio web site, Hong Kong, in English 0700 gmt 15 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) TALK SHOW HOST THREATENS TO QUIT AFTER WARNINGS | Text of report by Gary Cheung: "Albert Cheng threatens to quit radio show", carried by Hong Kong newspaper South China Morning Post web site on 17 June Popular radio talk-show host Albert Cheng King-hon is considering quitting his Commercial Radio programme Teacup in a Storm in protest at repeated Broadcasting Authority warnings. Mr Cheng, who announced he was taking leave as of yesterday for two months, said: "There is no room for my programme if we have to meet the stringent requirements set out by the authority. I may have to consider quitting the show." His remarks came after the Broadcasting Authority issued warnings on Saturday [14 June] to the radio station on the grounds that two officials had not been treated fairly during two editions of Teacup in a Storm on 24 and 25 April, which have triggered 157 complaints. Some of the complaints relate to comments Mr Cheng made on 24 April when he called Deputy Director of Housing Lau Kai-hung a "dog-like" official for turning a blind eye to "exploitation" of manual workers. During another on-air war of words between Mr Cheng and the then- acting chief executive of the Hospital Authority, Ko Wing-man, a day later, Mr Cheng criticised Dr Ko for failing to address medical workers' needs, which prompted a public offer from Dr Ko to "resign if necessary". The authority ruled that in both cases, the hosts had not taken special care when using language that was capable of adversely affecting the reputation of the individuals. The radio host, who is nicknamed "Taipan", said he had taken holiday voluntarily, without any pressure from the radio station. "I have been feeling a lot of pressure as if there is a knife at my throat. I have been attacked by gangsters and sued for defamation, and now the government is trying to limit my freedom of _expression," he said. "The Broadcasting Authority is trying to set a rigid model for talk- show programmes which allows equal time for hosts and guests. What's the point of letting officials waste our time by talking nonsense?" Source: South China Morning Post web site, Hong Kong, in English 17 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** HUNGARY. R. Budapest, English half-hour to NAm at 0100 on 9590 spars with VOIRI Iran English at 0030 \\ 1920 with repeat at 0130. Budapest does an English NAm service at 0230 on 9570 (Bob Thomas, CT, June 12, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ICELAND Right now at 1215 on June 16 I again can hear AFRTS Keflavik back on 13855 in USB after some weeks absence. However, the signal is weaker than early May and there seems to be some transmitter problems. 24232 (Anker Petersen, Denmark, DXplorer June 16 via BC-DX via DXLD) See also under: http://myafn.dodmedia.osd.mil/radio/shortwave/ Current Shortwave High Frequencies. Keep checking this web page for the posting of new freqs and txs when they become available. Location Band Daytime Nightime Keflavik, Iceland Upper Sideband 13855 13855 Diego Garcia Upper Sideband 12579 4319 Guam Upper Sideband 13362 5765 Key West, FL Upper Sideband 12689.5 12689.5 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Upper Sideband 10320 6350 RR, Puerto Rico Upper Sideband 6458.5 6458.5 Shortwave broadcasts of the AFN Interruptible Voice Channel (IVC). To look at a schedule go to http://myafn.net/radio/afn/schedules The IVC is often interrupted with live sport events. For a current sport schedule go to http://myafn.net/radio/sports If you would like to submit a SW reception report and request a QSL verification card please send your request directly to Navy Uplink Reception at QSL@m... [truncated] (AFN website via BC-DX June 16 via DXLD) The website has in the past been very lethargic in putting in new info (gh, DXLD) ** INDONESIA. 9743.6, 0740 June 16, RRI Sorong, presume the one here with ballad followed by announcement in BI. Poor signal with some modulation issues(Paul Ormandy, ZL4TFX, EchoLink Node 87378, Host of The South Pacific DX Report http://radiodx.com DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL. While it lasts, there is a javascript link at http://www.theconnection.org/shows/2003/06/20030612_b_main.asp to a bunch of antique ham QSL cards in Connexion with the recent show about ham radio, which is also audio archived: http://realserver.bu.edu:8080/ramgen/w/b/wbur/connection/audio/2003/06/con_0612b.rm (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL [non]. Summer A-03 schedule for some clandestines stations as of June 15: [time order, rather like TDP] IBC Tamil Oli Radio in Tamil: 0000-0100 Daily 11570 NVS 100 kW / 180 deg ================================================ Hmong Lao Radio in Laotian: 0100-0200 Fri 17540 TAC 100 kW / 131 deg ================================================ Radio Sedoye Payem e Doost in Farsi: 0230-0315 Daily 7460 KCH 500 kW / 116 deg ================================================ Voice of Homeland in Arabic: [for SYRIA] 0330-0400 Daily 7510 SAM 250 kW / 188 deg ================================================ Voice of Mezopotamya in Kurdish: 0400-0800 Daily 15675 KVI 200 kW / 110 deg ================================================ Voice of Mezopotamya in Kurdish: 0800-1600 Daily 11530 KCH 500 kW / 116 deg ================================================ Voice of Tibet in Tibetan/Mandarin Chinese: 1212-1300 Daily 15660/15670 DB 100 kW / 117 deg 21560/21570 TAC 100 kW / 131 deg ================================================ Radio Free Vietnam in Vietnamese: 1230-1300 Mon-Fri 9930 WHR 100 kW / 285 deg ================================================ IBC Tamil Oli Radio in Tamil: 1230-1330 Daily 17495 MDC 050 kW / 055 deg ================================================ Radio Togo Libre in French: 1300-1400 Mon-Fri 21760 MEY 250 kW / 328 deg ================================================ Que Huong Radio in Vietnamese: 1330-1400 Mon-Sat 9930 WHR 100 kW / 285 deg ================================================ Voice of Khmer-Krom in Khmer: [for VIETNAM] 1400-1500 Tue 15660 VLD 250 kW / 230 deg ================================================ Voice of Tibet in Tibetan/Mandarin Chinese: 1430-1517 Daily 17520/17540 TAC 100 kW / 131 deg ================================================ Democratic Voice of Burma in Burmese: 1430-1530 Daily 5910 TAC 100 kW / 132 deg 17495 MDC 050 kW / 055 deg ================================================ Voice of Homeland in Arabic: [for SYRIA] 1500-1530 Daily 12085 SAM 250 kW / 188 deg 12120 SAM 250 kW / 188 deg ================================================ Voice of Liberty in Arabic: [for LEBANON] 1600-1700 Daily 11645 SAM 200 kW / 224 deg ================================================ Radio Anternacional in Farsi: 1630-1700 Daily 13800 KCH 500 kW / 116 deg ================================================ Voice of Iran in Farsi: 1630-1730 Daily 17510 ISS 500 kW / 090 deg ================================================ Voice of Komalah in Farsi: 1700-1800 Sun 7560 KVI 200 kW / 110 deg ================================================ RTV Mezopotamya in Kurdish/Farsi: 1700-1800 Tue/Wed/Fri 7560 SAM 250 kW / 188 deg ================================================ Dejen Radio in Tigrina: 1700-1800 Sat 12120 SAM 250 kW / 188 deg ================================================ Radio Solidarity in Tigrina: 1700-1800 Sun 12120 SAM 250 kW / 188 deg ================================================ Sagalee Oromiya in Oromo: 1730-1800 Mon/Thu 12120 SAM 250 kW / 188 deg ================================================ Voice of Eritrean People in Tigrina: 1730-1800 Sun 9990 KVI 200 kW / 140 deg ================================================ Voice of Ethiopian Mehdin in Amharic: 1800-1900 Sun 7520 ARM 200 kW / 235 deg ================================================ Voice of Ethiopian Mehdin in Amharic: 1830-1930 Sun 12120 SAM 250 kW / 188 deg ================================================ Radio Sedoye Payem e Doost in Farsi: 1800-1845 Daily 7480 KCH 500 kW / 116 deg ================================================ Voice of Reform in Arabic: [for SAUDI ARABIA] 1800-2000 Daily 15705 KVI 500 kW / 125 deg ================================================ Jakada Radio International in Hausa: 1900-1930 Mon-Fri 15170 MEY 250 kW / 335 deg ================================================ Voice of Ethiopia WS in English: 2000-2100 Sun 7520 KVI 200 kW / 140 deg ================================================ Radio Togo Libre in French: 2000-2100 Sun 12125 MEY 250 kW / 335 deg ================================================ Voice of Biafra International in English: 2100-2200 Sat 7380 MEY 250 kW / 335 deg ================================================ Fang Guang Ming Radio in Mandarin Chinese: 2100-2200 Daily 6035 SAM 200 kW / 297 deg 9625 SAM 200 kW / 297 deg ================================================ Democratic Voice of Burma in Burmese: 2330-0030 Daily 9435 JUL 100 kW / 080 deg 9760 MDC 200 kW / 055 deg (Observer, Bulgaria, June 17 via DXLD) ** IRAN. ANALYSIS: IRAN REPORTED "JAMMING" OPPOSITION TV | Text of editorial analysis by BBC Monitoring Media Services on 16 June 2003 Iran on 16 June sent an official protest to the United States over what it called blatant interference in its internal affairs. The move followed remarks by President Bush describing six nights of pro- democracy protests in Iran as a positive development. During the previous week, Iran blamed US-based satellite TV channels which support exiled Iranian opposition groups for inciting the student-led demonstrations. "America is waging a psychological war against Iran," Intelligence Minister Ali Yunesi asserted. Iran has responded by stepping up the "jamming" of opposition broadcasts. Reuters news agency on 16 June said that since the end of the war on Iraq in April, "there is heavier jamming of US-based Iranian satellite television stations carrying entertainment and dissident messages calling for anti-government protests". However, none of the opposition stations monitored by the BBC in recent days has actually reported interference to the reception of their programmes. Iranian opposition broadcasts Curbs on receiving satellite television in Iran are less severe than before. It is tolerated to some extent. News and cultural programmes from about a dozen US-based Iranian opposition TV and radio broadcasters are available via satellite in Iran. The leading opposition stations include National Iranian Television http://www.nitv.tv run by Reza Pahlavi, the son of the late Shah, and Azadi TV http://www.azaditv.com US-funded broadcasts US international broadcasting's Persian-language services have also devoted considerable airtime to the ongoing anti-government protests in Iran. Voice of America's Persian Service http://www.voanews.com/persian/ and Prague-based Radio Farda http://www.radiofarda.com have both broadcast interviews, discussions and analyses, and made them available on the Internet. VOA has also broadcast them via satellite TV. Kenneth Y. Tomlinson, chairman of the US Broadcasting Board of Governors http://www.bbg.gov said: "We're providing accurate news and information that Iranians intent on more freedom are unable to get from their own media." Health fears over Iran's "jamming" In recent months the Iranian Students' News Agency has reported that apparent "jamming" or interfering signals, from known fixed and mobile transmitters, are disrupting some foreign satellite stations and satellite-delivered Internet data. Iran's health and environment ministries earlier this year expressed fears about the impact on public health of signals being transmitted to block satellite broadcasts over Tehran. In April, the deputy chairman of an Iranian parliamentary commission said "a certain organization had been identified as the source of signals being transmitted from Tehran to jam satellite broadcasts". However, MPs decided not to reveal the name of the organization to the media, "for fear that the issue might become political," and so jeopardize efforts to stop the interference. The interfering signals seem to appear with some degree of official sanction or protection - be it military, political or religious. How "jamming" works There are two main options for causing harmful interference to satellite signals. The first and most obvious, is to influence directly the uplink to the satellite. This may take the form of an interfering signal which would render the wanted broadcast unmonitorable, or replacing the wanted broadcast with an alternative signal. To accomplish this, the interfering signal must originate from the general area of the legitimate uplink, although this would depend on the individual satellite used, the configuration of the uplink/downlink equipment on board and the parts of the world covered by particular transponders. For example, if the uplink source is in USA, the interfering signal would also need to emanate from the same area covered by the beam of the satellite. This method was recently used successfully by the Falun Gong sect in China, when they replaced the China TV signal with their own messages and programmes. The second method of causing deliberate interference to satellite signals is to flood the reception area with microwave frequencies similar to those being used by the satellite downlink. These signals would need to be very strong to mask the official broadcast and they would almost certainly cause interference to other satellite and communication systems operating in the same band. The use of such jamming methods could be restricted to specific areas. Source: BBC Monitoring research 16 Jun 03 (via DXLD) ** IRAN. I've been listening to some of R. Farda this afternoon [June 14] and can't hear any Iranian jammers - they usually jam at least one frequency on SW. 17750 17670 [co-channel AIR] 13680 and 9435 [co- channel IBA?] were all 'jam-less', and now 11845 [Iranawila] and 11705 [Lampertheim] have come on at 1700, and there is still no audible jamming. They are co-channel with BBC Russian on 11845. I wonder if the trouble in Iran has tempted the Iranian government to switch them off --- I would have thought the opposite would be the case - or have they found new Mujahadin targets which are more important to jam? There is jamming this morning [June 16] on R Farda 15290, but I can't hear any on 17835 or 9510. IRIB broadcasts were well audible on 17 MHz so why not jamming --- if it's on air? (Noel R. Green-UK, BC-DX June 14/16 via DXLD) ** IRAQ. US FORCES CLOSE NEWSPAPER, TV STATION ACCUSED OF "INCITEMENT" | Text of report by Iran-based radio station Voice of the Mujahidin on 17 June The US troops have closed a newspaper and a television station in Holy Al-Najaf that are run by a newly-formed Islamic organization, the Supreme Council for the Liberation of Iraq, headed by Mahdi al-Awwadi. Press reports said that US troops stormed the newspaper offices and arrested all the staff. They also stormed the television building, which was previously used as a post office, in Al-Kufah and arrested the employees. The Americans accuse the newspaper and the television station that are run by the Supreme Council for the Liberation of Iraq of promoting incitement, in violation of the law that bans incitement against the occupation troops. Source: Voice of the Mujahidin, in Arabic 0700 gmt 17 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) WATCHDOG CONCERNED OVER US EFFORTS TO REGULATE LOCAL MEDIA IN IRAQ | Text of letter sent by the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) on 13 June 2003 to L. Paul Bremer III, Senior Administrator, Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq Dear Mr Bremer: The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) is writing to express its concern about efforts under way by the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq to regulate local media. US officials have indicated that they have drafted new regulations prohibiting, among other things, "incitement" in Iraqi media. According to US officials, the regulations aim to control inflammatory coverage in Iraqi media, including unsubstantiated news that officials believe will foment social unrest or hostility toward American troops. To CPJ's knowledge, details of the new regulations have not been released, but The Los Angeles Times reported this week that violators would face warnings, fines and possible detention. While we appreciate your concerns about false, misleading or even fabricated news disseminated by media, we fear that the use of highly interpretative prohibitions such as "incitement" could be used to restrict media discourse. Moreover, we deplore any regulation that provides for the arrest or detention of journalists in response to what they publish. As new Iraqi media emerge, it is imperative that they be allowed to operate in an environment free of government restrictions. That includes ensuring that newspapers and broadcasters can function free of unreasonable licensing regimes, censorship, criminal prosecution and arrest or detention. CPJ respectfully calls on you to make public any regulations devised by the coalition authority for Iraqi media. We also call on you to undertake all possible measures to ensure that Iraqi media is able to operate with maximum freedom and without official interference. Sincerely, Ann K. Cooper, CPJ Executive Director Source: Committee to Protect Journalists press release, New York, in English 16 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** IRELAND. DUBLIN: NEW FM RTÉ OPT-OUT A test-tone has appeared on 87.6 MHz in the Dublin area. This frequency will be used by RTÉ for Radio 1 opt-outs, which will also appear on 567 kHz, during the Special Olympics (From Radiowaves via Mike Terry, DXLD) These are special games for disabled athletes the former South African president Nelson Mandela and the former heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali will participate in the grand opening ceremony for the Special Olympics. The organisers of the biggest sporting event to take place in the world this year have also confirmed Hollywood actor Arnold Scwarzenegger, U2 and The Corrs on the star studded list for the opening of the games. Overall 7,000 athletes will be in Ireland over the next few days and the games will open next Saturday (From http://u.tv/newsroom/indepth.asp?pt=n&id=33461 via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** ITALY. Observed a spurious signal of Rai International on 12040 kHz (10 June at 0310), // 11800. Weak and hoarse audio, FM-like carrier. This unwanted signal causes interference to RUI. Went off the air at 0335, simultaneously with its fundamental frequency 11800 kHz (open_dx --- Alexander Yegorov, Kyiv, Ukraine, via Signal June 17 via DXLD) ** JORDAN. ARMED FORCES LAUNCH RADIO FANN - FM ENTERTAINMENT STATION Petra-JNA, the official news agency of the Jordanian government, on 11 June carried the following news item (in Arabic 1028 gmt): "Amman, 11 June: Within its celebrations of the Army Day and the Great Arab Revolt anniversary, the Jordanian Armed Forces today launched their new radio station, Fann [Arabic for "art"]. The station will transmit on FM to all parts of the Kingdom on the following channels: Amman 104.2, Irbid 91.3, Aqaba 91.1, Al-Tafilah 94.7, Ajlun/al-Karak 94.3 and Petra/Al-Azraq 105.4 MHz. The station employs high-standard professional and technical staff and uses the most sophisticated radio transmission technology." Monitoring observations indicate that the station, Radio Fann, had been testing for the previous week. It was observed in Amman on 104.2 and 105.4 MHz carrying Arabic and Western popular songs. Radio Fann has a web site http://www.radiofann.com/ The site carries the following announcement in English: "Tune into the hippest radio wave in town and turn up the volume of your life! Fann FM is a new radio station broadcasting across the Kingdom live from Amman and pulsating with the hottest tunes from the region and the world." Radio Jordan, the official radio of the Jordanian government, carries a daily two-hour broadcast called Voice of the Jordanian Armed Forces at 1300-1500 gmt. It consists of radio programmes targeted at Jordanian army personnel. It is heard on Radio Jordan's frequencies of 612, 693, 801, 1035, 1485 and 11810 kHz. Voice of the Jordanian Armed Forces was inaugurated by King Abdallah on 13 November 2001. Sources: Petra-JNA news agency web site, Amman, in Arabic 1028 gmt 11 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** KASHMIR. PAK TO START RADIO PROPAGANDA IN KASHMIR Monday, 16 June , 2003, 17:46 Jammu: Pakistani authorities have launched new Mobile Radio Stations to air programmes in Gojri and Pahari languages along the Line of Control (LoC) in Poonch and Rajouri sectors of Jammu region. An All India Radio official said they were unable to counter the Pak propaganda due to lack of funds and policies. A radio station -- Sadai-Hurriyat -- operating from Muzaffarabad in POK [Pakistani Occupied Kashmir??] had also been airing anti-India and anti-security forces programmes in Urdu language recently. These are heard in the Balakote, Mendhar, Rajdhani, Khari Karmara, Sabjian, Ajote, Loran and Mandi areas of twin border districts. The programmes launched by the radio since the last decade mostly reached the upper regions of Kashmir Valley and Doda district. http://sify.com/news/international/fullstory.php?id=13173601 (Sify News, India, via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) WTFK??? Probably not SW? This is a reference to the station known in English as the Voice of Jammu and Kashmir Freedom (Media Network via DXLD) The Muzaffarabad station, that is ** KOREA NORTH. 9450 at 1521 on 6/15 R. P`yongyang. I always hear them on 9335 but last week on 9235 and now on 9450. I guess things are "heating up"? (Gary Crites, location unknown, hard-core-dx via DXLD) English? ** KUWAIT. KWT was again in good old AM on 15110, so perhaps their tests in DRM are over? (Noel R. Green-UK, BC-DX June 16, via DXLD) ? ** LUXEMBOURG. I guess is the noise on 6095 --- it was on air at 0625 and still there at 0830 (Noel R. Green-UK, BC-DX June 16, via DXLD) Yes, DRM 6095 usual 15 kHz wide signal today (wb, ibid.) ** MEXICO. I`ve noticed another XE listed in the FCC database on 1630 kHz. There has been XEUT in Tijuana for some time now, but there is a new listing at Tizayuca, Hidalgo with the customary expanded band U1 10000/1000 setup. Tizayuca is about 50 km NE of Mexico City, so should be hearable if conditions are right (Bill Hale, DDXD-West, NRC DX News June 16 via DXLD) ** MOLDOVA. Moldavia, 9665 kHz, Radio Moscow, full data "Moskva River Near Kremlin" card with site (Kishinyov Moldavia), no V/S, in 2 months, for 1 IRC, received sticker, summer schedule and letter from Ms. Ol`ga Troshina, World Service In English (Joe Talbot, Alberta, Canada, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I have received 7 replies from SWL group DXers, to my posting of the Radio Moscow Moldavia QSL asking how I did it. I have replied to those DXers and in all fairness pass this on to you all. I heard the Radio Moscow broadcast April 19th/03 0433-0500 sign off on 9665 kHz with a excellent signal; during the broadcast I heard it was mentioned by the announcer that "...ending transmissions to North America". The sked I received notes 9665 kHz in English to North America: 0100-0200/0200- 0300/0300-0500, this from March 30th to September 6th/03. Please keep in mind that Radio Moscow is only verifying the Moldavia site 0433- 0500 sign off as per the QSL. The other times above may not be via Moldavia, they could be switching sites on-the-fly so to speak, 4 hours is a big propagation window. 0400-0500 is probably a safe bet? The Radio Moscow staff, Ms. Ol`ga Troshina, World Service in English, Voice of Russia, was very nice in her letter, so it may not be a bad idea to send your reports direct to her. A nice report and a small souvenir for the lady? It may take me several months, but I always get some sort of thank you letter or post card back to the QSLing station, help (???), can't hurt! Give this a try and in the next while I hope to see all your Moldavia QSL reports posted here. 73's. (Joe Talbot. Red Deer, Alberta, Canada, swl at qth.net via DXLD) I have a number of VOR QSL's from Moldavia. In fact, the first VOR QSL (1995) that I received from them (after losing all my old Radio Moscow = USSR cards) was from Moldavia for a Europe beamed broadcast. For awhile I = was trying to receive QSL's from all the old Radio Moscow sites (that are = still on the air) and kept getting Moldavia QSL's for transmissions that "Passport" and WRTH indicated originated elsewhere! And you're right, Ms. Olga Troshina usually puts a nice little note in = with the cards. 73 de (Phil, KO6BB Atchley, DX begins at the noise floor! Merced, California, ibid.) ** MYANMAR. 5985.84, R. Myanmar 1150-1207 June 16. Exotic flute music, YL announcer, then lite vocal music to 1200 IS; YL announcer talked in [unknown] language to 1206, then more vocal music. VG signal (John Wilkins, Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Drake R-8, 1oo-foot random wire, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** NIGERIA. VOICE OF NIGERIA EXTERNAL RADIO SERVICE LAUNCHES SERVICES IN IBO AND YORUBA | Text of report in English by French news agency AFP Lagos, 15 June: The Voice of Nigeria (VON), the arm of Radio Nigeria directed at audiences outside the country, has started to broadcast in two of the nation's main languages, an official of the radio said here Sunday. The VON, a state-run [shortwave] radio which began in 1962, recently began transmitting its programmes in Ibo [alternative spelling Igbo] and Yoruba languages, two of the main languages spoken in southern part of Nigeria, the official said. "The aim is to reach as many Nigerians outside the country as possible while not forgetting to export our culture, of which the local languages are part," said the official, who requested anonymity. Yoruba is also spoken in nearby Benin, Togo as well as in Brazil, while Ibo is used in western part of Cameroon. The radio, which broadcasts from both Nigeria's economic centre Lagos and its capital Abuja, added these two local languages to its English, French, Arabic, Swahili and Fulfude services. Source: AFP news agency, Paris, in English 1717 gmt 15 Jun 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) These languages were already mentioned some weeks ago here referencing the VON website schedule (gh, DXLD) ** PERU. El 15/06, a las 0602 UT, en los 6114.89 kHz, fue captada la emisora Radio Unión, 103.3 MHz, La Rumbera. Emitía música rumbera y salsa, con un locutor rapidísimo. Llamadas al aire con felicitaciones por el Día del Padre. SINPO 4/3. Muchos 73 y buen DX (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PHILIPPINES. FEBC will conduct test to South India from June 18 to June 22: 0100-0200 Sindhi on 15240 BOC 100 kW / 278 deg 1530-1600 Sindhi on 12100 BOC 100 kW / 278 deg (Observer, Bulgaria, June 17 via DXLD) ** ROMANIA. Harris is in the process of finishing an order for Romania that consisted of 6 x 400 kW rigs, a 200 kW long wave rig and a stand alone 200 kW rig on 909 kHz. Harris DX 200 mediumwave transmitter website: {corrected} http://www.broadcast.harris.com/product_portfolio/prod_media/dx200.pdf (via U. Volk, Germany, BC-DX May 23 / June 6 via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. Special Digital Radio Mondiale services are listed from transmitters at Moscow, for the period June 9 until August 9, as follows: 7325 0600-0800 to Central Europe 15780 0600-1200 to Western Europe 15780 1300-1600 to Western Europe Regards! (Bob Padula, Mont Albert, Vic, Aus, June 17, EDXP HF Forum via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. The past two mornings at 0105-0230 I have heard the Russian religious station R. Krishnaloka drifting around 7435.8 - 7437.0 with strong signal first, then fading out after 0200. They are scheduled with tests 0100-0300 from a 150 watt transmitter. Programs are in Russian airing sermons and cultural talks of the Krishna worship which originates from India. Around 0110-0140 there is a sermon in English with translation to Russian (Anker Petersen, Denmark, undated, Signal June 17 via DXLD) ** SAO TOME & PRINCIPE. IBB`S SÃO TOMÉ TRANSMITTING STATION FACES UNIQUE CHALLENGES SÃO TOME --- IBB`s São Tomé transmitting station, set on an island in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Africa, offers unique challenges for the staff charged with ensuring that Voice of America (VOA) programs are delivered to millions of listeners by medium wave (AM), FM and shortwave. ``São Tomé gives us wonderful access to Central and Western Africa,`` said George Moore, director of IBB`s Office of Engineering and Technical Services, which oversees the São Tomé station. ``If we didn`t have our station there, we wouldn`t be able to reach nearly as many listeners in more than six languages.`` IBB`s permanent facility opened in 1996 on São Tomé, an island about 30 miles long and 15 miles wide. Along with its sister island, Principe, São Tomé forms one of Africa`s smallest countries with a population of roughly 155,000. A former Portuguese colony, São Tomé is 135 miles off the coast of Gabon. Staffed by about 30 people, including three IBB employees sent from the United States, the São Tomé site is located on 346 acres about five miles from the capital`s center. The facilities include a 600 kilowatt AM transmitter, several shortwave transmitters, a power plant, a warehouse and staff housing. The FM transmitters, which allow São Toméans to listen to VOA, are located several miles away. Although São Tomé is thought to sit upon vast, undeveloped oil reserves, fuel must be delivered to the IBB transmitting station about every eight months. More than 300,000 gallons of diesel fuel are brought in regularly to allow the São Tomé station to generate its own power. This complex offloading procedure takes about 24 hours. [Caption:] Satellite antennas outside the main transmitter and administration building at IBB`s São Tomé Relay Station. http://www.bbg.gov/reports/02anrprt.pdf (BBG 2002 Annual Report via gh, DXLD) ** SAUDI ARABIA. Harris is in the planning stage to handle an inquiry to deliver Harris DX 200 MW transmitter to Saudi Arabia [as it already has to Afghanistan, Romania, q.v.] Harris DX 200 mediumwave transmitter website: {corrected} http://www.broadcast.harris.com/product_portfolio/prod_media/dx200.pdf (Wolfgang Bueschel, June 15, BC-DX via DXLD) ** SERBIA & MONTENEGRO. R. ``Yugoslavia`` is now calling itself: ``International Radio of Serbia-Montenegro`` at start of English and during transmission, daily except UT Sun at 0000 to ENAm; daily to WNAm at 0430, both on 9580. They still run the sung ``Radio Yugoslavia`` ID after the news (Bob Thomas, CT, June 12, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SEYCHELLES [non]. RUSSIA(non): Freq changes for FEBA Radio via RUS txs with kW, azimuths: [Chita; Armavir] 0015-0045 Sun/Thu Kannada NF 15425 TCH 250 / 230 ex 15580 0015-0030 Mon/Wed/Fri/Sat Kannada NF 15425 TCH 250 / 230 ex 15580 0015-0030 Tue Tulu NF 15425 TCH 250 / 230 ex 15580 0030-0045 Fri/Sat Badaga NF 15425 TCH 250 / 230 ex 15580 0030-0130 Mon-Wed Tamil NF 15425 TCH 250 / 230 ex 15580 0045-0130 Thu-Sun Tamil NF 15425 TCH 250 / 230 ex 15580 1530-1630 Daily Persian NF 9650 ARM 100 / 150 ex 9495 (Observer, Bulgaria, June 17 via DXLD) ** SOUTH AMERICA. Dear free radio friends, We are really sorry, but at last minute, to the moment of to start our transmitter, the transmitter has burned a tube. We shoud suspend the planned transmissions. Amigos piratas, Lo lamentamos pero por razones técnicas tuvimos que suspender la transmisión planeada para el día de hoy, debido a que al momento de encender el equipo, una valvula fue quemada. Realmente, lo lamentamos muchísimo. FFFR (Cachito, Radio Cochiguaz op. http://www.geocities.com/rcochiguaz June 14 via hard-core-dx, not delivered until June 16, via DXLD) That doesn`t explain why I couldn`t hear them on 11440 just before 0300 UT Sun. The reason is that I would not have been able to hear them anyway (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SWEDEN. First, note that Radio Sweden is considering dropping one of their multiple English language broadcasts; see the item towards the bottom of the quoted text. Feedback / input wanted -- AHEAD of time for a change!! Second, and more as an FYI, Radio Sweden is also on the list of organizations with regular (in this case, daily) e-mails regarding programming news. To subscribe, visit http://www.topica.com/lists/radioswedennews@topica.email-publisher.com/ or send e-mail to radioswedennews@topica.email-publisher.com. (Richard Cuff / Allentown, PA USA, swprograms via DXLD) --- Special announcement: We're considering discontinuing one of our broadcasts, but before we change our schedule, we'd like to check with listeners first. We want to hear from those of you who usually tune in at 11:30 hours UTC; how you would feel if we dropped this transmission, but maintained the rest of our schedule, and if there's an alternative broadcast you could listen to? If our shutting down that broadcast would absolutely devastate you, please write in and let us know. We'll be rewarding one of those responding with a CD. The postal address is: Radio Sweden SE-105 10 Stockholm, Sweden Or send us an email to english@radiosweden.org (via Richard Cuff, swprograms via DXLD) ** TAIWAN. Last night June 15, I heard on Radio Teipei International Spanish service that this station will be changing its name to: VOICE OF TAIWAN --- RADIO TAIWAN INTERNATIONAL This change will be from July 1st. Thanks (CESAR PEREZ DIOSES, CHIMBOTE, PERU, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** TOGO [non]. R. Togo Libre: I'm sorry to say that I wrote down the wrong details of this station`s Sunday broadcast, and there was nothing to hear when I tuned in. I don't see why this broadcast on 12125 should not also come via Meyerton, but we can only know from listening to it or see a report about its location. Meyerton is listed on 12130 at 1700-1800 for AWR, so they are no "strangers" to this part of the band (Noel Green, UK, June 16 via Kai Ludwig, DXLD) Just to clarify my point: Do we know for sure that 12125 originates from Meyerton? It was my impression that no fully reliable information on this matter is available, and so I noted down another possibility that would fit [Russia], just to prompt some monitoring. Of course I yesterday forgot to tune in :-( (Kai Ludwig, Germany, June 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RADIO TOGO LIBRE SEEKING CORRESPONDENTS IN TOGO Despite operating under difficult conditions, the clandestine broadcaster Radio Togo Libre (RTL) is seeking local correspondents in the main town of each prefecture in Togo, namely Tsévié, Atakpamé, Kpalimé, Sokodé, Kara and Dapaong. An announcement on the Togodebout.com Website says that the station also wants to recruit journalists and correspondents who speak and write one of the national languages: Ewé, Kabyè, Kotokoli, Akposso, Ifè, Ouatchi, Moba. RTL is preparing to launch a listener participation programme directed at Togolese both inside the country and in the diaspora. "Paroles de Togolais" (Words of the Togolese) will enable listeners to express their opinions about the situation in Togo, or what's happening in their own locality. The station asks listeners wishing to particpate to E-mail their telephone number. RTL is currently broadcasting Mon-Fri at 1300-1400 UTC on 21760 kHz, and on Sundays at 2000-2100 UTC on 12125 kHz. It began operations on 1 June 2003, and its existence was first reported in DX Listening Digest (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 16 June 2003 via DXLD) Yes, there is a second website now including this page: http://www.togodebout.com/rtl.html (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K [non]. RUSSIA(non): Frequency change for BBC in Uzbek: 1700-1800 NF 13860 MSK 250 kW / 117 deg, ex 7385 \\ 9580 and 9915 73 from Ivo and Angel! (Observer, Bulgaria, June 17 via DXLD) ** U S A. The U.S. Broadcasting Board of Governors 2002 Annual Report is now available at http://www.bbg.gov/bbg_press.htm Or request a printed copy via the website or Broadcasting Board of Governors, 330 Independence Avenue SW, Washington DC 20237. 73 (Kim Elliott, DC, June 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) v., e.g., São Tomé ** U S A. WLC, ROGERS CITY MI --- Hi Glenn, yes I'm trying to remember that edition too, WOR 919, or 918? If you are interested, I do have pictures of WLC from 1997 when I visited the station. I can only remember that I faxed you the information about WLC in Rogers City, MI closing down on November 28th, 1997, after 75 years of service to the Great Lakes Maritime Community. The fax contained the time of the last transmission, and the frequencies. Sorry, I don't have the copy of the fax anymore (Joe Olig, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. WMNR (88.1 Monroe CT) marks its thirtieth anniversary later this month. John Babina put the station on the air December 11, 1973 as a low-powered high school station. A decade later, WMNR began boosting power, adding relays around the Nutmeg State and programming a full-time classical music format. Next Saturday (June 21), Babina will host a reunion of the student staffers from WMNR's first decade, with the help of former WMNR student engineer Bill DeFelice; you can hear it on the Web beginning at 2 PM [1800 UT] at http://www.capitalradio.us (Scott Fybush, NE Radio Watch June 16 via DXLD) ** U S A. Legal ID just prior to the hour: "The Bridge. AM 16-80 KTFH Seattle. A service of Salem Communications" Cheers, (Paul Ormandy, New Zealand, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Salem is primarily a religious broadcaster: look out for them to be trying to convert the Hindus on this station (gh, DXLD) [Earlier:] 1680, 0722 June 17, KTFH Seattle WA, very good with Spanish music, IDs "Somos Radio Sol 13-60, la primera emisora de la cadena marinero cristiano [sic]". Address: 2815 Second Ave. #550, Seattle, WA 98121 (Paul Ormandy, ZL4TFX, New Zealand, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. 10'S PACE APOLOGIZES FOR GESTURE Saturday, June 14, 2003 FEATURES - ACCENT & ARTS 03D By Tim Feran, THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH Viewers of Thursday night's episode of Without a Trace had a surprise during the popular CBS drama: a still video clip of WBNS-TV (Channel 10) anchorwoman Angela Pace making an obscene gesture to the camera. Hundreds of complaints jammed Channel 10's switchboard yesterday. "Was it embarrassing? Sure,'' said Channel 10 general manager Tom Griesdorn. "Was it unfortunate? Indeed. Was it unprofessional? Yes. Was it intentional? No. I think Angela was simply goofing around with the studio crew. It wasn't intended to offend anyone, but it certainly did and should.'' Griesdorn said the clip of Pace exhibiting an upraised middle finger was an outtake from work on a public-service announcement. "At the end of taping, some information was incorrect, and Angela made a gesture to those working with her,'' Griesdorn said. "They thought it would be fun to send it to the newsroom.'' A technical error put the clip on the air soon after 10 p.m. and wasn't realized by the station's master control room for seven seconds. "There's a rule in the business: No matter what, you always assume the microphone is on and the camera is on,'' Griesdorn said. "You don't fool around. It's beneath the standards of WBNS and unprofessional.'' Pace apologized for herself and the others involved in the incident to viewers during the 6 and 11 p.m. newscasts yesterday. "It offended many of you, and it should have,'' she said. "I made an inappropriate gesture.'' The incident was "clowning around,'' Pace said, and was never intended for viewers. "I apologize wholeheartedly,'' she said. Griesdorn said he has taken disciplinary action against Pace, the director and the technical director involved. All three will remain with the station. "I can't punish them any more than they've punished themselves,'' he said. "They're sick with guilt. "We've all made mistakes,'' Griesdorn said. "But I need to apologize to all the viewers of 10TV and set about insuring that this never happens again.'' (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) RED FACES AT CHANNEL 10 It started as a joke. But WBNS 10-TV General Manager Tom Griesdorn says it ended up on air. He says anchorwoman Angela Pace was recording a public service announcement when she jokingly made an inappropriate gesture. He says through a series of mistakes, it ended up on the air in the 10 p.m. hour during the primetime program "Without a Trace." Channel 10 management will continue to investigate how it happened. Griesdorn says no harm was intended. CLICK HERE for the actual video via: http://www.610wtvn.com/news/local/index.html (via DXLD) ** U S A. CANCELED CONCERT --- STATION TAKES ON ETTA JAMES WITH LAWSUIT Two weeks ago Etta James refused, at the last minute, to take the stage at a concert at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden. WCIN, the local, independent radio station that had sponsored her concert, had to eat the cost. It gave refunds to concertgoers, who'd been left waiting in a drizzle. Then, two days later, WCIN sued James, a blues, R&B and soul legend, alleging fraud and breach of contract. The lawsuit seeks $663,000 in actual and punitive damages. It pits an internationally known, Grammy-winning diva against a local, black-oriented radio station. . . http://www.enquirer.com/editions/2003/06/13/loc_amos13.html (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. A LOSS CAUSE --- AN ADVOCATE FOR THE BALDING PLUGS INTO UNGROWING RADIO MARKET http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A62982-2003Jun15?language=printer&content=article (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A [and non]. THE DTV TRANSITION The "horse's mouth" is on http://www.fcc.gov/mb/policy/dtv ====================================================================== To be concise: Commercial stations affiliated with the top 4 networks (ABC/CBS/Fox/NBC) in the ten largest TV markets were to be on with DTV by 1 May 1999. Top-network stations in markets 11-30 were to be on by 1 November 1999. All other commercial stations were to be on by 1 May 2002. All non-commercial stations were to be on by 1 May 2003. ====================================================================== Which means *all* stations are supposed to be on with DTV by now. Obviously, many aren't. According to the FCC, the status as of 21 May: Top-30 network affiliates: 108 of 119 on at full licensed facilities, five with low-power STAs, six off the air. (five of the six are NYC stations that lost their transmitters in the 9/11 attack. I suspect the sixth is in Denver where local opposition has stalled tower construction.) Other commercial stations: 273 of 1196 on at full licensed facilities, 523 with low-power STAs. Apparently 400 have extensions. Non-commercial stations: 112 of 373 on at full licensed facilities. 60 with low-power STAs. 201 have extensions. ====================================================================== At the end of this year, commercial stations whose analog and digital channels are both "in core" (between channels 2 and 51 inclusive) must choose which channel will be used for their permanent digital facility. Stations whose analog or digital channel is outside core have no choice to make! Non-commercial stations get an extra year to decide. Currently, stations with low-power STAs are protected from interference to the distance that would be served by their full authorized facilities. (this means there's an area where they provide no service, but where they preclude other stations from providing service) This extra protection will be lost on 31 December 2004 for commercial stations, and on 31 December 2005 for non-commercial operations. Commercial stations that want to keep their full coverage area have roughly 18 months (from now) to increase to full power; non- commercials have 30 months. The definition of a "city-grade" signal will also tighten on these dates. Stations are required to put a "city-grade" signal across their city of license. For analog stations this signal is 62dBu. (for UHF, it's lower for VHF) For digital, the current standard is only 41dBu! On these replication dates, the standard will increase to 48dBu. Which is still awfully low. (this leads to an interesting situation here in Nashville. Our Pax affiliate WNPX is licensed to Cookeville, roughly 65 miles east of Nashville. Their DTV transmitter is located *in* Nashville. It just barely meets the current 41dBu standard for their signal across Cookeville. And it's operating at over 700 kw ERP. A 7dB power increase would exceed the maximum permissible power for DTV stations. It seems to me they'll have to either move the transmitter or change the city of license when the new requirements kick in. I suspect the latter. Cookeville already has another TV station (WCTE-22) so it would be possible to move the DTV channel 36 allotment somewhere else.) ====================================================================== Analog is supposed to close on 31 December 2006. This date can be pushed back if 15% of households still have only over-the-air analog TV. The figure is currently estimated at roughly 20%. Will that gap be filled in three years? Good question. ====================================================================== LPTV stations and translators do not receive separate channels for DTV. They may choose to convert to DTV operation at will. Reportedly WTHC-LP [42] Atlanta has done so - the only one to do so at this point. Several DTV translators are reported operating in Utah under STA. They aren't in the FCC Database. (STA and experimental stations usually aren't) There are no multiple-ownership restrictions for LPTVs. It would be legal for a LPTV operator to buy another LPTV in the same city, using one for analog operation and the other for digital. I have seen nothing to indicate LPTVs will *ever* be prohibited from analog operation. It would seem possible for a DTV station to purchase one or more LPTVs in the same city and use them to continue analog broadcasts after the 2006 closure of full-power analog broadcasts. I wouldn't count on that happening though. ====================================================================== Most of the channel 52-69 spectrum being freed by the transition will be auctioned for commercial use. (four channels in 60-69 will be held for public-safety communications) It has been reported that TV broadcasting will be considered an acceptable use of the auctioned spectrum - there may continue to be at least some TV here. On the other hand, the value of this spectrum may be pretty great - it may prove economically impossible for anyone to make enough money at TV to pay for their bids. It is possible that *analog* TV will be considered an acceptable use of auctioned spectrum. So we could have all digital TV in channels 2- 51 and some analog in 52-69. I wouldn't count on that either, same economic reason. ====================================================================== Canadian stations are allowed to apply for DTV permits, and the Canadian government has allotted DTV channels for all transmitters. (even LPTVs and translators, unlike in the U.S.) Only one station (CITY-57 Toronto, DTV channel 53) has applied; they're already on the air. Canada has set no fixed date for DTV conversion. I have read reports that the CBC plans DTV transmitters only in the country's very largest cities. Viewers elsewhere wishing to receive CBC HDTV would be expected to use DSS satellite. ====================================================================== There is one regularly-operating DTV station in Mexico; XETV-DT 23 in Tijuana is on. They're the Fox affiliate for San Diego. DTV experiments have been run in Mexico City. ====================================================================== I'm trying to write a comprehensive review of how DTV works, both technically and from a regulatory standpoint. Hopefully this fall... Robert Cooper wrote: "Having an over the air of some kind." Not suggesting at this time the TV stations can close down ALL transmitters. Again, they only have to continue to operate OVER THE AIR with sufficient power/tower height to reach TWO locations - cable headend and satellite uplink site." Even there, often the local cable headend and the satellite uplink site are fed by optical fiber. That's certainly the case for the major Nashville stations. From a *technical* standpoint the transmitter is indeed unnecessary for reaching cable or satellite subscribers. As Robert says, outlying cable systems could be fed by satellite. The only issue is administrative. If the station no longer has an over-the-air signal, arguably its regulatory standing is no different from Fox Sports or CNN or Showtime etc.. There ceases to be justification for forcing cable systems to carry the station. So either you change the rules (to accept that the government can require a cable system to carry a particular channel with no particular justification) or you accept that locally-administered independent-of-the-cable-operator stations are going to disappear. I'll leave that decision to the politicians and lobbyists |grin|... maybe |frown| is more appropriate! (Doug Smith W9WI, Pleasant View (Nashville), TN EM66, http://www.w9wi.com June 17, WTFDA via DXLD) Doug, Thanks, that is pretty much what I was hoping you'd post. A nice, easy to read explanation of how this is all going down. And there are also rules coming down on the TV set manufacturer's to begin *real* mass production of the DTV sets. Because nobody will spend 1,000 bucks on a 27" TV set. At some point real soon the price of this equipment will have to drop and be comparable to existing analog equipment or the idea is not going to be very well accepted by the American public. Kind of like how they don't like to be told how heavy and gas guzzling a car you can drive. The old "You're trying to take away my SUV again aren't you?" mentality, only reversed. "You mean to tell me that I HAVE to buy that $1,000 set or NOT watch TV anymore?!!" This will be sure to make people VERY uncomfortable buying one of the new sets. The spin masters will be doing overtime on this one trying to convince everybody that they MUST get a new set "because it's better." If congress passed a bill that made the cost of the new equipment a one time tax deduction, that is if you could only use the purchase of replacement sets as a tax deduction, maybe folks would be more inclined to go out and get the new sets. And it should have been tied in with a national reclaim/recycling program whereby the older analog sets would be sold to third world countries or ground up and the materials reclaimed instead of filling up landfills. We know a lot about how that goes here in Niagara County, home of the Love Canal! and CECOS and the Lake Ontario Ordinance Works. (That's were the Army stored waste products from the first atomic weapons programs. It took DECADES of work to clean that mess up!) There are ways to do this that would be economically feasible given a large enough stream of raw material (TV sets). But most homes have 2 or even 3 or 4 TV's in them. Here in our house there are 4 sets - ones in each bedroom and one in the family room, and I think that may be pretty typical in a household that has teenagers living in it. Anyway, I don't want to talk anybody's ear off. Back to checking for more skip!! of the analog variety (Guy T. Falsetti, Lockport, NY, ibid.) ** U S A. 87.9 PIRATES IN CHICAGO --- Yes, plural... ====================================================================== I drove through Chicago this morning on my way home from Milwaukee. My attention was elsewhere (mostly, on the road...) much of the way down from Wisconsin, but I did check out 87.9 at the junction of the Edens and Kennedy. (I-94 and I-90 northwest of downtown) A station I presume to be the one Neil Kaz reported was in with a fair signal. Rock music with lyrics in an Eastern European language. I didn't hear any announcements, though I suspect they did one while I was driving under the Post Office. It continued until I reached the Skyway, (where I-90 and I-94 split again south of downtown) where I tuned elsewhere. The signal was weak but clear through the downtown area. I would wild-guess something on the order of 100 watts ERP from a site in one of the very near west suburbs or the extreme west part of the city itself. ====================================================================== My attention was then with the Skyway (and 6 meters) until I got near I-80 on Indiana 912 (Cline Ave.) in Gary. There was a billboard for WGVE-88.7 there, and I was going to check out the programming on this long-silent station. (which did reappear last summer) Never got that far. There was *another* pirate on 87.9. Rap music, soul oldies, several ads for the Coliseum Bar on Indianapolis Boulevard in East Chicago. My bet is that the station is owned by the same people who own the bar. If the transmitter was there, then this was a 10-watter. It wasn't in very long, but in the time I was listening I didn't hear any objectionable lyrics (Doug Smith W9WI, Pleasant View (Nashville), TN EM66, June 15, WTFDA via DXLD) ** U S A. ALL LPFM STATIONS ARE OPERATING ILLEGALLY?! http://www.ccbroadcasters.com/group5bgrantables.htm Got your attention? This is not an "April Fool's Day" joke several months late. We believe that the shocking headline above is true. Ray LaForge, Chief, FCC OCT (Office of Engineering and Technology), Measurements and Calibration Branch today told CCB that all LPFM transmitters must be "FCC Type Certified." Previously, in 1998, the FCC replaced its regulation that all AM and FM transmitters be certified with the requirement that equipment could "self-certified" by a process called "Part 73 verification." According to Mr. LaForge, when LPFM was established in 2000 the FCC established tougher standards for LPFM, "because of the pirate problem." Because the changes in FCC regulations were poorly cross- referenced, apparently no one realized that LPFM broadcasters had stricter equipment requirements than all other broadcasters! Even Mr. LaForge was not aware of the change in regulations for a period of many months. Because of this confusion, he will recommend that the Enforcement Branch not sanction or penalize any manufacturer or LPFM broadcaster who was unaware of the certification requirement if they take action now to correct the problem. Equipment manufacturers may now either seek Certification from the FCC itself, which is a very slow process, or use independent testing laboratories - called TCBs - which charge $5,000 to $10,000 and can grant certification in a week or two. The FCC will probably allow manufacturers to send a Certification decal to be placed on the transmitters rather that requiring units to be returned to have a metal plate affixed. LPFM operators should contact their equipment manufacturer to determine how soon their equipment will be Type Certified and keep this information in file to show FCC inspectors. It is the manufacturers' responsibility to solve this problem for their customers. For the latest in professional guidance concerning underwriting guidelines: http://www.dovebroadcasting.com/underwriting.htm (John Broomall, Christian Community Broadcasters, June 16, WTFDA via DXLD) ** URUGUAY. Re: Hay osos en Uruguay? no :))) (Horacio A. Nigro, Montevideo - Uruguay, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. Hola Glenn, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA. La emisora "Música Beat", 96.7 MHz, se escuchó en la extraña frecuencia de 15075.07 kHz. La captación fue el día 15/06 a las 0129 UT, con SINPO 2/2. Transmitía baladas clásicas en español, salsa y raggamuffin' estilo panameño. Desconozco de donde pueda ser la estación. Audible hasta las 0202 UT, cuando la frecuencia es ocupada por los Emiratos Árabes Unidos, si no me equivoco [creo que no --- gh]. Identificaciones como: Música Beat 96.7 MHz, "El Gran Sonido". (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ NEWS FLASH ! RBDS: SCROLLING AND MOVING TEXT IS NOT ALLOWED IN THE USA United States "Radio Broadcast Data System" (RBDS) Standard http://www.nab.org/SciTech/Nrscgeneral/rds.asp "The RDS signal is a low bit rate data stream transmitted on the 57 kHz subcarrier of an FM radio signal. Its data rate is 1,187.5 bits per second – though 10 out of every 26 bits transmitted are error correction codes used to combat signal distortions that occur in the transmission path. Consequently, there is only about 730 bits per second of usable data in an RDS signal. The data in the RDS signal is transmitted in 104-bit groups, each of which consists of four 26-bit blocks. Because 10 of the 26 bits in each block are used for error correction coding, there are 16 bits of information in each block. The type of information included in each block is dependent on the group type. There are 32 different group types (0A, 0B, 1A … 15A and 15B). Certain types of information, such as the Program Identification (PI) code used to identify the transmitting station, are transmitted in every group type." - - - In the USA Radio Listeners know RDS mostly through its ability to permit RDS radios to display a Radio Stations Call Letters [.] US(A) Broadcaster generally only use the RBDS "PS" Code Feature to Transmit their Radio Station Call Letters. DEFINITION: Program Service Name (PS). Used for receiver displays of an 8 Character Alpha Numeric "Program Service Name" which may use Upper or Lower case characters. - - - Examples: KKSF, KKSF1037, LiteJazz, The Bone, ETC. Read Page #4 Section II Summary Differences Items 3 and 4. http://www.nab.org/scitech/rbdsrds.pdf Read Page #6 Item 3 - "DYNAMIC Program Service Name" The Requlation required a 'Static' Text Display Only. - - - It is against the Law to have Scrolling or Streaming RBDS Text in the USA. http://www.nab.org/scitech/rbdsrds.pdf Read Page #7 - "RBDS Standard" The Program Service (PS) Name is 'limited' to Eight (8) Characters. http://www.nab.org/scitech/rbdsrds.pdf Read Page #7 Item 4 - "Phase Out of Fast Program Service (PS) Feature." Newly designed equipment Shall Not have this Feature. - - - Broadcasters can NOT in the future have equipment that can transmit Scrolling or Moving Text. http://www.nab.org/scitech/rbdsrds.pdf Here is a website with several good webpages on RDS. http://murray.newcastle.edu.au/users/staff/eemf/ELEC351/SProjects/Hoppper/ Click-On the Topic [Modulation] in the Left Hand Column for specific information on how the separate RBDS Signal is transmitted via 57 kHz 'Off Set' using "Double Side Band - Supressed Carrier" (DSBSC) Transmission. This is a one page description with four go diagrams of how the RBDS Signal is structured and transmitted. About the RDS/RBDS Hardware and Technology http://www.semiconductors.philips.com/pip/SAA6588T_V2.html "The RDS/RBDS pre-processor is a CMOS device that integrates all RDS/RBDS relevant functions in one chip. The IC contains filtering and demodulation of the RDS/RBDS signal, symbol decoding, block synchronization, error detection, error correction and additional detectors for multi-path, signal quality and audio signal pauses." + Program Service (PS) Name (Call Letters & Frequency) - Traffic Program (TP) identification - Traffic Announcement (TA) signal - Alternative Frequency (AF) list - Program Identification (PI) - Enhanced Other Networks (EON) information + NOTE: Most USA FM Radio Stations 'only' use the "Program Service (PS) Name" Feature to transmit their: Call Letters, Frequency or Marketing Brand Name [.] WHY ? - Don't Ask Me Why ! - - The Revised Standard 'happen' in 1998 - - - Blame It On Bill Clinton :o) REMEMBER: When All Else Fails... - Read the Instructions ! - - Read the Manual ! - - - Read the Book ! More That You Wanted To Know ~ RHF (June 16, DX-398 yahoogroup via DXLD) This is interesting except that I never owned an RDS radio until I got my 2000 Chevy Impala, and on that radio I found scrolling text on several Boston radio stations. After tuning to the station, you would see first the Call Letters, then something like "Up next", "Beatle"s. Next you would see "Yesterday", and then.... "Rolling" ..."Stones"... etc. This is scrolling text and it was in the summer of 2000. I will be travelling to Boston again just after the 4th of July (in the same car) and will see if things look any different (Jay, ibid.) Jay, Besides the Primary RBDS Features like Program Service Name (PS). http://murray.newcastle.edu.au/users/staff/eemf/ELEC351/SProjects/Hop per/ Click-On [Services] RBDS has several "Secondary Features" like these 1. Programme Type (PTY): 2. Decoder Information (DI): 3. Programme Item Number (PIN): 4a. Other Networks (ON): 4b. Enhanced Other Networks (EON): 5. Music/Speech Switch (M/S): 6. Clock-Time and Date (CT): 7. Radio Text (RT): 8. Transparent Data Channel (TDC): 9. In-House Data (IH): MAYBE: The station(s) that you saw may have been using these other RBDS Features in their transmissions. IMHO: I would think that if the FCC was concerned about Car and Truck Divers being 'distracted' by the Scrolling or Streaming RBDS Text. They could have 'created' a requirement that 'AUTO' Radios could only display Fixed Text and Home/Portable Radios could display any form of text transmitted (~ RHF, ibid.) The American approach to RDS is extremely interesting. Awful actually (full of awe and wonder like a disaster), this is a great piece of technology that should be implemented. It seems that some very narrow commercial interests have held up its introduction. I understand that the same was true of door knobs --- most of the rest of the world went to door handles a long time ago --- much easier to open but some narrow commercial interests in the US insisted that builders stick to the old door knob. Life grows curiouser and curiouser (Brian Millson, in Sunny England, ibid.) I have a friend who is a chief engineer at a radio station in the San Francisco Bay area. This is from our email exchange on RDS: RDS, in Europe it's RDS, here it's RBDS. An interesting technology that would never make it in the states due to the homologous monopoly of stations and competitive reasons. What, management would say, scan by format? They might not pick ours if they knew there might be a station doing the same thing on the dial? And what's this change channel stuff when you begin to get out of range! No WAY! The technology was launched about ten years ago, the EIA (Electronic Industry Association) came to each station and asked if we wanted to put RBDS on, we said yes and we put it on. They gave us the gear. I fully implemented it, we ran the spots on the air, if you had a fully functioning RDS radio you could see the name and artist scroll across on the radio text, it would scan to the format, show the call and set your clock. Radio manufacturers didn't make full function radios, with the exception of Delco. The NAB went up in arms over it. I wondered if anyone had an RDS radio that could radio text, so I put up "If you can read this call the station and win a free CD" No one called, so I took it off the air. Nobody called to say they missed it. Interesting to note, the last couple of GM cars I rented all had full function RDS radios. Hmmm. Maybe I should hook it back up now? The stations in the city that have the RDS indicator light up are only running the call sign; the rest of it is empty. Yet another experiment that the manufactures didn't go with. We also gave them FMX, and AM stereo. No one implemented it widely in their radio lines. John (via Russ Kiehne, WB6NIU, ibid.) RK, Your friend is telling the truth. - If RBDS Does NOT - - Add To The Bottom Line - - - WHY DO IT ? A Radio Station is a Business - A Very Big Business - - Not a Public Service - - - That Includes NPR and PRI (~ RHF, ibid.) Perhaps a sense of public service would be a fantastic reason for doing it, of great moral merit rather than some disgusting narrow financial interest. Actually the manufacturers in much of the world did go for it in a big way. If you tried to sell a car radio in Europe without RDS, you would go broke very quickly. Regarding scrolling text --- As far as safety goes telling a driver that an accident is at such and such a junction or that there was a jam ahead would be considered a safety feature rather than a danger to safety (we use RDS here for that all the time). Interestingly while RDS is promoted in a big way here in cars. MacDonald's and Burger King and their ilk are not allowed to place billboards by the motorway for fear of distracting motorists. I certainly regard our radio stations as not only businesses but public services too and my licence fee goes towards that. Radio 1, Radio 2, Radio 4, Radio 5, BBC 6, BBC 7 [not Radio 3?] (Brian Millson in Sunny England :-), ibid.) ANTENNAS GET SMART Adaptive antenna arrays can vastly improve wireless communications by connecting mobile users with virtual wires http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa001&articleID=000853F1-DD7F-1EDC-8 E1C809EC588EF21 (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) DRM +++ INTERNATIONAL RADIO STATIONS START DIGITAL SERVICE By ALEXANDER G. HIGGINS, The Associated Press, 6/16/03 6:05 PM GENEVA (AP) -- The British Broadcasting Corp., Voice of America and other international broadcasters launched digital short-wave radio service Monday, promising to provide near-FM quality in the place of static-filled signals. Digital broadcasts don't increase a station's range, but they eliminate static and let broadcasters transmit text, such as news updates and song information, with the audio signal. For now, digital radio receivers are considerably more expensive than analog radios. The Digital Radio Mondiale consortium launched its digital service at a global radio meeting in Geneva. "DRM's introduction will forever alter the course of radio broadcasting," said Peter F. Senger, chairman of the consortium, which has more than 80 members. The initial signals were transmitted from a nearby mountain in France shortly after 8 p.m., when Senger gave the word during a ceremony in conjunction with the World Radiocommunication Conference in Geneva. The conference is held every few years to decide airwave issues such as the sharing of radio and satellite frequencies. Simultaneously, other short-wave broadcasters started using digital transmitters in different parts of the world. The transmissions received at the reception featured voices in Chinese, French, English, German, Russian and Spanish, followed by static-free music. For the foreseeable future, broadcasters will use both traditional analog systems alongside the digital transmissions so people with traditional radios will still be able to tune in. At first, broadcasts will be aimed at Europe, North America, the Middle East, Australia and New Zealand. Digital radio signals are duplicated enough so that even if some are lost from interference, the receiver is able to put the transmission back together so it can be heard correctly. And Senger said the system uses much less electricity than analog, which will save broadcasters considerably on their biggest cost item. Although the Federal Communications Commission has approved a different digital standard for U.S. domestic broadcasters, Senger said the new system is meant to be universal and could eventually be used in the United States. Other broadcasters in Europe, Asia and Canada have been using digital transmissions for several years. That system, known as Eureka 147 or DAB, uses a different set of frequencies than traditional AM, FM or short-wave bands. ------ On the Net: http://www.drm.org (via Mike Cooper, Mike Terry, Art Preis, DXLD) See also CANADA, GERMANY, RUSSIA DRM FEEDBACK Commenting on last month`s special feature on digital shortwave broadcasting, Johnsonville member BILL SANGSTER comments ``it appears that in order to receive DRM, I`ll need a complicated and probably expensive modification to my shortwave radio, as well as a compter. This begs the question about the continuation of conventional AM transmissions on shortwave in the near and distant future. Will DRM revitalise our hobby?`` CHRIS MACKERELL responds ````Yes, right now a computer is needed, but that will change over the next year or so. At the moment, modifying an existing receiver, and using a computer to decode the signal is the cheapest option. There are commercial DRM receivers available, but they are expensive, partly because they include a PC in the receiver box to do the decoding! Having the decoding done on a PC is actually good at the moment because it allows bugs in the decoding software to be fixed much more easily than in any hardware solution. Keep an eye open for DRM receivers coming out from mainstream manufacturers in the near future. With regard to the modifications required to an existing radio to receive DRM, the practicality and cost depends on the radio involved. I`m currently playing with a $50 DRM module that I have plugged into the back of my AR-7030. It isn`t perfect, but it does work. Will DRM revitalise our hobby? Well, it already has for me! Really, this is the first major technical revolution to come to shortwave radio since international broadcasting began and I`ve found it very exciting to have some small involvement in it. If it keeps a few more countries broadcasting on shortwave I`m all for it. It`s an SWL medium more than a DX medium, but I think there will be plenty of non-DRM stations around for many years yet to keep the DXers happy. Of course, DRM could go the way of Beta video, but only time will tell.`` Thanks for the update Chris! (NEW ZEALAND DX TIMES PAGE 25 JUNE 2003 via DXLD) CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ IMPORTANT SPAM UPDATE - THE 3RD ANNUAL NIGERIAN EMAIL CONFERENCE http://www.20six.co.uk:80/-/de/weblogEntry/v1mlhzyesmi7 (Email From a blog called "buzzin'" via Tom Roche, DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-107, June 15, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3f.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1186: WBCQ: Mon 0445 7415 [long version] RFPI: Mon 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 7445 15039 WWCR: Wed 0930 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1186.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1186.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1186h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1186h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1186.html JUNE DXLD HTML ARCHIVE is now underway: http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3f.html ** AFGHANISTAN [non]. 18940 *1430-1545 NOR 07-06 R Afghanistan via Kvitsøy, Dari IDs, talks about Afghanistan, 1500 news, 1528 speech with applause, 35433 AP-DNK (Anker Petersen, Denmark, @tividade DX via DXLD) 18940, Radio Afghanistan, 7 June, 1438-1453, SINPO 44333, in Dari till 1452, then changed to Pushtu. Talks, a kind of a radio play after 1446. How can I contact the station? (Dmitry Mezin, Kazan, Russia, Signal via DXLD) So it`s still on despite new 400 kW MW 1107. I recall that they have the same old P O Box in Kabul as previous incarnations (gh, DXLD) ** AFGHANISTAN. AFGHAN'S FIRST PRIVATE RADIO STATION TAKES TO THE AIR WAVES --- Agence France-Presse Kabul, June 15 http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/181_281133,00050004.htm From a house in one of Kabul's relatively unscathed districts, Afghanistan's first commercial radio station is taking the city by storm with a mix of music and chat by male and female DJs that would have had the Taliban summoning the religious police. Surrounded by posters of Western and Indian pop stars and footballers, Massouda Zalmai, 18, and her co-host Abdul Azim, 23, present Radio Arman FM's lunchtime show with a mix of friendly banter, gossip about rising Bollywood actor Vivek Oberoi and more serious discussions on the dangers of smoking, interspersed with music. Radio Arman FM 98.1 went on air April 16 as Afghanistan's first ever private radio station, serving up a mix of entertainment, information and education for the capital's millions. The station broadcasts Afghan, Indian, Tajik, Uzbek and Western music 24 hours a day, with bilingual DJs using Dari and Pashtu, Afghanistan's two main languages. Arman FM's format of music, gossip and chat has long been the staple of radio stations elsewhere, but the presenters' informal approach and use of colloquial Dari has drawn criticism from some listeners unused to hearing young men and women chat together on air even 19 months after the toppling of the puritanical Taliban. Others among those who aired their views on state-run TV last week have accused the fledgling radio station of being unprofessional in recruiting young presenters with little or no training (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** ALASKA. 11765, KNLS, *0800-0825, 6/12, English. Familiar format with ID, "This is Alaska Calling, you`re listening to KNLS, Anchor Point, Alaska, USA", "Eye on.."rpts, golden oldies, "Postcard from Alaska" and Mailbag program. Usual religious bits throughout. Overall fair signal, with splatter from HCJB, 11770 (Scott Barbour, NH, NASWA Flashsheet via DXLD) Back on scheduled frequency; recently reported on 11675 (gh, DXLD) ** BOTSWANA. 909 kHz was recently mentioned as used for the VOA service to Zimbabwe 1700-1800. This was originally direxional south when South Africa was the main target, but now we see in the IBB frequency schedule that the azimuth is ``999`` --- meaning, I assume non-direxional to distinguish that from 000 which would mean due north, a more appropriate direxionality for the present service to Zimbabwe. Maybe it`s about time the second transmitter and antenna farm in the original plans be built for northward direxional coverage. But by that time, Mugabe would probably be ousted and the US no longer care (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. 3205.00, [Rádio?] Ribeirão Preto. June 2003 - 0300 UT. Normally the frequency is totally clean from signals here in Quito but at one occasion this Brazilian came up with good strength (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin June 15, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. I received an email from a RCI Audience Relations Representative in response to an inquiry about an item I had heard on the "Maple Leaf Mailbag" program concerning RCI and DRM. The email stated that RCI would begin broadcasting in the DRM mode for several hours a day on June 16, 2003. They state that this is IN ADDITION to their usual analogue transmission, and that any total changeover to DRM "would be years down the road." 73, (Joe Wood, TN, NASWA Flashsheet June 15 via DXLD) ** CANADA. And in Canada, the CBC offers groups tours (by advance reservation only) of its massive Broadcast Centre in Toronto. I'm trying (well, Saul Chernos is trying) to set one up for WTFDA this July; I'll try to do one for NRC next year as well if there's interest. Local CBC studio facilities will also do tours on request; I've visited Moncton, Ottawa and Vancouver that way. And the staff at the RCI transmitter site in Sackville, New Brunswick LOVES visitors. I still haven't figured out how to get a tour of the Radio-Canada/RCI "Maison Radio Canada" facility in Montreal... s (Scott Fybush, NY, NRC-AM via DXLD) See also FRANCE; UK ** CHILE. Concerning to RADIO SANTA MARIA, 6029.7v khz, I have the confirmation from a friend that is living in Coyhaique, that the station by a budgetary problem is off the air and currently they are broadcasting only on MW fq. Is uncertain when the station could return again on SW, but everything will depend of the interes of the director of the station that in fact have not any has been their attention the radio. He is a priest that is concerned of other interests. Regrettable. Also, comes to collation the low receipts product of the great competition of radio stations, specially FM stations via relay stations from Santiago, mostly. Is shame because the SW frequencies in this zone, is very important because has access to places of very difficult access. The world integration of the Internet and the interest of to listen Stereo music of great quality added to the administration lack, implies that at this time the short wave of Radio Santa María is outside of the air until somebody puts the point to the "i" and look about the importance that has this radio station. The important is that all equipments and the antennas are in guards by the personal of Radio Santa Maria, but, for the moment, we should only wait (Gabriel Iván Barrera, Argentina, in DXplorer List via Conexión Digital June 15 via DXLD) ** CONGO. 30 May, 2055-2103 5985 Radio Congo in French till 2100. At 2100 broadcast in Spanish started, with ID "Aquí Radio Congo" !!! Slight sideband splash from the Voice of Turkey; I was able to suppress it with synchrodetector. 44444. Voice of Russia (transmitter in Germany) caused considerable QRM before 2100, but nevertheless signal of Radio Congo could be recognized downunder. I've got a feeling that Radio Tanzania was also audible on this frequency (after checking 5985 kHz against parallel 5050). Both Voice of Russia and Radio Tanzania leave the frequency at 2100, opening the way for Congo (open_dx - Sergey Mulyk, Chervonograd, Ukraine, via Signal June 15, via DXLD) ** CUBA. RDS from the station on 90.3 displays as ``PROGRESSO`` (Bruce Elving, June FMedia! via DXLD) Surely the Cubans know how to spell it ** CUBA [non]. ESTADOS UNIDOS --- Quem gosta da parte religiosa do hobby, a dica do José Moacir Portera de Melo, de Pontes e Lacerda (MT), é a sintonia da missa para os cubanos, emitida, nos domingos, pela Rádio Marti. Vai ao ar, às 1100, em 9805 kHz. A missa é celebrada na Ermita de la Caridade del Cobre e "os destaques são para os cânticos e a organista que os acompanha", conforme Portera. (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX June 15 via DXLD) Standard rant about separation of church and state. I really can`t understand why all the other sects aren`t banging on the doors of Radio Martí demanding equal time. Or, are they? Someone should publicize this in the NRB (gh, DXLD) ** CZECH REPUBLIC. REPÚBLICA CHECA --- Aqui vai mais uma dica do Leônidas dos Santos Nascimento, de São João Evangelista (MG), para os amantes do idioma francês: a Rádio Praga leva ao ar, nas terças, o programa "73 de Rádio Prague", com informações aos radioescutas. O esquema da emissora é o seguinte: entre 0600 e 0627, em 5930 e 7345 kHz. Das 0800 às 0827, em 11600 kHz. Entre 1630 e 1657, em 5930 e 17485 kHz. Das 1830 às 1857, em 5930 e 13580 kHz. Por último, entre 2200 e 2227, em 11600 e 13580 kHz (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX June 15 via DXLD) ** DENMARK. Denmark. A collection of Danish QSL cards up through the years can now be seen at: http://www1.dr.dk/pubs/nyheder/html/programmer/kortboelge/qsl.html 73, (Erik Køie, Copenhagen, June 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ECUADOR. It might be a good idea to check all HC stations on SW, both active and inactive when the economic situation in the country is rather depressed. 3 million school pupils have been without education for at least a month but the conflict is ended on Monday. How they will manage to come to their schools is uncertain when a big transport strike starts the same day. The situation is also bad due to closed gas stations and strikes among oil workers. On top of that is strike among the doctors with closed hospitals. It will be interesting to see how long the president, Lucio Gutiérrez, can keep his office. 4879.00, Radio Nacional Espejo, Quito. On behalf of WRTH I am updating the addresses for the stations in the province "Pichincha". Nacional Espejo said they are looking into the possibility to take up SW transmissions again. I hope this will be a reality as very few area active on SW nowadays from Ecuador. 4899.77, Radio Saquisilí y Libertador, Saquisilí. June 2003. Has had an active period now with broadcasts early evenings and late mornings local time which make them hard logged back in Sweden. 73 från BM in Quito! New address: bjornmalm2003@yahoo.com (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin June 15, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ECUADOR [non]. As you have heard on this week's DX Partyline, WINB will be airing the program. DX Partyline and HCJB were instrumental in my growth as a DXer starting way back in 1976. It is a great honor for me to be able to air the DXPL on WINB nearly 30 years later. We'll be airing it starting next Saturday, June 21st from 8 to 8:30 PM on 12160 kHz (This is UT Sunday, June 22nd at 0000-0030.) We'd welcome reception reports which can be sent to WINB, PO Box 88, Red Lion, PA 17356 USA or winb40th@yahoo.com (Hans Johnson, Sales and Frequency Manager, WINB, Cumbredx mailing list June 15 via DXLD) How about that! Same time as used to be on HCJB. Wonder when they`ll update the online program schedule (gh, DXLD) ** EL SALVADOR. Haven't heard Radio Imperial 17835.16 for some time... not even a carrier beating against Japan. Anyone else hear them recently? (Paul Ormandy, Oamaru, New Zealand, June 15, dxing.info via DXLD) At least their fax machine is broken, the only way they would QSL: (gh) {not so: see 3-108} Estou enviando uma informação muito importante sobre a Radio Imperial e espero que colegas até mesmo de outros países possam aproveitá-la. Em contato com a administradora desta emissora (Erika García), ela informou que o equipamento de faz deles está danificado, impossibilitando assim o envio de confirmações. Para os colegas que desconhecem este caso, a dita emissora tem registros de confimações apenas por este meio. Para a minha sorte, recebi a informação que a minha confirmação por carta está a caminho e além disso, receberei um certificado de "ouvinte especial" da emissora (Ivan Dias - Sorocaba, SP, 11/06/2003, @tividade DX via DXLD) ** FINLAND. YLE, R. Finland Sked 30 March to 26 October 2003 Finnish, except other languages as specified below 558 24 hrs 963 24 hrs 6120 0400-2200 9560 0530-0600 9655 0400-0600 9705 1300-1500 11755 0500-2000 11895 2330-2345 11990 0100-0200 13665 2330-2345 13730 0100-0200 13775 0430-0500 15135 0600-0800 15335 1700-1800 15400 1200-1300 15445 0400-0530 15515 1900-2000 Th 17625 1300-1400 17670 0700-0800 Sa, Su, 1200-1300, 1530-1600, 1700-1800 Su 17710 1700-1900 21595 1000-1100 21800 0830-0945, 1000-1200 Special Finnish: 1555 17670 1945 6140 558 2055 6120 963 0245 6120 558 0845 17615 558 Latin 1555 17670 Su 1945 6140 558 Su 2055 6120 963 Su 0245 6120 558 Mo 0845 17615 558 Mo Swedish 0530-0600 9560 Su 0630-0700 15135 Su 1000-1100 15530 Su 1235-1300 15400, 17670 Sa 1300-1900 9630 | Radio Vega relay: 1400-1600. | R.Vega/R. Extream rly: 1630-1900. Russian 0200-0245 6120, 558 0445-0500 Helsinki 97.5, Tampere 88.3, Turku 96.7, Lahti 90.3, Kuopio 88.1, Jyvaskyla 87.6 0700-0800 17615 Sa 0800-0845 558, 17615 1900-1945 558, FM (see above), 6140 | Radio 1: 1955-2000 ------------------------------- Local stations relay: 0700-0800 11755, 6120, 963 | Mo Kainuun Radio, | Tu - Etela-Savon Radio, | Wd - Pohjos-Karjalan Radio, | Th - Turun Radio, | Fr - Tampereen Radio, | Sa - Radio Keski-Suomi (till 0900) 0800-0900 11755, 6120, 963 | Mo - Ita-Uusimaa, | Tu - Radio Perameri, | Wd - Kymenlaakson Radio, | Th - Radio Hame, | Fr - Radio Keski-Pohjonmaa. 1000-1100 11755, 6120, 963 | Mo - Lahden Radio, | Tu - Satakunnan Radio, | Wd - Tampereen Radio, | Th - Etela-Karjalan Radio, | Fr - Lapin Radio. 1200-1300 11755, 6120, 963 | Mo - Turun Radio, | Tu - Radio Savo, | Wd - Ylen lantinen, | Th - Oulu Radio, | Fr - Pohjanmaan Radio. 1315-1400 9630 in Swedish | Mo - Radio Aboland, | Tu - Radio Vastnyland, | Wd - Radio Osterbotten, | Th - Radio Mellannyland, | Fr - Radio Ostnyland 1315-1400 11755, 6120, 963 & 9705 (-1330) | Mo - Fr Ylen aikainen. ------------------------------------ Capital FM Helsinki 97.5, Tampere 88.3, Jyvaskyla 87.6, Turku 96.7, Lahti 90.3, Kuopio 88.1: | 1800 DW in German, | 1830 RFI in French, | 1900 BBC in Russian, | 1905 YLE in Russian, | 1945 Special Finnish, | 2000 CRI in English, | 2030 NPR in English, | 2100 CBC in English, | 2130 NPR in English, | 2200 BBC in English, | 2230 CBC in English, | 0000 ABC in English, | 0030 BBC in English, | 0300 VOA in English, | 0330 NPR in English, | 0400 BBC in English, | 0430 YLE in English. Helsinki 97.5, Tampere 88.3, Jyvaskyla 87.6: | 0900 NPR in English ( Su -1200), | 1500 BBC in English. Helsinki 97.5: | 0500 DW in German, | 0530 RFI in French, | 0555 Sr/Su YLE in English, | 0600 BBC in English, | 0700 ABC in English, | 0800 DW in German, | 0830 RNE in Spanish, | 1000 DR in Danish (Sr BBC -1100), | 1030 SABC in English, | 1100 DW in German, | 1130 RFI in French, | 1200 RV in Italian (Sr,Su BBC), | 1230 BBC in English (Sr BBC -1700), | 1300 CBC in English, | 1400 NPR in ENglish, | 1530 NRK in Norwegian, | 1600 VOA in English, | 1700 DW in German, | 1730 RNE in Spanish. (via Sergey Kolesov, via Alan Roe, June World DX Club Contact via DXLD) ** FRANCE [and non]. FRENCH CLANDESTINES STATIONS IN 1943 Good evening Glenn, I am sending you an article in French on the secret stations which spread towards the Maghreb in 1943 in Arabic and French. This article is based according to documents which exist in the National Archives in Paris and which mention the activities of Propaganda Abteilung in France. This Nazi organization which operated in France used broadcasting station Allouis`s short waves to spread programs towards North Africa. Documents are drafted in German (I possess the photocopies of these archives). Between 1939 and 1945 the Nazis also had broadcasts of disintegration against France. From January 10, 1940 a broadcasting station becoming identified "Le Réveil de la France" began the broadcasts on short waves, follow-up some days later by "la Voix de la Paix". These two last stations used the broadcasting stations of Radio Warsaw. Broadcasts existed also under the name of "Radio Humanité" which had to give the impression to have between the hands of the French Communist Party of which the leader was then Maurice Thorez. Another SW broadcasting station known in French under the name of "Radio Metropole" operated it seems from Semlin in Yugoslavia until 1944. When I shall have a little more time I shall make an article about that. For the moment the article on broadcasts towards the Maghreb is in French. I have no time to make a translation of it in English (Bernard Chenal, France, June 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) LA PROPAGANDE ALLEMANDE VERS LE MAGHREB PENDANT LA 2E GUERRE MONDIALE Il y a très peu d`écrits qui ont été menées concernant la propagande allemande vers le Maghreb. Il y a cependant quelques historiens allemands qui ont brièvement ébauché ce sujet dans le cadre d`une étude générale de la propagande allemande vers l`étranger. Bien que le sujet soit un peu plus vaste que celui étudié ici, je me contenterai de relever brièvement certaines émissions clandestines que l`on pouvait entendre en 1943. Au Maghreb très peu de personnes possédaient des postes de radio. Il en existait 4660 au Maroc en 1938 et 9833 en Algérie en 1941. Radio Alger avait inauguré un journal en langue arabe de 15 minutes en 1936 en réaction à la propagande italienne de l`émetteur italien de Bari qui ne se gênait pas pour attaquer la politique colonialiste des Français et des Anglais. Depuis Bari, les fascistes envoyaient des émissions dans les différents dialectes arabes pour inciter la population du Maghreb à se soulever contre la domination française ou anglaise. C`est la BBC qui ripostera la première en lançant ses premières émissions en langue arabe dès janvier 1938, suivie par Radio Paris Mondial en avril de la même année. A partir de septembre 1939, ce sont les émetteurs de Zeesen (Berlin) et de Radio Stuttgart qui entrent dans la danse en diffusant des nouvelles et des bulletins en arabe et en français vers le Maghreb. Plus tard, les allemands y ajouteront trois autres émetteurs ondes courtes. Un propagandiste chevronné resté célèbre au Maghreb, Younis Al-Bahri officiait sur l`émetteur ondes courtes de Zeesen. L`émetteur était semble-t-il mal reçu en Algérie, mais beaucoup mieux en Tunisie. Ce speaker s`exprimait dans un arabe littéraire difficile à suivre pour les maghrébins. Même si son message n`était pas parfaitement compris (parce irakien), Younis al-Bahri était écouté par des cercles attentifs avec admiration et respect. Un autre speaker arabe, Yassine Abderrahman, de nationalité tunisienne (ex-membre du Comité d`Action Révolutionnaire Nord-Africain - C.A.R.N.A) présentait chaque jour sa chronique sur l`émetteur de Zeesen. Radio Stuttgart qui émettait depuis Mulhacker en Allemagne en français par la voix d`une speakerine sans accent, était facilement captée le soir au Maghreb. Les émissions de Radio Stuttgart étaient beaucoup plus violemment anti-française que celle de Radio Bari ou Radio Tripoli. La propaganda Abteilung de Paris avait mis en route depuis la France de pseudos postes clandestins dirigés vers le Maghreb . Le plus important d`entre eux était sans conteste Radio Brazzaville N 2 qui émettait cinq fois par jour pendant 15 minutes sur 11700 kHz. Ce poste était également audible en France dans la bandes des 49 mètres. L`émetteur est en fait celui d`Allouis qui rayonne avec ses 100 Kw. Le responsable de cette radio est le fameux Dambman, plus connu sous le nom de Docteur Friedrich qui excelle aussi sur Radio Paris Allemand. Il est secondé par des collaborateurs membres du Parti Populaire Français (PPF), tels Roger Nicolas, René Fonjallaz (journaliste suisse) ou encore des autonomistes bretons pro-nazis comme Olier Mordrel et Paul Gaignet. Le studio de Radio Brazzaville N 2 se trouve au 120 avenue des Champs Elysées à Paris. La station se définit comme un "poste de combat pour la France éternelle et indivisible". Plus tard, elle se met à attaquer le général Giraud en Afrique du Nord, qui ne s`était pas encore rallié au général de Gaulle. Radio Brazzaville N 2 fustigeait "les traîtres" et recommandait aux soldats français de rester fidèles à leur chef légitime, le Maréchal Pétain et de "combattre les envahisseurs anglo- saxons". En mai 1943, trois émetteurs aux dénominations curieuses font leur apparition : Radio Lutte Sociale, Radio Libération, et Radio Torchon qui incitaient les musulmans à "brutaliser les juifs et à résister contre les autorités américaines et Gaullistes". En vue d`accroître la confusion politique, le premier émetteur était sensé appartenir au Parti Communiste Français, le second aux Gaullistes d`Afrique du Nord, et le troisième comme un poste clandestin reflétant "l`opinion publique nord-africain". Les trois stations clandestines sont animés par des membres du P.P.F. Il s`agit de MM Brun, René Fonjallaz, Jean Grappard (né le 24 juin 1916 à Paris), Rogère et Peretti. En 1943, Radio Libération Ondes Courtes émet cinq fois par jour, à 11h49, 12h49, 13h49 et 15h49 pendant 15 minutes. Radio Torchon fonctionne chaque lundi, mercredi, et jeudi de 13h15 à 13h30 et Radio Lutte Sociale chaque dimanche, mardi et vendredi à la même heure vers l`Europe dans la bande des 49 mètres. Une émission similaire a lieu vers l`Afrique du Nord les mêmes jours entre 13h15 et 13h30 pour Radio Torchon et entre 13h45-14h pour Radio Lutte Sociale sur 11700 et 11720 kHz. Le 25 mars 1944 à 16h30 et 21h15, la station clandestine de la Résistance française "Honneur et Patrie" (qui était exploitée par le Political Warfare Executed –PWE) affirmait sur ses antennes que "le studio du soit disant poste clandestin Lutte Sociale se trouvait au siège de l`ancien Poste Parisien, 118 avenue des Champs Elysées. Il a pour rédacteurs deux membres du P.P.F. qui appartenaient naguère au Parti Communiste Français. Ce sont Fouché, délégué adjoint à la propagande du P.P.F. et Renaud". Le 26 mars 1944 Radio Rabat rectifiait le tir en affirmant qu`il s`agissait de Bougère et non de Fouché. Le nom de Bougère, quelque peu écorché, était en réalité Rogère. Jean Renaud travaillait en réalité sur le poste " La France Fidèle " du gouvernement de Vichy. Lutte Sociale avait comme speakerine une nommée Mme Peretti. On ne connaît pas la portée de ces émissions et les dégâts qu`elles ont pu provoquer. Mais une chose est certaine : la propagande nazie n`est jamais parvenue à jeter le désordre chez l`ennemi, car de nombreuses stations à travers le monde combattaient le nazisme. La partie était vraiment inégale et de plus la politique allemande n`a jamais voulue appuyer le mouvement de libération arabe. Emissions vers le Maghreb en 1943 (les heures indiquées sont GMT +1) = Broadcasts towards the Maghreb in 1943 Radio Zeesen : Maghrébin : 1800-1900, 2115-2215 sur 19m83, 25m24 Français : 16h45-1800, 1900-2000 sur 19m83, 2015-2115 sur 25m24 Radio Brazzaville N 2 (Propaganda Abteilung) entrée en fonction le 23 décembre 1942 jusqu`au 15 avril 1943. En Français vers l`Europe à 10h49, 11h49, 12h49, 13h49, 14h49 (heures d`Europe centrale) sur 49m26 (11 minutes par émission) Vers le Maghreb à 10h15, 11h45, 12h45, 14h45, 15h45 via Allouis sur 11700 kHz (15 minutes par émission). "La France Fidèle" (poste officiel du gouvernement de Vichy) = Official station of the government of Vichy ) Vers le Maghreb : Français : 1100-1200, 1300-1330 Arabe : 1330-1400, 2015-2045 Français 1915-2015, 2300-2400 Dans les bandes des 31, 41 et 49 mètres Radio Révolution Ondes Courtes (gouvernement de Vichy) clandestine En français (vers la France et l`Europe) 2000-2030 dans les 31, 41 et 49 mètre en plus de l`émetteur de Toulouse sur 308 mètres (qui appartenait au groupe de Jacques Trémoulet (décédé en 1971) qui avait fondé Radio Andorre et Radio Africa Maghreb à Tanger et qui à la libération sera condamné à mort par contumace pour " collaboration avec l`ennemi ", puis gracié par la suite). Vers l`Afrique Orientale et Equatoriale française : Français : 0545- 0630,0645-0730, 1230-1315, 1415-1540,1923-1945,2100-2145, 2200-2245 sur 31m19, 19m68, et 25m33 Radio Torchon Entrée en fonction le 11 mai 1943. Diffuse pour commencer en français, d`abord les lundis, mercredis et vendredi puis à partir de juin 1943 tous les jours de 13h15-13h30 sur 11720 kHz et dans les bandes des 49 mètres. A partir du mois d`août 1943 cette station commence à diffuser en arabe et kabyle en plus du français (horaire et fréquences non connus) Radio Lutte Sociale (disait appartenir au Parti Communiste Français) Elle a commencé à émettre le 18 mai 1943 les dimanches, mardis et jeudis. Dès août 1943 cette station animera une émission journalière en langue française de 13h45-14h00 sur 11700 kHz. Emettait aussi en arabe et kabyle (horaires et fréquences non précisés) Radio Libération (affirmait appartenir aux Gaullistes d`Afrique du Nord) A pris la suite de Radio Brazzaville N 2 lorsque celle-ci a cessé d`émettre. Elle est entrée en fonction le 5 mai 1943 d`abord en français à 1149,1249,1349,1449, et 15h49 sur 11700 kHz ( 15 mn par émission) vers le Maghreb et vers l`Europe dans la bande des 49 mètres. Emettait aussi en arabe et en kabyle. (Nota : Les horaires et fréquences ainsi que les commentaires sont extraites de pages dactylographiées en allemand de la Propaganda Abteilung dont les notes se trouvent aux Archives Nationales de Paris (Je possède environ une cinquantaine de pages chez-moi, des photocopies faites à partir des originaux). (Bernard Chenal, France, June 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** FRANCE. In Paris, Lisa and I took a tour of Maison Radio France, the home to all of France's state radio services, including Radio France International. The tour is given entirely in French, and I probably understood about 40 percent of what the guide was saying and picked up another 30 percent by context. (Our Quebecois contingent would enjoy this experience!) The highlight of that tour is about an hour that's spent in the Musee Radio France, a very well appointed small museum that tells the history of broadcasting from a very French perspective. Access to the museum is only by guided tour. The rest of the tour is relatively skimpy by comparison; we walked past several of the national networks' studios, a newsroom, and visited the very big auditorium/studio where orchestral concerts and other large events are broadcast. s (Scott Fybush, NY, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** GALAPAGOS. Radio Santa Cruz Writes from the Galápagos Islands: We would be very thankful if you would update the information on our radio station, as follows: Name: RADIO SANTA CRUZ Frequency: 88.7 FM. Stereo (1000 kw) Director: P. Segundo Clarito Pucachaqui Thanks for doing that. We also want to tell you that our own website is http://www.puertoayora.com/radiosantacruz and its e-mail is radiosantacruz@gpsinter.net Franciscan Brothers Galápagos, Ecuador (Catholic Radio Update June 16 via DXLD) Probably the world`s most powerful FM station, and thus a DX target even under non-DX conditions, unless they really mean 1000 watts . . . But according to site it is on 92.1 and has a webcast, audible on wm player. Listened around 1500 UT Sunday with live DJ, CST time chex, music with religious angle, and frequency as 92.1. Almost seemed like DX from such an isolated(?), exotic(?) location (gh, DXLD) ** GERMANY. New DW address: Deutsche Welle, D-53111 Bonn, Germany. 73 wb (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, June 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDIA. RELAUNCH OF INDIA WORLD RADIO This info from Mr Raman Nanda (earlier used to work with BBC-Hindi) via cr-india mailing list. Regds (Alokesh Gupta, dx_india) India World Radio, one of the country's first independent radio (broadcasting on Internet) has been relaunched and now has a magazine format. May I request you to visit http://www.indiaworldradio.com --- listen to the programmes that interest you and give us you feedback. Let me tell you that all the programmes presently out there have been presented by first time broadcasters who got into the flow of producing and presenting programmes during an intensive three week workshop conducted by Media Arc in Delhi. The programmes include: "Good News Delhi", "Osho: Conversation between a father and daughter", "Books `n` Authors', 'School Junction' and 'Sex and Spirituality'. Look forward to your feedback. With regards Raman Nanda Internet Radio? Experience it: http://www.indiaworldradio.com http://www.media-arc.net/samples_radio.htm Radio for Schools: http://www.media-arc.net/ryanradio.htm Our work with an International TV channel: http://www.channel4.com/kumbhmela Applications of live, interactive audio: http://www.indiatalkslive.com Contact Details: Email: raman@media-arc.net Tel: 91-11-2649 5658, 91-11-2649 5748, 98681 27916 Add: 1st Floor, 118, Shahpur Jat, Near Asian Games Village, New Delhi- 49 (via Alokesh Gupta, dx_india via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. MUSLIM GROUP TO AIR SATELLITE TALK SHOW 'Washington Live' will offer insights on U.S. Muslim community CAIR-NET: Muslim Group to Air Satellite Talk Show In the Name of God, the Compassionate, the Merciful FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (WASHINGTON, D.C., 6/10/03) - The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) will air a new satellite talk show tonight dealing with issues of concern to the North American Muslim and Arab communities. The weekly hour-long program, called "Washington Live," will be broadcast out of the nation's capital to North American and worldwide by the Arab Radio & Television (ART) satellite network. SEE: http://www.art-tv.net/arabic/ It will air every Tuesday at 8 p.m. (Eastern) and is available in the United States through the Dish Network, on cable and by satellite in other parts of the world. [UT Wednesdays 0000, a rather inconvenient time in the Middle East] SEE: http://www.dishnetwork.com/content/programming/international/packages/arabic/index.shtml Tonight's program is scheduled to include segments focusing on the recent defamation lawsuit filed by American Muslim charitable institutions against CBS's "60 Minutes," a recent congressional hearing on the targeting of Muslims and other minorities following the 9/11 terrorist attacks and on a poll showing that the image of the United States dropped worldwide following the war on Iraq. "We are excited to bring this unique programming to Muslims and Arab-Americans who have long sought a media outlet that reflects their views and concerns," said CAIR Executive Director Nihad Awad, the host of the program. "'Washington Live' will focus on practical social and political issues that CAIR deals with on a daily basis and that impact Muslims and Arabs living in North America." Awad said "Washington Live" will be co-hosted by CAIR Communications Director Ibrahim Hooper and will include guests, such as elected officials, policy-makers and commentators, who offer a broad spectrum of views on current issues. CAIR, America's largest Islamic civil liberties group, has 16 regional offices nationwide and in Canada. - END - CONTACT: Ibrahim Hooper, 202-488-8787 or 202-744-7726, E-Mail: cair@cair-net.org; Rabiah Ahmed, 202-488-8787 or 202-439-1441, E-Mail: rahmed@cair-net.org NOTE: CAIR offers an e-mail list designed to be a window to the American Muslim community. Subscribers to the list, called CAIR-NET, receive news releases and other materials dealing with American Muslim positions on issues of importance to our society. To SUBSCRIBE to CAIR-NET, go to: http://cair.biglist.com/cair-net/ ----- CAIR -- Council on American-Islamic Relations 453 New Jersey Avenue, S.E., Washington, D.C. 20003 Tel: 202-488-8787, 202-744-7726 Fax: 202-488-0833 E-mail: cair@cair-net.org URL: http://www.cair-net.org (CAIR list via Fred Waterer, DXLD) ** IRAQ. U.S. RADIO IN BAGHDAD INCREASES SURRENDER APPEALS By JIM KRANE, Associated Press Writer The United States is increasing its radio appeals for Iraqis involved in weapons of mass destruction programs to surrender for trial, offering leniency for those who cooperate. On Sunday, an AM radio station in Baghdad operated by U.S. Army's Psychological Operations personnel broadcast an appeal to Iraq's former weapons scientists to give up. "It's time to leave your hideouts," an announcer said in Arabic. "If you come voluntarily and give information about weapons of mass destruction and their launch vehicles, the United States will do its best to give you a just trial in accordance with the law." Nearly three months of searching have turned up no Iraqi weapons of mass destruction, and pressure is mounting on President Bush to explain the failure. Last week, U.S. military units assigned to track down the banned weapons appeared to slow their search - with some assigned to other duties - as some officials said they had run out of places to look. A Pentagon intelligence team is coming in to take over the effort, relying more on leads from interviews and documents. Saddam Hussein's alleged caches of chemical, biological or nuclear weapons were the main justification offered by the United States to go to war. The Army Psyop broadcasts is aimed at helping the effort to find more candidates to interview. The station, which is called Information Radio and is operated from a portable radio transmitter, has broadcast similar appeals since April. The Army's Psychological Operations force in Iraq is the largest in U.S. history, with 11 companies and almost 1,000 psyops personnel in the country or in support roles in the United States, said Lt. Col. Glenn Ayers, commander of the 9th Psychological Operations Battalion based in Fort Bragg, N.C. In the past two weeks, the station has increased its appeals - broadcasting them multiple times daily. "If you choose to cooperate today, you'll get tolerance and mercy for what you've done. If you refuse to cooperate today, you'll be arrested later," the announcer repeats (Wilmington Star June 15 via DXLD) WTFK? ** KURDISTAN [non]. UNIDENTIFIED, 10 June, 4380 kHz - 0230, ID OM: "Aira dengi syureshi yiran" - repeated twice, then "Dengi syureshi yiran, da kurdistan lawo dagistan". "International" anthem played, then YL speaking in a middle-eastern language. 34443. Nothing heard at re-check at 02:49 (open_dx - Yaroslav Derevyagin, Odessa, Ukraine…) My suggestion: you've heard the Voice of Iranian Revolution. Program is prepared by Kurdish Communist Party of Iran. // 3880 kHz. (open_dx - Sergey Mulyk, Chervonograd, Ukraine, via Signal June 15 via DXLD) ** LUXEMBOURG. During the WRC at Génève RTL will again do DRM tests via Jünglinster on 6095, this time carrying seven RTL group stations, including 104.6 RTL from Berlin, on a hourly rotation scheme. I guess Radio Polonia will appreciate it (Kai Ludwig, Germany, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 104.6 RTL press release: 104.6 RTL goes DRM Berlin (ots) - Anlässlich der World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC 2003) in Genf sendet der Berliner Radiosender 104.6 RTL ab dem 16. Juni 2003 im Übertragungsmodus DRM (Digital Radio Mondial). Im stündlichen Wechsel sendet Berlins Hit-Radio zusammen mit sechs weiteren Stationen der RTL Group auf Kurzwelle 6095 Khz. Durch diesen Testlauf sollen Chancen und Vorteile von DRM aufgezeigt und die Weiterentwicklung der technischen Standards vorangetrieben werden. Die Übertragung erfolgt von Luxemburg aus mit einer Tagesreichweite von mehr als 15 Millionen Hörern. DRM ist weltweit der einzige nicht patentrechtlich geschützte digitale Übertragungsmodus für Kurz-, Mittel- und Langwelle, der bereits existierende Frequenzen nutzt. DRM-Übertragungen sind in punkto Klangqualität dem Standard FM Stereo beinahe ebenbürtig. Das heißt: FM-Sound mit AM-Reichweite. Die RTL Group ist mit 22 Radiostationen in acht Ländern der führende Radioanbieter in Europa. ots Originaltext: 104.6 RTL Digitale Pressemappe: http://presseportal.de/story.htx?firmaid=23869 Pressekontakt: Sabrina Rabow - Pressesprecherin - 104.6 RTL und RTL Radio Deutschland Tel.: 030 - 884 84 252 Fax: 030 - 884 84 259 sabrina.rabow@104.6rtl.com (via Kai Ludwig, Germany, June 14, DXLD) ** MADAGASCAR. The R. Netherlands station at Tananarive is listed to carry 60 mb test transmissions as follows: only one day each time: 4930 at 0400-0430 on Jun 17 only, 3215 at 1630-1655 on Jun 17, 6040 at 0400-0430 on Jun 18, and 4930 at 1630-1655 on Jun 18. The purpose is to cover only Madagascar with a religious program, per Frequency Office of RN (Gabriel Iván Barrera, Argentina, DX-plorer via DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. Radio 538: "What is the significance of ``538`` in the name? Not a frequency" --- A wavelength, corresponding to 558 kHz, used by an offshore station back in those days... Anoraks nostalgia. And those who can receive Hulsberg 891 complain about a low modulation depth, suggesting that the new processing equipment Radio 538 wanted to have installed first is not properly adjusted yet. By the way, I guess that the primary goal of this refitting is to achieve an improved audio bandwith, similar to Lopik 675 where in 1998 a new Optimod 9200 with steep 6.5 kHz lowpass filtering replaced the previously used 9100. And 675 indeed sounded quite good when carrying Radio 10 FM (the overshooting Arrow Classic Rock now is another story). (Kai Ludwig, Germany, June 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Dutch station names Hi, Glenn, The significance of 538 is that it was the wavelength in metres (not frequency) of Radio Veronica in the last period its existence as an offshore station prior to closure in 1974. Another Dutch station, which failed to get a licence this time, is Radio 192. It's run by some ex-Veronica people. 192 metres was also the original wavelength of Radio Veronica. Radio 192 even used the old Veronica logo with the name changed. The Dutch have a "thing" about stations named after numbers, often wavelengths: we also have Radio 10, of course, and in the past there was a station called Cable One. I think this use of numbers in station names and slogans dates back to the offshore era of 1964-1967, where all the offshore stations announced their wavelength (often inaccurately so it rhymed with the station's name or jingle). Some I remember off the top of my head were: Radio 270 Radio 390 Radio Caroline on 199 (actually 197 for Caroline North and 201 for Caroline South) Radio City: "it sounds fine on two nine nine" which was actually about 290 (1034 kHz) etc. Why do they do it today? The Dutch get very emotionally attached to their favourite radio stations. When Veronica closed in 1974, they did so with an emotionally charged message that said it spelt the end of democracy in The Netherlands! It didn't, of course, but it felt like it to many people at the time. Using names that have a significance in Dutch media history immediately give the station and edge: every Dutch listener knows the significance of 538. If they don't remember it, they've read about it or been told by their parents. It's a way of getting an immediate "brand" name, and there have in the past been some court cases here about the right to use certain names, slogans and logos. 73, (Andy Sennitt, Netherlands, DX LISTENING DIGEST) That makes sense, except holding onto a number once it is no longer applicable! (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** OKLAHOMA. OETA is just celebrating its 50th anniversary: http://www.oeta.onenet.net/OETAHISTORY.html Had a special show UT Sun 0100-0230 with dignitaries, 13-minute HDTV produxion on ex-NCHOF museum. Hmm, anniversary was actually the week of May 6. Turns out that the extreme right E. K. Gaylord of the Daily Disappointment was OETA`s early secret underwriter. But this week OETA is supposed to start carrying the POV season (via Glenn Hauser, Enid, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** OKLAHOMA. KCSC-FM Programming Notes June 2003 -- Kent Anderson For many years one of KCSC/KBCW's most popular locally-originated features has been the "Classical Birthday Hour," weekday mornings at 9:00 [1400 UT], during which we pay tribute to composers born on that date. It's been a pleasure to re-visit and, in some cases, to discover music by composers from the Renaissance to the 21st century. Beginning this month, you may notice some unusual listings in the birthday hour. There are a handful of days during the year on which there are no composer birthdays in our database. At the same time, there are composers --- primarily from the Renaissance and early Baroque periods --- who do not have a documented, exact birthdate. I've decided to put these two factors together and give those "undocumented" composers their due by plugging them into the "empty" days on the calendar. These are musicians like Thomas Tallis, John Dowland, and Giovanni Gabrielli, just to name a few --- important musicians, to be sure, but whose exact dates of birth cannot be verified. I hope you enjoy this expansion of the Classical Birthday Hour (Kent Anderson, Program Director, KCSC-FM via DXLD) KCSC`s stream was Not Found when checked around 2208 UT Sunday for Community Curtain Call --- but it`s one of the very few classical stations I can actually pick up on ---- a radio! No thanks to the Enid gospel huxter translator on the next frequency 90.3, on most receivers forcing me to sidetune to 90.05 or 90.0. Playlist, but not in advance: http://www.kcscfm.com/programming/playlist/playlist_daily.asp (Glenn Hauser, Enid, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PARAGUAY. Dear Friend Glenn Hauser: Greetings from Paraguay! This is to advise that we have had very good results with our test transmissions, on 41 metres. We have discontinued the use of 7300, 7385 and 7737 kHz, but still test on 7370. At this moment, we are testing on 9983 and 15185, in simultaneous form. These frequencies retransmit the regular programming of ZP20 Radio América, which also broadcasts on 1480. As well, we are testing on 1590, from Radio Villeta. The programming is locally-originated, different from that of ZP20 Radio América. All transmissions are on-air, the 24 hours, daily, save for power outages or for technical adjustments. Reception reports will be very welcome at: radioamerica@lycos.com or ramerica@rieder.net.py Printed QSLs will be posted to the listeners, for correct reports. With best regards (Adán Mur, Radiodifusión América, Asunción, Paraguay, June 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. 6042.59, Radio Melodia, Arequipa, 0546-0552, Jun 14, Spanish, musical program, man announcer, news about Toledo president (travel to United States), IDs " a través de la Onda Corta internacional desde la programación de Radio Melodía", "la programación del sábado a través de Melodía", tc & ID "nueve minutos para la una de la mañana en Radio Melodia", 24322. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Location: Villa Lynch, Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina. Receivers: Icom IC R-75, Kenwood R-2000, Sony ICF-2010, Antennas: T2FD, V Inverted 10 mts with balun, V Inverted 11 mts with balun; Others: MFJ 959B Receiver Antenna Tuner/Preamplifier (Nicolás Eramo, Argentina, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. 5009.62, Radio Altura recently reactivated for some occasional days but just now on air daily. Radio del Pacífico, which has been on exactly 4975.00 kHz is down on 4974.77. New Peruvian radio station on 6163 kHz or just a BM "joke"? This line was in an "SWB América Latina"-mail June 3. Our member Henrik Klemetz mailed an answer completely corresponding with the following: 6163.00v, Radio Unión, Lima. June 14 2003, 1015 UT. I watched this frequency for a few days, strong signals but semi distorted audio. I first believed something more exciting because of a weather report for Chiclayo. ID: "Radio J.H.C.", a MW-station with QTH in Chiclayo. Some minutes later a "Unión"-ID. Was also heard on its fundamental 6115 kHz but very weak. Now back on its usual frequency. 4975.00, Radio del Pacífico, Lima. May 2003 --- evening. "La Cadena de Milagro" with reverend Yeye Ávila. A religious program from Puerto Rico linked by satellite to various radio stations in Perú. The mentioned reverend "Yeye Ávila" is found on this web-address: http://www.yiyeavila.org/Revista%20La%20Fe%20En% I couldn`t hear all stations mentioned but here are a few: Radio Manantial de Vida, Cajamarca 82 25 79. Radio La Voz de Dios, unknown QTH. Nueva Estación Cristiana, Cajamarca 83 00 87. Radio Vida, unknown QTH. Radio Amanecer, Bambamarca 84 32 60. Radio Buenas Nuevas, Tumbes 52 31 61. Radio Jerusalén, Piura 30 77 70. Radio Televisión Cristiana, Chincha. Radio Buenas Nuevas de Salvación, Talara. Radio Haleluja, Tingo María 68 37 38. Radio Príncipe de Paz, Tumbes. Radio Rio, Moyabamba 56 23 48. The numbers are telephone numbers. I have never before heard of this "cadena" so if you have more info please give me a mail. Good "site" with valuable info for us DXers --- Besides links to several radio stations in Latin America you can download a list of all stations in Peru having a licence: no less than 2184 stations. Choose between PDF- or Excel-format. You get there by clicking on this link: http://www.radiodifusion.com/radios/peru1.htm (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin June 15, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SINGAPORE. R. Singapore International printed sked as at 20 May 2003 English: 1100-1400 UT 6150 9600. Also broadcast on FM in Singapore from 8 pm to 9 pm local time (1200-1300 UT) on "Newsradio 938". (via Patrick Travers, World DX Club, via Alan Roe, DXLD) But there are also lots of domestic network relays on SW (gh) ** TOGO [non]. Re: ``2000-2100 Sunday on 12125 (55444)`` -- Probably this one originates not like 21760 from Meyerton but from Russia instead? (Kai Ludwig, Germany, June 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Because, I suppose, a number of other clandestines in this 12 MHz range are via Russia" Yes, and TDP brokered ones and aiming at Africa. Wolfgang, Noel, Olle, perhaps you can remember to check it out tonight if I once again fail to do so? (Kai Ludwig, Germany, June 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. My wife and I went to London a year ago - mainly for pleasure, but while there I interviewed some folks at BBC World Service for an article about their new digital audio distribution system for Radio World. World Service is at Bush House, near The City (the financial district) and St. Paul's. All I got to see there, despite being a visiting journalist from abroad, was a conference room and the offices of the Albanian Service. Show up without an appointment and all you'll see is the BBC Store on the ground floor :-) And even though I asked very nicely and gave their PR person nearly two weeks' advance notice, all I was able to see of Broadcast House (on Portland Place in the West End, just south of Regent Park and a few blocks north of Oxford Street, where your wife will be shopping :-), home to the BBC's domestic radio services, was the BBC Store on the ground floor and the front lobby, where there was a nice display of the plans to renovate and expand the facility. BBC TV's main production center, located in "White City," outside the touristy areas on the outskirts of West London, does offer public tours, though we didn't get the chance to take one. http://www.bbc.co.uk/tours/ has all the information on these, by the way. Reservations required - but it sounds like it's worth the 8 pounds. I'll have to put it on the list for "next time," whenever that might be. I can offer some tower-hunting tips as well if you're interested... s (Scott Fybush, NY, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. Re: ``Washington, D.C., June 12, 2003 -- "Radio Theatre-- Live" is back! (VOA press release June 13 via DXLD) But when to be broadcast????`` Nothing in the PR said this was to be broadcast anywhere -- I suspect the PR is simply the fact that the LATW is performing at the VOA auditorium. See http://www.latw.org/stations.html for a rather short list of stations broadcasting LATW -- all 3 of which webcast; most notably, KPCC, Sundays 0300-0500 UT (Saturdays 8 - 10 PM PDT). (Rich Cuff, PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) VOA has actually broadcast some previous plays, saved up for holidays. Here are the others from above site, if still current. They got KPFA wrong: 94.1, and it`s Berkeley. See also BOTSWANA (gh) KPFA 94.7 San Francisco Airs Sundays 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm [0200-0400 UT Mon] Series Start Date ~ October 6th, 2002 (Series available to 56 college stations nationwide through weekly satellite uplink.) Visit KPFA for programming updates. KUOW 94.9 Seattle Airs Fridays 10:00pm - Midnight [0500-0700 UT Sat] Series Start Date ~ January 10th, 2002 Visit KUOW for programming updates. (via gh, DXLD) ** U S A. Wavescan will remain at 1430-1500 UT Sundays [on WINB 13570] (Hans Johnson, WINB, June 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Yes, sounded like Barosoain this week. See also ECUADOR non (gh, OK, DXLD) AWR's "Wavescan", edition 441, heard via WINB, 13570, from 1430 to 1500 on June 15th (Bill Matthews, Ohio, USA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. The Story of Radio Station WINB --- References ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Year Date Event & Reference ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 1950 Oct 22 WGCB AM inaugurated; BCYB 1972 B182 & AMP visit RMI 81 1960 Oct WGCB FM inaugurated; AMP visit RMI 81 1960 CP issued; WINB = World in Need of the Bible; MT 3-00 14 1962 Oct Began broadcasting 50 kW Continental 417B; RMI 143 & NASWA 1-94 33 1962 Oct Rhombic to Europe at 62 degrees; RMI 143 & WINB Schedule 1962 Oct WINB = World Inter National Broadcasters, 1.5 m E Red Lion; WINB Schedule 1962 Dec Already heard in Holland & New Zealand; R&H 79.15 1-63 103 1963 Testing completed, 2 channels to Europe & Africa; R&H 79.15 2-63 1963 McIntire Inquiry; R&H 77.14 7-63 103 & MT 3-00 15 1970s Mid Used WGY GE MW transmitter 4BT50A1 purchased for conversion, not used 1976 Jun 8 CP issued for rhombic to Latin America 160 degrees; WINB folder 1977 Rhombic to Latin America under construction; AMP visit RMI 153 1993 Summer Latin American antenna dropped by grass cutter; NASWA 1-94 33 1994 Plans to rebuild original Continental; NASWA 1-94 33 1995 Apr 19 Transmitter problem, off air; MT 3-00 16 1997 Jan WINB re-activated; MT 3-00 17 2003 Now oldest commercial shortwave station in USA; MT 3-11 14 WINB information; 84.156 91 (Adrian Michael Peterson, AWR via DXLD) Accompanying previous feature ** U S A. WJIE gives the world yet another chance to hear old WORLD OF RADIO 1179, as quickly checked around 1645 UT Sunday June 15 on 13595 with the usual CODAR QRM. I wonder if all the preachers are also having their old April shows repeated over and over; might be harder to tell (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. DAVID BRINKLEY INFLUENTIAL PIONEER FROM THE GOLDEN AGE OF AMERICAN TELEVISION NEWS Godfrey Hodgson, Saturday June 14, 2003, The Guardian X-URL: http://www.guardian.co.uk/Print/0,3858,4691136,00.html David Brinkley, who has died aged 82, was one of the most admired and influential journalists in what is coming to be remembered as the golden age of American television news. From 1956 to 1970, his partnership with Chet Huntley, as the joint anchors of the NBC Nightly News, established the formula that virtually all news programmes have followed ever since. Their sign-off, "Goodnight, David", "Goodnight, Chet", became a byword. After Huntley retired to a cattle ranch in Montana, Brinkley's partnership with John Chancellor failed to develop the same chemistry, and CBS News, anchored by the avuncular Walter Cronkite, pulled ahead. Brinkley did not retire, as he could well have done. Instead, in 1981, he went to ABC News and developed an authoritative Sunday morning political chat show, This Week With David Brinkley. The title of the second of his two books said it all, and with his customary brevity. It was David Brinkley: 11 Presidents, 4 Wars, 22 Political Conventions, 1 Moon Landing, 3 Assassinations, 2000 Weeks Of News And Other Stuff On Television, And 18 Years Of Growing Up In North Carolina (1995). Unlike some American anchors, but like most of the best of them, Brinkley was not a glamour boy but a hard-working reporter with an inquisitive mind, a vast knowledge of the workings of Washington DC and a deft writing style. His first - and better - book, Washington Goes To War (1988), was an interesting account of the US capital in the second world war, a vanished world few of his contemporaries could remember as he did. He had a fairly short fuse; he notoriously called President Bill Clinton "a bore" - and other unflattering things - on election night in 1996. Brinkley apologised on air, and Clinton graciously said, "I always believe you have to judge people by their whole work, and if you get judged on your whole work, you come out way ahead". Brinkley grew up in the small southern town of Wilmington, North Carolina, and started reporting for his high school newspaper. He studied at three good southern universities - North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Vanderbilt in Nashville, and Emory in Atlanta - and after working for smalltown papers in the south, and for southern bureaux of the United Press, moved to Washington in 1943. He thought he could get a job at CBS, but was hired instead as NBC's first White House correspondent. Modestly, he said, "I didn't create anything, I just got early". It was true that he was in the right place at the right time, and that his timing was perfect. Wartime Washington, not long before a sleepy, segregated southern town with a few boarding houses for congressmen, was rapidly becoming the capital of the world, and under Franklin Roosevelt the presidency was becoming the key institution of modern America. But network television was still in the future. Brinkley remembered in his memoirs how he was in the NBC bureau when "a large, odd-looking object arrived at the Washington studio". It was the station's first television camera. With Huntley and their producer Reuven Frank, he worked out many of the basic techniques of television news, including the habit of switching back and forth between Huntley in New York and Brinkley in Washington. Brinkley was known for the quality of his television writing, using sharp, declarative sentences. Frank praised him for a skill only fellow professionals would recognise. "Brinkley writes silence better than anyone else," he said, meaning that his man knew when to shut up and let the picture tell the story. Brinkley liked to maintain that he would not be able to get a job on air today because he didn't look like a news anchor - perhaps a gentle swipe at the trend toward hiring good-looking but intellectually challenged anchors. At any rate, he was neither a matinee idol nor smooth. His delivery was jerky, and that temper famously fragile. At his zenith, he was extraordinarily successful. During the tense Democratic party convention at Atlantic City in 1964, with President Lyndon Johnson coyly secretive about whether or not Robert Kennedy would be his vice-presidential running mate, and fireworks on the floor over which of two delegations, one white and one largely black, would represent Mississippi, Brinkley and Huntley won a stunning 84% of the audience. Inevitably, after 50 years, as Americans became more cynical about politicians, Brinkley came to seem almost too much a Washington insider. But he remained a shrewd and witty observer, and he was never anyone's man. He is survived by three sons from his first marriage, to Ann Fischer, of whom the eldest is the American historian Alan Brinkley. In 1972, he married Susan Benfer, with whom he had one son. David McClure Brinkley, journalist, born July 10 1920; died June 11 2003. Guardian Unlimited (c) Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003 (via Tom Roche, DXLD) ** U S A. WRR 101.1 Dallas TX is using its classical format to help combat road rage. ``Road Rage Remedy`` airs weekdays at 7:20 am and 5:20 pm [CDT = 1220, 2220 UT], providing 10 minutes of uninterrupted, tranquil music. ``Within a matter of months, `RRR` became one of WRR`s most popular features,`` said Greg Davis, GM. Selexions of music with anti-road rage messages have made it onto a CD the station sells. It features humorous images of irate drivers, and is intended to get buyers to be curious about the music on the disc, and what the station plays. It is also sold in stores. Selexions include compositions by Brahms, Dvorak, Schubert, Tchaikovsky, Debussy, Beethoven, Handel, Massenet and Bach (June FMedia! via DXLD) Hmm, my (I think) unmodified MS Word spellchecker recognizes only Beethoven from this list. What does that tell us? And ten minutes of tranquil music should not be the noteworthy exception! (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. WRAL 101.5 Raleigh NC [one of the Ibiquity stations in last issue], still with [dagger]M,R, Seeburg. It is one of the few stations nationally with two music SCSes. I talked with Keith Harrison, CE, who confirmed that the SCSes have not been interfering with or been interfered with by so-called ``HD Radio,`` which they have tested. ``but a few other broadcasters told me on their car radios the scanning has stopped on white noise. I have not heard this. It might be only in certain locations or on certain radios.`` (Bruce F. Elving, FMedia! June via DXLD) ** U S A. GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY AT WGRV --- By Duncan Mansfield GREENEVILLE, Tenn. (AP) --- For 50 years, friends and neighbors in Greene County have gathered around the radio at 12:30 p.m. every weekday to hear the news from the same familiar voice. "Good afternoon, this is Maxine Humphreys ...," the newscaster greets her WGRV-AM listeners, immediately jumping into a commercial for a funeral home, her long-time sponsor. "I will have the latest on the local scene after this ..." Since 1953, Humphreys, who won't reveal her age but is likely in her early 70s, has delivered her 15-minute dispatches daily with the authority of Walter Cronkite and the homespun appeal of Aunt Bee from The Andy Griffith Show. Her broadcast May 19 was typical, despite a 50th-anniversary celebration. A fatal car wreck, a meth lab arrest and a trailer fire led her report, followed by a listing of the winner and all six runners-up in the Miss Iris beauty pageant, a reading of 10 obituaries and a reminder about an upcoming high school play. WGRV, a 1,000-watt country music station that doesn't reach much beyond the 65,000 residents of this East Tennessee county bordering North Carolina, may as well be named "Maxine's station." That's what locals call it, general manager Ronnie Metcalfe said. "She is a legend in Greeneville," said Joe Hickerson, president of Doughty-Stevens Funeral Home, her sponsor since she took the job. "It wouldn't surprise me if one of every two radios in Greene County, and maybe more, is tuned to the noonday news with Maxine." In a community without a network TV station, farmers plan their chores and lunch around her newscasts. When locals tell one another, "Maxine said it," no further explanation is needed. Paul Metcalfe, the retired patriarch of the family-owned radio station, said a doctor told him that he stopped making house calls at noon because his patients "wouldn't tell him what was wrong until Maxine was off" the air. Accolades poured in to recognize Humphreys' 50th anniversary. "You've distinguished yourself as one of the truly dedicated broadcast professionals in our business," wrote Edward Fritts, president and CEO of the National Association of Broadcasters. U.S. Senators Lamar Alexander and Bill Frist, as well as Gov. Phil Bredesen, sent congratulations. The General Assembly compared her in a resolution to national radio commentator Paul Harvey. It was inconceivable to Humphreys that she would make such a mark when she took the part-time news reader job an estimated 14,500 newscasts ago. But, without ego, she said it is where she was meant to be. "I feel like I have been where God can use me because I am doing things for the people," she said. "I have really taken it to heart." A Greene County native, she was in her early 20s working in the employment office at Tennessee Eastman in Oak Ridge when the WGRV job came open. Armed with a high school diploma and a year studying voice at Tusculum College in Greeneville, she applied. "First thing, she has a nice voice. It carries well. That is very important in radio," Paul Metcalfe said. "And she was pretty, personable, a local girl. She had all those things going for her." Over the years, Humphreys took correspondence courses, learned to type and began working full-time, handling everything from the station's books to its radio bingo game. When her late husband, Ransom Humphreys, fell ill seven years ago, she considered retiring. The Metcalfes persuaded her to continue doing the newscasts part time. She has no regrets. "I don't know how much longer I will be here, see. But I say, 50 years and counting," she said. Acknowledging the milestone, she ended the broadcast with a rare personal note. "It would be just fine if I go to Heaven from here," she said. "I love you radio land. Thanks for listening." (via Mike Cooper, and from Harry van Vugt, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, June 12, DXLD) ** U S A. R. Disney: It's not supposed to be directly profitable. That comes directly from a Michael Eisner statement to investment analysts (David Gleason, CA, NRC-AM via DXLD) As another station is about to flip to it, 1680 in MI (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. WESTERN STATES TIS UPDATE: -- mostly UT, WY The following update is the result of a meandering 4,675 mile car trip taken May 23 - June 7, 2003, with overnight stops in Lone Pine, CA; US highway 6/50 at the NV/UT border; Eureka, NV; Ketchum, ID; Yellowstone Lake Village, WY; Green River, WY; Teasdale, UT; and Las Vegas, NV. All times are ELT. [he means: UT -4, a timezone irrelevant to the area -- but really, there are hardly any times mentioned in the first part of this report] 530 KOC913 ID Arco (area) - INEEL (Idaho National Environmental/ Engineering Laboratory) station is on the air with a brief tape loop about the nation's first nuclear power plant. 4 transmitters were originally licensed, but I would agree with a web article I read a while back implying that only the station near the US-20/26 split is on. 530 (WPIW323) ID Idaho Falls/Roberts - No station noted here as we drove through town. 530 (WPET783) ID Twin Falls - No station noted here as we drove through town. 530 (KOJ876) NV Hoover Dam - Not noted as we drove south on I-15. Used to be an easy catch from I-15, so they may be silent again. 530 (WPWF496) NV Wells - This recently-licensed station does not appear to be on the air yet. It was not on as we drove through Wells. 530 (TIS) UT Glen Canyon NRA - There is no trace of a TIS station anywhere in the Utah portion of this park, at least in the areas where any roads exist (US-89, UT-95 Hite Canyon, UT-276 Bullfrog/Hall's Crossing). I don't believe this station exists. 530 (WPBF898) UT St. George - "Color Country" station is still silent, perhaps gone for good? Used to get out well when it was on. 530 (TIS) UT Vernal-Jensen - I don't think this station is still on, although we were only in Vernal and didn't drive over to Jensen. 530 (KCP271) UT "Vernal Annex" - I don't think this station is on; no sign of a station on 530 when we were in Vernal. 530 TIS WY Jackson (area) - National Elk Refuge TIS is still active and getting out well during the day. Station is north of Jackson, WY, probably near the visitor center. 530 (KCP272) WY Rock Springs - This station appears to be long gone. No trace of them when we drove through, and the Ashley National orest ranger at Green River had never heard of these stations. 660 "KRSX" CA Victorville - Good signals with oldies (mostly pre- British invasion) and slogans "Cruisin' Oldies" and "The big 66." I read about this station in Route 66 Magazine; it is run by the former owner of KMIN-980 [Grants NM?] and runs with 0.1 watts. Commercials sell for $1 each. The signal was audible for 15 or 20 miles along I-15 as we returned on June 7th. 1000 WPFM428 CA Barstow - CalTrans HAR is still getting out well. Message very similar to WPSG912-1610 and WPSE479-1610. 1570 UNID NV Las Vegas - Some kind of a low-power station, noted along Charleston Blvd. with a woman interviewing the author of a children's book. 1590 WPLP689 ID Victor - Wyoming DoT station for ID side of Teton Pass is active, but with a very short tape loop and a very long gap between messages. I did not get over to Jackson, WY, to hear the companion station at the other end of the pass, but it was on when we drove through in May 2000. 1600 WPWA784 MT West Yellowstone - MT Fish and Game department TIS getting out well with a message about aquatic pests carried by boats from one lake to another. Announcer mis-IDs as WDWA784. Contrary to someone's report a few years ago, the West Yellowstone (national park) TIS did not move to 1600. This is a new station. 1610 -- CA Chula Vista / Otay Ranch - Talking house for Arroyo(?) Realty advertising a 7-bedroom(!) house. Tape loop includes clips of the song "Takin' Care of Business." 1610 KMC723 CA Manzanar NHS - New station is on the air with a short test loop. (Manzanar is only now being prepared for tourist access). Logged from Lone Pine at night and for a few miles along US 395 during the day. [Japanese WW II internment camp] 1610 (WPSG912) CA Mountain Pass - Station was off as we drove through their coverage area. Signs posted 10 miles from their transmitter on each side of I-15 say the station is only on when the lights are flashing. The big road widening project has now moved 14 miles west of the transmitter site. 1610 WPSE479 CA Needles - CalTrans station is getting out well with a message that is almost identical to that of WPFM428-1000 and WPSG912- 1610 except for the interstate highway numbers (15 and/or 40) and city. Logged from AZ, UT, and NV at night. 1610 KNEC996 CA Yosemite (west side) - Can be logged from NV and UT at night with CalTrans road information, mixing with WPSE479. 1610 -- ID Driggs - Talking house noted for new Creekside development and a local mortgage company. 1610 (TIS) ID Teton Scenic Byway - Recent Internet articles mentioned TIS coverage on 1610 for the scenic byways (ID highways 31, 33, 32, 47) but none were noted and no signs were posted. 1610 (KNNV605) ID Idaho Falls - Not noted as we drove through town. I think the Pocatello station is still on the air (have heard these calls at night on recent trips) but we didn't get to Pocatello on this trip to confirm. 1610 KOE780 ID Sunset Cone - Craters of the Moon NM station was not on when we first saw the signs on US 20/26/93. Rangers didn't realize the station was off, and they turned it on when I told them about it. Gets out poorly, possibly carrier current or talking-house transmitter, only audible within a few hundred feet of the visitor center. Message emphasizes safety hazards of exploring caves and lava tubes. Announcer seems to have gotten the idea that his station's calls are "XRC01"! 1610 (KII596) MT Cooke City - We found no trace of a station here. The station at the NE entrance to Yellowstone is only a few miles away from here, so it's unlikely a station has existed in Cooke City recently. 1610 KOP796 MT Deer Lodge - Grant-Kohrs Ranch TIS is getting out well with information about the self-guided walk. 1610 (KII605) MT Gardiner - Delete this old listing. The Yellowstone north entrance station is located in Gardiner. 1610 KOP708 MT Gardiner (Yellowstone NP North entrance) - Local monitoring indicates the station is located at the north entrance gate at Gardiner, not in Mammoth Hot Springs. It gets out amazingly well through the canyons and 2000-ft. elevation gain from Gardiner to Mammoth, and is still strong enough in Mammoth to fool you into thinking it might be located there. 1610 (TIS) MT Madison River Canyon - There is no evidence of the listed station here, which is a shame. The Madison River Earthquake area has some fascinating local history, and there are numbered road signs all along this road that don't make any sense until you stop at the visitor center near the north end of the canyon. 1610 KOP709 MT Silver Gate (Yellowstone NP NE Entrance) - Gets out pretty well with the same message as the other entrance stations. 1610 (KHA517) MT Targhee Pass - We've never heard a station at this location. If it existed, it has probably been gone for years. 1610 KOP710 MT West Yellowstone (Yellowstone NP West entrance) - Station is still here (did not move to 1600 as someone had reported a while back) but much weaker than before. Gets out about a mile at best with same message as other Yellowstone entrance stations. 1610 WPXK767 NV Carlin - NV DoT HAR station (also licensed as WPWF496) is running a test message and getting out well. 1610 WPXK767 NV Dunphy - NV DoT HAR station (also licensed as WPWF496) is running a test message almost identical to the Carlin station. 1610 -- NV Elko - Station noted running NOAA weather seemed to be coming from Elko as we drove by. There is a license for LaMoille listed in the FCC database (same group of stations as Carlin and Dunphy) but not Elko. 1610 -- NV Ely - White Pine Middle School in the center of town is operating what sounds like a talking house transmitter with local school news (e.g., interviewing a student who had recently won at a track meet). 1610 (Part 15?) NV Mesquite - Local oldies station "the boss" was off the air as we drove through this time. They were on last June when we drove through, and were mentioned in a recent Internet article, so maybe just temporarily silent. 1610 (TIS) UT Fremont Indian State Park - Evidently, there was indeed a station here at one time. Signs are still up on I-70 a few miles on either side of exit 17. No trace of a station on either day we were in this area. Note that KCP260's message does make mention of this park. 1610 (KOJ777) UT Fry Canyon - No sign of a station here. There is basically only a single private lodge building at this location, and it isn't currently open, so there's nothing for a TIS station to talk about. 1610 KOP798 UT Bryce Canyon NP - This station is on with park shuttle info, but it does not currently get out anywhere near as well as the Garfield County station which covers some of the same information in its message. 1610 TIS UT Kolob Canyon (south of Kanarraville) - Station near I-15 exit 40 is on the air but putting out horrible weak signals. Male voice with tape loop about vehicle restrictions for the Kolob Canyon scenic drive. 1610 (KOQ516) UT Mackinaw - Fish Lake Forest TIS was silent all 3 days we were in this area. They were on last year with good signals. 1610 WPBE828 UT Panguitch (Red Canyon) - Garfield County Information Station has gone back to a longer message (covering Bryce Canyon and all of the other attractions along scenic highway 12) and is easily logged at night throughout NV, UT, and even WY. It is especially easy to mistake this for the Bryce Canyon station (KOP798), which does not get out as well and only mentions the Bryce Canyon Shuttle and the 1590 station, both of which are also mentioned on this station. 1610 "KCEU" UT Price - "Broadcasting live from a janitor's closet at the College of Eastern Utah, this is KCEU, Price, Utah." Typical rock format. 1610 (KOJ494/KOJ499) UT Steinaker - Two old US Department of Interior stations were listed for this state park near Vernal, but there is no sign of a station. This location is within the midday coverage area of KCP270. 1610 KCP260 UT Salina Canyon - Tape loop contains some basic information assembled at a visitor center in Richfield, plus 3 additional tape loops from Wayne, Sevier, and Emery counties. 1610 KCP270 UT Vernal - Former Ashley National Forest TIS is now run jointly by several government agencies. Tape loop describes various attractions in "Dinosaurland." Of all the stations listed in this area, this is the one that is actually on the air. 1610 KOJ723 UT Virgin-La Verkin (Zion NP) - Zion's monster TIS station is now using these calls (station is audible for about 30 miles along I-15 middays despite being located well east of the freeway). There are 5 stations in Zion NP; this is consistently the one that gets out. 1610 WPLP689 WY Dubois - Mobile HAR station warning motorists about the numerous accidents involving cars striking migratory deer and elk (158 incidents per year in this location, with an average damage of $2000 to each vehicle involved). Located at the WYDOT maintenance yard in Dubois. 1610 (KCP270) WY Green River - Delete the old listing for an Ashley National Forest station at this location. The senior ranger at this location had no memory of such a station, and the calls are in use by the station in Vernal, UT. (It seems as though most old Forest Service stations have either been taken over by other federal or local government agencies or gone off entirely). 1610 (KOP714) WY Madison Junction - This inside-the-park station was active in 2000, but is currently silent. 1610 KOP701 WY Pahaska Tepee (Yellowstone NP East entrance) - Station is on and getting out pretty well with the same message as the other entrance stations. 1610 KOP711 WY South Entrance (Yellowstone NP) - Same messages as other entrance stations, gets out for about 5 miles each way. 1610 KOP718 WY Yellowstone Lake Village (Fishing Bridge) - Station is here (not 1550) with an "inside the park" message emphasizing staying away from wildlife and how to handle food so as not to attract bears. 1620 -- UT Roosevelt - Talking house near the intersection of US 191 and Utah highway 121. 1650 Pirate NV Las Vegas - Pirate station in Summerlin area is getting out pretty well. A word about Yellowstone NP stations: The only active TIS stations in Yellowstone are the 5 entrance gate stations and the station at Lake Village - Fishing Bridge, all on 1610. Another inside-the-park station was active at Madison 3 years ago, but not this year. Most of the other two dozen or so listings for stations at individual attractions in the park (all of which would be very useful if they did exist) have probably been gone since the fire of 1988 and should be deleted. 73, Tim Hall, Chula Vista, CA http://www.inetworld.net/halls/dx/index.html [Above listing includes the many listed stations he did not hear; below are the stations he did hear, now including dates and times, and otherwise duplicative, but too much bother to weed out --- gh] TIS and OTHER: 530 KOC913 ID Arco (area) - 5/27 1500 - Idaho National Environmental/ Engineering laboratory station is on the air with a brief tape loop about the nation's first nuclear power plant. 4 transmitters were originally licensed, but I would agree with a web article I read a while back implying that only the station near the US-20/26 split is on. (TRH-ID) 530 TIS WY Jackson (area) - 6/1 1110 - National Elk Refuge TIS is still active and getting out well during the day. Station is north of Jackson, WY, probably near the visitor center. (TRH-WY) 660 "KRSX" CA Victorville - 5/23 1220 - Good signals with oldies (mostly pre-British invasion) and slogans "Cruisin' Oldies" and "The big 66." I read about this station in Route 66 Magazine; it is run by the former owner of KMIN-980 and runs with 0.1 watts. Commercials sell for $1 each. The signal was audible for 15 or 20 miles along I-15 as we returned on June 7th. (TRH-CA) 1570 UNID NV Las Vegas - 6/7 1245 - Some kind of a low-power station, noted along Charleston Blvd. with a woman interviewing the author of a children's book. (TRH-NV) 1590 WPLP689 ID Victor - 5/27 1611 - Wyoming DoT station for ID side of Teton Pass is active, but with a very short tape loop and a very long gap between messages. I did not get over to Jackson, WY, to hear the companion station at the other end of the pass, but it was on when we drove through in May 2000. (TRH-ID) 1600 WPWA784 MT West Yellowstone - 5/27 1840 - MT Fish and Game department TIS getting out well with a message about aquatic pests carried by boats from one lake to another. Announcer mis-IDs as WDWA784. Contrary to someone's report a few years ago, the West Yellowstone (national park) TIS did not move to 1600. (TRH-MT) 1610 KMC723 CA Manzanar NHS - 5/24 0749 - New station is on the air with a short test loop. (Manzanar is only now being prepared for tourist access). Noted later that morning for a few miles along US 395. (TRH-CA1/CA) 1610 WPSE479 CA Needles - 5/25 0154 - CalTrans station is getting out well with a message that is almost identical to that of WPFM428-1000 and WPSG912-1610. (TRH-UT1) 1610 KNEC996 CA Yosemite (west side) - 5/25 0747 - Good with CalTrans road information, mixing with WPSE479. (TRH-UT1) 1610 -- ID Driggs - 5/27 1621 - Talking house noted for new Creekside development and a local mortgage company. (TRH-ID) 1610 KOE780 ID Sunset Cone (Craters of the Moon NM) - 5/27 1115 - Station was not on when we first saw the signs on US 20/26/93. Rangers didn't realize the station was off, and they turned it on when I told them about it. Gets out poorly, possibly carrier current or talking- house transmitter, only audible within a few hundred feet of the visitor center. Message emphasizes safety hazards of exploring caves and lava tubes. Announcer seems to have gotten the idea that his station's calls are "XRC01"! (TRH-ID) 1610 KOP796 MT Deer Lodge - 5/27 0141 - Grant-Kohrs Ranch TIS is getting out well with information about the self-guided walk. (TRH- ID1) 1610 KOP710 MT West Yellowstone (Yellowstone NP West entrance) - 5/27 1845 - Station is still here (did not move to 1600 as someone had reported a while back) but much weaker than before. Gets out about a mile at best with same message as other Yellowstone entrance stations. (TRH-MT) 1610 WPXK767 NV Carlin/Dunphy - 5/26 1203 - NV DoT HAR stations (also licensed as WPWF496) are currently running a short test message (TRH- NV). 5/27 0155 - The Carlin station is the one that gets out at night. (TRH-ID1) 1610 -- NV Elko - 5/26 1315 - Station noted running NOAA weather seemed to be coming from Elko as we drove by. There is a license for LaMoille listed in the FCC database (same group of stations as Carlin and Dunphy) but not Elko. (TRH-NV) 1610 -- NV Ely - 5/25 1303 - White Pine Middle School in the center of town is operating what sounds like a talking house transmitter with local school news (e.g., interviewing a student who had recently won at a track meet). (TRH-NV) 1610 WPBE828 UT Panguitch (Red Canyon) - 5/25 2343 - Garfield County Information Station has gone back to a longer message and is getting out like gangbusters. It is especially easy to mistake this for the Bryce Canyon station (KOP798), which does not get out as well and only mentions the Bryce Canyon Shuttle and the 1590 station, both of which are also mentioned on this station. This station was logged almost every night of my trip, along with KOJ778 Glen Canyon NRA, AZ, and KOJ723 Zion NP (Virgin-La Verkin, UT). (TRH-NV1) 1610 "KCEU" UT Price - 6/3 1457 - "Broadcasting live from a janitor's closet at the College of Eastern Utah, this is KCEU, Price, Utah." Typical rock format. (TRH-UT) 1610 KCP270 UT Vernal - 6/3 1140 - Former Ashley National Forest TIS is now run jointly by several government agencies. Tape loop describes various attractions in "Dinosaurland." Of all the stations listed in this area, this is the one that is actually on the air. (TRH-UT) 1610 KOJ723 UT Virgin-La Verkin (Zion NP) - 6/3 0435 - Zion's strong TIS station is now using these calls. (TRH-WY2) 6/6 1600 Confirmed by local monitoring (station is audible for about 30 miles along I-15 middays). (TRH-UT) 1610 WPLP689 WY Dubois - 6/1 1315 - New mobile HAR station warning motorists about the numerous accidents involving cars striking migratory deer and elk (158 incidents per year in this location, with an average damage of $2000 to each vehicle involved). Located at the WYDOT maintenance yard in Dubois. (TRH-WY) 1610 KOP718 WY Yellowstone Lake Village (Fishing Bridge) - 5/27 2100 - Station is here (not 1550) with an "inside the park" message emphasizing staying away from wildlife and how to handle food so as not to attract bears. (TRH-WY1) 1620 -- UT Roosevelt - 6/3 1224 - Talking house near the intersection of US 191 and Utah highway 121. (TRH-UT) Currently the only TIS stations in Yellowstone are at the 5 entrance stations plus Fishing Bridge near Lake Village. All are on 1610. The 5 entrance stations all air the same message. (Tim Hall, IRCA via DXLD) ** U S A [and non]. [Continuing DTV+ discussion in last issue]: In a few cases a station's interim UHF assignment is "outside core" - is in the channel 52-69 band that is to be turned over to land-mobile. In those cases, stations will be FORCED to retake their present (VHF, in some cases) analog assignment for their DTV operation. In many more cases, the station's *present* analog assignment is "outside core", in which case they will be FORCED to remain on their new DTV assignment. An example of the former case is WTVF-5 Nashville, whose DTV assignment is 56. This is outside core; WTVF will be required to move their DTV operation to channel 5 after transition. An example of the latter case is WJFB-66 Lebanon, whose DTV assignment is 44. Their *analog* assignment is outside core; WJFB will not have the option of moving their DTV station to channel 66 after transition. I should mention, I believe the station being used as an example here (KCBS Los Angeles) falls into the former case - if I recall properly their DTV assignment is 65? (don't have my database conveniently handy) "Which two? The cable headend and the satellite uplinker's receive site. After those two, the one-by-one homes become very expensive on a per-home basis to even mess with or worry about. Add to that the trend for even cable systems to take the in-market satellite feeds from Echostar's DISH and Murdoch's soon owned DirecTV and you can eventually eliminate even getting "out" (transmitting as far as to) the cable headends in their market area." Do consider that many markets have multiple cable operators. For example, Comcast in the city of Nashville but Charter in Clarksville. (which at over 100,000 population is well worth worrying about|grin|) Charter does still use off-air pickup for the locals; the tower is next door to our county Wal-Mart |grin|. Guaranteed cable coverage is obtained through having an over-the-air signal of some kind. Drop the transmitter altogether and you either drop guaranteed carriage, or you make some significant changes to regulatory policy. Or the existing over-the-air broadcasters disappear altogether - they cease to exist even as programmers of a cable channel. A complete switch to cable/satellite distribution is IMHO somewhat less likely in the USA than it might be in a country with a more-regulatory telecommunications policy. "Clear VHF channels, reception like Bob Seybold's legendary stuff in the 50s from Brasil/Brazil? Well, that's a giant step of faith." Absolutely. Especially at high band. That spectrum is simply too valuable to sit unused. On low-band, if TV doesn't use it my money would be on greatly-expanded use by very inexpensive unlicensed Part 15 devices. (baby monitors etc.) "options. And that will indeed leave for a period of time - perhaps a decade - the VHF channels largely (if not completely) free of (USA) stations making" Well, the third case are stations that have both existing analog and new DTV assignments on VHF. Example, my employer WSMV-4 whose digital assignment is channel 10. I really believe the FCC contemplates the use of all 12 VHF channels for TV broadcasting for as long as over-the-air television continues to exist. Whether that's 3 years or 30 is the question (Doug Smith, WTFDA via DXLD) Multiple cable operators" --- I accept that all markets have many-many cable operators. Off-air is convenient but not mandatory. Off satellite through DirecTV and /or DISH is another alternative and sooner or later it will be a better one than off-air. "Having an over the air of some kind." Not suggesting at this time the TV stations can close down ALL transmitters. Again, they only have to continue to operate OVER THE AIR with sufficient power/tower height to reach TWO locations - cable headend and satellite uplink site. If they have to run mega power and tall stick to reach further out cable headends, everyone would be better off financially if the further out cable headends switched from their own tall tower and signal processing gear to DISH/DirecTV (thus my KTLA into Bakersfield example). Why build 500 foot cable TV receiving towers to capture quality signals from 70 miles or even 50 miles away for cable service when a 2 foot dish at ground level will produce a better video signal to noise ratio? No reason I can think of! (Bob Cooper in New Zealand, ibid.) It appears to me that countries like Mexico are going to be in a "damned if they do, damned if they don't" situation when it comes to converting to DTV. Problems like analog set prices increasing, many very poor people, a poor economy overall, the high costs of DTV broadcast equipment, etc could possibly cause the loss of TV service. Some over-the-air stations and networks could close down entirely. The wealthy minority will have cable and satellite TV, regardless (Danny Oglethorpe, Shreveport, LA, ibid.) ** U S A. There's a new IBOC article at http://radioworld.com/reference-room/guywire/gw-06-10-03.shtml I could not agree more with RW. For maybe 5 years, a large part of my work was audio coding and specifically performance issues. At this point in the game, the fundamental properties of the algorithm can only do so much. Any tweaks might make the DSP SW run faster or with less memory needs or fix a specific small issue. It's really unlikely that the basic algorithm can be changed enough to take a so-so codec operating at dial-up bit rates and make it FM quality. No one else has done it either. I'm no longer in touch with those at the forefront of new codecs, but I'm not hearing any whispers of anything in progress that can make 36 kb/s sound like FM stereo. I think iBiquity is in deep trouble over the audio quality issue, and I'd guess they know that. Were I them, I'd be looking for a backup plan like full digital mode on certain channels even though that will slow market penetration enormously. Better than nothing, I suppose. I do wish these guys would say something about the interference to and from IBOC but I guess they don't feel comfortable making big proclamations about that. With the audio issue, it's easy. We have test clips and our ears to tell us what the quality is. With interference, RW needs to hear real live IBOC at a handful of points and judge for themselves whether the interference is fatal. That day shall come (Chuck Hutton, June 15, NRC-AM via DXLD) [Raising hand] How about scrapping IBOC AM/FM, and put all digital services in the UHF band on unused TV channels, or restructure a portion of the UHF band so that say all TV is moved out of 14-19, and the digital stations are placed there. If people want the digital, they will go there to get it and analog will die on the vine from lack of interest. But, it does not ruin radio for those of us with "heritage" receivers (Fred Vobbe, ibid.) ** U S A. During the recent FM translator window, 13240 applications were filed with the FCC. . . Nationally, several were religious groups. The following are believed to be religious applications, with the most filed by: 2454, Radio Assist Ministry 1766, Edgewater Broadcasting Inc. 875, Educational Media Foundation 271, Calvary Chapel of Twin Falls, Inc. 257, Covenant Network 165, Educational Communications of Colorado 158, Way FM Media Groupo {sic} 124, Robert J. Connelly Jr. 118, Turquoise Broadcasting Company LLC 114, CSN international 114, Radio Training Network 111, Indiana Community Radio Corp. 104, Big Bend Broadcasting 104, Public Broadcasting of Eastern Indiana 103, Edward A. Schober Total from the 100+ applicants: 6838. All other applications: 6507. Over 50% of the applicants were filed by 15 parties (June FMedia! via DXLD) Note those names well, especially the ones with ``Educational``, ``Community`` or ``Public`` in their name! There ought to be a law preventing gospel huxters from co-opting such names. It`s obviously no accident as they try to disguise their true colors. WWJD? (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. A new chart of US amateur radio frequency allocations, including the new 60 meter band, is now available from the ARRL at http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/bands.html You can choose between two pdf files, color or black and white, or you can go to the text version at http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/allocate.html (graphics) http://www2.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/allocate.html (text) Meanwhile, Field Day is coming up during the last full weekend in June (this year, June 27-29). The W1AW schedule for this event will be: W1AW FIELD DAY BULLETIN SCHEDULE Day Mode Pacific Mountain Central Eastern [UT] FRIDAY CW 5:00 PM 6:00 PM 7:00 PM 8:00 PM 0000[+day] Teleprinter 6:00 PM 7:00 PM 8:00 PM 9:00 PM 0100[+day] Phone 6:45 PM 7:45 PM 8:45 PM 9:45 PM 0145[+day] CW 8:00 PM 9:00 PM 10:00 PM 11:00 PM 0300[+day] SATURDAY CW 7:00 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:00 AM 1400 Phone 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 1500 CW 5:00 PM 6:00 PM 7:00 PM 8:00 PM 0000[+day] Teleprinter 6:00 PM 7:00 PM 8:00 PM 9:00 PM 0100[+day] Phone 6:45 PM 7:45 PM 8:45 PM 9:45 PM 0145[+day] SUNDAY CW 7:00 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:00 AM 1400 Phone 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 1500 PSK31 9:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:00 PM 1600 W1AW will operate on the regularly published frequencies. The special PSK31 bulletin will be transmitted on the regular W1AW frequencies. CW frequencies are 1.818, 3.5815, 7.0475, 14.0475, 18.0975, 21.0675, 28.0675 and 147.555 MHz. Teleprinter frequencies are 3.625, 7.095, 14.095, 18.1025, 21.095, 28.095 and 147.555 MHz. Phone frequencies are 1.855, 3.99, 7.29, 14.29, 18.16, 21.39, 28.59 and 147.555 MHz (ARRL via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VENEZUELA. Radio Táchira on 4830.02 has been off air for a while (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin June 15, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ZIMBABWE [non]. See BOTSWANA and next item UNIDENTIFIED. 4880; new: R Africa, presumably from Sao Tomé, June 12th, until 19.00 in E, then Portuguese. together with good friends I spent some nice days on the antenna farm of Wilhelm Herbst in Denmark. Normally the month of June is not the season for good reception on TB and MW. So we had some disturbing noises caused by thunderstorms. Nevertheless there are some DX-results, presented as survey below. Not all stations were heard with clear ID. (Michael Schnitzer, Homepage: http://home.arcor.de/mschnitzer/ Location: Fjerritslev, Denmark Receiver: NRD-525 Antennas: 80m Beverage, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Surely Zimbabwean clandestine SW Radio Africa, via South Africa; but Portuguese? Mixed with some other station? São Tomé (national station, not VOA), 4807.5, has been gone from SW for some 20 years, per Anker Petersen (Glenn Hauser, DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ BORDERHUNTER SUMMER SW/MW MEETING IN HOLLAND SATURDAY JUNE 28 Soon it is time again for the meeting in the border area of the Netherlands and Belgium. On Saturday the 28th of June at around 1500 local time [1300 UT] the meeting will start for every listener or pirate on Short-Wave or Mediumwave. There will be again a barbeque and lots of beer, soda or what ever you like to boos. Just like before the option to stay overnight is there again. Are you coming, Let us know at summermeeting@hotmail.com and the route to the meeting will be mailed out to you. Greetings and See Yea!!! The Summer meeting team. Binnenkort is het weer zover, de Borderhunter zomermeeting 2003. Zaterdag 28 Juni vanaf 15.00 uur is er een meeting voor luisteraars en stationoperators voor MW en SW liefhebers. Dit alles duurt tot laat in de nacht en overnachten is mogelijk. Gaarne aanmelden via summermeeting@hotmail.com en je krijgt de routebeschrijving thuisgestuurd. Tot ziens! source: http://www.alfalima.net/cgi- bin/teemz/teemz.cgi (via bclnews via DXLD) NATIONAL FEDERATION OF COMMUNITY BROADCASTERS NFCB announces its 29th annual community radio conference April 21-24, 2004, in Albuquerque. Host station is KUNM *89.9; the conference is at the Hyatt downtown, ``two blocks from Route 66.`` (June 2003 FMedia! via DXLD) PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ CONQUISTADOR Don't know if there are any SF fans out there but I am reading an interesting alternate-history novel, 'Conquistador" by S.M. Stirling, fellow discovers an alternate Earth (no Europeans) in 1946 while listening to his shortwave radio, the radio generates a window to this alternate world! Amazing what shortwave can do...73s, (Sue Hickey, Grand Falls-Windsor, Newfoundland, Canada, June 15, GRDXC via DXLD) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ WELCOME TO THE RIGPIX DATABASE The source of information and pictures of radios, accessories and more- This is the original, online since 2000-04-07. Check http://www.rigpix.com/whatsnew.htm for latest updates. Preferred screen resolution is 1024*768. Please note that some of the equipment presented here may not be generally available in all parts of the world (73 de SM0OFV/Janne, SW Bulletin June 15 via DXLD) DRM +++ Re. DRM: "And Kunz is ready to back up his claim: aacPlus delivers CD quality starting at a data rate of 48 kBit/s. The MP3 process, which is popular because of the economical way it works with resources, requires 100 Kbit/s to do the same." --- MP3 gives CD quality at 100 kbit/s? That's simply nonsense, assuming that we talk about stereo. A realistic bitrate for MP3 files that deserves to be labelled as "CD quality" is 192 kbit/s. When slight, unobtrusive quality degradations are acceptable a suitable bitrate is 160 kbit/s. Anything less has nothing to do with "CD quality", and at 96 kbit/s the degradation is really obvious. Unfortunately I cannot say much about AACplus, except for listening experiences with DRM at 14.5 and 17 kbit/s: The first one was simply AM quality, the second one sounded brighter but with so much audio artifacts that it was still far away from FM quality (Kai Ludwig, Germany, June 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) see also LUXEMBOURG Hi Glenn, Contrary to your assertion, nobody involved in DRM has, to my knowledge, ever described other technologies as 'outmoded'. That would be daft, since we're all still using them! The word was used by the writer of the Electronic Times piece, Christoph Hammerschmidt, who displays his own ignorance of the subject by referring to "Long wave, short wave or mid-range wave" and asserting that "hardly any listeners still tune their radios to these outmoded [sic] frequency bands any more." That's patent nonsense. He doesn't even know the correct terminology! By "mid-range wave" I assume he means mediumwave. I don't believe it's fair to blame the people who developed DRM - engineers - for the more extreme exaggerations of hacks. Many of these engineers are radio hams in their private lives and use these "outmoded" technologies all the time. 73, (Andy Sennitt, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-106, June 14, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3f.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn In case anyone be confused, previous issues were 3-102 and 3-103, tho the subject line of the first one read 3-012. Evidently all other references and hyperlinx were correct (gh) NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1186: RFPI: Sat 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 7445 15039 WWCR: Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 9475 WJIE: Sun 1030, 1630 7490 13595 [maybe] WBCQ: Mon 0445 7415 WRN: Rest of world Sat 0800; Europe Sun 0430; North America Sun 1400 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1186.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1186.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1186h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1186h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1186.html WORLD OF RADIO on WWCR [non] WOR not heard Sat 0600 again --- I just checked the tape and found that once again, something other than WORLD OF RADIO was broadcast UT Saturday at 0600 on WWCR (John Norfolk, OKCOK, June 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) For the second week in a row. We are making enquiries (gh) MUNDO RADIAL en UNION RADIO Gracias Glenn. Puedes anunciar con toda confianza la transmisión de tus informaciones a traves de la señal de Union Radio Porteñas 640 para todo el oriente de Venezuela é islas del caribe. y en internet a traves de la siguiente dirección: http://intranet.unionradio.com.ve/intranet/Default.htm haciendo click en audio de emisoras y luego en AM 640 Atte: (José Elías, Venezuela, DX LISTENING DIGEST) JIM CONRAD Fw: Update on Jim Conrad -- Just letting you know about this, Glenn. Thanks to you for letting me meet Jim back in 1992(?) in the Wisconsin Dells for Jim's Conrad Family Reunion. As I get more information on Jim I will pass it on to you. 73's, (Joe Olig, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Gerry Dexter called yesterday to let me know our friend Jim Conrad had suffered a heart attack. Apparently Jim and his mom were going out to dinner when he collapsed. His heart stopped and he had to be zapped three times before he came back. He was taken to the hospital and placed in intensive care. Mom is staying with him in a "companion" room. Today Jim was moved from ICU to a regular patient room. I talked to him for a few minutes. He's awake and alert when I called and seems upbeat. He's wearing a cardiac monitor but is not hooked up to a bunch of machines. He said he's eating full meals (actually, more than he usually eats at home!), and not in discomfort because of the medications he's on. His sense of humor is intact, and he's making wisecracks. Gerry and his wife drove to Waterloo and are going to see Jim later today. I'll keep you posted on how Jim is doing. This past year has been difficult for him, with his dad Wendell passing away, then Mom fell a couple of times, and then she broke her ankle. Jim is one of the good guys, so please keep him and his mom Lee in your thoughts and prayers. 73s from (Evelyn Hampton, June 12, via Joe Olig, DXLD) ** ANGOLA. 4950, Radio Nacional de Angola Full data (wrong date however) tri-lingual computer generated QSL card in 4 months for a fresh report after numerous follow-ups since 1997 went un-answered. A big thank you to Marcelo Toníolo who helped me translate my report to Portuguese (George Maroti, NY, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) 11955.7 kHz, Radio Nacional De Angola, full data RNA Tower Globe Card, no V/S, In 7 months, for English report and 2 IRCs, received a short letter in Portuguese. The station had addressed the QSL to a wrong address, the envelope was stamped "Mail Delayed Wrong Address And Postal Code", then my correct address was written on the envelope by someone. The return address typed on the envelope is: Radio Nacional de Angola, Rua: Rainha Jinga, C.P: 1329, Luanda-Angola. Angola is my 32nd African country verified. This QSL report is NOT meant for DXpress/DXplorer publication! (Joe Talbot, Red Deer, Alberta, Canada. Cumbre DX et al via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. Re: UZBEKISTAN(non): New schedule for Voice International in Hindi: 1100-1700 on 13635 via DRW 250 kW / 303 deg ||||| cancelled Please note the Voice International Hindi transmission at 1100-1700 on 13635 still continues and has not been cancelled. Regds, (Alokesh Gupta, India, June 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. And...they DID give the frequency, for this new community FM station in Sydney. 73- (Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) BETTER LATE THAN NEVER After years of setbacks, Sydney's first community station dedicated exclusively to local music and culture is set to launch ... almost. Sue Javes reports. The studios in Alexandria are not quite finished, some announcers have yet to sign on, a key part is missing from the transmitter and the playlist is still being fed into the computer. Nevertheless, barring disasters, Sydney's long-awaited community station FBi will start broadcasting at 94.5 FM, at least in test mode, from June 28. The official launch is set for August 29. . . http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/06/11/1055220640167.html (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** AUSTRIA. Saludos colegas diexistas. El pasado Sábado en el programa: El Buzón Internacional de Radio Austria, la amiga y colega locutora Isabél Miró dijo lo siguiente: "Quiero anunciarles que nuestro último Buzón Internacional, no tendrá lugar el último Domingo de este mes de Junio, sino un poco antes, es decir el dia 22 de Junio, porque los dos últimos dias de las emisiones, el sabado y domingo últimos de este mes estarán dedicados a dos emisiones especiales, así que para estar con nosotros, para que nos podamos despedir como hay que hacerlo, estén aquí con nosotros en la emisión del 22 de Junio.....será nuestro último Buzón" De acuerdo a lo escuchado en emisiones anteriores, este dia se sorteará un radio receptor Grundig como agradecimiento a todos los oyentes de radio Austria por haberlos acompañado durante tanto tiempo, así como otros regalos cortesía de la emisora. Atte: (José Elías, Venezuela, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. TRANSATLANTIC TV DX --- CONCLUSION Well, I thought I'd write to CKCW and I had a reply in a matter of minutes! The guy must have been sat on the computer checking his e mails at the time! The reply ... Hello John Thank you for your inquiry concerning distant reception of Channel 2 I've listened to your audio file and I'm happy to report that you did indeed listen to the ATV signal last Saturday morning. I was able to hear the on air announcers in Halifax during the promos that ran. The programming for CJCH and CKCW is identical except for the occasional commercial spot. Unfortunately I was not able to discern any local commercials on the file which would allow me to say conclusively that you were watching Channel 2, however we are the only high power Channel 2 in the ATV system in Atlantic Canada so I would say you were indeed listening to our transmitter signal. The CJCH signal is Channel 5 and the CJCB signal in Sydney, Nova Scotia is Channel 4. A few facts about Channel 2. Perhaps you already have them. Power 56,000 ERP Visual -- 9200 ERP Aural. Transmitter located in Albert county New Brunswick on Caledonia Mountain. Elevation 1300 feet, tower height 300 feet. Antenna is a GE Ultra Power 4 slot. Transmitter is a Larcan 12 KW. I've checked out your web site. Very interesting. If you have any more questions about our system please don't hesitate to contact me. Hope this helps. I've attached an ATV/CTV logo. atvjpeg.jpg Carson McDavid Director of Engineering ATV/CTV Moncton New Brunswick It's great to hear this straight from the station. I'm not really a QSL collector, but I suppose this actually counts as a QSL. What a catch! I could even print off the e mail attaching the logo they sent! So the station itself is confirmed but not necessarily the actual transmitter, though with this being the only high powered CKCW station on the channel.... Hmmmm! Wonder what the lower powered ones are at? a few hundred watts?? It was really bizarre to be able to listen to the audio from such a distant signal for the best part of two hours. I guess we're talking at least double hop, possibly triple since the theoretical limit for double from New Brunswick would place the signal roughly at the west of Ireland. I'm sure there will be a repeat performance sometime. After all, TA on 6 is fairly regular throughout the summer months, so fingers crossed! A VERY BIG THANKS to everybody who has given help on this. Good DX (John Faulkner, john.faulkner@skywaves.info http://www.skywaves.info June 12, WTFDA via DXLD) ** CANADA. Here's a good DX challenge for you this weekend: "Radio Grand Prix" is on the air until Sunday night in Montreal on 104.7 broadcasting in French and English in mono. This is the official radio of the Canadian Grand Prix. Technical info from last year: CKGP-FM - ERP: 40 watts - EHAAT: 12 meters! Reception here is pretty good, I'm one mile away from the race track! There is also lots of activity in the 450 to 512 MHz range. LOTS of international broadcasters feeds. Channel 14, 15 and 20 on TV are showing lots of interference!! 73, (Charles Gauthier, St-Lambert, PQ, June 13, WTFDA via DXLD) ** CANADA [and non]. Very good article on the future of DAB in Canada and IBOC in the US. At the National Association of Broadcasters massive convention in Las Vegas this year, rumour had it that DAB - Digital Audio Broadcasting, the Eureka standard adopted by most of the world including Canada - is dead. Um, not exactly. In Ottawa, CBC services are now available on the second of three DAB transmitters planned for the region. The third transmitter is scheduled for switch-on before the end of this year. . . http://www.broadcastdialogue.com/magazine.asp (Second story down) (via Brian Smith, ODXA via DXLD) ** CANADA. GLOBAL VILLAGE SPREADS ITS WINGS WITH AN EXCITING NEW CONCERT SERIES, GLOBAL VILLAGE IN PERFORMANCE, FRIDAY NIGHTS AT 8 P.M. http://www3.cbc.ca/sections/newsitem_redux.asp?ID=2871 Global Village, CBC Radio's award-winning world music program, premieres GLOBAL VILLAGE IN PERFORMANCE, beginning Friday, June 27 at 8 p.m. on CBC Radio Two, during the regular timeslot of the preeminent concert program In Performance. GLOBAL VILLAGE IN PERFORMANCE is an eight-part series of culturally diverse world-music concerts recorded in Canada and presented by Global Village host Jowi Taylor and special guest co-hosts. The works in this series will include: Tasa, a Toronto-based jazz fusion group rooted in the classical traditions of north India; co-hosted by Ghazal singer Kiran Ahluwalia Maria del Mar Bonet, a heroine of Catalan culture; co-hosted by Catalan broadcaster Margarita Ramón* Liu Fang, an internationally recognized master of the Chinese pipa and guzheng; co-hosted by Chinese musician Jie Hong The Istanbul Oriental Ensemble, injecting Turkish classical music with gypsy spirit; co-hosted by Brenna MacCrimmon, musician and Global Village correspondent* Desandann, a Cuban vocal group dedicated to the preservation of their Haitian heritage; co-hosted by Haitian musician, songwriter and presenter Ronald Jean* Misia, an inspired approach to Portuguese Fado by an international star; co-hosted by actress and playwright Aida Jordao from Portugal* Masters of Persian Music, who draw from ancient Sufi texts and contemporary poetry to produce neo-classical Persian music; co-hosted by journalist Maryam Aghvami from Iran The Global Divas, who offer music that blends elements of Cuba with India, Portugal, Venezuela, Brazil and more; co-hosted by Claudia McCoy, a writer for Urban Mix Magazine* ***These concerts will also be broadcast during August on Global Village, which is heard Wednesdays at 8 p.m. during the summer and Saturdays at 7 p.m. throughout the year on CBC Radio One. Says Executive Producer Ann MacKeigan: "This series is a wonderful opportunity to present listeners across Canada with a culturally diverse series of concerts, and to provide them with meaningful context for the music." Global Village has broadcast reports from 331 places in 110 countries around the world. It is a unique hybrid of radio program and Web site produced at the CBC in Toronto, Canada. It is broadcast weekly across Canada on CBC Radio One, to most of the world by shortwave and satellite on Radio Canada International, and in streaming RealAudio from the main pages of both cbc.ca and rcinet.ca GLOBAL VILLAGE IN PERFORMANCE is produced by Ann MacKeigan, Paolo Pietropaolo, Andy Sheppard and Malcolm Gould. An extensive Web site on the project can be found on ARTSCANADA at cbc.ca (via Ricky Leong, DXLD) ** CHINA. CRI English programs: all transmissions start with 30 Minutes of NEWS AND REPORTS (China Related News, World News, Sports News, Business News, News On Culture --- Showbiz, Sci-Tech, Press Clippings.) On Sat & Sun reduced to 15 minutes and includes: China Related News, World News, Sports News. Feature programs: Mon: PEOPLE IN THE KNOW Tue: BIZ CHINA Wed: CHINA HORIZONS (Zhejiang Special, Nanjing today, Wuxi Journal, Changzhou Report, On the Road) Thu: VOICES FROM OTHER LANDS Fri: LIFE IN CHINA Sat: CUTTING EDGE, LISTENERS` GARDEN (You Ask Us -- You Tell Us, Chinese Folk Song, Idioms and Their Stories, The Week Ahead, Learn to Speak Chinese) Sun: REPORTS ON DEVELOPING COUNTRIES, IN THE SPOTLIGHT (Cultural Carousel, In Vogue, Writings from China, China Melody, Talking Point) (via Michael Beesley, June World DX Club Contact via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. Hola Glenn, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, Venezuela. RCN "La Voz de Guaviare", captada en los 6039.99 kHz, a las 2220 UT, el 12/06. Anunciaba el teléfono 58-40-154 para mensajes al programa "Campesinos, buenas tardes". SINPO 5/4. Mejor que la señal de Caracol 5958 kHz. Promoción al aire de un concierto del venezolano Reinaldo Armas, a realizarse el 21/06 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CROATIA [non]. HRT via DTK T-systems Germany as revised 23 May, showing lots of overlap on 9925, two targets at once: A03web05 23.05.2003 Gesamtplan frq start stop ciraf ant azi type day from to loc pow broad 9925 2300 0059 11 - 16 202 230 218 1234567 300303 261003 JUL 100 HRT 9925 0100 0400 11 - 16 202 230 218 1234567 010503 261003 JUL 100 HRT 9925 2300 0100 6 - 10 112 300 216 1234567 010503 261003 JUL 100 HRT 9925 0100 0259 6 - 10 112 300 216 1234567 300303 261003 JUL 100 HRT 9925 0300 0459 2 - 10 119 325 216 1234567 300303 261003 JUL 100 HRT 9925 0500 0700 2 - 10 119 325 216 1234567 010503 261003 JUL 100 HRT 9470 0400 0500 55,59,60 202 230 218 1234567 010503 261003 JUL 100 HRT 9470 0500 0659 55,59,60 202 230 218 1234567 300303 261003 JUL 100 HRT 13820 0600 0700 58,59,60 208 270 218 1234567 010503 261003 JUL 100 HRT 13820 0700 0859 58,59,60 208 270 218 1234567 300303 261003 JUL 100 HRT 13820 0900 1000 58,59,60 208 270 218 1234567 010503 261003 JUL 100 HRT (via Alokesh Gupta, India, DXLD) ** CUBA. A las 1230 UT quedó fuera del aire la señal de radio Rebelde por los 11655 kHz; de repente se escuchó la identificación musical de Radio Habana Cuba, comenzaron a indicar sus frecuencias y cuando las decían, la transmisión se cortó quedando fuera del aire la señal mencionada. [10 minutes later at ``7:50 am``, whatever yahoogroups zone that be] De nuevo en el aire la frecuencia 11655 kHz con la señal de Radio Rebelde. Indicaron el número telefónico de la radio: 554360. Hubo una llamada de un oyente que dijo que Radio Rebelde es la Radio de la Revolución. Y el locutor dijo luego, que les importaba poco y que hablaran lo que les dé la gana el pueblo norteamericano sobre las marchas del pueblo cubano el día de ayer. Hubo una identificación musical de Radio Rebelde que dice: Manténgase en sintonía con Radio Rebelde. La grabación está a la orden. Atte: (José Elías, Venezuela, June 13, radioescutas via DXLD) During Tip for Real Living on DXPL, June 14 at 1250, I tuned over to 11655 to check for R. Rebelde, but no sign of it, just Australia on 11650 (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. Cuban TV listings can be found at http://www.jrebelde.cubaweb.cu/sumarios/tv.html BTW, there is a new 3rd network - TV Educativo - which is mainly UHF, although I think there is a Channel 8 Santiago de Cuba and possibly other VHFs. There are plans for a 4th network soon. Ch 6- could be CMJB Camagüey, I think Havana is 6z. These offsets are from 20-year old WTFDA publications, so who knows what the current situation is. On my trip to Cuba, they had only 2 Cuban stations on the hotel cable (others mainly US/Latin) - there was Channel 2 Havana, which is Tele Rebelde - except it breaks for local programming (called "Tele Centros") from 4:25 to 5:55 E[D]T, such as CHTV for Havana, Tele Camagüey for Camagüey, etc. Channel 6 Havana is Cubavisión. I don't know what channel is used in Havana for TV Educativo. The 2 networks Tele Rebelde and Cubavisión sometimes have identical programming - especially for Castro speeches and news discussions. (VEM3ONT22, William Hepburn, WTFDA / CIDX, Brampton, Peel, ON, CAN, WTFDA via DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. U.S. TAXPAYERS PAY FOR A CUBAN BROADCAST THAT NO ONE SEES --- From ABC.com June 13, 2003 TV Martí is a U.S. government-run TV station in Miami used to promote democracy in Cuba. It costs U.S. taxpayers almost $10 million a year to keep TV Martí going. But few - if any - Cubans see it. (ABCNEWS.com) Newscast to Nowhere --- By Jeffrey Kofman Fifty-five reporters, editors and producers --- all U.S. government employees --- work seven days a week in a television newsroom in Miami. Each day they earnestly assemble, record and broadcast 4½ hours of news and information programming in Spanish. And no one sees it. The intended audience is the people of Cuba. Like those Voice of America radio broadcasts the United States used to beam across the Iron Curtain during the Cold War, TV Martí is meant to promote democracy in Communist Cuba. But since it began in 1990 the only thing it has successfully promoted is scorn here in the United States. Because from the beginning, the Castro government has successfully blocked the TV Martí signal. It costs the Cuban government just pennies a day to operate the jamming antennas that are strategically perched on top of Havana's highest buildings. It costs U.S. taxpayers almost $10 million a year - more than $100 million since TV Martí began - to keep broadcasting TV Martí's anti- Castro invective into the ether. ABCNEWS Havana producer Mara Valdes checked to see if people on the streets of the Cuban capital had ever heard of the U.S.-based newscast that is produced just for them. "No," said one man as he shook his head, "because I haven't seen it on TV." "Never," added a woman, "because it can't be seen." 'Never Been Seen in Cuba' "TV Martí has just never been seen in Cuba," said Republican Rep. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., one of chorus of congressmen who think TV Martí's funding should have been cut long ago. His conclusion: "It's a jobs program. Frankly, I think it's a political payoff." According to Flake, TV Martí is zealously protected by Miami's three Cuban-American congressional representatives who reward their hardline supporters with jobs. "I'd like to say it's something different, but given the amount of time and effort we put in trying to change it and the resistance we had, you can only conclude that it's a jobs program," he said. The newest director of TV Martí and its sister operation Radio Martí (which is heard in Cuba, although even U.S. reports suggest it has very few listeners) is Pedro Roig. A real estate lawyer with no broadcasting experience but deep roots in the anti-Castro exile community in Miami, Roig gets a salary of $132,000 a year. "I am not looking at the past, but at the future," said Roig when asked what he has to say to critics of his newscast to nowhere. "And my answer to the critics is this: This could be a valid criticism. Give us a few months. Give us time." Roig wants time to explore alternative methods of transmission. Possibly from a satellite - although few Cubans have satellite dishes - and possibly from a U.S. government broadcast plane that would make daily flights just outside Cuban airspace. He doesn't know what that would cost. And while he and others explore options. The news goes on. To nowhere. (via Mike Terry, DXLD) Saw this on World News Tonight, June 12 (gh) ** CZECHOSLOVAKIA. Here's the BBC story on the jailing of Karel Hoffman for shutting down Czechoslovak radio in 1968. 73- (Bill Westenhaver, DX LISTENING DIGEST) FIRST JAILING OVER PRAGUE SPRING --- THE FIRST SENIOR CZECH COMMUNIST OFFICIAL IS JAILED IN PRAGUE FOR HIS ROLE IN THE 1968 SOVIET INVASION http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/2/hi/europe/2978008.stm (via Westenhaver, DXLD) COURT: HOFFMAN ABUSED POWER COMMUNIST-ERA OFFICIAL SENTENCED TO FOUR YEARS FOR STOPPING BROADCASTS By Kevin Livingston, Staff Writer, The Prague Post, (June 12, 2003) The June 9 conviction of former Telecommunications Minister Karel Hoffman spawned mixed reactions from former political prisoners and the office in charge of investigating communist crimes. Hoffman, 79, was sentenced by a Prague City Court to four years in prison on charges that he abused his authority during the 1968 Soviet- led Warsaw Pact invasion when he ordered Czechoslovak Radio off the air. . . http://www.praguepost.com/P03/2003/Art/0612/news3.php was sent to you by: (Westenhaver Bill, DXLD) ** DENMARK. Re: ``I am sure that it would be possible to reactivate the transmitter at Kalundborg which was previously in use on LW 243 kHz during morning hours.`` To avoid possible misunderstandings: 243 is still on air as always. By the way, this outlet is operated at Kalundborg with a certain Telefunken transmitter model of which only three ones were built at all (the other two ones are the 153 and 207 units here in Germany). (Kai Ludwig, Germany, June 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hi Glenn, As far as I am informed Danmarks Radio still uses the frequency longwave 243 kHz from Kalundborg. (Listening in when writing these lines). It is on air from 05.34 to 00.30 local time (UT +2 during summer) with as well P2 as P1 and Special programs. More to be found here (unfortunately in Danish) http://www.dr.dk/pubs/nyheder/html/programmer/kortboelge/Kalund.jhtml Best 73s (Ydun Ritz, Denmark, June 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ECUADOR [non]. This week I actually monitored DX Partyline at 1230 UT Sat on 15115 --- excellent reception; can`t tell me this is not really for NAm. Finally revealed identity of US station to carry the show; surprise: WINB. But no details yet of day, time, frequency or start date. 15115 went off afterwards by 1300* (Glenn Hauser, OK, June 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Glenn, I heard DX Partyline this morning June 14; tuned at 1250 UT when they had the South Pacific DX report. After that Allen Graham read some tips from a South American DXer; then at signoff said they would be back one week from today with the Electronic DX Press report and off the air at 1300 on 15.115 MHz. No other programs heard but DX Partyline (Ron Trotto, Waggoner, IL, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** EGYPT. Hi Robertas and Glenn. Re item Egypt on 9755 in DXLD 3-104. On 13 Jun at 1710 tune in there was a program in English with terribly bad modulation. Features, Arabic, Italian and African songs. I kept the audio on (what a pain) while doing some other things. Could not catch the ID but just prior 1830 when heard Radio Cairo mentioned within closing announcement of English program. 1831 there was a program in some African language. So, as Robertas said, this seems to be Radio Cairo. 1630-1830 transmission to Africa in English moved from previous 15255? With this kind of horrible audio --- what a waste of time, money, program producers` efforts, etc. Jees (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, June 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) The modulation on the day I listened to was rather good, compared to their other frequencies. Is this changing from day to day, or does it depend on the receiver? (Robertas Pogorelis, Belgium, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Typically it does, on other English transmissions (gh) ** GERMANY. Bonn 774 is off, perhaps permanently since it is no longer announced in the special VERA service (all traffic jam announcements all the time) WDR carries at times on mediumwave; since yesterday they mention only 720 anymore (Stephan Kaiser, June 14 via Kai Ludwig, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GUYANA. Voice of Guyana con señal algo deteriorada en 3291.26 kHz, a las 2237 UT. SINPO 2/2 (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HUNGARY. R. Budapest 0100 UT 9590 kHz. No, this isn't another complaint about the Voice of the Islamic Republic of Iran causing moderate to severe QRM to R. Budapest. I have a question about the transmitter site for the R. Budapest broadcast. Is this via a transmitter in Hungary? Reason I ask is Radio Canada Int. is on 9590 kHz until 0100 UT. I do not notice a change in transmitter signal before Radio Budapest begins transmission. 73, (-.. . Kraig Krist, KG4LAC, VA, June 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Kraig, If this is a relay, they`ve really pulled a fast one. I suspect the two signals overlapped so it seemed like there wasn`t a break. You might try watching the S-meter closely and on different dates when there might be a significant difference in signal level if Europe is not propagating so well. 73, (Glenn to Kraig, DXLD) Glenn, Thanks for the reply. I will check again, if thunderstorms allow! I noticed, turning my weekly monitoring of R. Budapest, the immediate switch from RCI to R. Budapest for quite some time now. Today was the first I remembered to email about it. I also emailed R. Budapest asking about the transmitter for the 0200 UT 9590 kHz broadcast. Hopefully, I will receive a reply. [Later:] Glenn, OK. I checked on June 14, 2003. RCI, until just about 00:59:55 with a max reading of S9 +50 dB. Then R. Budapest begin, around 00:59:56 with a max reading of S9 +40 dB. The RCI transmitter really cuts things close. 73, (-.. . Kraig Krist, VA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HUNGARY. BBC AND RFI LAUNCH MULTILINGUAL RADIO BROADCAST BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) -- Two international broadcasters on Wednesday jointly launched a 24-hour, multi-lingual radio channel in the Hungarian capital Budapest, officials from the two broadcasters said. The British Broadcasting Corporation will broadcast in English and Hungarian, and Radio France International will broadcast in French and German on the 92.1 FM frequency. "The service will bring ... an international perspective that makes us unique in the broadcasting world," Nigel Chapman, the deputy director of BBC World Service, said. With the exception of some locally made programs from the BBC's Hungarian Service, most programs will be taken from the normal international programming of the two companies, focusing on news, current affairs and culture. Chapman said the service was being launched at a time when Hungary is preparing to join the European Union and that several programs will be focused on the issue. Hungary is expected to join the EU in May 2004. Jean-Paul Cluzel, the head of RFI, said the new service would add to the information channels available to Hungarians. "We want to contribute to the pluralism of information in the world," he said. The new channel will reach around 650,000 people in Budapest, though the broadcasters hope they will be allowed to extend the reception area in the future. The license to broadcast is valid for seven years. Originally, German international broadcaster Deutsche Welle planned to take part in the project, but later withdrew due to financial considerations. (kpk/rp) (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** INDIA. BBC COULD SOON AIR ON YOUR LOCAL FM STATION 13th June '2003 NEW DELHI: Your daily dose of FM could soon include music, plays and entertainment programmes from none other than the BBC, if the Prasar Bharati Board has its way. A move is under way to bring BBC radio programming to All India Radio's FM channels and, while the Board has approved the idea, the BBC is said to be open to exploring all possible opportunities before it spells out its mind. Prasar Bharati CEO K S Sarma will be flying to London on Saturday, armed with the Board's nod to work out a deal which will be mutually beneficial to both broadcasters. Said Sarma, ``We are looking at equal time programming, by which AIR will supply programmes to the BBC and the latter will do the same with no money involved in the arrangement.'' Sarma also said, that while the BBC was open to the idea of sharing AIR's news, the latter was bound by law not to outsource its news and current affairs content. ``We can have their music while we give them the news from here'', said Sarma. AIR's aggressive forays with the BBC comes in the wake of the plight private fm operators in the country find themselves in today. While Win 94.6 radio station in Mumbai shut its operations in Mumbai only a few days ago, unable to pay up the steep licence fee, other private FM operators are lobbying hard for the reduction of what they call ``steep licence fees'' for private FM operators. Ever since the Government auctioned frequencies in March 2000, a group of private companies submitted huge bids in their bid greed to capture the virgin FM market _ but since then they have been asking for help from the Government. Review of the annual licence fee (ranging between Rs seven and 12 crores with an annual 15 per cent escalation cost) _ is top of the agenda. With most of the operators pegging their cumulative losses at Rs 120 crore last year, they are hoping the Information and Broadcasting Ministry will come to their rescue. (newindpress.com - 13 june'03) Regds, (via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. U.S.-BASED TVS ON FRONT LINE OF IRAN PROTESTS By