DX LISTENING DIGEST MAY 2003 ARCHIVE

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DX LISTENING DIGEST MAY 2003 ARCHIVE

DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-095, May 31, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3e.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1184: RFPI: Sat 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 7445 15039 WWCR: Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 9475 WJIE: Sun 1030, 1630 7490 13595 (maybe) WBCQ: Mon 0445 7415 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1184.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1184.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1184h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1184h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1184.html CONTINENT OF MEDIA 03-03! New edition is now available, on RFPI 7445, 15039: Sat 2130, Sun 0330, 0930; Thu 2000, Fri 0200, 0830 Also via DXing.com: {Stream) http://www.dxing.com/com/com0303.ram (Download) http://www.dxing.com/com/com0303.rm And via our site: (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/com0303.ram (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/com0303.rm (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/com0303.html WORLD OF RADIO, CONTINENT OF MEDIA, MUNDO RADIAL BROADCAST SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE JUNE 1, 2003 It always pays to check all RFPI frequencies beyond their scheduled hours. Schedule shown is nominal, but it is not unusual for one transmitter to be down, and for programming to run up to an hour late. 15039 resumed in early May so its hours and those of 7445 may be adjusted. For now, we show them both at all times. For logistical reasons except weekends, RFPI repeats after 0600 appear about half an hour later than +12 or +18 hours. WJIE: Operation is irregular; both frequencies are shown altho one or both may be missing. Not all times are confirmed, and often not latest show. For latest updates see our Anomaly Alert page: http://www.worldofradio.com/anomaly.html Days and times here are strictly UT. Wed 2200 WOR WBCQ 7415 17495-CUSB [first airing of each edition] Thu 2000 COM RFPI 7445 15039 Thu 2030 WOR WWCR 15825 Fri 0200 COM RFPI 7445 15039 Fri 0800 COM RFPI 7445 15039 v to 0830 Fri 1400 COM RFPI 7445 15039 v to 1430 Fri 1930 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 Fri 2115 MR WWCR 15825 [or as early as 2110] Fri 2300 WOR Studio X, Momigno, Italy 1584 1566 87.35 96.55 105.55 Sat 0130 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 Sat 0600 WOR WWCR 5070 Sat 0730 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 v to 0800 Sat 0800 WOR WRN1 to Eu, Au, NZ, WorldSpace AfriStar, AsiaStar, Telstar 12 SAm Sat 0855 WOR WNQM Nashville TN 1300 Sat 0930 WOR WJIE 7490 13595 Sat 1330 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 v to 1400 Sat 1530 WOR WMQM Memphis TN 1600 [week delay] Sat 1730 WOR WINB 13570 [NEW from June 7] Sat 1730 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 Sat 1828 WOR WPKN Bridgeport CT 89.5 [week delay] Sat 2130 COM RFPI 7445 15039 Sat 2330 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 Sun 0230 WOR WWCR 5070 Sun 0330 COM RFPI 7445 15039 Sun 0430 WOR WRN to Europe only; webcast via http://www.nyhedsradioen24-7.dk/ Sun 0530 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 Sun 0630 WOR WWCR 3210 Sun 0930 COM RFPI 7445 15039 Sun 1030 WOR WJIE 7490 13595 Sun 1130 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 Sun 1400 WOR WRN to North America, also WLIO-TV Lima OH SAP Sun 1530 COM RFPI 7445 15039 Sun 1630 WOR WJIE 7490 13595 [often early from 1625] Sun 1830 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 Sun 1930 WOR Studio X, Momigno, Italy 1584 1566 87.35 96.55 105.55 Mon 0030 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 Mon 0330 WOR WSUI Iowa City IA 910 [week delay] Mon 0445 WOR WBCQ 7415 Mon 0630 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 v to 0700 Mon 1230 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 v to 1300 Mon 1830 WOR SIUE WEBRADIO http://www.siue.edu/WEBRADIO/ Tue 1900 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 Wed 0100 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 Wed 0700 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 v to 0730 Wed 0930 WOR WWCR 9475 Wed 1300 WOR RFPI 7445 15039 v to 1330 Wed 1830 COM SIUE WEBRADIO http://www.siue.edu/WEBRADIO/ Wed 2100 MR WWCR 15825 Latest edition of this schedule version is at: http://www.worldofradio.com/radioskd.html An expanded schedule also showing local times: http://www.worldofradio.com/wormast.html Internet on demand: see Our Current Audio page for availability: http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html Webcasts at times shown are available from all stations except WWCR, WNQM, WMQM, Studio X. WRN: http://live.wrn.org:8080/ramgen/live/wrnengnaeu.smi or http://live.wrn.org:8080/ramgen/live/wrnengnaus.smi RFPI via SW feed: http://www.boinklabs.com/ifpi.html RFPI direct webcast: http://195.210.0.134:8004/listen.pls [suspended] WJIE: http://www.wjiesw.com WPKN: http://www.wpkn.org WSUI: http://wsui.uiowa.edu ** AFGHANISTAN [non]. Now that R. Afghanistan has the US-supplied 400 kW MW transmitter on 1107, will the sporadic relays via NORWAY on 18940 continue, or the morning service via UAE, which I have lost track of? Please check (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) & see IRAN ** ARGENTINA. 11710, RAE, Buenos Aires, from 0137 with YL in Portuguese with light pop and EZL. SINPO 33333. At 0157, ID in Portuguese, chime interval signal, followed by multi-lingual ID (Spanish, French, English, German, and 3-4 others) and into English program at 0200. By 0200 signal was fading fast at SINPO 22222. May 30. Drake SW8 with whip antenna (Roger Chambers, Utica, NY, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ARGENTINA. 6215, 0034-0050, R. Baluarte, May 22. Tentative logging. I have heard a het on the frequency for some time now and finally above noise floor in rather clear audio. Two males in Spanish with long talks. Audio suddenly dropped down and unable to copy at 0045.Still at S 5 level but no audio (Bob Montgomery, Levittown, PA, NRD 535db, DxPro T2FD antennas, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. 13685, 1058-, CHRISTIAN VISION INT. May 26. Excellent reception at 1100 and better by 1130. Continuous pop tunes with news at top of hour with ID by female announcer in English. Web address several times. Slight fades but fairly nice signal at S9 to S10 levels. Female with world weather reports at 1135. Male and female in happy prorgram with both adding to the program. Voice talk back program. Dell advert at 1137. Insurance ad at 1138. Format similar to that of the 60's type US medium wave stations. Nice name 'The Planet' http://www.voice.com.au (Bob Montgomery, Levittown, PA, NRD 535db, DxPro T2FD antennas, Cumbre DX via DXLD) What, no evangelism? Stealthy! ``The Planet`` is already taken by a programme on R. Australia, and by a station in Maine (gh, DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. Have just spent half an hour listening to HCJB Australia starting at 0930 on Saturday May 31st which is the usual time slot for The DX Partyline. All I heard was the same classical music over and over again. I presume this has been done purposely so that Australian DXers could log the DX Partyline from the final English broadcasts of HCJB Ecuador; that means that the program details sent to HCJB Ecuador would have to be genuinely heard FROM Ecuador and that listeners could not cheat by listening to HCJB Australia (which is very easy to do) and write down the DX Partyline details and then send in a report pretending or claiming to have heard HCJB Ecuador. Very clever trick HCJB and congratulations on good thinking! I was lucky to have been able to log Ecuador at 0600 on 9860 [Ecuador to Europe] and even though reception was poor, I managed with some hard listening to log the DX Partyline program details, so, hopefully, I will receive a QSL for my efforts of logging this genuine broadcast. I only hope a lot of other Australian listeners will be able to do the same! Best wishes to you all and I would like to hear if you managed to log HCJB Ecuador and which broadcast you were successful with! (Michael Stevenson, Port Macquarie, N.S.W., Australia, EDXP HF Forum via DXLD) Somehow, I doubt the absence of DXPL was intentional. So what did they say about the future of the show via US SW stations??!! Since the show is not ending, why would there be anything special about QSLing it now?? (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BENIN. ORTB, 7210.25, May 25 2210-2300* French, vernacular talk, variety of US and French pops, ballads, Afro pops. Sign-off with NA. Weak but in the clear (Brian Alexander, Mechanicsburg PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOLIVIA. 6585.4, Radio Nueva Esperanza, El Alto, 1010+, May 25. Spanish and Aymara transmission. Religious program - Gospel music. Ann. & ID: "Esperanza con los niños", 25442 (Arnaldo Slaen, Chascomus DX camp, Argentina, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** BOPUTHATSWANA. RSA: MINISTER CONFIRMS PLANS TO CLOSE BOP BROADCASTING | Text of report by South African news agency SAPA web site Johannesburg, 30 May: The SA [South African] Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) confirmed on Friday [30 May] Communications Minister Ivy Matsepe-Casaburri's recent announcement in parliament that Bop Broadcasting would be closed. SABC said it had already started communicating with the staff at Bop and that the corporation's CEO, Peter Matlare, was due to go to Mmabatho to ensure the process was handled with care. "I believe the SABC has acted responsibly and at all times went out of its way to ensure the best possible outcome for Bop and its staff. There has been ongoing communication with the Bop staff, and we know that the closure of Bop is a very difficult matter for all concerned," Matlare told the staff at SABC on Friday. In her announcement on Thursday [29 May], Matsepe-Casaburri said: "The Broadcasting Amendment Act provides for the launch of regional television stations in two regions of the country. To this end, it has been decided to close the Bop Broadcasting operation and replace it with a service to deliver indigenous languages of the Northern Region." In 1997, the State Reorganization Act sought to integrate the broadcasting assets and services of the former homelands into SABC. Once this decision was taken, the treasury allocated money to meet the funding requirements of Bop, while SABC played a caretaker role. In November 2001 when the subsidy ended, SABC had to fund the operations of Bop from its own coffers. It has spent over 120m rands to date but expects to recover these funds in full from government. Source: SAPA news agency web site, Johannesburg, in English 1624 gmt 30 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** BOTSWANA. RADIO BOTSWANA TO BROADCAST FOR 24 HOURS FROM 1 JUNE | Text of report by Radio Botswana on 30 May Radio Botswana will start operating for 24-hours with effect from Sunday [1 June]. The station has been operating only up to midnight. The chief broadcasting officer, Mrs Banyana Tshegoe, says the introduction of the 24-hour service is a response to the needs to Radio Botswana listeners. In an audience survey commissioned by the Department of Information and Broadcasting, listeners overwhelmingly indicated that they want a 24-hour service. Source: Radio Botswana, Gaborone, in English 1110 gmt 30 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) Oh, no! This could mean the end of the `dawn chorus warmup` of barnyard sounds; check 4820 (gh) ** CANADA. Attn Ontario / Western NY DXers: CN Tower maintenance Monday morning. I have word of a planned shut-down for maintenance purposes of all the FMs at the CN Tower in Toronto from roughly 03:45 to 04:45 [EDT == 0745-0845 UT] this coming Monday morning. The times may vary slightly, and I will be at my Snowball DX site north of Toronto around midnight or 1 am just in case they go down early. They are performing their yearly antenna sweep. Stations affected include 90.3, 91.1, 94.1, 97.3, 98.1, 99.9, 100.7, 102.1, 104.5, 107.1. Some may use auxiliary transmitters, though these can be less powerful (Saul Chernos, ON, AMFMTVDX at qth.net via DXLD) ** CANADA. Four stories about CBC`s strategy for 2003-2004 TV season: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPPrint/LAC/20030530/RVDOYL_4/TPEntertainment/ http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPPrint/LAC/20030530/RVCBCC/TPEntertainment/ http://www.canada.com/search/story.aspx?id=f20e7bbf-7046-4bd1-92b8-bf5c7c0dea3d http://www.canada.com/search/story.aspx?id=43c8e860-9f05-4ef9-88fe-500c724eab17 (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** CAYMAN ISLANDS. For those of you on 6m, I will be operating as ZF2PB in a couple of days. Wimpy signal -- 5 watts into a folded dipole. Peter, Memphis. (Peter Baskind, J.D., LL.M./AG4KI, Germantown, TN/EM55, May 30, WTFDA via DXLD) See previous story in greater detail ** COLOMBIA [and non]. I heard Radio Melodía last night (29 MAY, 2315 UT) on 6139.8 kHz. In fact heard no ID, but Colombia mentioned several times + time announcement "6:20 en Colombia" at 2320 UT. Then --- suddenly --- switched off at 2321! Nice reception here in the middle of Europe. In fact I was alerted since last evening when I saw K-index jumping on 8, so I expected improved (auroral) conditions along southern paths on low frequencies. [cf. PERU, a different Melodía] Especially Brazil was coming in with nice signals in the 60- and 49 meters. Not so often heard stations like R. Guarujá 5980 kHz, R. Difusora, Taubaté on 4925 kHz... Angola on 4950 kHz was just in Hi-Fi quality. I have been watching the bands between 2200-0110 UT (29/30 MAY). Then I had to go to bed because it was 3:10am local time and a normal working day before me... GOOD DX, (Karel Honzik the Czech Republic (Czechia), AOR AR-7030 30 m Long Wire, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** CONGO. R. Congo, 5985, May 25 2155-2300* Surprisingly good, strong signal and in the clear. No one else on frequency for a change. Very nice signal. But started to get some co-channel QRM at 2230. French talk, many ``R. Congo`` IDs. Local African pops, hi-life music, abruptly off at 2300 (Brian Alexander, Mechanicsburg PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CONGO DR. ETHNIC MILITIA BROADCASTS HATE MESSAGES ON CONGOLESE RADIO --- Echoes of 1994 genocide: French troops likely to deploy as West again keeps the peace Steven Edwards, National Post, Friday, May 30, 2003 UNITED NATIONS - In a chilling reminder of how Rwandans were incited to commit genocide in 1994, an ethnic militia group in the northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo began broadcasting hate messages yesterday. Candip Radio said Hema militia will use force to dislodge civilians seeking refuge in the UN mission in the regional centre of Bunia, where fighting between Hema and Lendu ethnic groups has left hundreds dead and driven thousands from their homes. The broadcast recalled how Hutu extremists in Rwanda used Radio Mille Collines to urge the slaughter of the country's minority Tutsis, resulting in 800,000 mainly Tutsi deaths. Violence erupted in Bunia after the withdrawal several weeks ago of Ugandan troops, who had been under international pressure to end their occupation of the area. Hema and Lendu forces are each seeking control of the town, which is a centre for gold in the resource-rich but desperately poor country. The UN Security Council is expected to pass a resolution today sending a French-led international force to Bunia after the 700-member UN force proved incapable of quelling the violence. About 1,000 troops under French command are expected to begin deployment within a few days. . . http://www.nationalpost.com/world/story.html?id=01613871-C2E1-43F3-9A27-72E679CFAB04 (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** CROATIA [and non]. The 0600-0603 English newscast is on shortwave, noted here May 28th on 9470 9925 and 13820 [via Germany]. Not carried on 6165 and 13830 [Croatia]. (Mike Barraclough, June World DX Club Contact via DXLD) ** ECUADOR. Audio files of the last 3 DX Partylines have finally been uploaded at http://www.hcjb.org/english/dxpl/dxplaudio.php -- That is, May 10, 17 and 24. For most of May, the latest show was May 3. The rest of DXPL and most other HCJB pages are badly outdated, not updated in months. Checking the various programs` pages, I see nothing about their imminent demise? Too demoralized or too busy packing up to say anything? (Glenn Hauser, OK, May 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) See also AUSTRALIA ** EQUATORIAL GUINEA. R. Nacional, Malabo, 6250.33, May 25 2230-2302* Spanish talk, Spanish pops, ballads, rap! ``R. Malabo`` ID. Sign-off with NA. Poor-fair with QRM and QRN (Brian Alexander, Mechanicsburg PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ETHIOPIA. 6940, 0259-0330, R. Fana, May 26. Best copy of R. Fana ever. Interval signal, crystal clear then to female announcer in Arabic [?] and then sudden off at 0301 till 0302. Male announcer with some brief comments, then short tune and female announcer back with more music. at 0304. S8 to S9 signal level with a bit of a bounce and some fades. But over all, best I have ever heard (Bob Montgomery, Levittown, PA, NRD 535db, DxPro T2FD antennas, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** FRANCE. Special event to mark Concorde's last commercial flight: Special event station TM5SC will mark the final commercial flight of the supersonic Concorde jetliner from Paris to New York. TM5SC will be on the air until June 8, 80 through 10 meters plus satellites. Look for TM5SC on 3777, 7077, 14,140 (the 40 and 20-meter frequencies are outside the US phone band), 18,140, 21,240, 24,940 and 28,440 kHz SSB and 29330 FM. QSL via F5ASD and enclose US$1 for a direct reply (ARRL May 29 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** FRANCE. According to a CSA member interviewed by the French newspaper Libération, some of the 9 new AM stations could be authorized this summer. In other words it means that these stations should start their broadcasts before September. Stay tuned (Pascal Perriot, Tours, France, May 31, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** GUATEMALA. 3300, 0416-0430, R. Cultural, May 28. English broadcast of religious program. English program ended at 0428 and then back to Spanish with ID by male announcer at 0428. Preacher invited the listeners back for another English broadcast from 9 to 1030. S 5 signal level, nice clear audio (Bob Montgomery, Levittown, PA, NRD 535db, DxPro T2FD antennas, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** GUINEA. RTV Guinéène, 7125, May 25 2240-0001* May 26. French talk, variety of French, US, Afro pops. Sign-off with NA; good (Brian Alexander, Mechanicsburg PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GUYANA. GBC? 3291.25, May 26 0300- and 0800-: still hearing a very weak signal here, just too weak to ID; 0840 Hindi vocals (Brian Alexander, Mechanicsburg PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HUNGARY. LABOR MINISTRY FUNDS ROMANY RADIO Labor Minister Sandor Burany and Radio C Editor in Chief György Kerenyi signed an agreement on 22 May whereby the ministry will grant 4 million forints ($19,000) to the cash-strapped Romany radio station and expects it to broadcast information concerning job opportunities, Hungarian television reported. Kerenyi said he plans to re-launch the station on 1 June. The station stopped its broadcasting on 7 April due to a lack of funds (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 8 April 2003). ("RFE/RL Newsline," 23 May via RFE/RL Media Matters May 30 via DXLD) ** ICELAND. As of 30th May AFN 13855 has been off for a week or more (Mike Barraclough, UK, June World DX Club Contact via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. XM SKYFI SATELLITE RADIOS NOW AVAILABLE AT WAL-MART STORES NATIONWIDE Delphi SKYFi XM Radios Arrive at More than 2,800 Wal-Mart Stores WASHINGTON, May 28 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- XM Satellite Radio (Nasdaq: XMSR), America's number-one satellite radio service, today announced that Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., is now selling the critically- acclaimed Delphi XM SKYFi Radio in stores nationwide. (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20000724/XMSATLOGO ) Wal-Mart is merchandising the popular SKYFi XM Receiver and vehicle adaptor in an "all-in-one" kit in the automotive department of every store. Plus, 2,100 of the 2,800 Wal-Mart locations will carry the SKYFi Receiver, home and vehicle kits, and boom box in the home electronics section. "XM is thrilled to have the top-selling satellite radio available at America's biggest retailer," said XM President and CEO Hugh Panero. "This rollout represents another critical step in XM's march to one million subscribers this year." The SKYFi Receiver is an affordable next-generation XM radio retailing for $129.99 (MSRP). It offers the most advanced user features of any satellite radio on the market today: portability, a large display, direct channel entry, the ability to preview and channel search by artists and song titles, and 20 channel presets. The accompanying home and vehicle adaptor kits retail for $69.99 (MSRP) each. Also available at Wal-Mart is the SKYFi Audio System, a self-contained "boom box" containing a pair of high quality speakers with an integrated high gain antenna and a port for the SKYFi receiver, retailing for $99.95 (MSRP). It can be powered by an A/C adaptor to create a high quality countertop/bookshelf system for the home or office, or used with six "D" batteries to experience XM Radio virtually anywhere, from the beach to the campground to a backyard barbeque (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL WATERS. The Pacific Inter Island Net has been running on 14.315 MHz at 0800z each and every day, for over 60 years. Net is a Health and Welfare net as well as a checkin net for Maritime stations, also a Net for the Pacific Island stations to make contacts and where legal, pass messages etc. Those on the www can check out a yahoogroup, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Pacific_Inter_Island_net/ The Pacific Inter Island net also conducts QNEWS Sunday at 0700 UT (Chris Wright vk2uw, Wireless Institute of Australia Queensland Q- News June 1 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** IRAN. AFGHAN PAPER ATTACKS "LIES", "PROPAGANDA" OF IRANIAN RADIO STATION | Text of editorial by Afghan newspaper Anis on 29 May The years of fighting the Soviet Union have passed, the years of fighting the communists have finished, the years of instability after the collapse of Dr Najibollah's administration [in 1992] went by and finally the years of rule by the stereotyped Taleban are over. A partial stability and an administration were established in Afghanistan with the collaboration of the international community and those who had made sincere efforts for independence and territorial integrity. This administration was afterwards confirmed by the people in the Emergency Loya Jerga [grand assembly], and for the first time the representatives of the people were able to determine their country's destiny in a traditional gathering. The roles of neighbouring countries, particularly those of Pakistan and Iran, have been of high importance for Afghanistan. Afghanistan has constantly emphasized having good relations with neighbours. This has been responded to positively by neighbouring states, which have even expressed their interest in enhancing those relations. But these policies have not been able to overlay all aspects. One of the media from the Islamic Republic of Iran that has not been able to conform itself to its country's new policies towards Afghanistan is Radio Dari in Mashhad [provincial Iranian radio that broadcasts to Afghanistan]. When one listens to the news from this station, it seems as if their staff are not obeying the Islamic Republic of Iran, but they are obeying Al-Qa'idah, and they are launching propaganda for Bin-Ladin. Radio Dari from Mashhad not only broadcasts unclarified reports, quotes from sources that do not want to reveal their names and disseminates untrue remarks, but it has also got some special "experts in Afghan affairs" of its own and is constantly interviewing them. The discussion is about the desperate situation in Afghanistan (according to the radio). In addition to the "experts in Afghan affairs" from Radio Mashhad broadcasting perverse images of the international security forces in Afghanistan, the presence of the international coalition against terrorists in the country and the new government of Afghanistan, this station also follows another cause and that is to give a different picture of the relative stability and security in Afghanistan. This radio, in continuing its broadcasting of lies, recently broadcast a report that the US embassy had been closed, which is quite far from reality. This station, intending to show the situation as one of conflict, said that because of new threats and clashes the US embassy has been closed. In addition, the broadcasts of Radio Dari from Mashhad have always been in favour of the enemies of Afghanistan and the said radio has proved this. Such lies, public deception and misrepresentation of the Afghan situation which are broadcast by Mashhad Dari radio are definitely not the policy of the Islamic Republic of Iran, but Iranian friends should tell the radio: dear experts in Afghan affairs, dear journalists, experts of Radio Mashhad! Please don't try to destroy the new Afghan administration, which is trying to refurbish itself after many years of conflict, wars, destruction and disaster. Do not lie to people, quoting sources that do not want their names to be disclosed and do not upset the relative stability in Afghanistan irresponsibly with your lies. After all, be honest to the principle that Afghans are honest to and that is the pledge for good-neighbourliness. Good- neighbourliness is the guarantor of our future. Source: Anis, Kabul, in Dari 29 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) Evidently R. Mashhad has scoops about media developments in Afghanistan, as it has often been quoted by BBCM (gh) ** IRAQ. I have found out important new information about the Voice of Iraqi Liberation, the clandestine radio operation first monitored by and reported on DXing.info - see http://www.dxing.info/about/press_release_2003_03_11.dx and http://www.dxing.info/news/2003_03.dx#liberation for more on how it all started. It has now been officially confirmed by the PUK leader that the station was a U.S.-sponsored operation in which the CIA was involved, and that it was broadcasting from the PUK-controlled part of Iraqi Kurdistan. I'm currently in Atlanta attending the CNN World Report Conference representing the Finnish Broadcasting Company YLE. A few hours ago I had a chance to interview via satellite Jalal Talabani, Founder and Secretary General of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), aired live on CNN at 10.23 a.m. EDT, and this is what he had to say when I asked about the station: Question: Mika Makelainen, Finnish Television. Mr. Talabani, from March to April a radio station called the Voice of Iraqi Liberation was transmitting over the mouthpiece of the PUK, your radio station, Voice of the People of Kurdistan. Now that all this is over, can you say who was behind this clandestine radio operation? Answer: As I told you, the National Assembly of Kurdistan unanimously decided that the Kurds are partner of the United States of America in fighting against tyranny, terrorism and for freedom and democratic Iraq. This station was yes in the area controlled by the PUK, it was the administration was joined from the PUK people and from certain American friends, representing different parts of American State Department, the special forces and some others. Follow-up question: Can you specify what do you mean by American friends more precisely? Answer: Well, American friends I mean the American friends. I mean the people, diplomats from State Department, people from Pentagon, people from CIA, I mean the White House, those people, all those people are American friends (Mike Mäkeläinen, Finland, May 29, dxing.info via DXLD) ** IRAQ. Salam Pax revealed - at last! Thanks to Lou Josephs for drawing my attention to a long piece in today's edition of The Guardian: "The most gripping account of the Iraq conflict came from a web diarist known as the Baghdad Blogger. But no one knew his identity - or even if he existed. Rory McCarthy finally tracked him down, and found a quietly spoken, 29-year-old architect. From next week he will write fortnightly in G2." For those not familiar with it, G2 is the second (tabloid) section of The Guardian, which unfortunately isn't included with the special European version. Thank goodness for their Web site! BTW I hope that the Canadian journalist who a few months ago claimed Salam Pax was actually a Baath Party activist feels suitably chastened, and will issue a public apology both to Salam and to those of us who never doubted for one moment his sincerity and authenticity! Or will he now claim The Guardian is making it all up too? (Andy Sennitt, Media Network blog May 30 via DXLD) ** IRAQ. ONCE-OUTLAWED SATELLITE DISHES SPROUTING LIKE MUSHROOMS ON BAGHDAD'S ROOFTOPS --- By Valentinas Mite Satellite television dishes are sprouting like mushrooms on rooftops in post-Saddam Hussein Baghdad. The trade in TV gear is flourishing, and enterprising Iraqi entrepreneurs see bright prospects for this business, which was banned during the rule of Saddam Hussein. Abu Mehdi is one of the owners of the Hyder shop in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad. The shop imports satellite dishes, receivers, and decoders from neighboring Jordan. Mehdi said Iraqis are hungry for news from outside the country. "The news, the news. Al-Jazeera, yes. MBC [an Arabic-language channel]. Lubnan. Lubnan, very good Lubnan [a Lebanese channel]," he said. Mehdi said people are buying satellite equipment for two reasons. The first one is that satellite television was illegal in Iraq under Saddam Hussein's rule and people now want to "taste a forbidden fruit." The other reason is that Iraqi state TV is off the air and people want access to news and entertainment of any kind. Following Hussein's ouster last month, houses in Baghdad began to sprout satellite dishes. No one wants to depend on their neighbor to see foreign broadcasts. Everyone wants their own remote controls. And while Iraqis often complain about a lack of money, many somehow find the cash for satellite television setups. A European-made satellite dish with all the necessary equipment costs about $250. Satellite gear from China costs around $150. The most popular television sets, Egyptian-made Toshibas, cost nearly $200 each. Mehdi said he usually sells five to six pieces of satellite equipment each day and makes a profit of $20 per unit. His shop also sells all kinds of electrical equipment -- from light bulbs to air conditioners. He said the former authorities in Iraq used to confiscate satellite dishes and fine their owners $200. Such fines also attracted the attention of Hussein's omnipresent secret services. Firas is an owner of the Al-Ajraas shop, which is just several meters from Abu Medhi's store. His shop has three employees and sells only satellite gear. Firas said he sells about 20 units in his shop each day. He said people in Baghdad mainly watch Arabic channels. They like these channels, he said, but notes they have few alternatives. While they can watch BBC television, they can't tune in to CNN or Fox News from the U.S. without buying an expensive decoder. "No. It's coded, and it doesn't work on our system," he said. "If you want to see it, you should pay money for a card. We don't have them here. Until now, we do not have cards." Firas said a decoder card, or "smart card," costs more than $100 each, and that few people want to pay the extra money. Muhaned, a man in his 30s, came to Firas's shop to buy a satellite TV setup. He said he wants to watch the news, not just entertainment programs. "I want the news and the events which are happening in Iraq. I would like to watch Al-Jazeera, Abu Dhabi [television], CNN. However, [CNN] is coded," he said. Abas Marhun has a slightly different business. He has been making and assembling satellite equipment in his garage in Baghdad since 1991. He is continuing to work with his teenage son and said he manages to compete with the satellite shops selling all-imported equipment. He said he built a good reputation over the past decade and that people know his work. Marhun said he operated under difficult conditions when Hussein was in power. "Yes, I made [satellite gear] but closed the door [when I worked]. I made it inside here, in the garage, and no one see it. After midnight, I put the dish into the car -- a pickup or a lorry -- and sent it to a client," he said. He said a friend once warned him that the police were interested in his business. He said he managed to hide all of his equipment and evade arrest. --- Valentinas Mite is an RFE/RL correspondent (RFE/RL Media Matters May 30 via DXLD) ** ISRAEL. I didn't see any followup regarding the IBA budget. I've been told, though, that there hasn't been any significant news to report regarding SW cutbacks --- The official word still remains that they're still cutting shortwave as of the end of the year (Doni Rosenzweig, NY, May 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) {Jewish or Common?} ** LATVIA. Test transmissions from the Latvian shortwave site used by Laser Radio have been heard last month on 9520. No date is set so far for the stations return to shortwave (Nick Sharpe, Staines, UK, June World DX Club Contact via DXLD) ** LIBERIA. Just received some e-mails from WJIE/SW. The station in Liberia on SW (Voice of Liberty) is currently off the air on 11515. They are waiting for a sparepart to arrive. They are working on a station in Uganda "you should be able to hear well", so assume the ex- FEBA transmitter from Seychelles will operate from Uganda (as predicted in DXLD lately). More about this and some photos of Voice of Liberty/Liberia will follow soon here at DXing.info (Jari Savolainen, Finland, May 30, dxing.info via DXLD) ** LIBYA [non]. V. of Africa, 15315, May 25 1923-1926 ID, English news, 1927 French news. 1928 one-minute English announcement asking for letters. Gave address, fax and phone numbers; \\ 15025, both fair. Also on 11635, May 25 *2000-2130*; 2041-2045 and 2123-2127 English news. Also heard 1-minute English announcements at 2051 and 2129 asking for letters as above. No parallels heard; fair. Abruptly off at 2130 (Brian Alexander, Mechanicsburg PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) presumably via France ** MADAGASCAR. R. Malagasy, 5010.03, May 26 *0255-0330+; sign-on with drums IS, 0256 local news, 0300 choral anthem, 0301 ID and vernacular talk; reggae music. Good (Brian Alexander, Mechanicsburg PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MARSHALL ISLANDS. MARSHALL ISLANDS ON THE AIR SHORTWAVE Play music from Marshall Islands website http://janeresture.com The Marshall Islands are a small group of islands that form a part of Micronesia in the central Pacific, about half way between Hawaii and Australia. The Marshalls are made up of 34 coral atolls with a total area of just 70 square miles and a total coastline of just 75 miles. These islands run in two parallel chains about 130 miles apart and they extend for 650 miles. The capital island is Majuro and the total population is around 75,000. The Marshall Islands were first populated by Micronesians who migrated into the area approximately 3,000 years ago. The first Europeans to sight the islands were from Spain, the islands were named by the British, and Germany bought them from Spain in 1885. The Japanese were granted a mandate over the islands from the League of Nations in 1920, and the Americans were granted a mandate from the United Nations in 1946. The Marshall Islands gained independence in 1986. Three island atolls in the Marshalls have achieved world wide fame. Kwajelein and Eniwetok were the location of two fierce battles during the Pacific War, and Bikini and Eniwetok were the locations for the American atomic tests in the Pacific a few years later. Radiowise, the first transmitter in the Marshall Islands was established under the Japanese mandate on the southern island of Jaluit (ja-LOO-it) somewhere around the mid-1920's. This was a communication station under the callsign JRX. In 1944, American forces established two stations in the Marshall Islands; WXLG with 1 kW on Kwajelein and WXLE with just 50 watts on Eniwetok. Two years later, radio played another important role during the American atomic tests on Bikini and Eniwetok. The radio transmitters on several ships relayed a live broadcast from a nearby location, giving a running commentary of the events associated with the atomic explosions. The mediumwave station WSZO began with just 200 watts on 1500 kHz somewhere around the year 1960. This station was established by the local government and it was supplementary to the two AFRS stations on the air in this island group in the central Pacific. In 1980, on March 4 to be exact, a new 1 kW transmitter at station WSZO made its first appearance on the shortwave bands. Two channels were in use, 6070 and 4940 kHz, though the tropical band channel gave the widest coverage. A few months later, the station stated that they were swamped with reception reports from all over the world, though mainly from Australia, New Zealand and North America. The transmitter was a Japanese NEC 10 kW unit and the antenna was beamed north west. Two years after its inauguration, the shortwave service came to an abrupt end when the antenna balun (BAL-un) failed. This service for the outer islands was never revived and gone was the possibility for distant listeners to hear this exotic radio station in the central Pacific. However, there is good news. Several recent news reports state that the Kentucky shortwave station WJIE, with its offices in Louisville and transmitters at Upton, indicate that they have bought the three shortwave transmitters from FEBA Seychelles. They are apparently planning to install one in Liberia, another in the United States, and the third in the Marshall Islands. The government radio station in the Marshall Islands began its on air service under the callsign WSZO and this was changed to V7AD after independence. What will be the callsign for this new Gospel shortwave station in the Marshall Islands? (Adrian Michael Peterson, AWR Wavescan June 1 via DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. The article HIGH PROFILE CASUALTIES IN DUTCH COMMERCIAL RADIO that appeared in DXLD 3-094 is copyright Radio Netherlands. Its inclusion verbatim in DXLD was an oversight. The original article appears at http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/features/html/ned030528.html Take a look! (gh, DXLD) ** OKLAHOMA [non]. News Central story under USA mentions OKC as one of the victims of local news and weather that is not local. That would be KOKH-25, e.g.: Besides, he says, there's still plenty of flexibility in News Central's structure. When tornadoes cut a path through Oklahoma City earlier this month, News Central's Chuck Bell -- a onetime Oklahoma City weathercaster -- went live on KOKH with updates on the twisters' path from Hunt Valley. "We still have the same responsibility to be as accurate as possible," says Bell, "even if it's an illusion that we're experiencing the same weather as our viewers." http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A60149-2003May30.html 73, (-.. Kraig Krist, KG4LAC, DXLD) ** OKLAHOMA [non]. HAM-PIANIST CLOSING IN ON HALFWAY POINT IN RUN Concert pianist Martin Berkofsky, KC3RE, is closing in on the halfway point in his CelebrateLifeRun http://www.celebrateliferun.com from Tulsa to Chicago. A cancer survivor and an ARRL member from Northern Virginia, Berkofsky set out April 9 -- his 60th birthday -- on an 860- mile jog to celebrate his recovery from cancer and to raise money for research into the disease. Berkofsky -- who has ham gear, including APRS, along with him -- was 380 miles into his journey and some 20 miles south of Hermann, Missouri, as of mid-week. Berkofsky reports he's made many new ham radio friends in his travels, and he's hoping for an invitation to operate Field Day with an Illinois ham club group. "So far he has found local folks -- sometimes Amateur radio enthusiasts, sometimes cancer survivors--to put him up for the evening or drive him to his next base camp," said Joni Shulman, assistant research director of the Cancer Treatment Research Foundation in Tulsa. "Thanks to the generosity of total strangers, Martin has spent only two or three nights in motels." The CTRF will benefit from money raised during Berkofsky's run. Berkofsky has scheduled some benefit concerts along his route, including Rolla, Missouri, May 30; June 2 in Hermann, Missouri; and June 12 in St Louis (at Webster University). "St Louis will mark halfway through the run with my target arrival in Chicago 11 August," Berkofsky told ARRL. "I have managed to always keep a few days ahead and to run a few extra miles most days, weather allowing." Follow his progress via the Internet http://www.celebrateliferun.com/route.cfm (ARRL Letter May 30 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** PAKISTAN. 21465 at 0838 May 26 was with signal 24132. For prior days did not find any signal on this freq. The supposed 15095 for same time was not used. New problem on radio reception. From 9th of this month powerline noise (PLN) from the nearby 10kV electricity towers affect again my reception , with a S9 to S9+10 level over all the bands. Noise seems quasi ignition or spark type since only in short parts of the band the new bhi NES 10-2 external noise blanker can eliminate it. In other cases my MFJ1025 double antenna noise canceller can beat the noise but not 100% and requires very fine adjustments. The PLN is quite strong around and outside the house I made a call to the national Electricity company DEI for this noise problem. The officer in charge insisted that I was the first claiming about it, and supposes it is a local transformer problem or due to possible overload from electrical appliances (but still exists though we are in cold weather and rain for today ). It is expected powerline communications to start in late end this year by DEI`s daughter company Tellas (Zacharias Liangas, Thessaloniki, Greece, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. Radio Melodía probably is on 6042.55 kHz but the signal is weak and it`s difficult to get a 100% ID (Björn ``Somebody`` Malm, Quito, Ecuador, May 30, hard-core-dx via DXLD) 6042.5, 0335 30/May R. Melodía, Arequipa, Spanish, "...amigos oyentes de Radio Melodía...", " ...aquí en la ciudad de Arequipa...", "...mucha violencia en Arequipa y otras partes del Perú por el paro de los Maestros (Profesores), hay muertos...", music La Barca, 44444 73 (Rogildo Fontenelle Aragão, Cochabamba - Bolivia, Lowe HF-225E - Sony 2001D - LW 50m, ibid.) See also COLOMBIA ** PERU. Radio Del Pacífico (Lima); 5-31-03; 4975 kHz; 0614-0641 UT; Spanish; long sermons alternating with prayer, then rock music after ID; lots of noise; loud echoey ID "Radio Del Pacífico" at 0641; SINPO 33132; Icom R71A with folded dipole for 60 meters (John Sandin, Merriam, KS, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** RUSSIA. VOR WHAT`s NEW --- THIS IS RUSSIA St. Petersburg, the northern Russian capital, is now celebrating its 300th anniversary. Thousands of guests have come to attend the jubilee festivities. Our next edition of THIS IS RUSSIA will be wholly devoted to the magnificent city on the Neva. We will speak about what was probably the most dramatic episode of World War Two – the siege of Leningrad, the Soviet-time name of the city of St. Petersburg; we will tell you about a long-standing tradition in St. Petersburg – gun salutes at Sts. Peter and Paul Fortress and also about the popular composer Andrei Petrov. The program will go on air on Monday, June 2nd at 0230 and 1530, on Tuesday at 1930, on Wednesday at 0830, on Thursday 0730, on Friday at 0530, on Saturday at 0630 and 1830 and Sunday at 1930, all times UT. MOSCOW YESTERDAY AND TODAY In the first edition of Moscow Yesterday and Today in June --- on the air on June 2 and the week following --- we'll tell you about Russian literary genius Alexander Pushkin and about the time he spent in Moscow, which the poet himself described as the happiest in his life. The next three Moscow Yesterday and Today programs will focus on the history of Russia's ancient capital. We'll be speaking about Arbat, one of Moscow's oldest streets, which is over 500 years now. We invite you to tune in to the three consecutive editions of Moscow Yesterday and Today, beginning Monday, June 9. The program goes on the air on Monday at 0830 and 1930 UT and is repeated throughout the week. Our program guide can be found at: http://www.vor.ru/ep.html (VOR via Maryanne Kehoe, May 29, swprograms via DXLD) ** SINGAPORE. Singapore Volmet, 6676 kHz, QSL letter (v/s: Chua Guat Mui, Director), Pamphlet and calling card in 29 days for EG report & 1$. Reply from National Environment Agency, Meteorological Service Division, P. O. Box 8, Changi Airport Post Office, Singapore 918141, Singapore (Kenji Hashimoto, Japan Premium via DXLD) ** SVALBARD. Do you want to take part in a DXpedition to the Arctic this summer? Well, LA3OHA is organizing a second DXpedition to Prins Karls Forland, which is part of the Spitsbergen Archipelago, and is looking for more operators. LA3OHA`s group put on a very successful DXpedition to the island in 2001, when they operated as JW0PK. This summer`s operation is scheduled to take place between the 11th and 25th of July. Contact LA3OHA direct if this trip interests you (GB2RS via Amateur Radio Newsline May 30 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** UKRAINE. AMBASSADORS WARN UKRAINE AGAINST CRACKDOWN ON WESTERN BROADCASTERS The UK, US and German ambassadors to Kiev have warned Ukraine against restricting the rebroadcasting of the BBC, the Voice of America and Deutsche Welle in Ukraine. Amendments to the law on TV and radio broadcasting to be passed by the Ukrainian parliament in September should not be directed against Western broadcasters and their Ukrainian partners, the ambassadors said in a front-page article in the leading independent Ukrainian weekly Zerkalo Nedeli on 31 May. Free flow of information is one of the pillars of democracy, and the new law should be in line with European practice and the commitments Ukraine undertook in the Council of Europe, the ambassadors said. Fears have been voiced that some of the proposed amendments would ban Western radio stations from Ukraine. That would put the country in the company of Iran and Cuba, the ambassadors said. The independent Ukrainian radio station Kontynent, which rebroadcasts the BBC, the Voice of America and Deutsche Welle, has repeatedly complained of government pressure, which the station says is linked to its independent reporting. Source: Zerkalo Nedeli, Kiev, in Russian 31 May 03, p 1 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** U S A. Don't you believe New York VOLMET is "missing." I'm listening to it on 10051. There are times when I'm unable to receive New York VOLMET, but I've always assumed that this is due to poor propagation. (Mike Cooper, May 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Well, I guess it was when the column was written about a sesquimonth ago (gh) ** U S A. NEW STATION TO BROADCAST WAVESCAN Beginning next Sunday, we will welcome another radio station into the worldwide network of shortwave stations that regularly broadcast the AWR DX program, "Wavescan". This new shortwave station that will begin the relay of "Wavescan" next Sunday is station WINB in Red Lion, Pennsylvania, and in reality it is not a new station but an old friend in the international radio world. The schedule for the new broadcast of Wavescan over WINB on Sundays will be 10:30-11:00 am Eastern Time, which will remain the same all year round. Currently this timing corresponds to 1430-1500 UT on Sundays. All reception reports for the first day of broadcast of Wavescan next Sunday over station WINB may receive two QSL cards. One QSL card will be a specially endorsed QSL card from Adventist World Radio honoring this new event. After processing the reports in Indianapolis, we will forward them on to station WINB for their QSL card also. Reception reports for this first day only should be addressed to: Wavescan, Box 29235, Indianapolis, Indiana 46229, USA. We would like to acknowledge with appreciation the noted North American DXer and international radio monitor, Hans Johnson, for initiating these arrangements with station WINB. In our program two weeks from now, we will present a Station Profile on station WINB in Red Lion, Pennsylvania (Adrian Michael Peterson, AWR Wavescan June 1 via DXLD) ** U S A. NASB News from Jeff White NASB ELECTS NEW OFFICERS AT ANNUAL MEETING May 30, 2003 (Washington) - The National Association of Shortwave Broadcasters (NASB) -- the organization of privately-owned shortwave stations in the United States -- has elected Jeff White of Radio Miami International (WRMI) as its new President, and Paul Hunter of Word Broadcasting (WJIE and KVOH) as its new Vice President. The election took place at the 2003 Annual Meeting of NASB in Washington, DC on May 2. In addition, two new members of the NASB Board of Directors were elected: Charles Caudill of KNLS and Doug Garlinger of LeSEA Broadcasting (WHRI, WHRA and KWHR). They join White and Hunter, plus two other members of the Board: Elder Jacob Meyer of WMLK and Ted Haney of the Far East Broadcasting Company (which owns KFBS). NASB rules state that Board members must rotate off the Board for at least one year after two consecutive three-year terms. Board members Ed Evans of WSHB (former President) and Dan Elyea of WYFR (Secretary/Treasurer) completed their second consecutive terms, so they left the Board. However, Dan Elyea remains the NASB Secretary/Treasurer and Ed Evans has been appointed head of a new NASB PLC (Power Line Carrier) Committee. At this time, 18 of the 25 FCC (Federal Communications Commission)- licensed shortwave stations in the United States are members of NASB. The Association also has nine associate members, which include transmitter and antenna manufacturers, frequency consultants, etc. At the annual meeting, Tom Lucey of the FCC's International Bureau brought the good news that FCC frequency coordination fees are effectively being cut in half as of the B03 season, since the Commission will only be charging for two frequency seasons per year instead of four. This will save the privately-owned U.S. shortwave stations thousands of dollars a year, and this is a goal that the NASB had been working on for a number of years. Mr. Lucey also explained the new optional electronic format for submitting seasonal frequency schedules to the FCC. Don Messer of the International Broadcasting Bureau (IBB) spoke about the upcoming World Radio Conference in Geneva and the shortwave- related issues that will be dealt with at that meeting. Mr. Messer is also Chairman of the DRM (Digital Radio Mondiale) Technical Committee, and he gave an update on the DRM coalition and its plans to begin regular DRM broadcasts in June. Also at the NASB Annual Meeting, Ron Wilenski of associate member TCI/Dielectric gave a presentation about his company's shortwave antenna business. TCI is based in the United States, but over 80% of the company's sales are overseas. Mr. Wilenski explained that all of the antennas presently used by shortwave broadcasters will be compatible with DRM transmissions, and his company hopes DRM will revitalize shortwave broadcasting. Doug Garlinger of LeSEA Broadcasting and Jeff White of WRMI presented a slide show about their representation of NASB at the two most recent High Frequency Coordinating Committee (HFCC) conferences in Bangkok, Thailand and Johannesburg, South Africa. Several representatives of the U.S. International Broadcasting Bureau (IBB) took part in the NASB's annual meeting, and they gave an update on IBB's leasing of private facilities to accommodate special broadcasts to Afghanistan and Iraq, as well as other news about IBB developments in frequency management and monitoring services. Dr. Kim Elliott of the IBB's Audience Research department talked about the different forms of media used by international broadcasters in today's world, and he revealed the results of a very recent worldwide listener survey conducted by the Voice of America. Among other things, 59% of survey respondents indicated they were listening to VOA on shortwave, 16% to rebroadcasts of VOA on local AM and FM stations, 15% to VOA mediumwave outlets, 9% to VOA Internet audio, 0.4% to direct- to-home VOA satellite transmissions, and 0.2% to VOA on cable radio. At the business portion of the NASB's annual meeting, a proposal was discussed to initiate joint NASB broadcasts in the DRM format in the near future, using an existing DRM facility. No decision was reached at the meeting. An NASB Power Line Carrier (PLC) Committee was created to lobby the FCC against proposed use of power lines by broadband services which would cause harmful interference to HF transmissions. Next year's NASB Annual Meeting will be Friday, May 7, 2004 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Arlington, Virginia -- just north of Washington, DC's Reagan National Airport. More information is available at the NASB's website: http://www.shortwave.org (via Dan Elyea, WYFR, NASB, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Re audience survey above: Thus, nearly 75% of VOA listeners tune in to the VOA's OWN transmitters (both MW and SW), and those highly-touted local-station rebroadcasts are pretty negligible in their reach by comparison --- ditto internet/satellite/cable radio, only more so. I don't know --- perhaps VOA is the exception... life goes on, rah-rah- rah for new media etc. But I would love to see comparable audience figures for some of those international broadcasters who have chosen to curtail and/or eliminate their various shortwave services in favor of "more efficient" delivery means like rebroadcasts/satellite/Web audio etc. To me, it's a bit like Chevron/Texaco dropping its Met- broadcast sponsorship after next season because the bean-counters apparently couldn't justify the $7,000,000 budget line-item (which amounts to something like ONE PERCENT of their total budget!). 73, (Randy Stewart, Springfield MO, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. MONOPOLY OR DEMOCRACY? By Ted Turner, Friday, May 30, 2003; Page A23 On Monday the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is expected to adopt dramatic rule changes that will extend the market dominance of the five media corporations that control most of what Americans read, see and hear. I am a major shareholder in the largest of those five corporations, yet -- speaking only for myself, and not for AOL Time Warner -- I oppose these rules. They will stifle debate, inhibit new ideas and shut out smaller businesses trying to compete. If these rules had been in place in 1970, it would have been virtually impossible for me to start Turner Broadcasting or, 10 years later, to launch CNN. The FCC will vote on several proposals, including raising the cap on how many TV stations can be owned by one corporation and allowing single corporations to own TV stations and newspapers in the same market. If a young media entrepreneur were trying to get started today under these proposed rules, he or she wouldn't be able to buy a UHF station, as I did. They're all bought up. But even if someone did manage to buy a TV station, that wouldn't be enough. To compete, you have to have good programming and good distribution. Today both are owned by conglomerates that keep the best for themselves and leave the worst for you -- if they sell anything to you at all. It's hard to compete when your suppliers are owned by your competitors. We bought MGM, and we later sold Turner Broadcasting to Time Warner, because we had little choice. The big were getting bigger. The small were disappearing. We had to gain access to programming to survive. Many other independent media companies were swallowed up for the same reason -- because they didn't have everything they needed under their own roof, and their competitors did. The climate after Monday's expected FCC decision will encourage even more consolidation and be even more inhospitable to smaller businesses. Why should the country care? When you lose small businesses, you lose big ideas. People who own their own businesses are their own bosses. They are independent thinkers. They know they can't compete by imitating the big guys; they have to innovate. So they are less obsessed with earnings than they are with ideas. They're willing to take risks. When, on my initiative, Turner Communications (now Turner Broadcasting) bought its first TV station, which at the time was losing $50,000 a month, my board strongly objected. When TBS bought its second station, which was in even worse shape than the first, our accountant quit in protest. Large media corporations are far more profit-focused and risk-averse. They sometimes confuse short-term profits and long-term value. They kill local programming because it's expensive, and they push national programming because it's cheap -- even if it runs counter to local interests and community values. For a corporation to launch a new idea, you have to get the backing of executives who are obsessed with quarterly earnings and afraid of being fired for an idea that fails. They often prefer to sit on the sidelines waiting to buy the businesses or imitate the models of the risk-takers who succeed. (Two large media corporations turned down my invitation to invest in the launch of CNN.) That's an understandable approach for a corporation -- but for a society, it's like overfishing the oceans. When the smaller businesses are gone, where will the new ideas come from? Nor does this trend bode well for new ideas in our democracy -- ideas that come only from diverse news and vigorous reporting. Under the new rules, there will be more consolidation and more news sharing. That means laying off reporters or, in other words, downsizing the workforce that helps us see our problems and makes us think about solutions. Even more troubling are the warning signs that large media corporations -- with massive market power -- could abuse that power by slanting news coverage in ways that serve their political or financial interests. There is always the danger that news organizations can push positive stories to gain friends in government, or unleash negative stories on artists, activists or politicians who cross them, or tell their audiences only the news that confirms entrenched views. But the danger is greater when there are no competitors to air the side of the story the corporation wants to ignore. Naturally, corporations say they would never suppress speech. That may be true. But it's not their intentions that matter. It's their capabilities. The new FCC rules would give them more power to cut important ideas out of the public debate, and it's precisely that power that the rules should prevent. Some news organizations have tried to marginalize opponents of the war in Iraq, dismissing them as a fringe element. Pope John Paul II also opposed the war in Iraq. How narrow-minded have we made our public discussion if the opinion of the pope is considered outside the bounds of legitimate debate? Our democracy needs a broader dialogue. As Justice Hugo Black wrote in a 1945 opinion: "The First Amendment rests on the assumption that the widest possible dissemination of information from diverse and antagonistic sources is essential to the welfare of the public." Safeguarding the welfare of the public cannot be the first concern of large publicly traded media companies. Their job is to seek profits. But if the government writes the rules in a certain way, companies will seek profits in a way that serves the public interest. If, on Monday, the FCC decides to go the other way, that should not be the end of it. Powerful public groups across the political spectrum oppose these new rules and are angry about their lack of input in the process. People who can't make their voices heard in one arena often find ways to make them heard in others. Congress has the power to amend the rule changes. Members from both parties oppose the new rules. This isn't over. The writer is founder of CNN and chairman of Turner Enterprises Inc. (c) 2003 The Washington Post Company (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. ARE BIGGER VOICES BETTER VOICES? With FCC expected to relax ownership rules Monday, the media industry faces static from a public wary of consolidation. By Kim Campbell | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor (On- Line Edition May 30th) Depending on whom you ask, next week could mark the end of consumer choice in the media, or usher in a new era of quality and resources. Or neither. On Monday, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is expected to relax long-standing media-ownership rules, and furor is filling op/ed pages and spurring ad campaigns nationwide. The debate is one of the sharpest over media policy in years, as corporate interests, keen on modifying "outdated" regulations, confront a public increasingly uncomfortable with consolidation. If, as many observers expect, the rules are loosened to allow for ownership of multiple media outlets in a single market, the industry could be transformed - though the extent of that revolution remains unclear. "This is not the final battle. This is the first battle," says Robert McChesney, head of Free Press, a group that advocates media diversity. "There will be recourse on a number of different levels," he says. "There's no doubt that members of Congress will come back with media- ownership legislation in the next session." Driving public concern is the fear that most media outlets could fall into the hands of a few players, limiting diversity of voices and local coverage. In print and TV ads this week, a coalition of groups portrayed an industry in which a few media moguls - like Rupert Murdoch, the man behind the Fox News Channel and the New York Post - reign supreme. Already, about three-quarters of what Americans see, hear, and read in the media is controlled by a handful of large companies. That, argue critics, is not desirable in a democracy, where independent voices are essential. Congress and the FCC have received hundreds of thousands of e-mails and letters on the topic. Though the public debate is less than fever pitch, grass-roots meetings attended by various of the FCC's five commissioners have drawn crowds from a few dozen to nearly 1,000. The plan is opposed by both conservative and liberal groups, from the National Rifle Association to the National Organization for Women. The two Democratic commissioners on the FCC's decision-making board, and members of Congress from both parties, have tried unsuccessfully to persuade Republican FCC chairman Michael Powell, son of Secretary of State Colin Powell, to delay the vote and allow more time to consider the rules. But the meeting is expected to go ahead, as planned, on Monday. Even some experts who say deregulation will help the media environment aren't convinced that now is the right time, since not all Americans have access to the full range of media options. "Short term, I'm uncomfortable about it, because we haven't yet gotten to the point where I think it is the most appropriate remedy," says Everette Dennis, professor of media management at New York's Fordham University. On the docket for Monday are several rules, including those that cover bans on ownership of a television station and a newspaper in the same market, owning more than one of the top four TV stations in a market, and a single company owning local stations that reach more than 35 percent of US TV households. Those in favor of loosening the rules, including Chairman Powell, argue the current restrictions are outdated, having been created in the 1960s and '70s. The way they see it, the rules were meant for an environment with just three broadcast networks, a world in which Web surfing was for Spiderman. Now, their argument goes, people have many options for news and entertainment - diminishing the need to protect a few players. With more competition, and with the rising production costs, comes the need for large, prosperous companies that can afford to keep up, supporters say. "If you want to preserve and strengthen free, over-the-air, local television, then you need to extend some modest deregulation in terms of duopolies [single owners owning more than one outlet]," says Dennis Wharton, a spokesman for the National Association of Broadcasters. Those in favor of the changes argue that if a struggling local news station can use the resources of a cross-owned newspaper, the community benefits. But critics insist that synergy deprives the market of one more independent voice - and deprives outlets of competitive drive. Public response, albeit limited, is larger than that generated in 1996, say observers, when Congress passed the Federal Communications Act. Among its changes, that law deregulated the radio industry, allowing single owners to buy many stations. Clear Channel Communications, for instance, went from owning fewer than 50 stations to more than 1,200. Protests were planned at Clear Channel stations in major US cities Thursday to object to the current FCC action. The perceived homogenization of radio is fueling concerns about relaxing ownership rules for TV. Though broadcasters argue that there are now more radio formats to choose from, critics complain of similar content, increased commercialism, and a loss of local flavor. Since 1996, the number of radio-station owners has dropped by roughly a third. That, opponents say, is a harbinger of the weakening of local media if regulations are relaxed. How quickly and to what extent the landscape will change remains unclear. Because cross-ownership of newspapers and TV stations is already permitted in some markets, many consumers are used to seeing the same reporters on several channels, or plugs on the nightly news for a commonly owned newspaper. Though analysts say media companies will likely be eager to take advantage of looser rules, the sagging economy - and the available outlets - may keep them from moving too fast. Some media watchers are less troubled that the potential moves represent a doomsday scenario for diversity and democracy. "The FCC is going to move incrementally ... such that you won't see a significant change in the landscape," says Rob Frieden, a telecommunications professor at Pennsylvania State University. He's not opposed to deregulation, arguing that media is no different from other industries forced to do more with less. "Media industries are not exempt from having to economize, streamline, become more productive," Professor Frieden says. "To a certain extent, a large, deep-pocketed media conglomerate is better able to produce or acquire the high-quality content we expect." If the rules are relaxed, Dennis sees an opportunity for more accountability and public involvement. "Media can be very responsive to criticism.... We've had a weak tradition of media criticism in the United States, so maybe this will bolster that." (via Roger Chambers, Utica, NY, DXLD) Heard on R. Australia Feedback that one R. Chambers won something but he was in OO-ti-ca (gh, DXLD) As the vote on proposed FCC changes looms on June 2, the Washington Post has a resource page with numerous links to information about this topic. There is also a poll, and a quiz to test your knowledge on this subject. The URL is: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/technology/techpolicy/fcc/?nav=hptoc_ (Roger Chambers, Utica, NY, May 3, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. BROADCAST RADIO: INDUSTRY SURVEY SAYS LISTENERS ARE HAPPY WITH CONSOLIDATION Still with regulatory news, a recent listener survey has given credence to a claim by major radio chains that industry consolidation has provided more local flavor and diversity in programming. The report by Arbitron Inc. found that most listeners were very pleased with the programming choices available to them. In fact, about 79 percent said they get more or the same amount of programming choices from consolidated radio than they did five years ago. Skeptics say the report is biased as it comes from a company whose business is perpetuated by the growth of big radio company profits. (Via e-mail) (Amateur Radio Newsline May 30 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. The Friday edition of Marketplace has a 4-minute segment on the FCC vote, starting 7 minutes into the show. I think the current show is only available for a limited time: http://www.marketplace.org/current.ram (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. TV'S NEWS CENTRAL: ONE SOURCE FITS ALL MD. STUDIO FEEDS LOCAL SHOWS NATIONALLY --- By Paul Farhi, Washington Post Staff Writer, Saturday, May 31, 2003, Page A01 HUNT VALLEY, Md. -- With a cheerful "Scott, how's it shaping up?" WSMH anchorman Jim Kiertzner cues forecaster Scott Padgett for the local weather forecast. Padgett, bright and sunny himself, tells viewers of the Flint, Mich., station to expect a high of 63 and more rain. He backs up the prediction with radar images showing a storm spreading like spilled ink toward Flint, Saginaw and Bay City. It's such a smooth performance that you'd never guess that Padgett, WSMH's "local" weatherman, isn't in Flint. Or that he's never even visited the city. Moments before WSMH's 10 p.m. news, Padgett recorded his forecast in a studio located here, some 600 miles away, and shipped it to the station via its computer network. . . http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A60149-2003May30.html 73, (-.. Kraig Krist, KG4LAC, DXLD) see also OKLAHOMA ** U S A. KWKH PLAYING COUNTRY MUSIC AGAIN Hello Glenn, A couple nights ago I noticed country music on 1130 AM, but didn't give it much thought, since any number of things can come in on 1130 here in central Missouri, given conditions, etc. Thursday night I heard it again between 9 and 10 PM CDT (0200-0300 UT) and confirmed it's KWKH, Shreveport, LA, playing only classic country, liners, and commercials. I didn't hear any live announcers. Liners say they're playing country legends. One mentioned sports and country legends, so they're apparently still doing some sports programming. I didn't think KWKH was supposed to be audible up this way, but for the past several months, I've heard them with a very loud signal quite often. You might have had other reports on this, or maybe noticed it yourself, but thought I'd add my two cents (John Wesley Smith, KC0HSB, Hallsville, MO, May 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) One frequently suspects their direxional pattern be out of whack or not employed properly at nite (gh, DXLD) KWKH-1130 LOUISIANA HAYRIDE CDS If any of you have Cracker Barrel restaurants near you, they seem to be as common on interstates as clover leaf intersections, look in their CD display for the KWKH Louisiana Hayride CDs. These are compilations of classic live performances from the 50s. So far I've seen 3 different CDs and tapes; a CD of classic country performances, one of classic gospel performances, and one of an Elvis Presley performance made just before his explosion on to the music scene. These are nice historical pieces and I wish other stations would follow this lead. It's good to hear they are going back to classic country. I remember listening to KWKH as a young teenager when I discovered DXing. They are just a frog hair from my hometown powerhouse WBT and were easy to find on my All American 5 RCA radio. Now if we could just convince the other 10 million "Sports Talk" stations to change programming (Rick Robinson, who's about sports talked, news talked and preached out, Hendersonville, NC, May 29, NRC- AM via DXLD) ** U S A. THAYRONE HAS A NEW JOB YPSILANTI, Mich. (AP) --- A disc jockey who was fired by Eastern Michigan University's public radio station has a new gig with a station in Ann Arbor. Terry Hughes, known on his radio program as "Thayrone," will host a show on Sunday nights on WQKL-FM. WEMU-FM station manager Art Timko fired Hughes early last month for giving on- air opinions about the war in Iraq and refusing to air National Public Radio news during his show. Timko said WEMU-FM policy doesn't allow announcers to express opinions on matters of a controversial nature. Hughes had hosted "The Bone Conduction Show" for about 20 years, Timko said. Because Hughes spoke favorably about President Bush and his handling of the war in Iraq, his dismissal became a hot topic among conservative radio and television pundits. Ray Nelson, general manager for Clear Channel's Ann Arbor stations, is giving Hughes complete creative control of his new show. Starting this weekend, the show will air each Sunday from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. "The show's success is in its host and the creative juices that flow with it," Nelson told The Detroit News for a Friday story. "I don't want to stymie that. Thayrone, I trust, will use the good judgment that any other broadcaster would in complying with our rules and regulations." (Relayed by Harry van Vugt, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, DXLD) ** U S A. LOS ANGELES PUBLIC RADIO STATION KUSC 91.5 FM GOES DIGITAL WITH HD RADIO(TM) TECHNOLOGY Southern California's Public Radio Network is Poised to Broadcast Digitally on Additional Stations KCPB-Thousand Oaks, KFAC-Santa Barbara, And KPSC-Palm Springs COLUMBIA, Md., and WARREN, N.J., May 28 /PRNewswire/ -- iBiquity Digital Corporation, the sole developer and licenser of HD Radio (TM) technology, and KUSC 91.5 FM, licensed to the University of Southern California, announced today that KUSC 91.5 FM in Los Angeles is the area's first noncommercial licensee of HD Radio technology. KUSC is part of a Los Angeles area public radio network providing classical music and arts programming to the nation's second largest radio market. KUSC is the largest noncommercial classical station in the country. Other stations in the same Southern California network licensed for HD Radio technology include KCPB-Thousand Oaks, KFAC- Santa Barbara, and KPSC-Palm Springs. "HD Radio technology opens the door for public broadcasters, such as KUSC, to offer digital quality and superior services to their loyal listeners," said Bob Struble, president and CEO, iBiquity Digital Corporation. "Public radio offers the potential for listeners to get the local news and information they value, as well as the option for new and exciting secondary services – all offered on the same frequency." Brenda Barnes, president and general manager, KUSC 91.5 FM said, "Classical music deserves and demands the highest quality transmission possible. HD Radio technology offers us the chance to improve the technical quality of the programming we provide as well as the consistency and reliability of our service. As a noncommercial station governed by a mission, improving service to our listeners is always the primary goal." For more information on how to license HD Radio technology please contact Stephen Wallace at 410-872-1554, wallace@@ibiquity.com or Scott Stull at 410-872-1578, stull@@ibiquity.com About KUSC 91.5 FM KUSC, the radio station of the University of Southern California started 55 years ago as a small student-run radio station on the USC campus and grew into the largest noncommercial classical station in the country, serving the entire Southern California region. According to recent Arbitron ratings, KUSC's classical format is the most popular music format on public radio, accounting for 30% of all programming. For more information on KUSC please visit: http://www.kusc.org (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. The current edition of the Society of Broadcast Engineers chapter 48 on-line newsletter has a very interesting story about the IBOC situation by Cris Alexander, Director of Engineering for Crawford Broadcasting. There is also a very informative article about the recent upgrade of KNRC/1150 (ex-KCUV) here in the Denver area. And yes, before you start poking fun, there is a big old picture of my ugly face next to a local TV personality in the very first story in the newsletter. My apologies for that! The newsletter is at http://www.smpte-sbe48.org/news.asp (Patrick Griffith Westminster, CO, USA, NRC-AM via DXLD) Viz.: RANDOM RADIO THOUGHTS Cris Alexander, CSRE, Crawford Broadcasting Company Back in April at the NAB convention, there was a lot of hubbub about the rollout of HD Radio, Radio's version of a digital transmission medium. A number of FM stations in the nation's top six markets are already on the air with the FM version; there are a couple of AM stations transmitting in digital as well. One thing I noted while at NAB was that the AM HD over-the-air demos sounded rough. To my ear, they sounded like a fair quality Internet stream. There were artifacts present, particularly on high-frequency components. Much of the source material was high-density, however, which made it hard to discern the artifacts. Crawford Broadcasting Company and several other broadcast groups recently made decisions to wait on AM HD implementation. I based my decision almost entirely on the quality issue, although the unresolved nighttime questions also played a part. My opinion was that AM HD Radio was not ready for prime time. The PAC algorithm for AM needs a lot of work. On May 14, the NRSC DAB subcommittee announced a suspension of activity in the in-band-on-channel (IBOC) standards-setting process. The reason cited was "...growing concerns over the audio quality of iBiquity's low bit-rate codec..." It was the very demonstrations that I heard at NAB 2003 in Las Vegas plus similar demonstrations at a private NPR event in Washington that led the NRSC to pull the plug for the time being on IBOC standards setting. It was interesting to note that many NRSC members found that earlier demonstrations at 36 kbps sounded much better and were "...suitable for broadcast." Whatever changes iBiquity has recently made to the AM PAC algorithm, they were in the wrong direction. It will be interesting to see what happens in coming months by way of PAC improvements. I think it is very unfortunate that AM, which stands to gain the most from a digital transmission medium, has been back- burnered once again. Maybe we should take Leonard Kahn's new AM proposal a little more seriously after all (SBE/Denver May via DXLD) ** U S A. As of 1034 [EDT] today [May 29] I do not note the IBOC effect on either side of WOR. Stations on both 700 and 720 are coming in clearly (Ben Dangerfield, Wallingford, PA, NRC-AM via DXLD) Thanks Ben! That is good news! Let's hope it's permanent. I enjoy listening to CHTN-720 on my drive home through Plymouth, Mass. It's virtually impossible when IBOC is turned on (Marc DeLorenzo, Marstons Mills, Mass., ibid.) As mentioned on the list earlier, IBOC is on hold while problems with the codec are addressed. Personally I find it hard to believe that such a screw-up made it this far. An in-band digital solution has been in the works for some ten years now, and they still don't have it right? Now's the opportunity for Kahn and DRM to step forward (Bruce Conti - Nashua NH, ibid.) It's the standardization efforts in the radio industry's NRSC group that's on hold, not the usage of IBOC by stations. If IBOC is gone from WOR, I'd guess WOR finally woke up and decided there's no reason to play around with IBOC for a good while at least (Chuck Hutton, ibid.) Well no, NRSC said that the PAC used on the MW IBOC was unacceptable at the low data rates, and they needed to fix it or go back to AAC. And the night use of IBOC has not even been addressed by them yet. I expect they are awaiting another round of software upgrades. And since NO one has any IBOC radios for now.... (Powell E. Way, ibid.) ** U S A. Re Sweeper: Thanks to Walter and to other people who replied to my message about the sweeper. Frederik, the sweeper I am talking about is a kind of device called Long Range Sea Sonde. Please find more information below I got from George Maroti a long time ago. The text was written by Andy Wallace and Paul McDonough. THE SMOOCHER ("SWISHER"). I think I read somewhere that this was possibly a "sea state" evaluator for close-in waters. It bounces the HF signal off the ionosphere (way below MUF) and gets weak reflections that have a doppler spread on it. The doppler frequency spread is directly related to the speed of the ocean waves. That way they know how fast the waves are moving, hence sea state. If it were some type of over-the-horizon radar (OTHR) it would change frequency as the ionosphere changed during the day (higher frequencies for farther range during daylight/higher MUF, else the signal would be absorbed by the D layer). Since this doesn't change frequency range, it's probably not an OTHR. But an experimental station that could only get a license for a particular band sounds more probable. Sea state sounds like one possibility. Any way to check for experimental FCC licenses in the 4 MHz band? (Paul McDonough, Boston Area DXers) Went to the FCC database and found that the University of Maine has a license for some CODAR ocean HF radio units. See CODAR's website http://www.codaros.com/products/LongRangeSpecs.htm for specifications. In brief, output power 80 watts peak, 40 watts average; operating frequency range, 4.5-5.5 MHz; transmitter, SSTX 100. They say the frequency sweeps up and then returns. The signals we are hearing seem to sweep downwards. Per the FCC experimental licensing database, a licensee is University of Maine, School of Marine Science, station location Heron Neck Light House, Vinalhaven, ME, North 44 1 30, West 68 51 50. Rutgers has also installed a bunch in NJ. I think these must be the sweepers. I bet if we search carefully when propagation allows we will find that they sweep less than 100 kHz and we are actually hearing more than one. The Maine installation also explains why we heard it at Chamberlain, but I haven't looked to see how close that is to Heron Neck. Paul McDonough wins the prize for pointing me in the right direction! (Andy Wallace, BADX) It's about 37 miles as the crow flies. This would certainly explain why 4.8-5.0 MHz was overwhelmed by smoocher QRM during our DXpedition this past weekend. (JB) (all via Marcelo Toníolo, NZ, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** WESTERN SAHARA [non]. What may have been the National R. of the Saharan Arab Dem. Rep. was heard for only a short time on 7460 at 0640 until fade around 0650 on May 31st. Signal strength was poor, but Arabic music and speech was heard. 73s (Noel R. Green [Blackpool, UK], Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) Recently filed by mistake under SAHARA WESTERN (gh) UNIDENTIFIED. This morning I heard an LA station on 5067 kHz. I did not get an ID but probably it is listed Ondas del Suroriente. Best Wishes! (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, May 30, hard-core-dx via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. There are some UNID stations heard by Serguei Nikishin in Moscow with his Sony Pro80 right in urban part of the city: 6037.4 UNID in Spanish between 0000-0100 May 28. If anyone could help, it will be too much appreciated 73 and DX, (Serguei Nikishin via Artyom Prokhorov (Moscow, Russia) Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. I have heard recently an AM carrier on 6350.0 SSB [sic] for most of the day; no station seems to own it as no station is heard. This is blocking AFN from the horrible high pitched noise the carrier makes when in SSB mode. Can someone investigate- if nothing better to do, and see what this mystery carrier is doing. -? NOTE: This was heard in Tasmania, Australia, and other overseas listeners may not find this problem, but why not see. -Carrier heard continuously from when I heard it at around 0000 UT to 1000 -approx only. I don't believe that the 'Voice of Hope' is doing something there on that frequency. All keep well! --- Kind regards, (Robert Wise, Hobart, Australia, May 30, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. This month`s featured station is both a numbers station and a pirate. While there have been a few parody numbers stations in the past, they have usually been short lived, with just one or two transmissions. For almost a year now, we`ve been hearing coded messages from the ``Rodent revolution``, a.k.a. WBNY. These are supposedly transmitted form the revolution`s leader, Commander Bunny, to his shock troops in the field. These transmissions were first noted on August 7, 2002 on 6950 kHz. They have mostly been heard on this frequency, altho 6955 and 6925 have also been reported. Both AM and SSB have been heard. Signal strength and technical quality is usually quite poor, leading one to suspect a connexion to the Cuban Atención stations. Most transmissions have used he same encryption method, a simple substitution cipher, one of the most basic methods of encoding a message. Each letter of the alphabet is encoded using a number from 1 to 26. No spaces are sent; it is up to the recipient to place spaces in the correct locations after decrypting the message. Derek Glidden came up with the solution using letter frequency information. The decryption table is: 1 M 8 E 15 P 22 ? 2 L 9 D 16 ? 23 Y 3 J? 10 C 17 R 24 J? 4 I 11 B 18 S 25 ? 5 H 12 A 19 T 26 ? 6 G 13 N 20 U 7 F 14 O 21 W J has been reported to use both 3 and 24; this may be due to encryption errors --- 3 fits the obvious pattern better. 16 can be inferred to be Q. K, V, X and Z are unknown at present. Further transmissions may identify them. The most recent message heard was on May 19, 2003 at 2328 UT on 6950 AM, and decrypted to: ``COMMANDER BUNNY IS GO`` That`s it for this month. I need to go outside and check my tire pressure. 73, (Chris Smolinski, Covert Comms, The Monthly A*C*E, June via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ PROPAGATION +++++++++++ [CUMBRE DX] PROPAGATION REPORT Geomagnetic storm conditions prevail at the moment with the solar wind speed elevated at 685 km/sec, with a highly unusual +24 nT bias. Since May 27 a number of M and X class flares have been noted with associated fadeouts, and coronal mass ejections. Coronal hole activity was prevalent early in the week keeping the geomagnetic field active for a few days as well. Magnetically complex and compact solar region 365 located in the south-west solar quadrant, produced the two X class flares. These events were associated with Type II radio sweeps and mass ejections. At least one of the X class flares produced protons with 10MeV solar proton flux levels currently just below event threshold at time of issue of this report. Two shocks are expected to arrive on 30/31 May. Background solar wind speed are currently elevated at 650km/sec, due to a coronal hole now located in the western solar hemisphere. A much larger coronal hole is visible in the Sun's eastern hemisphere and is expected to produce an extended period of elevated wind speed from 02 Jun. More CMEs are expected to impact on May 31 and Jun 2, with possible major storm conditions from Jun 1. Needless to say propagation conditions are forecast to be mostly poor at least for the first half of the week. Produced using data from http://www.ips.gov.au (Richard Jary, SA, May 30, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) AURORAL AUDIO CLIPS Does anyone have any audio clips of AU receptions on their sites? (Mike Hawk, WTFDA via DXLD) Yes, I have a couple at http://fmdx.usclargo.com/ra.html (Mike Bugaj, Enfield, CT, http://pages.cthome.net/fmdx ibid.) Mike, enjoy! WOMC 104.3 Detroit, MI - 5:50PM [EDT May 29] This one was almost a pain it was in for so long and so clear! http://mpickar.home.attbi.com/WOMC-104.3-AU-05-29-2003.mp3 (Bill Nollman, WTFDA via DXLD) FIRST DTV ES RECEPTION IN HISTORY? This Morning at 8:22 AM EDT I successfully got the PSIP ID from KOTA- DT (Channel 2), Rapid City, SD from 1,062 miles. It locked only long enough to snag the PSIP, and no video frame or sound was decoded. Picture of the PSIP ID is available at my website http://www.DXFM.com The first picture may yet come today. I still have have "Prairie Public TV" KGFE, Grand Rapids, ND up on channel 2 with DTV snow. That's the way things were just before the ID came in for KOTA-DT. To answer some questions... The setup for the reception is as follows: Hauppauge WinTV-D card Delhi / Jerrold VIP-307SR Antenna @ 45 feet Channel Master CM-7777 preamp I started seeing a coherent but intermittent DTV signal on channel 2 last night at around 6:00 PM when the auroral activity was seemingly at its peak. I was getting a steady carrier offset frequency reading of 2.5 kHz, and intermittent EQ locks. I had no sync locks last night. By 7:00 PM no hint of the DTV signal remained on channel 2. I got up and started DXing shortly after 2:00 AM and noticed that the coherent carrier offset frequency reading and intermittent EQ locks were back. I parked the antenna on the beam heading for KOTA-DT (299 degrees) and I didn't move it after that. At about 8:15 AM I started seeing intermittent sync locks. Finally at 8:22 AM EDT, I got full sync lock, the frame error rate went to zero, and the PSIP ID was captured. The frame error rate only stayed at zero for perhaps 5 seconds. Even so, it wasn't enough time apparently to decode a video frame. I suppose I better go to work now :-) (Girard Westerberg, Lexington, KY, May 30, WTFDA via DXLD) CONGRATS! This is a huge milestone for the TVDX hobby. I think most of us knew it would happen some day - now it has. Hopefully it will be the first of many (Doug Smith W9WI, Pleasant View (Nashville), TN, ibid.) SOLAR UPDATE Sun watcher Tad "I See the Light" Cook, K7RA, Seattle, Washington, reports: While this bulletin is being written Friday, May 30 at around 0600 UTC, a severe geomagnetic storm rages. For the past three reporting periods (three hours each), the planetary K index has been 8, indicating extremely active conditions. A late forecast at 0359 UTC on May 30 shows the projected planetary A index for May 30 through June 2 as 60, 40, 25 and 20, followed by an A of 30 for June 3-5, 35 for June 6, and 30 again on June 7. On May 29 Earth was hit by coronal mass ejections at 1215 UTC and 1900 UTC. A third coronal mass ejection may hit Earth May 30. Rather than working HF, now seems a good time for 6-meter operations and observing aurora. Solar flux over the next few days (May 30 through June 2) is predicted at 145, 140, 135 and 125. Sunspot numbers for May 22 through 28 were 110, 87, 84, 51, 65, 116 and 116, with a mean of 89.9. The 10.7-cm flux was 118.4, 117.9, 116.8, 121.1, 125.1, 128.8 and 130.2, with a mean of 122.6. Estimated planetary A indices were 25, 21, 22, 22, 18, 26 and 36, with a mean of 24.3. (ARRL Letter May 30 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ================================================================= This Is SKY & TELESCOPE's AstroAlert for Sun-Earth Interactions ================================================================= A s t r o A l e r t Sun-Earth Alert Solar Terrestrial Dispatch http://www.spacew.com Supporting Imagery and Movies are available at: http://www.spacew.com/astroalert.html 30 May 2003 BAD LUCK FOR NORTH AMERICAN AURORA OBSERVERS Sometimes (lots of times) things don't go quite according to plan when you're hunting for the elusive "Northern Lights." The fact that the occurrence of auroral activity is predictable at all is a testament to our scientific knowledge and expertise of the Sun and the processes that couple solar disturbances with the Earth's magnetosphere. As most North American aurora observers can attest, the anticipated display of the northern lights on 29 and 30 May were foiled by circumstances beyond anyones control. Just as the Sun began setting over the eastern fringes of North America, the disturbance that had been broiling furiously began to decay. By the time it was dark enough to observe anything, very few people were able to spot the northern lights. Some travelled great distances to see the phenomena, only to be disappointed. Dedicated observers in eastern Canada were treated to a few relatively brief periods of moderately strong activity during the evening hours last night, but such luck didn't hold out for most. Unfortunately, this is one of the quirks of hunting aurorae. They can be frustratingly elusive at times. Prospects were much rosier for Europeans. Numerous reports of moderate to strong auroral activity were received from the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and even Germany. Had the solar disturbance arrived 6 to 9 hours later than it did, observers across North America and down to the central United States might have been privileged to observe activity as well. The last coronal mass ejection to impact the Earth arrived around 12:25 pm EDT (16:25 UTC) on 30 May and did not contain sufficient "punch" to rejuvinate auroral storming. Although there remains a chance some middle latitude regions may spot periods of low to moderately strong auroral substorming over the next 12 to 18 hours as the magnetosphere stabilizes, the chances for observing activity from most middle latitude regions have vanished. Active sunspot complex Region 10365, which was responsible for the flurry of recent space storm activity, is still capable of producing energetic major solar flare activity. However, it has rotated into a less favorable position for throwing coronal mass ejections Earthward. Ironically, although it is in a less favorable position for ejecting mass Earthward, it IS in almost an ideal position (at least, statistically speaking) for accelerating high energy protons toward the Earth should a major proton flare occur. As a result, operators of satellites and other vulnerable technology in space are as concerned now as they were several days ago. Energetic proton bombardments can permanently decrease the ability of solar arrays to generate electricity - thereby shortening spacecraft lifetimes. Energetic protons can also produce occasional anomalies such as phantom commands or single event upsets (SEUs). As far as the satellite industry is concerned, we are not yet out of the woods. ** End of the AstroAlert Bulletin ** (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) NEWFOUNDLAND CLUB PROMOTING INTEREST IN LF WORK The Marconi Radio Club of Newfoundland is promoting interest in low- frequency (LF) work on 136 kHz The club reports it's breaking new ground on the long waves by conducting experiments aimed at assisting Radio Amateurs of Canada (RAC) http://www.rac.ca to acquire a 136-kHz amateur allocation and promoting interest in LF work. The RAC has endorsed and Industry Canada has approved an experimental license proposal drafted by club member Joe Craig, VO1NA. Since then, an LF transmitting station--the first in the Newfoundland-Labrador Section- -has been on the air at 135.830 kHz as MRCN members conduct various experiments including crossband contacts. Signals from the station have been copied by W1TAG near Boston and by G3NYK in England. The FCC recently decided against granting the 136-kHz allocation for US amateurs that ARRL had requested and the FCC had proposed granting in 2002. Visit the MRCN Web site http://www.ucs.mun.ca/~jcraig/mrcn.html for further information (ARRL Letter May 30 via John Norfolk, DXLD)### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-094, May 29, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3e.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1184: RFPI: Fri 1930, Sat 0130, 0800, 1400, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0730, 1330 7445 15039 WWCR: Sat 0500, Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 9475 WJIE: Sat 0930, Sun 1030, 1630 7490 13595 (maybe) WBCQ: Sun 0445 7415 WRN ONDEMAND [from Fri]: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1184.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1184.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1184h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1184h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1184.html CONTINENT OF MEDIA 03-03! New edition is now available, first broadcast on RFPI 7445, 15039: Thu 2000, Fri 0200, 0830; Sat 2130, Sun 0330, 0930 Also via DXing.com: {Stream) http://www.dxing.com/com/com0303.ram (Download) http://www.dxing.com/com/com0303.rm And via our site: (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/com0303.ram (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/com0303.rm (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/com0303.html (not yet available) WORLD OF RADIO, CONTINENT OF MEDIA ON SIUE WEB RADIO Glenn, I am PSA Director for Web Radio, a student-run radio station at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. I raised this idea with the station's General Manager, Lisa Herman, and she's all for what I am proposing. I am proposing the airing of World of Radio on Mondays at 1:30 p.m. CDT (1830 UT) on Mondays, and Continent of Media (which may be substituted with another WOR airing) on Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m. CDT (1830 UT). I am proposing beginning WOR airings on June 2, and COM airings on June 4. The URL for Web Radio is: http://www.siue.edu/WEBRADIO/ The show will be inserted into regular automation, after my shows. "Journey Through The '70s", a program of '70s hits, airs on Monday beginning at noon (1700 GMT) and "Journey Through The '80s", a program of '80s hits, airs Wednesday at noon (1700 GMT). SIUE Web Radio (and sister station WSIE 88.7 FM) have facilities to record programs downloaded from the Internet on audio cassette, and convert them to MP3 files. If you have any other questions, let me know! BTW, I ran Part 15 radio station 107.1 KXLW Hazelwood, MO in the mid-1990s. E.B. Stevenson, PSA Director, Web Radio and 88.7 WSIE Southern Illinois University Edwardsville ** CANADA. CBC-TV FIRES VETERANS DUTHIE, GLOBERMAN Video-journalists to replace reporters; union to file grievance Tony Atherton, The Ottawa Citizen, Wednesday, May 28, 2003 Ottawa CBC TV reporters Dian Duthie and Danny Globerman were told yesterday their jobs would be eliminated by late July -- and replaced with two new positions designed for camera-wielding video journalists. Ms. Duthie, an award-winning health reporter who has worked for CBC television for 21 years, and Mr. Globerman, an arts and entertainment reporter who has been with the public broadcaster since 1978, were not encouraged to apply for the new positions. "They advised me that I could," Mr. Globerman said, but they did not encourage it. Ms. Duthie said the news left her "pretty numb. I was very shocked and sad and angry." Video journalists or VJs -- reporters who do their own camera work and editing -- now account for five of the eight news reporting jobs at CBC Ottawa. After this change takes effect, senior reporter Cory O'Kelly will be the only CBC staffer covering city news who is not a VJ. The Canadian Media Guild, the union representing CBC employees, said it would file grievances on behalf of the reporters, charging the broadcaster breached the union's collective agreement by not offering retraining for the new positions before the pink slips were issued. Ms. Duthie and Mr. Globerman said yesterday they would be interested in retraining. Wendy Robbins, president of the journalists' bargaining unit for the Ottawa branch of the guild, called the handling of the job shuffle "mean-spirited and short-sighted." "Why did they go through this demeaning process of declaring jobs redundant that happen to be held by senior players in the newsroom, when they could have simply said, 'We want to reclassify these jobs, we need more shooting, we're going to offer you all the training you need, and we'll support you because you're valued people here," said Ms. Robbins, who is also executive producer of the CBC series On The Road Again. Lynn Raineault, CBC's regional director for Ontario and Quebec, said she couldn't promise the new jobs to the reporters because their training in the required camera and editing skills might take too long. "Our needs are fairly immediate, so if you had a fully trained VJ from Montreal or somewhere close who applied for the job, we'd have to look at it," said Ms. Raineault. She said the urgency is the result of increasing demand from other parts of the CBC news system for footage from Ottawa. Retraining is always an option, she said, "but it's got to be the best option for that particular job." Even if the guild's grievance is unsuccessful, Ms. Duthie and Mr. Globerman may still be able to continue with CBC. As veteran journalists, they could bump less senior reporters working in radio or on Parliament Hill. They can't displace VJs because they are in a different category. "I'm hoping that retraining could be a possibility," said Ms. Duthie. "On the other hand, there may be producing opportunities or something on radio that would be fun to do." (c) Copyright 2003 The Ottawa Citizen (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** CANADA. for anyone interested in reading about (& linking to broadcasts of) Park Radio (Canadian Rockies -- Banff & area), you can visit: http://www.friendsofbanff.com/radio.htm (Eric Flodén, BC, IRCA via DXLD) viz.: ! Park Radio on the Web: Click Here (requires RealPlayer8) Park Radio is a visitor information radio station located in Banff National Park. It began as a project by Banff National Park in 1992. In 1994, the Canadian Radio Television and Telecommunications Commission (C.R.T.C.) approved the license for the station and it has been broadcasting since 1995. In January of 1999, the C.R.T.C. approved the transfer of the license to the Friends of Banff National Park. Park Radio broadcasts a wide range of park information including: natural and cultural history programming, public safety messages, trail reports, public service announcements, park events, weather and things to see-and-do. Park Radio has office and production space located in the Banff National Park Information Centre, at 224 Banff Avenue, in the Town of Banff. Transmission facilities are located at the Tunnel Mountain Campground Theatre. Our Streaming audio feed on the Internet is hosted by The Banff Centre. Park Radio Mission Park Radio will tell the story of Banff National Park to the visiting public: from the rise of the Canadian Rockies, to the plants and animals who came to inhabit the mountains from the evidence of pre-historic life 11,500 years ago, to the modern adventurers who explore the mountains today of our quest to understand the mountain landscape and our place in it Park Radio will also provide basic information to help visitors better enjoy their stay: weather and trail reports, where to get information, public safety messages and information about park events and facilities Park Radio will use a variety of programming to enlighten and entertain visitors: Stories, interviews, quizzes, documentaries, trivia, music, sound effects and on-location stories For up to date information on all aspects of your trip to Banff National Park - Internet in Real Audio - English - - 101.1 FM - English - - 103.3 FM - Français - The Official Radio Station of Banff National Park (via gh, DXLD) Listened a while: beware of overmodulation; how to scare bears, etc. (gh) ** CHINA [non]. Change for Fang Guang Ming (Falun Gong) on TDP's website: 2100-2200 on 6035 and 9625 (ex-9945) (Silvain Domen, Belgium, May 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ECUADOR. Hi Glenn; Here is the answer I received from Jeff Ingram regarding this weekend`s MM program. 73 Mick Delmage Hello Mick, I just wanted to write in response to your question about the Musical Mailbag. It's kind of a yes and no answer. Yes there will be a Musical Mailbag this weekend. No it will not be aired on Sunday. When Ralph mentioned that there would be one more program, he forgot to mention that it will be aired in the old Saludos Amigos timeslot, right after DX Partyline. So, you can hear the final Musical Mailbag program on Saturday May 31, but if you tune in Sunday... you'll get silence. Thanks for asking (Jeff Ingram, HCJB, via Mickey Delmage, AB, DX LISTENING DIGEST) The Musical Mailbag program usually heard here local Sunday evenings on HCJB will air its final program this Saturday in NAm (UT Sunday June 1) right after the DX Party Line, thus at 0030 and 0330 UT on 9745 to North America. This should be the case for the European release also. 73 (Mick Delmange, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Also, for Saturday UT (Friday night here in NAm), Jeff Ingram told me "Studio 9 is going to be an hour. That will push Música del Ecuador back a half hour, but you'll still hear it. We're going to pull one of the programs that is provided from an outside broadcaster". That is the only other change to the final weekend schedule. Enjoy. 73 (Mick Delmage, AB, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. A guy from Berlin I consider as reliable told me about interesting observations he made on 855 (Berlin-Britz): One day the transmitter was running some kind of analogue/digital hybrid mode with digital signals above and below a narrow-bandwith (even poorer than it is on 855 anyway) AM signal. So far nobody knows what this was. There were indeed already talks (don't ask me where, I cannot recall) about a hybrid mode on DRM but with SSB+carrier and a digital signal taking the place of the supressed sideband, not this IBOC-like appearance. And I heard a bird chirping that Wertachtal would by no means be ready to start DRM transmissions in June as it was reported recently. It would be surprising how some guys would know, and sometimes it would be better to publish nothing. Yeah, sure (Kai Ludiwg, Germany, May 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) * * INTERATIONAL VACUUM. SKY NEWS TO LAUNCH IN US 10:38 BST, Thursday 29th May 2003 -- by Neil Wilkes Sky News could soon be seen on satellite TV across the US, according to this week's Broadcast. The channel, which could launch as early as July, is said to be on the brink of securing a deal with DirecTV, America's largest satellite service with 11 million subscribers. "Sky News is currently in discussions with various parties in the US about distribution deals," a Sky spokeswoman said, refusing to comment on the DirecTV deal. The channel will just be a rebroadcast of the standard version, similar to the broadcast of FOX News in the UK. The magazine reports that the focus of the channel may shift with time, however, becoming more of an international news station to compete with the likes of BBC World. Sky is also expected to pursue carriage of the channel on US cable networks. http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/article/ds11167.html (via Kim Elliott, DXLD) ** IRAN. ANALYSIS - IRAN: REFORM IN THE AIR? | Text of editorial analysis by Chris McWhinnie of BBC Monitoring's Media Services Iran finds itself in a situation where internal politics are in a period of change and tension between the USA and Iran appears to be rising. Washington has piled on the pressure and accused Iran, which it brands as part of the "axis of evil," of harbouring Al-Qa'idah operatives, despite Iran claiming to have expelled 500. The US says intelligence intercepts suggest that orders for the 12 May bombings in Saudi were isssued from inside Iran. The US has also repeated the accusation that Iran is planning to arm itself with nuclear weapons. In Iran, nearly 130 members of the reformist-dominated parliament have signed an open letter to the country's Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Khamene'i, calling on him to intervene to break the political deadlock holding up reforms. This internal instability, could be exploited from outside, but there seems to be no prospect of US military action against Iran, and the Iranian leadership is keen to avoid provocation. Under the US spotlight President Khatami, at heart a reformer, spoke at the Organization of the Islamic Conference on 27 May about forming collective policies for problems facing the world Islam. In the same speech, he had to denounce terrorism but oppose the USA's "unilateral" policy. He had to support the Palestinians and accused Israel of "organized state terrorism". These are difficult issues for Iran to express while it is under the spotlight of the US administration. Iraq is also a point of contention with the USA: The USA is trying to minimize the influence Iran will have on the political makeup of Iraq. But, in terms of media, there is the operation of the Voice of the Mujahidin radio station, which appears to be affiliated with the Tehran-based Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq, SCIRI. This is a direct, if limited, attempt to influence the Iraqi political scene using Iranian state broadcast facilities. Strength of reform The struggle for influence, power and control of reform is played out in the Iranian domestic state media. Moderate reformist President Khatami has been trying to wrench politics and society out of the grip of Iran's highly conservative clerics. President Khatami's popular liberal ideas have, however, put him at odds with Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Khamene'i, and other hard-liners reluctant to lose sight of established Islamic traditions. The print media is an example of a newfound and enjoyed freedom, which although it had limited success, made some impact too. Dozens of papers emerged, most on the side of the reformers. But the relative freedom of the press, while being a very tangible achievement of President Khatami's reformist government was also a main target for conservatives in their power struggle. Many pro-reform newspapers were closed down and reformist writers and editors jailed. The highly conservative judiciary has led the campaign against the liberal media, with President Khatami and the parliament apparently powerless to intervene. Press control, some freedom Political debate and acknowledgement of Iran's international and domestic predicament is certainly tolerated in the press: The newspaper Etemaad, on 28 May, carried a commentary which suggested that political decisions in Iran are made too late and that the country sends the wrong message to the outside world: "\… The narrowing of our sphere of manoeuvrability and lessening of our available options to a minimum - has been a constant behaviour, to the extent that rivals and outsiders are anticipating Iran's every move\…". The mechanisms for press control can ban publications and take legal action against writers. The newspaper Nasim-e Saba reported on 27 May that the re-appointed Tehran chief prosecutor said that if the approach followed by the press is the same as those previously banned, then he would not hesitate to seek to ban them in open court with a jury. Less freedom for broadcasters The broadcast media under President Khatami has seen some changes but it is more restricted than the press. Curbs on satellite television are less severe than before - it is tolerated to some extent. The government has increased the number of central television channels to five and introduced an international satellite channel for Persian speakers and Iranians abroad and news networks for home and abroad have been launched to compete with foreign TV. Television is very popular in Iran. More than 80 per cent of the population watch TV and do so for more than four hours each day. As over 50 per cent of the population is under the age of 25 it is not surprising that the most popular TV station is the state channel 3, the youth network. The Iranian Student's News Agency has reported that apparent jamming or interfering signals, from known fixed and mobile transmitters, are disrupting some foreign satellite stations and satellite-delivered Internet data. The interfering signals seem to appear with some degree of official sanction or protection - be it military, political or religious and this may be indicative of the divisions between the government and the conservative military. Financial inquiry at state broadcaster The huge financial losses at Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB) are also a matter of public and parliamentary concern and wrangling. The head of IRIB has said that the investigation into the supposed financial irregularities was politically motivated and that his organization has been treated in a factional manner. The English- language Iran Daily web site reported on 26 May that law makers sitting on the parliamentary investigative committee have been refused access to IRIB's accounts. Earlier, on 12 May the official IRNA news agency said that IRIB's own on-air reports of the financial investigations and remarks by the IRIB president were "inappropriate" and had been criticized by the council that supervises IRIB. President Khatami has intervened, but did so by asking IRIB to remain politically neutral towards all parties and groups. Talking to IRIB's supervisory council, the president urged the council to perform its oversight function for IRIB without political bias. He stressed that IRIB should present the policies of the state clearly and in a way that cooperated with government to help bolster national security. Internet "filtered" The Internet is also a subject of controversy. On 20 May the Nasim-e Saba newspaper reported 187 web sites being filtered officially by the authorities. Most are dissident sites of political grouping inside and outside Iran. Curiously this net blockage also included the web site of a moderate magazine, Aftab, which is however openly available on newsstands with a permit issued by the same Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance. Media - part of the story of reform Iran's media plays a part in the politics of the country and is also tasked with reporting on the changes taking place within Iran. It is inevitably pulled in different directions. It reports the path to reform, there are those parts of the media which seek their freedom and the conservative elements in Iran which seek to impose controls on the media through the courts. Source: BBC Monitoring research 29 May 03 (via DXLD) ** IRAQ [non]. Around 1400 UT, RFI signed on, frequency 15495. Radio Kuwait signed off that frequency around 1315 leaving it free!!! One more thing: when Radio Free Iraq was announcing the frequencies used, they never mentioned 15495!?????? Strange! (Tarek Zeidan, Cairo, Egypt, May 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Re DXLD 3-093 KUWAIT HEARD RELAYING RADIO FREE IRAQ As Tarek says, 15495 is broadcasting Radio Free Iraq, and is heard parallel listed 9825 [KAV] 11805[LAM] 15170[MOR] and 17740[KAV] at 1500 until 1700, so it is an additional frequency. This relatively new entry appears in today`s IBB schedule: 15495 1400 1500 VOA W VAR WOF 08 102 10/23/2003 10/25/2003 15495 1500 1700 VOA W VAR WOF 08 102 10/23/2003 10/25/2003 Could this already be on air and is it this transmitter being heard carrying R. Free Iraq? [i.e. Woofferton, UK, not KUWAIT] Radio Kuwait should not be using 15495 at 1500. Their current HFCC registration says 0200-1305 and 1800-2400 on this frequency. The gap in service between v1305 and v1800 has been in their sched for years. At 1500 they are audible on 15110 [this has Urdu once again at 1600- 1800] 13620 [until v1605] 11990 [from v1615] and 9880. And 15505 is also on air, but carries a different programme, thought to be the Kor`an service (Noel Green, UK, May 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRELAND. PIRATES ARE SHIPWRECKED - NOT FOR LONG From The Irish Independent 27th May 2003 The pirate radio stations have been silenced by the gardai and the telecoms regulator. JOHN MEAGHER listens to the voices of the alternative airwaves. The airwaves are quieter this week. Aficionados of Radio 1, 2FM, Today FM and the city's local broadcasters, 98FM and FM104 won't have noticed a change in their radio station of choice. But for the growing pirate radio audience the past seven days have been dramatic. Last week, between 15 and 20 unlicensed radio stations were in operation in Dublin. Today, there is no trace of them. The bandwidth on which they used to broadcast is silent. Last Tuesday, gardaí and inspectors from the telecommunications regulator, ComReg, raided small studios throughout the city, seizing equipment and cutting off the power supply. Other stations, hearing of the raids, voluntarily closed down in an attempt to safeguard their expensive equipment. Within hours Jazz FM, Choice FM, ICE FM and Premier FM among others were off the air - possibly for good. Broadcasting without a licence is an offence, according to legislation dating back to 1926, and in recent years ComReg has taken a tough stance. For the past couple of months, stations throughout the country have had their equipment confiscated and transmitters removed. It was Dublin's turn last week. The move will have left thousands of listeners fuming. Pirate radio stations cater for people who feel marginalised by the music offerings of licensed, commercial broadcasters who seem bent on playing the same middle-of-the-road pop songs over and over. In this staid, conservative environment pirates have flourished. Jazz, alternative rock, dance and country - the sort of music that one rarely hears played on day-time radio - receives heavy rotation on the pirates. Some, like Jazz FM, specialise in niche markets. A ComReg spokeswoman says the crackdown on pirates was instigated because of complaints received by air traffic controllers, who claimed illegal radio stations were clogging up bandwidth. She says there had been concerns among the gardaí and ambulance workers that the frequency used by some stations was in danger of interfering with their two-way radios. She would not say how many stations had been raided. Legal operators have pushed for a blitz, too. While there is little advertising carried on the pirate stations, licensed commercial operators have been calling for a crackdown for some time. They claim that pirates, particularly those targeting the youth market, have been taking listeners from legitimate stations. Estimates fluctuate wildly, but it is believed that one-in-five Dublin residents regularly tune into pirate radio stations. Phantom FM, regarded as the most successful pirate, claims to have had a market share of 4pc before it voluntarily closed last week. Although impossible to verify, sources within the Dublin radio industry believe this figure is not far from the mark. And that's impressive, considering Phantom is competing with the heavy marketing spend and brand awareness enjoyed by, say, 2FM and Today FM. Phantom's founder and station manager Pete Reed says it will back be on the airwaves soon. Unlike other pirates, the station - which specialises in independent/alternative music - wants to go legit. Twice turned down for a radio licence, for many it's the real sound of Dublin music radio. A musical sanctuary for those who are switched off by the inane, mid-Atlantic warbling of many mainstream DJs, Phantom is a broadcasting free spirit which is as irreverent towards commercial music as is it authentic in its own tastes. It has championed many domestic musicians, Mundy and Damien Rice among them, long before they were acknowledged by the commercial stations. "It's obvious that there is a market for a station like Phantom," says Reed, a long-serving pirate thanks to his work on the Coast and Spectrum stations. "Unlike other pirate stations that operate in someone's bedroom, this is a professional set-up in every way - from the equipment to the DJs and the schedules." Phantom's studio is housed near a well-known city centre music venue. "We heard on the grapevine that some stations were being raided," he says, "so we took the decision to shut down. The equipment is expensive - thousands of euro worth of stuff - and it would be very difficult to start up again if it was gone." Phantom's directors have voluntarily taken the station off the airwaves before. The last time was during its bid for a "special interest" licence from the Irish Broadcasting Commission (formerly IRTC) and it was off the air for seven months in 2001. "The whole application process cost us about Euro20,000, which we raised ourselves, or borrowed from the credit union, because we had to come up with architect drawings and cashflow projections," Reed says. It was widely assumed that Phantom would win the licence, but it went to a country and western station. The failure stung, and Reed and the 30 or so DJs at Phantom were faced with the dilemma of staying off the air to appease the IBC for any future bids or to start broadcasting again. For music lovers like Reed there could only be one answer. When Phantom went back on air again it seemed to attract even greater interest than before. What motivates people like Pete Reed? "We do this because we love music and because we have complete control over what we play," he says. "When people are bored with the status quo, they want to do something different. Phantom could become Dublin's answer to XFM (the successful London alternative music station that began life as a pirate). Some people out there don't want to hear the latest Westlife song every time they turn on the radio." Reed believes Phantom will eventually be awarded a licence as a result of its growing appeal. Apart from their Dublin listeners, Phantom DJs are picking up new fans in Australia and the US as they can be heard on the internet. Almost all pirate DJs are unpaid and perks are few, unless you count the thousands of free CDs sent in by record companies, all of which seem to be very supportive of pirates (privately at least). A DJ with dance station Nova says the enjoyment comes from playing to people who are "obviously fans of the music" rather than to an audience for whom the music is just background noise. Another factor is less altruistic. "Because you can play what you like, it's a good way of letting club owners and other DJs hear what you're like. DJing on a pirate is putting yourself in the shop window. I think people would be surprised to learn how influential it is." Some pirates never make it past the bedroom, or garden shed, and go unnoticed by listeners. Many use antiquated equipment and because of a lack of soundproof technology, all sorts of noises are picked up by the microphone. The origins of pirate radio in Ireland are dubious, dating back to the Second World War when a Dublin group with Nazi sympathies rebroadcast the speeches of dissident "Lord Haw Haw" from Berlin. The first music-orientated pirate, Radio Atlantis, was established in 1964 by Davitt Kelly, an important figure in the development of the radio sector in Ireland in future decades. The motivation of the early pioneers had nothing to do with making money or influencing the direction of radio. It was just that some people got a buzz out of putting their own show on the air. It had to do with communicating. The 1970s was something of a golden era for pirate radio. These were the days before licensed local radio stations and when the number of broadcasters could be counted on the fingers of one hand. It is widely thought that Ireland's first legitimate pop station, 2FM, was established thanks to the huge listenership enjoyed by the pirates. Many of that station's DJs, including such influential figures in domestic music as Dave Fanning, served their time on the pirates. Anybody expecting Fanning to be sympathetic will be surprised. "There have always been crackdowns. You just have to move on and try something else. I think Phantom is a good station, but I'm don't know what the others are like because I've never heard them. "You play music as a pirate DJ because you love music, not because you want to make money. That's the way I saw it when I worked in pirate radio stations. I think people want me to say something like 'it's awful that this has happened', but I won't. It's life. Get over it." One thing is certain. Pirate radio won't be silent for long. Newcomers will find their place on the airwaves in time and some stations closed last week will be operating again within weeks. John Meagher (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** ISRAEL. I don't have any details yet - but as of an hour ago (1:50 AM Israel Time), Haaretz lists, "01:50 As part of emergency economic plan, Knesset approves reform of Israel Broadcasting Authority" http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/spages/ShTickers.html I gather they'd have a follow up article a bit later. I don't see anything on the Jerusalem Post or IBA website yet (Doni Rosenzweig, May 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** KOREA NORTH. Have any RTTY leads? Hi Glen[n]. Your DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-063, April 11, 2003 is about the only current report I have found thus far on the internet, and I was curious whether you had any RTTY leads that I might be able to copy. I am here on the west coast in San Diego, California, and have found very limited access or reception to finding RTTY that I can copy. I have copied and verified the French Navy running its RY tape on two frequencies, and verified it against an old list I found on the internet. I have also been able to copy ham traffic both using 170 Hz shift and MFSK16 utilizing HamScope, connected through a Tigertronics Signal Link and my rig. Right now I am in the process of verifying equipment set up and performance, and any fairly current RTTY information you might have would be helpful. Thanks, and hope to hear back from you soon. 73 (Greg Galaski, San Diego, California, May 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) KOREAN CENTRAL NEWS AGENCY (KCNA) KCNA is the official news agency of the North Korean government. Title in Korean: Choson Chugang Tongsinsa. In addition to radioteletype services in English shown below, KCNA also transmits a facsimile service in English, Japanese and Korean on HF. Tel: +850242149, Fax: +8502812421, Telex: 5475 Name of service: KCNA Radioteletype Service Main studio center: Pyongyang English (400 or 250 Hz shift/50 baud speed) Asia 0400-0600 HMF46 10580 1000-1200 HMF88/HMF46 8152/10580 1500-1730 HMF46 10580 (Pool Items) Europe 0400-0530 HMF26 15633 1000-1200 HMF55/HMF26 11430/15633 Americas 0400-0730 HMF52 11476 (Pool Items) 1230-1430 HMF52/HMF36 11476/13580 2130-2300 HMF52 11476 (Pool Items) Africa 0800-1030 HMF49 11536 1230-1430 HMF85/HMF49 8020/11536 1800-2100 HMF52 11476 (Pool Items) FAX Press Service (350 rpm/60 IOC) 2330-0030 HMF52 11476 2330-0030 HMY36 13580 (via Gayle and Larry Van Horn, Crisis on the Korean Peninsula, June Monitoring Times via DXLD) ** KUWAIT. See IRAQ [non] ** LIBERIA [and non]. The Latest News From WJIE International Shortwave ***** SPECIAL PRAYER ALERT!! ***** DATELINE: LIBERIA WEST AFRICA May 22, 2003 TO: FRIENDS AND PARTNERS ---- WORLD PRAYER BROADCASTING We urgently need you to pray for a very special need. Yesterday we tried to wire our Missionary in Liberia Money. The bank there refused the wire. This morning we received word that the fighting has reached the outskirts of Monrovia. There were 700 westerners there last week; today there are 50 left, as the US Consulate advised evacuation. Patty Heltsley, our missionary representative in Liberia, is very brave and wishes to stay on the ground, but all westerners are evacuating. As a nurse she has a great sense of duty and commitment, doesn`t want to leave, but we feel it is in her safety`s interest that she leave as well. So we need her out now! Please pray that she will drop everything and go. She will be faced with two choices... To try to escape by car and risk encountering rebels and border problems. The second choice will be the airport, which will be the first target of the rebels. So please pray for the Holy Spirit`s guidance in this decision. Pray for open doors for a ticket and safe passage. Next, please pray for protection of all our employees in Liberia as they go through this difficult time. A suicide bomber once destroyed this station and the staff was lost... So pray for those that will be left on the ground, pray for God`s divine protection. Please pray that the station and the Church will remain unharmed and that we will still be able to broadcast the Gospel. Finally, we have a praise report to bring to you. Yesterday we were to ship a 100,000 watt transmitter to Liberia from The Seychelles, with a replacement value of a quarter of a million dollars. Yesterday, it was to board a ship for transport to Liberia. We were refused because of one missing piece of paperwork. Today through God`s divine hand we were able to arrange for this to be moved to UGANDA where we already have people and a station on the ground....What a God we serve! There will also be a television station there as well so we praise God. As you have read this email there are people dying in Liberia, so we plead for your prayers. Please forward this as the Lord leads. Please email or doc with your questions, and you comments of support. In Christ Love, Brother Morgan morgan@wjie.org Doc Burkhart doc@wjie.org (WJIE website May 28 via DXLD) Hmm, maybe it wasn`t such a good idea to try to broadcast from Liberia. One can, after all, broadcast into Liberia on SW from a more secure place. And that place is now Uganda?? Note recent reports of something on 11512 presumed to be the Liberian station --- with its original lower-powered transmitter, moved in from Lebanon (gh, DXLD) ** LIBYA [non?]. Re. the new Iraq service from Libya: Actually transmit from where? Issoudun or reactivated Sabrata (or even anything else in Libya) facilities? (Kai Ludiwg, Germany, May 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO. It is perhaps telling that the signals and modulation of R. México Internacional are both so poor, even in the neighboring country, that it did not even occur to me to include XERMX when I remarked on page 92 of the June MONITORING TIMES that the departure of HCJB left us with nothing but Cuba and Argentina for Latin American external services in English. Strictly speaking, Mexico should be included, tho that hardly lightens the loss of HCJB. Strangely enough, no one has corrected me on this except myself (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO. MOVING MEXICO TV IDS PART 1 Glenn, Thanks for your interest! The list is short; this is part 1: XEPM-2 Cd Juárez. I'm not sure about this one, but it *appears* that they have replaced the two-line upper right ID with a one-line ID across the top, pushed against the left side. Due to bad signal I'm only about 90% sure this was XEPM. XHBQ-3 Zacatecas has replaced the big calls at the top with a small two-line ID upper left. XHAJ-5 Las Lajas has moved their ID from upper center to upper right and changed the wording. The new ID looks like this: TELEVISA LAJAS XHAJ-TV C-5 Also, XHQ-2 Guamuchil, Sinaloa (a full-time relayer of independent XHQ-3 Culiacán and their circle-3 logo) has added a local four-line supered ID upper right. It reads: GUAMUCHIL SON XHQ-TV C-2 TELEVISA TIME/DATE (Danny Oglethorpe, LA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Moving Mexico TV IDs part 2 Add these to my recent list of Televisa relayers that have moved their supered IDs to a different part of the screen: XHHMA-2 Hermosillo (XEQ-9/Galavision relayer) has moved their supered four-line ID from upper left to upper right. XEZ-2 San Miguel de Allende GTO (XEW relayer) has moved their four- line ID from upper right to lower left. (Danny Oglethorpe, Shreveport, LA, May 26, WTFDA via DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. The Dutch public network Radio 1 is no longer broadcasting on 1008 kHz from Flevo. The transmitter is now carrying a looped announcement telling people to re-tune to FM. For the oldies amongst us, the voice belongs to Hans Hoogendoorn, now with Radio Netherlands, but well remembered from his days on the Dutch service of Radio Northsea International. Hans has one of the best radio voices I've heard anywhere. For those who haven't been following developments closely, 1008 kHz will become a commercial radio frequency. Currently it, and 747 kHz, are radiated from Flevo with 160 kW using the two masts in a directional pattern towards the south east. The new commercial operator on 1008 kHz, Radlon, plans to use the full power of 400 kW and only one mast will be used, producing a much stronger signal into the UK. The transmissions of public network Radio 747 will be moved back to Lopik. I do not have any details of power/antenna, but in the "old days" it used 120 kW from that site (Andy Sennitt, May 29, hard-core-dx via DXLD) HIGH PROFILE CASUALTIES IN DUTCH COMMERCIAL RADIO Analysis by Andy Sennitt, 28 May 2003 If it's job security you're after, don't become a broadcaster in The Netherlands. As staff at the public stations busy themselves with the practical implications of savage budget cuts by the new government, many in the commercial radio sector are coming to terms with the licence decisions announced on Monday. There have been some high profile casualties in the bid to secure licences for the next eight years, effective on Sunday 1 June.... {see 3-095} At present many unconfirmed reports or rumours spread about the Dutch mediumwave outlets. Here a summary of what I read so far: 675: Radio 10 FM is the big loser in this game. Originally they intended to leave mediumwave in September because new FM outlets would made a continued operation unnecessary. But all these plannings were smashed; in fact Radio 10 FM lost *all* terrestrial outlets, both FM and MW. The station started a protest campaign, see http://www.radio10.fm/splash/ Allegedly the new licensee for 675 (described as "Music Country") reached an agreement with Arrow Classic Rock (at present on 828) which would result in Arrow being carried on 675 from Sunday. 891: Word is that Radio 538 will be put on this frequency (until now a "twin" of Flevoland 1008) immediately on Sunday. Hulsberg 891 was allocated to Radio 538 because the FM network they won has serious coverage gaps in the southern Netherlands. 1008: The licensee (Radlon Media) plans an English-language service, aiming at listeners in the UK. Once again, these are basically rumours so far. It appears that switches can be expected to take place on Saturday 2200 UT (i.e. midnight CEST) when the new frequency allocations come into force. Reportedly on FM some of the new outlets are already on air. Here is an official announcement: http://www.ez.nl/home.asp?locatie=main&page=/homepages/default.asp%3Fpagina%3Dpersbericht%26iMessage%3D284 As a reference you may use this frequency list: http://home.wxs.nl/~rabrand/zerobase/zerobase2.html (URL's pointed out by Wian Stienstra) [Later:] Indeed Arrow Classic Rock will be carried on 675 from Sunday, see http://www.arrow.nl Chart of the new frequency allocations, including the amounts of money the licensees paid: http://www.hvanbeek.com/medianieuws/zerobase.html And finally NOS already switched Flevoland-Zeewolde 1008 and Hulsberg 891 to a 19 second loop, announcing that Radio 1 can no longer be heard on mediumwave (Kai Ludiwg, Germany, May 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NEW ZEALAND. For two days in a row I have noted Radio New Zealand at close on 9885 at 1310. At that time they shift to 6095 for 5 minutes or so, then off. I'm wondering if they just do this to check out the 6095 transmitter/antenna? I know that on occasion they do use 6095 for sporting events and/or cyclone warnings (Steve Lare, Holland, MI, May 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** OKLAHOMA. Worst Thing [about KWGS in online survey]: Not knowing when KWGS or any other OK public radio station will be broadcasting the entire OK Mozart 2002 series. Help?? (gh to KWGS) The 2002 series broadcasts for all stations have been delayed until Fall of this year. The 2002 season will likely be combined with the 2003 recordings into a longer broadcast series (Frank Christel, Director of Broadcast Services, The University of Tulsa, May 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PAKISTAN. Additional changes for Radio Pakistan since May 24th: World Service to Gulf & ME 0500-0700 on new 17755 282deg [API-6 x 21460] and 11570 260deg [API-1 x 17835] API-5 15100 now via 252deg World Service to Western Europe 1700-1900 on new 15065 [API-5 x 9400]. API-6 11570 continues - both via 313 deg. And re this in 3-093: The updated Radio Pakistan A-03 schedule in DXLD 3-092 has them on 17720 at 1600-1615 when the A-03 schedule that appeared in DXLD 3-050 had them on 17820. Can anyone confirm which they are actually on? (Dan Sampson, Prime Time Shortwave, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Their A-03 schedule lists 17820 [API-1 at 233deg] and I don't know of any change, and cannot hear them on either frequency, but they were informed that RCI was also using 17820 at 1600. Best 73s (Noel Green, UK, May 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. 6042.55, 0718, COLOMBIA, Radio Melodía, SF de Bogotá, presumed the weak station here with lengthy newscast and the off "Melodía" spoken over the news readers by an FA [female announcer?] (Paul Ormandy, NZ, May 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Paul, this format seems more like that of Melodía, Arequipa. This station seems to be on the move, looking for a clean spot in the 49 metre band. Someone reported hearing them on approx. 6105 a few days ago. Bolivia's Panamericana was off at the time. Cheers, (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Me too for this one, today. Fair copy on rather clear channel, this morning 0940, here in Montevideo. Fair QSB kept signal strength varying 0-3, talks on the news by two men, brief canned time checks by male in the background. It is Peru, and almost sure Arequipa, as H. Klemetz says, since heard references to Peruvian facts and places (Horacio Nigro, Uruguay, May 29, Grundig YB400+Marconi 15m long, ibid.) In SWB/Sweden I reported Radio Melodía on 6106 kHz but the station was there for just one or two days. Is now back on 5996 kHz. Female is giving the "IDs": "Melodía es Melodía", "Melodía en la noticia" among others. A talking station with news 90%. 73 de (Björn Malm, Ecuador, ibid.) ** SLOVAKIA. El siguiente es un mensaje emitido por la Jefa de la Sección Española de Radio Eslovaquia Internacional -MARCELA GREGORCOVA- , el pasado domingo 25 de mayo de 2003, a través del programa "Las Cartas de los Oyentes" respondiendo a los reclamos de muchos radioescuchas y diexistas que no han recibido todavía la contestación de la emisora a sus cartas e informes de recepción. "Queridos radioescuchas, efectivamente estamos desbordados de trabajo y en casi todas las cartas que nos envían -que muchísimas gracias de verdad- nos piden lo mismo y nos piden lo mismo casi todos; por ejemplo aquí estoy leyendo: calendarios de bolsillo que no tienen contetación, luego si fuera posible mapa de tipo turístico sobre Eslovaquia y... materiales de su emisora como pegatinas, postales, banderín, boletín de programamción. Otro escribe: espero que todo sea por el retraso inicial pero está realmente ansioso de recibirlos. Nosotros igualmente estamos ansiosos de mandarles todo este material pero queridos señores, señoras, niños, niñas, la verdad no es posible de momento por el trabajo que tenemos, apenas nacimos, apenas estamos agarrando y jadeando la respiración, no será por el momento pero sí en un futuro, quédense fieles a nuestra radio, estamos pendientes del asunto pero paciencia, un beso". Este fragmento será reproducido en la voz de su autora dentro del Informe N 132 que se emitirá a través del programa "Antena de la Amistad" de Radio Corea Internacional, el próximo sabado en los siguientes horarios UTC aproximados, frecuencias y áreas de destino: 1008-1025 en 15210 Khz (para Europa), 9580 Khz (para América del Sur) y 11715 (via Sackville para América del Sur) 2008-2025 en 15575 Khz (para Europa) 0108-0120 en 11810 Khz (para Japón) Entrar a http://rki.kbs.co.kr para optar por los horarios y canales ON AIR o haciendo click en Antena Buzon y optando por la fecha 31.05.03 (archivo que agregan dias después de emitido el programa). Dirección electrónica: spanish@kbs.co.kr Dirección en Rep. de Corea: #18, Yoido-dong, Youngdungpo-ku, Seoul 150-790, KOREA Dirección en Latinoamércia: KBS Radio Corea Internacional, Casilla de Correo 950, S 2000 WAJ, Rosario, ARGENTINA. Gracias por difundir esta noticia. Saludos cordiales de... (Rubén Guillermo Margenet, DX LISTENING DIGEST) This new 2-month-old Spanish service has been inundated by requests from listeners for goodies, and begs them to be patient while the staff try to do their primary job of producing programs (gh, DXLD) ** UGANDA. See LIBERIA. Does that mean the 100 kW ex-FEBA SW transmitter will soon be on the air from Uganda instead of Liberia? (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. BIG BBC URL LIST Here's something potentially useful for some people, Glenn. It's a list of the URLs for the streams from the BBC Player so that you can put them into your own player for navigation purposes. You will recall the BBC player at their website does not allow a fast forward or rewind option - you may only step forward in 5 minutes increments which is a pain if you lose connexion towards the end of a 2 hours show. As I recall, this user-non-friendly setup (that's forced on the average surfer) was put in place as a sop to the UK music licensing suits who feared the usual Chicken Little rampant piracy fears.... Anyway this showed up on the alt.digital.radio newsgroup the other day... so any mistakes are not mine. Anyone with a text-only browser could have likely sorted most of this out already, but there are some programmes here I didn't know we could get (Tom Roche, Atlanta, DX LISTENING DIGEST) blues soul reggae rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/6music/ident_funkshow.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/goldfinger.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/6music/lively.ra -up yourself rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/paul_jones.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/soulreggae.ra classic rock/pop rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/scotland/radioscotland/g2/air.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/bobharris.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/6music/dreamticket_mon.ra also tue wed thu fri rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/northernireland/friel.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/scotland/radioscotland/g2/anderson_mon.rm -also tue wed thu fri -ian rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/scotland/radioscotland/g2/janice.rm -forsyth rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/shakerattle.ra -and roll rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/steveharley.ra -sounds of the 70s rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/soundsixties.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/critical_list.ra -Stuart Maconie rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/docu1.ra -the r2 docu classical rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/cdreview.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/choral.ra -evensong rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/cotw_mon.ra -comp of week -also tue wed thu fri rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/discmusic.ra -discovering music rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/fridaymusic.ra -fri night is music night rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/scotland/radioscotland/g2/gracenotes.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/northernireland/music_now.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/musicrest.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/privpass.ra -private passions rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/docu2.ra -another r2 docu dance rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/nightingale.ra -annie rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/blueroom.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/breezeblock.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/anthems.ra -dance rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/essselection.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/fergie.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/gilles.ra -peterson rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/jules.ra -judge rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/oneworld.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/fontaine.ra -seb drama rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/arts/afternoon_reading_fri.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/arts/afternoonplay_fri.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/arts/book_bedtime_fri.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/arts/book_week_fri.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/arts/classic_serial_sun.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/archers/archers_sunday.ra -omnibus rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/arts/friday_play.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/arts/saturday_play.ra easy and soundtracks rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/desmond.ra -carrington rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/listenband.ra -listen to the band rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/laycock.ra -malcolm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/melodies.ra - for you rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/russell.ra -davies rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/stagescreen.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/david_jacobs.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/organents.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/wales/radiowales/showtime.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/northernireland/sunclub.rm -the sunday club rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/100best.ra -your 100 best experimental rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/blueroom.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/mixingit.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/6music/freakshow.ra -bruce dickenson folk and country rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/bhcountry.ra -bob harris rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/scotland/radioscotland/g2/celtconnect.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/northernireland/hugo_mon.rm -country afternoon -also tue wed thu rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/northernireland/culan.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/northernireland/folkclub.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/northernireland/mclean.rm -'s country rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/mikeh.ra -mike harding rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/nickb.ra -barraclough rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/scotland/radioscotland/g2/pipeline.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/northernireland/pipesdrums.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/scotland/radioscotland/g2/takefloor.rm -take the floor rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/scotland/radioscotland/g2/bnopry.rm -the brand new opry rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/scotland/radioscotland/g2/reelblend.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/scotland/radioscotland/g2/morton_mon.rm -tom morton -also mon -fri rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/scotland/radioscotland/g2/travelfolk.rm -travelling folk jazz rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/scotland/radioscotland/g2/bebophiphop.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/bestjazz.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/profile.ra -r2 docu rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/courtneypine.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/northernireland/jazzclub.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/jazzfile.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/jazzleg.ra -legends rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/jazzlineup.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/jon3.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/jrr.ra news rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio5/brief_lives.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/news/olmedia/n5ctrl/radioseq/bh.ra pnm://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/live/farmingtoday.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio5/flreport.ra pnm://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/live/fooc.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/live/letter.ra -letter from america rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio5/campbell.ra -nicky rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/pm/pm.ra pnm://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/live/today0.ra (0-6?) rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio5/wakeup.ra -to money rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/wato/wato.ra -world at 1 rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/sun1300.ra -world this wkend rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/worldtonight/worldtonight.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/news/tip.ra -today in parly rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio4/news/yip.ra pop rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/usgreatest.ra -us greatest hits rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/pickpops.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio2/albumchart.ra rock and alt rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/northernireland/atl_mon.rm -across the line -also mon tue wed fri rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/6music/rockshow.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/eve_sess_tue.ra -also wed thu rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/lamacqlive.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/lockup.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/r1rockshow.ra pnm://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/northernireland/nireland.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/scotland/g2/sessioninscotland.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/sessioninwales.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/peel_tue.ra - John Peel rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/peel_wed.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/peel_thu.ra urban rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/dtpresents.ra -dreem teem rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/fabgroove.ra -fabio rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/rnbchart.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/westwood_fri.ra -r1 rap show rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio1/nelson.ra -trevor world rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/andykershaw.ra rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/northernireland/caschlar.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/latejunction_mon.ra -to thu rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/radio3/worldroutes0245.rm rtsp://rmv8.bbc.net.uk/1xtra/worldtour_tues.ra stations rtsp://rmlivev8.bbc.net.uk/farm/*/ev7/live24/england/realmedia/live/asiannetwork.ra rtsp://rmlivev8.bbc.net.uk/farm/*/ev7/live24/1xtra/live/dsatg2.ra rtsp://rmlivev8.bbc.net.uk/farm/*/ev7/live24/6music/live/dsatg2.ra rtsp://rmlivev8.bbc.net.uk/farm/*/ev7/live24/radio1/live/fmg2.ra rtsp://rmlivev8.bbc.net.uk/farm/*/ev7/live24/radio2/live/fmg2.ra rtsp://rmlivev8.bbc.net.uk/farm/*/ev7/live24/radio3/live/fmg2.ra rtsp://rmlivev7.bbc.net.uk/farm/*/ev7/live24/radio4/live/fmg2.ra rtsp://rmlivev8.bbc.net.uk/farm/*/ev7/live24/radio5/live/fmg2.ra rtsp://rmlivev7.bbc.net.uk/farm/*/ev7/live24/scotland/live/radioscotland.ra rtsp://rmlivev7.bbc.net.uk/farm/*/ev7/live24/northernireland/ru-live.ra rtsp://rmlivev8.bbc.net.uk/farm/*/ev7/live24/wales/rwg2.ra pnm://rm.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/live24/liveinfent.ra (via Tom Roche, DXLD) ** U S A. WHERE IS NEW YORK VOLMET? Hopefully, by the time anyone sees this, the routine aviation weather broadcasts from New York Radio will be back on the air. This is the VOLMET, a kind of French-ish contraction of ``flying weather.`` At press time, its frequencies of 3485, 6604, 10051, and 13270 kHz USB were dead, and had been for several weeks. Many listeners, and some pilots who were monitored on the oceanic air route control frequencies, were wondering what happened to the VOLMET. Repeated e- mails and calls to the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA), a mammoth US government bureaucracy which operates these transmitters, were not informative. Most of the people seemed perplexed, never having heard of this broadcast. Some weren't aware that shortwave aero radio still existed. This maze of public information officers and air control supervisors dead-ended at a voice mail, apparently with stress on the word ``dead.`` (Hugh Stegman, HF Communications, Utility World, June MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) {See 3-095} ** U S A [non]. Voz Cristiana, 0600 gmt, 6.070 MHz. From Buenos Aires Argentina, In Spanish and Italian, Say they are on 97.1 MHz (FM), so this must be running // along with it, religious programming and music. OM announcer, Signal s9 333 (Colonel Jon Standingbear, Army Radio Station adn3u, P. O. Box 44, Beaumont, Calif, 92223-0044, DX LISTENING DIGEST) via CHILE, of course I have been wondering what kind of Army Radio Station that is --- MARS? Google search on ADN3U led back to DXLD and other bulletin citations, nothing MARS or army, but also to his real ham call: http://buck.com/call/KA6BXC (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Something interesting happened this morning. I heard this morning 5040 kHz AIR Kolkata very well (45444). Not a big deal, but guess what ? I could hear on the background the famous "sweeper" that is very annoying on the East Coast of USA. I have lived in New York for 4 years and I know very well how annoying it is. Well...the thing is, I am sure that there was no propagation from the East Coast of USA to New Zealand at 1700 UTC. So....where is this signal coming from? Does anybody know if there are sweepers on the West Coast of USA or anywhere else in the world? Thanks (Marcelo Toníolo, Auckland, New Zealand, May 30, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Marcelo, yes, there are sweepers on the west coast. The best known is centered at 4800 kHz, but affects frequencies about 10 kHz each side. It's apparently located in Oregon, and is used for wave formation research. As for the above, I noted it as well pretty much identical to the 4800, as I recall, while at Greyland, WA in our mornings, about 1200 UT, indicating a site either on the WCNA or to the west (Walter (Volodya) Salmaniw, MD Victoria, BC, Canada, ibid.) Perhaps it is the radar at Jindalee, Australia? http://australianit.news.com.au/articles/0,7204,6226297%5e15321%5e%5enbv%5e15306,00.html 73 (Jilly Dybka, ibid.) ** U S A. Another Digital Test? I'm trying to listen to WSB 750, but it's been a challenge tonight (5/26). It seems there's an IBOC test going on 760 or 740. I can' t determine the originating station, but it's a familiar sound. Anyone on the list help out with possible source? Need to let WSB know how this is gonna cost a huge audience for Braves games, but would like to know who's doing it to them (Gerry Bishop, Nicelytrashedsignalville, FL, May 26, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. RADIO AND THE F.C.C. --- The New York Times May 29, 2003 To the Editor: In "The Great Media Gulp" (column, May 22), William Safire asserts that "today three companies own half the stations in America, delivering a homogenized product." The actual numbers are much less headline-worthy: the top three radio companies today own about 16 percent of stations. Regarding programming, in 2002, radio debuted more than 3,000 new songs and 550 new artists on 250 discrete formats. The public appreciates radio's strengths: according to the pollster John Zogby, 85 percent of Americans say their local radio stations do a good job in providing listeners with news, information and entertainment. At Congress's direction, the F.C.C. is currently evaluating a multitude of regulations governing media ownership. The gravity of this process demands a fair evaluation of each regulation based upon its individual merits. KATHY RAMSEY, Washington, May 23, 2003 --- The writer is executive vice president, public affairs, National Association of Broadcasters. Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. RADIO DEREGULATION Deregulation isn't the problem; it's allowing companies like Clear Channel and Infinity to own so many stations in a single market. It's interesting how the Feds have put so much time and effort into going after companies like Microsoft --- whose main sin was to have inept, feckless competitors like IBM and Apple --- while ignoring the growing anticompetitive influence of companies like Clear Channel. While Clear Channel has simply taken better advantage of the FCC's policies than anyone else, the result has been a de facto monopoly in several markets; Las Vegas is a notable example with CC having the lion's share of local radio, billboards, and concert promotions. Where are the DoJ trustbusters when you really need them? (Harry Helms, W7HLH, Las Vegas, NV DM26, NRC-AM via DXLD) That's easily answered - the pursuit of Microsoft was instigated in a different Washington than there is now - different administration, different mindset etc. But you're right - the problem is not deregulation per se - rather it's the resulting monopoly (Russ Edmunds, Blue Bell, PA, ibid.) Huh???? The antitrust action against Microsoft and the deregulation of broadcasting both took place during the Clinton years. Do a Google search and see for yourself. It doesn't matter whether Tauzin or Markley is heading the House committee that oversees the FCC --- both the Democrats and Republicans are in CC's hip pocket. Clear Channel doesn't make extensive campaign contributions to both parties strictly in the interests of better government (Harry Helms W7HLH, ibid.) There is a big difference between Microsoft and broadcasting per se. There is room for anyone that cares or is foolish enuf to compete with Microsoft. With Radio/TV you are selling the use of a finite resource. Radio spectrum. And it's supposed to belong to the people. Broadcasters are only given a license to use it. They never own it. Try to get a broadcasting license today. Next to impossible. You can open up shop tomorrow if you want to compete against Microsoft (Paul Smith, W4KNX, Sarasota, FL, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. KWKH-1130 Shreveport LA: According to M Street Journal, KWKH-1130 has abandoned their short-lived sports format for . . . . CLASSIC COUNTRY What a concept. They have lost some of their ooomph here lately due to XE QRMers. Can anyone confirm?? 73, (Bill in Fort Worth Hale, May 28, NRC-AM via DXLD) They were announcing the change last weekend --- it was to take place on Memorial Day. Been playing classic country every evening I've checked this week (Randy Stewart/Springfield MO, ibid.) Thanks, Randy. Good stuff for DDXD-West. And a welcome change. Now if only 1170 Tulsa would go back . . . (Bill Hale, ibid.) ** U S A. GOOD MORNING, RABBIT EARS A NEW TV STATION IS BORN, BUT IS ANYONE WATCHING? . . .South Florida's newest television station. Because there has been little promotion, there are likely no more than a few dozen viewers, mostly family members of the station's 30 employees. But the show is important; the station's owners hope it will help convince cable companies to carry Channel 57. Otherwise, WBWP -- which began broadcasting last week -- can be picked up only by rabbit-ears-using viewers from the Broward County line to Port St. Lucie. In addition, investors across the country are monitoring the station's launch to see if its novel approach of stressing local content should be copied. . . http://newtimesbpb.com/issues/2003-05-29/news.html/1/index.html (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) Why couldn`t you get it on a 7 foot UHF parabolic dish, at quite some distance? Or even sesquimegameter trans-Gulf tropo? Only on rabbit ears, indeed! (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. TV STATIONS TO PUT ANTENNAS ON NEW GROUND ZERO TOWER By DAVID W. DUNLAP, May 29, 2003 T he 1,776-foot Freedom Tower planned at the World Trade Center site is meant to send a signal of resilience to the world. Now it will also be designed to send signals of another kind to households from the New Jersey Shore to the end of Long Island to Fairfield County, Conn. Specifically, Channels 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 31, 41, 47 and 68. On Tuesday, the Metropolitan Television Alliance signed an agreement with Larry A. Silverstein, the leaseholder and developer at the trade center site, to install as many as 22 antennas atop Freedom Tower, to be completed in 2008. Freedom Tower is being designed by Studio Daniel Libeskind. There would be roughly 70 occupied floors, reaching 900 feet, and the upper half of the structure would be more of an open latticework. Some antennas could be mounted in the mast that Mr. Libeskind has already designed as the pinnacle of the tower, said Edward Grebow, president of the broadcasters' alliance. Others could be mounted within the latticework. The new agreement would return New York broadcasters to the site they occupied before Sept. 11, 2001. It would also bring Mr. Silverstein a rent-paying tenant "That always helps," he said yesterday that needs space at altitudes where many office workers feel uncomfortable. And, Mr. Grebow said, "It guarantees that Manhattan will dominate the skyline." Until recently, the broadcasters had given serious consideration to constructing a 2,000-foot mast in Bayonne, N.J. Only two months ago, Mr. Grebow said the Bayonne mast would "dwarf the Libeskind tower at the trade center, which, believe us, is not what we want but where we are being forced to go." In April, however, Mr. Grebow attended a luncheon at which Gov. George E. Pataki set out aggressive goals for redeveloping Lower Manhattan. "I came away thinking for the first time, `Yes, this is going to happen in a plausible time frame,' " he recalled. Under this timetable, Mr. Pataki asked Mr. Silverstein to pledge that the cornerstone for Freedom Tower would be laid in August 2004. "I told him we'd do that," Mr. Silverstein said. The governor also asked that the steel be topped out on Sept. 11, 2006. "I said we'd endeavor to do that," Mr. Silverstein said. There are many unknowns about the Freedom Tower project, including the exact design of the building and the cost. The broadcasters would "pay our way" in construction costs for the antennas, Mr. Grebow said, and would also pay rent to Mr. Silverstein, who was their landlord at the World Trade Center, where they paid about $9 million a year. Since the attack, broadcasters have been using the Empire State Building as a stopgap to reach the 700,000 households in the metropolitan area that do not have cable. Their search for a new site has led them to consider Governors Island, Jersey City and Brooklyn. The broadcasters' architects are Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, which would advise them on the Freedom Tower installation, working with Mr. Libeskind and with Mr. Silverstein's architects, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. "One of our big challenges will be to make the antennas aesthetically pleasing," Mr. Grebow said. They range in height from several hundred feet to 30 or 40 feet, he said, and could be concealed within a shell of fiberglasslike material. Twenty-two antennas are needed to accommodate both analog and digital signals from each of the 11 stations, but some channels could be combined. Members of the alliance are WCBS (Channel 2), WNBC (4), WNYW (5), WABC (7), WWOR (9), WPIX (11), WNET (13), WPXN (31), WXTV (41), WNJU (47) and WFUT (68). "What better place for them to be than in New York," Mr. Silverstein said, "from whence they came and where they've always operated." Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) New York Times makes no mention of DTV transmitters for the above channels. And what of channel 68? Won't that six megahertz of spectrum be reassigned by the 2008 tower completion date? (Brock Whaley, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. KID'S DAY II IS JUNE 21! NEWINGTON, CT, May 28, 2003 -- The second Kid's Day of 2003 will be June 21, from 1800-2400 UT. There's no limit on operating time. The twice-annual event, held in January and June, offers a chance for amateurs to invest in the future of Amateur Radio by participating in a simple, but rewarding, on-the-air event. Kid's Day is intended as an opportunity to share Amateur Radio with young people -- licensed or not--in the hope that they'll enjoy the experience and possibly pursue their own license in the future. Activity for Kid's Day [what`s the rest of the URL?] takes place on 20, 15 and 10 meters -- and perhaps your local 2-meter repeater. It's an opportunity to introduce your own youngsters, neighborhood kids and nieces and nephews to participate to the magic of ham radio and perhaps spark a lifelong love for the hobby. Kid's Day is not a contest, and patience is a must. Remember that the kids are not experienced operators. Your part, as the licensee and control operator, is to help with the basics, keep an eye on the technical aspects of the operation, observe third-party traffic agreements and be sure to ID at the proper intervals. Beyond that, relax, and let the youngsters have fun. If they find someone they're comfortable talking with, let them enjoy themselves. In this event, it's quality of the contacts that counts, not quantity. The suggested exchange for Kid's Day is first name, age, location and favorite color. It's okay to work the same station again if the operator has changed. Call "CQ Kid's Day." Suggested frequencies are 14,270 to 14,300, 21,380 to 21,400 and 28,350 to 28,400 kHz, and 2- meter repeater frequencies with permission from your area repeater sponsor. All participants are eligible to receive a colorful certificate (it becomes the child's personalized sales brochure on ham radio). You can help ARRL keep track of the Kid's Day activity and responses. Visit the ARRL Kid's Day Survey page to complete a short survey and post your comments. You will then have access to download the certificate page or send a 9x12 SASE to Boring Amateur Radio Club, PO Box 1357, Boring, OR 97009. Now in its ninth year, each running of Kid's Day typically attracts more than 1000 participants. Originated by the Boring Amateur Radio Club http://jzap.com/k7rat/ the event now is sponsored and administered by the ARRL with the cooperation and assistance of the BARC (ARRL May 29 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** VANUATU. 7260, Port Vila, good signal at 0737 UT 5/29 with news in presumed Bislama with English words, news on Papua New Guinea and other Pacific areas. At 0738 "...news comes from Radio Vanuatu". At 0740 some really nice local music (Drake R8, 14 Meter vertical, Patrick Martin, Seaside OR, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Patrick, I just want to confirm what you said. Vanuatu is very strong here on South Pacific too. 7260 Vanuatu, Port Vila, very good signal (555) at 1855 UT with nice "south Pacific style" song played with guitar and electronic keyboard. National Anthem at 1900, birds singing and "Good Morning Vanuatu...." by YL (Marcelo Toníolo, Auckland, New Zealand, NRD 545DSP Longwire 30 feet with MFJ 959B (Tuner/ Preamplifier), ibid.) ** VENEZUELA. VENEZUELA'S NEWS MEDIA SOUND ALARM OVER CHAVEZ MOVE TO REGULATE PROGRAMMING --- The Associated Press 5/29/03 1:45 AM CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) -- No live coverage of political violence. Limited daytime newscasts about terror attacks. No radio stations devoted exclusively to rock or other "foreign" music. Venezuela's news executives say all this could happen if President Hugo Chávez succeeds in enacting a law that imposes harsh restrictions on what and when Venezuelan television and radio stations can broadcast. Ruling party lawmakers defend the proposed law, saying it will protect children from violence and end what they call "selective censorship" by the news media, which they accuse of supporting the opposition. The also contend it will make broadcasters accountable to citizens. "This project is a weapon to defend us as a people and guarantee public freedoms," said Juan Barreto, a member of the committee which drafted the bill and a journalism professor at the Central University of Venezuela. It upholds "freedom of expression, which doesn't belong only to channels and journalists but also to the people," he said. Many press rights advocates, however, disagree. They say the law, now before the Chávez-dominated Congress, will allow an increasingly authoritarian government to silence opposition ahead of a possible recall vote on Chávez's presidency. Chávez designed the Law for Social Responsibility in Radio and Television to bring "the news media to its knees," said Víctor Ferreres, president of Venevisión television. "We would have to broadcast a blank screen and ignore almost everything that is occurring in the news" to comply with the law, Ferreres claimed. Chávez has long accused Venezuela's news media of conspiring to topple him. Most broadcasters slanted coverage of a brief 2002 coup against Chávez, and many supported an opposition general strike this year. Among other provisions, the law would ban "rude" and "vulgar" language; prohibit images and sounds related to alcohol and drug consumption, gambling and sex; and ban "psychological" or physical violence, all between 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Similar limits would apply to early morning and evening newscasts. Sixty percent of all programming must be produced within Venezuela, and of that, more than half must be created by "independent producers" approved by Conatel, the state media watchdog. Broadcasters say the law will allow censors hand-picked by Chávez to crack down on the mostly opposition news media. Violators can be punished with $37,000 fines or have their broadcast licenses revoked. Advertisers, too, can be held liable -- a provision critics say is meant to starve stations of publicity at a time when Venezuela's news media are confronting an economic crisis. Congress is expected to pass the bill by simple majority vote within weeks. Six of nine members of a committee to enforce the law would be appointed by Chávez. "If there is a terrorist attack this morning, I'd have to tell listeners we have to wait to inform them during the news at 11 (p.m.) because it could be labeled 'violent content,"' said Leopoldo Castillo, a talk show host with Globovisión television news channel. Deputy Willian Lara, a Chávez confidante, said the law won't stop TV and radio from broadcasting news. "The news can be reported like it is now, only the grotesque images are restricted," he said. Critics are wary. The legislation "is completely incompatible with international standards" of press freedoms, said José Vivanco, executive director of the Americas Division of Human Rights Watch. Definitions are so cloudy that some of Venezuela's prized daytime soap operas could be banned, he said. Opposition groups pushing for a referendum on Chávez's presidency later this year are organizing marches against the law. A leftist former army paratrooper, Chávez was elected in 1998 and re-elected to a six-year term in 2000 (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** VIETNAM. Re previous report of 17925 being the 3rd harmonic of 5925 --- no, it isn`t. When will we ever learn to confirm all such reports with the calculator? 17925 would be 3 x 5975, if there be a Viet transmitter there; did not catch in time to correct on WOR 1184 (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ SHORTWAVE AS MUSIC ++++++++++++++++++ And more(!) about shortwave (and beyond) and music and artform: Rafael Lozano-Hemmers first solo exhibition in his native Mexico. Created specifically for the large church nave at the Alameda Art Laboratory, this installation invites members of the public to scan the radio spectrum using their bodies. A custom-made sensor tracks the projected shadows of participants, and tunes specific radio signals based on their position and size. The piece can sweep all frequencies from 150 kHz to 1.5 GHz, allowing monitoring of broadcasts like air traffic control, taxi dispatch networks, wireless phones, short wave radio and many others. The installation can have up to 16 simultaneous channels of audio and the resulting sound environment is a self-organized composition controlled by people's movements. Free access to the radio spectrum, a contested public space, is presented in the context of the increased surveillance of the body. http://www.absolutearts.com/artsnews/2003/05/28/31074.html 73 (Kim Elliott, DX LISTENING DIGEST) COMMENTARY ++++++++++ QSLing, BELLABARBA Mr. Renfrew, I got your letter today. We don't keep audio records of Colorado Rockies baseball games, but I checked the box score of the Rockies game on the 23rd and it matches the script you've provided. KNEC is a 25kw FM in Yuma, Colorado. (Northeast Colorado). I've filled ot your card and I'm sending it back today. About 2 years ago we received a post card from Italy. A person picked up our signal and listened to our daily "Swap Shop" program. Our antenna is on a good hill, but we're only about 475ft above terrain. Jeremy Weathers, Station Manager, KNEC 100.9FM http://knec.iwarp.com (via Jim Renfrew, NY, DXLD) Bellabarba strikes again! (gh) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ MORE ON ACCESSORY INTERFERENCE In our April column, a reader asked how it was possible for an electronic device which has been turned off to emit considerable radio interference. Geoff Gidman, KA1EPF, provides one answer. A large percentage of modern electronic appliances are microprocessor controlled; even when the device is turned off, some power remains to allow the microprocessor to receive signals from the remote control to turn back on again. The clock circuit of a microprocessor is essentially a square-wave generator, rich in harmonics, operated at radio frequencies. Other hobbyists have learned that switching power supplies can emit considerable interference as well. Various external filters usually fail to offer much help since the interference may be radiated directly through the cabinet as well as attached cables. One sure cure, however, is to unplug the devices from the wall; this virtually always shuts down the interference – as well as the accessory`s capability to be turned back on by the remote control. Perry Crabill, Jr., W3HQX, went even further, determining which frequencies and which accessories were causing the interference at his home. He contacted Zenith Corporation to confirm that his model SJ- 2065-W TV's switching power supply was emitting a signal at 36.96 kHz as well as several generations of harmonics clear into the shortwave spectrum. But it was still within tolerance as set by the FCC. Additionally, his Sanyo VHR-3350 VCR was radiating a strong signal at 525 kHz along with harmonics, as was his AT&T model 5500 cordless phone at 300 kHz plus harmonics. He also discovered radiation around 560 kHz coming from his Brother model 600 facsimile machine, and even weak harmonics from his old Kenwood R5000 communications receiver on harmonics of 17.56 kHz. Perry`s sense of humor came through with this final report: Desiring to listen to the VLF spectrum one evening, he unplugged all the offending household electronic accessories, plus the automatic night light which generates considerable broad-band noise, switched off the porch lights` solid-state timers, the fluorescent kitchen lights, and a humidifier control. With great anticipation, he then switched on his radio and discovered that the natural atmospheric noise blanketed everything anyway! He turned off the radio, hooked up all the home accessories and went to bed. Thanks, Geoff and Perry, for sharing your excellent insights (Bob Grove, Ask Bob, Getting Started, June MONITORING TIMES via DXLD) SOURCE OF BEVERAGE WIRE FYI - I got some 18 gauge stranded copper, flaming red insulation, for $12.50 per 500-foot roll from National Electronics. I like to plug this company because they have great customer service - it's where I buy the coax for my long feedlines. Anyway, this wire turned out to be very nice quality, strong yet flexible ("like buttah"). I spooled up 1500' on a single Home Depot plastic orange cord spool and used it for the Long Beach Island DXpedition. I've now got two 1500' spools set aside for future expeditions. The website is: http://www.national-electronics.com For my permanent installations, I've used the Home Depot THHN wire - it is double-insulated, but I've found it to be very brittle (Rick Kenneally, CT, NRC-AM via DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ TROPO HI TO CA...AND CA TO HI Last night on IRC chat, Rod Thompson (Sacramento, CA) mentioned the November 1989 VUD, which has the following item about Sheldon Remington and his HI-CA tropo: ------------------------ Greetings to my old friends in the WTFDA. I haven't been a club member for some years, but Pat Dyer suggested I write up the FM reception which took place in June [1989!] and submit it to the VUD. The fabled VHF tropo duct has finally yielded some FM catches. On June 13, the local VHF ham ops were reporting the duct was open to southern CA. At 0955 I noticed some CCI bars on channel 11 and immediately checked FM with my hand held Sony ICF-7600D and built-in whip. For the next 2 1/2 hours I heard many southern CA FM's of which the following were positively IDed: Grover City 107.3, Lompoc 104.1, Santa Barbara 93.7, Ventura 100.7, Los Angeles 92.3, 93.1. 95.5. 97.1, 101.1, 102.7 103.5, 104.3, 105.1, 107.5, Glendale 101.9, Pasadena 106.7, and Santa Maria 102. The next night from 1000 to 1300, the opening had moved south to the Tijuana/San Diego area, yielding Tijuana 91.1, 104.$ and San Diego 94.1, 101.5, 103.7, 105.3, 106.7. The duct dissipated the next day, but returned on June 20 to 23, bringing LA thru Tijuana again, of which San Clemente 107.9 was the only now logging. No openings have been noted since. Distances for these 25 catches range from about 2345 miles for Lompoc to about 2500 miles for Tijuana. Signal strengths were generally low but sometimes reached full quieting and full lit the Sony's LED. I have subsequently added an CM 4408 beam so should do better the next time. Of particular note is that these catches were heard at just 500 ft, above sea level. Conventional wisdom holds that the CA/HI duct is usable only from the 8000 foot level on Mauna Loa, and indeed there is undoubtedly more FM and TV DX up at that site, judging by reports of the hams who word 144 MHz and higher from there. Eventually, I will have to try driving up the volcano to try FM. The duct should yield DX for California listeners as well, except that QRM is much worse on that end. The KOAS translator K276DG 103.1 is the only FM transmitter at a high altitude on this island (the Big Island) situated at the Humuula Sheep Station at 6000' with stacked yagis beaming FSE [ESE?] (note that K276 DG is in the center of the island, nowhere near the location shown in the FM Atlas). It might also be possible to hear KKUA 90.7 on Maui as it's situated part way up Mt. Haleakala. The hams conduct duct liaison on 28.885 MHz, and I can usually be found there doing 6 meter liaison. Well, that's the report for now. ---------------------------- Rod also mentioned to me that Shel at one time also had tropo reception from Imperial, CA. Now, Imperial is east of San Diego by maybe 100 miles. And to get from SD to El Centro (Imperial is close by), you have to cross some mighty steep mountains (I drove that route once on I-8). So, Rod wondered if the mountains between SD and El Centro are too high for tropo to cross over. If they are NOT, then is it unrealistic to expect that Rod in Sacramento would have a prayer of a chance to hear some HI tropo from his end? From what I've learned here from Bob Cooper, people on both ends of the duct must be inside the duct to hear the stations on the other side. And that the ducts can occur at various elevations and can be various widths. If I understand this right, there must not be any obstructions between the CA location and the HI location. But what makes us wonder about all of this is Remington's reception of FM from Imperial, CA. There are 6000' mtns in the way. How was this reception possible? Want to take a stab at these, Bob?? (Mike Bugaj - Enfield, CT USA, May 28, WTFDA via DXLD) I've driven the California section of Interstate 8 dozens of times, and those mountains are a formidable barrier; you can't hear any San Diego FM stations on a car radio from El Centro (best known as the birthplace of Cher). Not only are the mountains high, but there is also a HUGE contrast between the cooler, moist marine air found along the coast and the warmer, dry air found east of the mountains in the desert areas around El Centro; when it's in the 60s and foggy in San Diego, it's often over 100 with humidity in the teens in El Centro. I just don't see how an east-west duct can form along that path, and El Centro is over 100 miles inland as well. Sheldon is an experienced DXer and reliable reporter, so I would be reluctant to dismiss his report out of hand. But reception of an El Centro translator in Hawaii via tropo IMO comes really close to the "it just isn't possible" category (Harry Helms W7HLH, Las Vegas, NV DM26, ibid.) First, I'd like to hear from Shel himself that this HAS happened! The report seems to be several layers down from the source. Now, assuming it did happen, the hams have found on 144 and 432 MHz that stations as far north as the Seattle area and as far INLAND as Reno, Nevada had been able to "couple" into the duct when and if the conditions are "just right." For example, K6QXY lives in Santa Rosa, inland from the Pacific quite a ways but well elevated and at least half of the time the "first reports" of the amateur 144/432 "beacons" from the Hawaii mountain top originate with him - Bob is very good at what he does and it may be (1) he is more alert than others, (2) he has monster antennas - true, or, (3) his inland elevated location has a "duct into a duct" coupling effect. Sacramento is barely feet ASL but hams in Sac (and Modesto and up the valley to Redding) HAVE in fact been able to make it; even east of Sac to Reno over the top of the -not 6,000 feet - but 9,500 feet Sierra Nevada mountain range (admittedly only once but it did happen!). The most important point is to KNOW when it is happening and WHEN to look/listen. One of the many ham radio VHF reflector sites is good for this function. Ref: (Harry H.) "I've driven the California section of Interstate 8 dozens of times…`` It is that CONTRAST between the hot dry air of the inland Imperial valley region and the moist offshore air masses which creates an overruning of the inland skies. That contrast in turn creates a duct from inland to the coastal area. It is not common but it does happen! And, one duct into another is not that rare and given the geography of Southern California, a duct that goes from Imperial westward to the coast at some elevation is in fact not unusual during August-September (a side effect of a weather condition called "Santa Ana Wind"). If the Imperial signal(s) can couple into a duct that is higher than the intervening mountains, and thereby go westward where at some altitude (doubtless 3,000 feet or above) it "couples" into a trans-Pacific duct, the "mystery" is explained without any excessive stretching of the basic laws of propagation physics. As for Shel's 500 foot ASL location (and his simplistic receiving system), hams have worked from coast line California to coast line Hawaii on a few (that means not many but some none the less) occasions with mobile rigs on BOTH ends. This is not a "it NEVER happens this way" world - it is a "it SELDOM happens this way world." One aspect of this amazes me. There has NEVER been even one report of reception from a Hawaii station by a West Coast DXer. A lot of people out there seem to have their antennas stuck in the wrong direction or wasting time making notes on local weather conditions! Best, (Bob Cooper, New Zealand, ibid.) SPORADIC E ``GOING LONG`` Ref Gerard Westerberg and others commenting on beyond Es distance reception at the end of an (intense) Es opening. ``One characteristic of Es is that maximum path distance will occur just below the MUF cutoff. That makes sense because that's the point at which refraction is just sufficient to return the signal to earth. In most cases we can tell that we are reaching the end of an Es event when the path distances "go long.`` --- Once again I strongly urge members to acquire a copy of "Beyond Line of Sight" - "A History of VHF Propagation from the pages of QST" by the ARRL. And in this instance page 146 entitled "Ionospheric Scatter By Field-Aligned Irregularities at 144 MHz." FAI is a little understood artefact of normal Es occurring just as and shortly after the normal E layer propagation has ceased to work. It is of interest here as it at least in time sequence dovetails neatly with the observations reported by Westerberg, Doug Smith and others - reception beyond normal Es distances just as the Es event was terminating. FAI involves a scattering mechanism in the E layer, thought to be the result of the Es cloud breaking up and dissipating perhaps to a slightly higher (more elevated) altitude where there is a momentary (may last up to 2-1/2 hours) recombining ALONG LINES OF MAGNETIC FORCE. The essence is signals at least to 144 MHz (amateur two meter band) have been found to exist over paths in the Es distance region (up to 1400 miles nominally) on around half of the days when 50 MHz Es occurring later in the afternoon/early evening has just died. Note that during the 50 MHz opening itself, normal Es, there was no 144 MHz Es event noted. It is after the event when the FAI propagation seems to appear. Amateur observations dating back to 1978 indicate that FAI is most likely to occur on more or less east-west paths, that FAI events are no more likely to occur after a very intense direct Es opening (i.e. having Es MUFs to 144 MHz does not appear to enhance the likelihood that 144 MHz FAI will follow the break up of "normal" Es). FAI signals tend to be quite stable (not with heavy fading, often with no or very slow fading other than a gradual build up, levelling off, then gradual build down), and at amateur 144 MHz equipment levels, varying from just out of the receiver noise to as much as 30 dB (a bunch in anyone's book) above receiver noise. There may be nothing more than coincidence here but Doug Smith and Gerard's loggings at least fit the time frame for FAI. And almost nothing is understood about FAI - if you think Es is a mystery, try to find authoritative references on VHF FAI! Anyone who really wants to understand the basics of wave propagation needs to have a copy of the afore mentioned ARRL publication. Nothing else comes close to establishing the "limits" of VHF (and UHF) wave propagation in such plain talk language (Bob Cooper in NZ, WTFDA via DXLD) AURORA ALERT Check for unusual propagation tonight, and if clear and atropical enough, look for visual auroral displays; see previous issue. WTFDA members and I were seeing auroral hash on TV and hearing it on FM around 2330 UT May 29 (gh, DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-093, May 28, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3e.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn CONTINENT OF MEDIA 03-03! New edition is now available, first broadcast on RFPI 7445, 15039: Thu 2000, Fri 0200, 0830; Sat 2130, Sun 0330, 0930 Also soon via DXing.com: {Stream) http://www.dxing.com/com/com0303.ram (Download) http://www.dxing.com/com/com0303.rm And via our site: (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/com0303.ram (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/com0303.rm (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/com0303.html (not yet available) FIRST AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1184: Wed 2200 on WBCQ 7415, 17495-CUSB Thu 2030 on WWCR 15825 Fri 1930 on RFPI 15039 WRN ONDEMAND from Fri: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html from early UT Thu [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1184.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1184.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1184h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1184h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1184.html ** ALGERIA. ALGERIAN RADIO LINKS UP SEPARATED FAMILIES IN QUAKE ZONE By JULIANE VON REPPERT-BISMARCK, The Associated Press, 5/26/03 7:39 AM ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) -- Telephone lines were down and cell phone service was spotty. So Dahbia Abderahne found another way to track down her family in Algeria's ravaged quake zone: the radio. Since a powerful earthquake struck the region east of Algiers on Wednesday night, families separated by the destruction have been turning to radio stations and newspapers as a way to get in touch. State-run Chaîne 3, for example, has been taking calls round the clock -- at a rate of about 150 an hour -- from people desperate to contact relatives and friends in the damaged areas. The messages are then broadcast on the air. The Internet site of the El Watan newspaper has also been inundated with e-mails asking about relatives. The paper it was passing the messages to radio and TV for broadcast. At Chaîne 3, some calls are simple condolence messages to devastated communities. Some describe apocalyptic images of crushed buildings and bereaved families. But many of the callers were like Abderahne -- searching for the missing. Most of the calls concerned people in Boumerdes, where about half of the quake's victims died. "I am looking for my family. They live in Boumerdes. I haven't heard from them since Wednesday," Abderahne said Saturday, her tired voice breaking on a mobile phone line. "Could you please tell them to give me a sign of life? Just a small sign." On Saturday, a female newscaster repeatedly asked for the parents of a five-year old boy to come and collect him from Algiers' Belle-Aire clinic, where he had regained consciousness that morning. Not all the messages were sad on Chaîne 3. "This is a message for Yasmina Merdez," said one caller. "I live beside her daughters ... I saw them in the street today. I want her to know her daughters are fine." "Thanks be to God," came the presenter's reply. Thousands of e-mail messages have also poured into the station from all over the world -- France, Britain, Spain and Canada -- as immigrant Algerians ask for news of families left behind in North Africa. El Watan said a TV studio was being set up in Boumerdes solely to receive and distribute messages from inside Algeria and from Algerians living abroad (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. PLUG PULLED ON ABC CHANNELS 27may03 THE ABC will cancel its digital channels as part of a $25 million spending cut. ABC managing director Russell Balding told a Senate committee yesterday the national broadcaster had no choice after its funding was not increased in this month's Federal Budget. The ABC wanted an extra $250 million from the Government over three years but got nothing. Mr Balding said the corporation could not afford the $7 million ABC Kids channel and Fly TV youth channel, which it paid for through a one-off reallocation. "There's no current identified ongoing source of funding to maintain those channels beyond the end of the financial year," he told the Budget Estimates hearing. The ABC will also shelve plans to expand Radio National and Triple J coverage. Mr Balding said there were "no more rabbits left in the hat" after overspending on digital technology. He said he had warned the Government several times that programs and services were under threat and that up to 38 jobs were likely to go because of these decisions. The ABC board expected to decide the cuts at its July meeting. "I don't give up . . . I view the triennial funding outcome as a minimum level of funding for the ABC for the next three years," Mr Balding said. "We need additional funding for content . . . it's no good trying to reach all Australians if we don't have content there." The ABC overspent $20 million-$25 million on its digital rollout and now had to find this money in its forward budget. Communications Minister Richard Alston said the ABC had no chance of an increase in the recent Budget. He rejected any blame for the demise of the digital programming, saying the ABC should have planned ahead once it decided to trial the technology. The Federal Opposition said the ABC's announcement was a "digital disaster". "The ABC multi-channels were meant to drive digital uptake in Australia," said communications spokesman Lindsay Tanner. "There is now even less reason for Australians to convert to digital television." © Queensland Newspapers (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ABC DIGITAL DEAD; KIDS NET SHUTTERED May 27, 2003 2:01pm SYDNEY --- The Australian Broadcasting Corp. is quitting digital broadcasting and will shutter ABC Kids and youth signal Fly TV, after almost two years and close to zero eyeballs. The decision comes after the government capped the pubcaster's funding at $460 million a year. The ABC, banned from accepting paid advertising, had launched the digital services without extra coin. "Given the paucity of incentives for the public to take up digital television, the ABC considered that a dedicated children's and youth television service could attract funding support from the government," ABC managing director Russell Balding said. "Unfortunately this has not been the case. "This is the first of several hard decisions the ABC will make. Maintaining the comprehensiveness of ABC broadcasting is becoming increasingly difficult with funding today 30% less than it was in 1985/86." Digital TV was introduced in Australia in January 2001. But consumer uptake has been slow because the equipment is expensive and there were few services on offer. The government hopes the advent of digital feevee services at the end of this year will stimulate consumer interest. Copyright (c) 2003 Reed Business Information - US (via Variety via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** CANADA. I'm hearing CFRX here at the moment on 6070 at 2320. Hard to tell though whether they are on reduced power or not, but definitely on. 5/27/03 (Steve Lare, Holland, MI, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hello Glenn, Per your question, "Is anyone hearing CFRX 6070", I can reply, "Yes". 6070, CFRX, 1219, May 28, Relay of 1010 AM with promo for the "Edmonton Street Festival" at tune-in, ID as "News Talk 1010". "Ted Wallason (sp?) Show " with news of SARS in Toronto and its economic impact, talks with correspondent from WBZ 1030, Boston MA. regarding SARS concerns in US. Fair signal with fades and "bubble" jammer!! (Scott R Barbour Jr-NH, USA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. CBC RADIO REPORTER BEGAN CAREER IN MARITIMES UPDATED AT 4:55 PM EDT Tuesday, May. 27, 2003 Montreal -- Veteran CBC Radio reporter David McLauchlin has died of brain cancer at the age of 55. The network's national reporter based in Montreal, he was known for his features from across Canada and around the world. Most recently, Mr. McLauchlin reported from Afghanistan as part of a documentary series and last year won an award from the Canadian Association of Journalists for a report on the high rates of brain cancer in firefighters. In 1996, he was the only journalist to participate in a healing ceremony that ended the long feud between the Dene and Inuit of NWT. Mr. McLauchlin began his career with CBC Radio in the Maritimes where he was a writer-broadcaster for Information Morning in Saint John. Later, he was field producer for Sunday Morning in Winnipeg and a reporter for Radio News for the Prairies. (c) 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** CANADA. Ross Porter, Canada's top jazz broadcaster, joins CanWest Porter becomes VP Programming of COOL 99.1 FM and soon to be launched cable channel COOL TV [Winnipeg]. . . http://www.newswire.ca/releases/May2003/26/c5720.html (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) Canadian angle on Metropolitan Opera: see USA ** CHINA [non]. Re CRI using Brazil. Well, according to the HFCC, for what it's worth, CRI do indeed use Brazil as a relay: CRI 0100 0200 1234567 14,16 9665 250 BRA B 300303 261003 D RTC CRI 0300 0400 1234567 10-12 9665 250 BRA B 300303 261003 D RTC As you can see this information is supposed to be 'in date' and supposedly correct. Getting detailed information from CRI regarding sites and relays is not that easy. According to HFCC, CRI uses transmitting facilities in the following countries: China, Brazil, Canada, Cuba, Spain (1 transmission from 0200-0400 on 9690), France (ISS), French Guiana, Mali and Russia. I hope this clears up where the confusion is coming from. 73 Sean Regards, Sean D. Gilbert Editor: Shortwave Guide International Broadcasting Editor: WRTH World Radio Tv Handbook - THE Directory of International Broadcasting Email:- wrth.skeds@ntlworld.com Web:- http://www.wrth.com (hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** C I S [and non]. FOREIGN RELAY VIA SHORT WAVE TRANSMITTERS OF THE COUNTRIES OF CIS 30/03/2003 - 25/10/2003 kHz UTC kW Radiostation Armenia 5855 2610-1740 100 TWR [1610-?] 6240 1200-1215 100 TWR 9365 (7550*) 2300-2400 500 RFA 9365 0100-0300 500 RFA 11510 1500-1600 500 RFA 11590 1100-1400 500 RFA 11975 1400-1500 100 VOA 15625 1400-1500 100 RFA 17485 9600-0700 500 RFA [0600-?] Moldova 7460 0230-0315 500 RPD 7480 1800-1845 500 RPD 11530 0800-1600 500 MSP Kazakhstan 5910 1430-1530 200 DVB 9355 1530-1600 200 VOO (Tue, Fri) 11515 1300-1400 2000 RFA 11520 1400-1500 200 RFA 11560 2330-0030 200 RFA 11570 (7455*) 2230-2330 200 RFA 13830 0000-0100 200 RFA 15135 2300-2350 500 DWL 15625 1230-1330 200 RFA 15635 1100-1200 200 RFA 15660 0030-0130 200 RFA 17485 1000-1400 500 DWL 17770 1430-1455 500 DWL 19 m* 1215-1300 500 VOT Tajikistan 4760 0100-0200 100 RFE 4760 1630-1700 100 RFE 4995 1400-1600 100 RFE 5860 1400-1600 100 RFE 5860 1900-2100 100 RFE 6140 1900-2000 200 RFE 7185 0300-0400 100 RFE 7295 0200-0300 100 RFE 7465 1600-1700 200 RFA 9350 0100-0200 200 RFA 9370 1600-1700 200 RFA 11520 0100-0200 200 RFA 11520 (7530*) 1800-2100 500 RFA 11540 (9975*) 2330-0030 200 RFA 13835 1500-1600 200 RFA 15680 (7540*) 2300-2400 500 RFA 15680 (11540*) 1300-1500 200 RFA 15580 (7540*) 1500-2200 500 RFA 15695 (9395*) 2300-2400 200 RFA 15695 1100-1400 200 RFA 15695 (13830*) 0100-0300 200 RFA 15705(11535*) 1400-1500 200 RFA 17495 0300-0700 500 RFA 17510 0600-0700 200 RFA 17525 0300-0700 500 RFA 17525 (11540*) 0030-0130 200 RFA 19 m** 1215-1300 100 VOT Uzbekistan 7430 1500-1530 200 BBC 9445 2315-0200 200 TWR 9445 1115-1630 200 TWR 9865 1330-1445 200 BBC 11850 0100-0400 100 VIL 12065 1330-1425 100 RNW 12065 1430-1600 100 VAT 12075 1430-1625 100 RNW 13745 0100-0130 200 BBC 17540 0100-0200 200 HLR (Fri) 17695 1200-1230 100 RVI 21780 0800-0830 200 BBC 13 m* 1215-1300 100 VOT 16 m* 1430-1515 100 VOT * = From 07/09/2003 ** = different frequencies in the mentioned metre band. (Nikolay Rudnev, Belgorodskaya obl., Rus DX May 25 via DXLD) see also RUSSIA ** COSTA RICA. [RFPI-Vista] RFPI ONLINE NEWSLETTER PART ONE Dear friends and listeners, This month we are going to be sending out three parts to our Vista Online as we have been so very busy and we know that we have missed out a month! The first part that follows this initial section is an article written by Jean Parker who represented RFPI at the AMARC conference in Nepal in February. Here at the station, the Peace Journalism and Progressive Media Through Radio courses are continuing as RFPI works towards adding as many non-embedded journalists to the world's media as possible. Action around the station is intense as June begins, bringing a whole host of new people, students and volunteers into the station. We would like to welcome Emily Morales onto the RFPI staff as Operations Manager this month. She brings us vast business, educational and administrative experience and is a welcome addition to the team. Our Program Director Naomi Fowler went to Nicaragua last month and amongst other things helped deliver a production workshop and give a talk on RFPI in Managua. For the report on her trip, see Part Two of the newsletter coming your way soon! Four staff members from RFPI last month visited and spoke with the Huetar indigenous people in the local area by the radio station. We are going to work with them in setting up a community radio station starting with an experimental weekend of broadcasting next month to generate interest in the community and involve as many people in the area as possible. We also plan to work with them in an oral history project and a project to conserve their language, which is dying out. As you may have heard, Radio For Peace International has started up a 15 minute daily news broadcast focusing on freedom of expression news from around the world as well as events in Central America, a region which seems to be off the radar of most media organizations. It is broadcast Monday to Friday at 2130 UT and it is the beginning of a greater focus on in-house programming regularly coming your way at RFPI. NEEDED!!! Computers/lap tops of 400 MHz or more with a minimum hard drive capacity of 10GB. Studio and hand held microphones, headphones. Fundraising and Contact We wish to invite all our readers, members and listeners to contact us here at RFPI if they have any questions or comments about Vista Online, our programming, or the station in general. If any of you have comments or ideas on how we can improve our service to you, please send us a note via e-mail or traditional mail. We thank you for your continuing support, both financial and moral. We need your contributions to keep an independent voice like ours on the air. RFPI is the ONLY progressive independent voice on shortwave in the world, we have a unique schedule of programming and important visions for future projects and work at the station. Fundraising at RFPI is on a continual basis. If you can offer financial, material or equipment support in any way, please contact us. You can do so via: Radio For Peace Internacional, PO Box 75, Ciudad Colón, Costa Rica, Central America Tel. +506 - 249 1821 Fax. +506 - 249 1095 Web site: http://www.rfpi.org Email: info@rfpi.org For Pay Pal donations with a visa credit, visa debit or mastercard, you can click on the Pay Pal icon on http://www.rfpi.org Here follows Jean Parker's article from Nepal. [q.v.] In Peace, The RFPI Staff (RFPI-Vista mailing list May 27 via DXLD) ** CUBA. 590, Radio Musical Nacional, Santa Clara, Villa Clara; 0100+ May 28, noting tonight (a few days after reactivation but with Rebelde audio) reverting to the original Musical network of classical music, great audio. [non] 530, CLANDESTINE (FLORIDA/CUBA); Per my contact (who is an engineer at Radio Martí at Marathon), the EC-130E "Commando Solo" aircraft MW channel used last Tuesday was 530 kHz. Not sure how that could have cut through Vision Cristiana from the Turks & Caicos, but... (Terry L Krueger, Clearwater, Florida, May 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. CASTRO EXIGE A EEUU QUE RESPETE FRECUENCIAS RADIALES sábado 24 de mayo, 10:59 AM LA HABANA Copyright 2003 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. En medio de un altercado por el uso de las frecuencias radiales entre Cuba y Estados Unidos, el presidente Fidel Castro exigió a la nación vecina que respete el derecho internacional sobre telecomunicaciones, al tiempo que ofrecía planes de educación para alfabetizar por radio a los habitantes de la Florida. Castro reafirmó en la noche del viernes las declaraciones de su cancillería que protestó ante Washington y ante organismos mundiales por la retransmisión el pasado martes de la Radio y la Televisión Martí -- con sede en la Florida y de corte anticastrista -- desde un avión de la Fuerza Aérea norteamericana. "Hacen mal en subestimar a este país", dijo Castro vestido con su uniforme verde olivo durante una de las habituales Mesas Redondas. Castro calificó de "cinismo" y "alevosía" las acciones estadounidenses de usar una nave para enviar las señales, que habitualmente no llegan a la isla por el bloqueo de ondas que aplican los técnicos locales. Según Cuba, Washington le envió una nota diplomática diciéndole que había advertido al piloto José Basulto del grupo anticastrista Hermanos al Rescate, que sería sancionado si con su aeroplano buscaba enviar TV y Radio Martí a la isla, como lo había declarado a la prensa. Sin embargo, el mismo gobierno de Estados Unidos preparaba un gran avión de la Fuerza Aérea "para hacer lo mismo que le habían dicho al otro que era un bandidaje", dijo Castro. "Y los dos volaron a ver si nos confundían", expresó el mandatario. La señal contenía también un mensaje del presidente George Bush en saludo al 20 de mayo, día de la independencia cubana de España, en el cual hacía votos por una pronta "liberación" de la isla. "Nosotros exigimos que se le exija al gobierno de ese país que cumpla con las normas (del derecho sobre telecomunicaciones)", expresó Castro quien indicó que no se desea afectar a emisoras de onda corta de Estados Unidos teniéndola que interferir. En la ocasión Castro anunció la extensión del "Canal Educativo", de reciente creación a todo el país, además informó sobre la creación de uno nuevo para el año entrante. Cuba no tiene pautas publicitarias en sus televisoras, todas en manos del estado. Tras considerar los alcances de la emisora para fines no comerciales el mandatario aseguró que su país cuenta con programas para enseñar a leer y escribir en cinco idiomas. Castro comparó el sistema de educación cubano con el de Estados Unidos y en especial el de la Florida. En este sentido mostró cables de agencias de prensa que dan cuenta de las bajas al presupuesto gubernamental académico en ese estado del sur norteamericano y el impacto sobre las minorías hispanas y negras. Castro destacó que en la Florida faltan más de 6.000 profesores anualmente. Dijo que según el diario Miami Herald, en "más de 142.000 de las escuelas públicas del sur de la Florida no saben leer..." "Nosotros les ayudamos y le enseñamos a leer y escribir a todos esos muchachos", exclamó Castro, "Bush puede seguir bajando el presupuesto". "Si quiere puede bajarlo a la mitad y nosotros le garantizamos por radio y por televisión que esos muchachos aprenden a leer y escribir todos...y estaríamos dispuestos a hacerlo tan gratuitamente como lo podemos hacer con un país cualquiera del tercer mundo, porque allí (en la Florida) hay unos cuantos terceros mundos", expresó el mandatario. (via Héctor García Bojorge, DF, Conexión Digital via DXLD) But wouldn`t Commie propaganda be included in Cuban reading programs for third-world Floridians? This might offend (gh, DXLD) ** ECUADOR [non]. Hi Glenn, I´m a little concerned and worried about how to hear my favourite DX-programme DX Partyline from HCJB, the Voice of the Andes after close down of English broadcasts to Europe and North America in the end of May. Last Saturday May 24 1450 UT I heard few last minutes of DXPL with interview of Jeff White of WRMI-R Miami International. My wish is HCJB will continue with DX-Partyline from Kununurra relay station. Has anybody ever heard WRMI-R Miami International?! 73´s (Jouko Huuskonen, Turku, FINLAND, May 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) If they didn`t make it clear, it was made clear on Viva Miami that DXPL will continue on Kununurra; seems likely WRMI will be one(?) of the US stations carrying it, but this has not been made public just yet; of course, I hear it all the time --- but WRMI is not intended for Europe (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** EGYPT. 17675, Radio Cairo, 1215, May 28, Sign-on routine noted with ID and frequency schedule, I wasn't able to copy much else due to fading and massive QRM "splatter" via Radio Finland, 17670, to South America with a whopping 500 kW (Scott R Barbour Jr, NH,USA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GHANA. RADIO WORLD - Sunday May 25, 2003 SOUND GBC (listen to the programme via audio link on this page) Have you recognised this signature tune? It's an old one from GBC, the Ghana Broadcasting Corporation. Ghana is the place we're going to this week. Recently women from all over the world travelled to the country for a conference on and for women in radio and television. An Mulders was there too. I'm sure some of you will recognise the name from the days when An was a member of the Brussels Calling Team, as we were called then. She met with very interesting women in the world of broadcasting. Paulina Azupwa works for the local station in the Upper East region of Ghana. You will hear how radio in rural areas in Africa is different from what we are used to. Many people are illiterate and radio always has an educational mission. Also the programmes produced by Paulina: SOUND Paulina Azupwa Mrs Paulina Azupwa of the Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, producer at the local station for the Upper East region. We'll hear from other delegates at the conference in Ghana in coming editions of this programme. FRANS VOSSEN Listen broadband: http://www.vrt.be/wm/rvi/rw_HI.asx Listen narrowband: http://www.vrt.be/wm/rvi/rw_LO.asx (from http://www.rvi.be/rvi_master/uk/radio_world/index.html via gh, DXLD) The May 18 show, if any, never appeared on the website (gh) ** HUNGARY. Hello Glenn, In light of my previous report of a Radio Budapest QSL and letter regarding station restructuring, I am surprised to read that others noted I had a "bad" QSL experience. How so? All prior reports were verified. It was just that my very first Radio Budapest report was the last one to be QSLed. I have received various replies from around the world in as little as four days, up to 1 1/2 years and I am just as pleased as punch to find them in my mailbox. I am also fortunate to have QSLs from 4 of the 6 countries Mr. Chambers lists, (Vietnam, Mongolia, Syria, Korea DPR) in addition to several from Africa and Latin America for reports written in English. Sam Barto, NASWA QSL Editor, provided me with much valuable assistance when I took up this aspect of the DXing hobby. First, be patient! Stations are busy producing radio programs. Two, because it is expensive and most stations are cash-strapped, include return postage. Third, be polite and ask nicely. You will sometimes be amazed at what you receive (Scott R Barbour Jr, Intervale, NH USA, May 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDIA. The unusual relay of AIR Patna via Delhi on 11620 kHz (due to problems of MW transmitter of Patna) which was on air for the past 2 weeks, seems to be over. Just now at 1515 UTC 11620 is noted with External Service programs like in the past. For the last couple of days I had monitored AIR Patna reactive on 621 kHz and there were no announcements about the SW frequency lately. Even at 1130 UTC today I heard the sign on of evening transmission of Patna relayed on 11620. ===== 73 (Jose Jacob, VU2JOS/AT0J National Institute of Amateur Radio Box 1555, Somajiguda Hyderabad 500082, India, dx_india via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. Had another check on 27 May on 6770 kHz and again found the previously heard unidentified station sign-on at 0124 UT with its military-style drumming. As before, the jamming came in almost immediately. However, this time noted that the jammer jumped from 6770 to 6750 at 0128, with the unidentified station underneath. A very quick check found the same station frequency-hopping as well between 5650 and 5670 kHz to avoid jamming. The latter is, of course, one of the frequencies used by Voice of the Mojahed in the past. Didn't that station disappear shortly after the coalition entered Iraq? Presumably it's back, still from Iraq? (Tony Rogers, Birmingham - UK, AOR 7030+ / LW, BDXC-UK via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. 9450 Radio Bopeshawa (Radio Forward). My letter to their address in Canada (A.K.P.I., P. O. Box 491, Domains Postal Station, North York, Ontario M3C 2T4) was returned after ten days as 'return to sender moved/address unknown' So that postal avenue is closed (Edward Kusalik, VE6EFK, DX'er since 1965, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** IRAQ. SHIITES PLAN OWN RADIO AND TV SERVICE IN IRAQ According to the Financial Times Hassan Grebawy, head of the Shiite Centre for Public Islam, claims he has received permission from US forces to start radio and TV broadcasts. The stations will be based at the al-Hikmah mosque in a Shiite suburb of Baghdad, and will initially serve a radius of 50km around the capital. Plans are under way to extend the broadcasts to the entire country. 55% of Iraq's population are Shiites. Mr Grebawy has made clear that the broadcasts, to be called "Baghdad Reports" will be introduced with the symbol of Iraqi state television, and will not be friendly towards the US presence. His followers have frequently organised mass demonstrations in Baghdad calling for an end to US occupation. But he produced a letter from the US 1st Brigade, which is responsible for security in Baghdad, giving permission for a radio station. Mr Grebawy says he also has received verbal permission for a TV station. If the letter is genuine, it could indicate that the US appreciates the help of the Shiite hierarchy in Baghdad in helping with the reconstruction of essential services. But, if the content of the programmes is hostile to the US as Mr Grebawy implies - saying this merely reflects the opinion of the man in the street - it could spell problems for the US interim administration further down the line. (Media Network May 28 via DXLD) ** IRAQ. IRAQIS UNHAPPY WITH U.S. SIGNALS INTERFERENCE FROM AMERICANS AMONG CHALLENGES FOR POST-HUSSEIN TV By Peter Slevin, Washington Post Staff Writer, Monday, May 26, 2003; Page A13 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A38682-2003May25.html BAGHDAD -- Putting Iraqi television back on the air has proved to be no simple matter, from the electrical outages to the makeshift staff assembled in the postwar chaos. Telephones do not work, and news is hard to confirm. And then there is the dispute over the editorial influence of U.S. occupation authorities. The U.S. ambassador to Morocco, Margaret Tutwiler, was dispatched to Baghdad to polish and package the U.S. occupation. But she triggered a rebellion earlier this month when she and a young White House aide in Baghdad, Dan Senor, intervened with strong judgments about programs and said that broadcasts would be reviewed in advance by the wife of a prominent Kurdish militia leader, according to several people involved. Iraqis and U.S.-paid television consultants called it censorship. They protested that the supervision by Tutwiler and Senor violated the concepts of liberty and independence that President Bush said would undergird Iraq's future. Most of all, they objected to the idea that the Americans thought they knew what was best for Iraqi viewers. "Dependence on any governmental body, whether it is Iraqi or non- Iraqi, will lead to another dictatorship and will kill democracy," said Ahmad Rikabi, 33, a foreign-born Iraqi recruited from exile to become a network anchor. "If we really want democracy, we should protect this child that is the Iraqi media." The station is now broadcasting news and documentary pieces. The tempest, at least for the time being, has died down. But the enduring tension over control reflects the network's importance in a country where national television was an instrument of the state for decades before Saddam Hussein was pushed from power by allied troops. In the aftermath of the government's collapse, nothing has arisen to take its place, due to the wartime destruction of broadcasting towers and subsequent looting of production facilities. A foreign official in the U.S. occupation authority said he thinks Tutwiler relied too heavily on Hero Talabani -- wife of Jalal Talabani, who heads the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan -- who "has convinced them all that she is the great arbiter of Iraqi taste." Instead of promoting an Iraqi-run program, the official said, Tutwiler and Senor are "effectively acting like the station manager and the news director." The two Americans opposed Rikabi as anchor and objected to the reading of verses from the Koran, staffers and advisers said. Then there was the time that Senor voiced the opinion that an inexperienced staff member was unprepared to interview the new U.S. reconstruction chief, L. Paul Bremer III. So Senor posed the questions himself as the camera rolled, a reconstruction official said. "If Dan Rather didn't show up for an interview with George Bush," the official asked, "would Ari Fleischer conduct the interview?" A U.S. adviser said "it was not a good idea" to allow Hero Talabani to screen the broadcast, given that her husband has long fought and maneuvered for Kurdish independence from Baghdad's Arab-controlled government. "You can't go to a person who has a known political agenda," he said. "There were lots of people who said this was not a good idea." But the adviser said in Tutwiler's defense that her goal was to make the U.S.-funded program "more professional" at a time when Iraqis remain uncertain about the U.S. occupation and the country's future. Talabani was to "provide a quick check to see whether the tone was right," he said. When many people objected, "the idea was kiboshed." A senior Kurdish official said that Tutwiler visited the Talabanis' elegant rented house in Baghdad several times and that Senor spoke with her frequently by telephone. "It's not censorship; it's advice," said the official, who said he believed that the Americans needed Talabani's help. "The problem with the coalition is they think like a coalition, not like Iraqis." An occupation authority official said that Talabani was one of "many Iraqis familiar with the media" consulted by U.S. advisers responsible for starting the station. The official said the authority is consulted about programming before it airs but does not review specific pieces in advance. Tutwiler has returned to Morocco. Senor said, however, that the U.S. authorities have clear goals. "This is the first time in decades that the Iraqi people have been able to turn on the TV and not be subjected to Saddam Hussein- controlled media," Senor said. "Our priority is to build out infrastructure, develop broadcasting capabilities and develop systems so a free and robust media can flourish in Iraq." To the consternation of network staffers, holdovers from the Hussein era have tested producers' nerves by making their own editorial choices at the remote transmission site, at one point putting the station's prewar logo on the postwar broadcast. On a recent evening, the team raced to piece together two hours of news and features against a deadline imposed by a scheduled electrical outage. It was the day Senor interviewed Bremer. When the power went out early, one Iraqi journalist cracked, "Beautiful. Tell Bremer to give us some electricity to put his statement on the air." Two weeks earlier, the station's satellite dish burned out. The staff borrowed one from the BBC, but it overheated. As a production team was broadcasting the country's first postwar soccer match, someone purposely cut an expensive cable. Technical problems have limited the broadcast range to roughly a 75-mile radius of Baghdad. The equipment is so old that "some of it ought to be in the Newseum in Washington, D.C. It's that old," said an adviser, who like several others asked not to be identified by name for fear of alienating Tutwiler or influential members of Bremer's staff. "It will not be a professional news show yet, but we hope it will be a here-are-the- facts-ma'am show that people can have some trust in." Even before the dispute over editorial influence, everyone agreed that credibility was the goal. But they differed greatly about how to achieve it. On one side were the Iraqis and most of their international advisers. On the other was, most prominently, Tutwiler, a veteran Washington image-maker who has been asked to run the State Department's office of public diplomacy. At the peak of the dispute, one well-placed reconstruction agency adviser marveled that Tutwiler and Senor had achieved "what the White House has been dreaming of for years . . . controlling the evening news." With a measure of admiration mixed with his dismay, he called Tutwiler a "one-woman psychological operations team." Tutwiler -- with the concurrence of Bremer and Talabani, staffers said -- thought it would be a mistake to allow Rikabi to anchor the broadcast, fearing that he would be perceived as a U.S.-imposed outsider. Rikabi was born to Iraqi expatriates in Prague in 1969. He spent seven years in Swedish radio and became London bureau chief of Radio Free Iraq, but he never lived in Iraq. The network's staff and the international advisers favored Rikabi, who they felt had paid his dues by spending most of his young life opposing Hussein's government, albeit at a distance. Rikabi and his supporters asked what the alternative was -- someone from Iraq's co- opted television past teaching Iraqis about broadcasting freedom? That dispute was one in a series that angered the Iraqi staff members and some of their foreign advisers. Others involved the Koran, Talabani and a series of man-in-the-street interviews deemed overly critical of the U.S. occupiers. They were held pending on-air replies from the reconstruction team. According to Don North, a Fairfax resident who is an adviser to the television station and formerly worked for NBC and ABC, the Iraqi staff had held an intensive debate about the Koran, with some saying that the broadcast "must absolutely have readings of the Koran" and others that religion and newscast credibility cannot mix. The staff agreed to a series of limited readings. "These are all Iraqi decisions," North said. "This is the last thing I want to do, tell them whether they can have their Koran or not." But Americans at the reconstruction agency said no to the readings. At about the same time, the staff and advisers learned that Hero Talabani was being consulted by Tutwiler and had been invited to review the programs in advance. They threatened to walk out and leaked word to the international news media. Tutwiler & Co. compromised. The parties agreed that Rikabi would stay off the air the first week, that the station would look for additional personalities and that the early programs would be treated as pilots. The Koran would be read, as the station staff preferred. Talabani could offer advice but would not see scripts or tapes in advance. And Senor, several people said, promised no censorship. Correspondent Scott Wilson in Baghdad contributed to this report. © 2003 The Washington Post Company (via Kraig Krist, Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** IRAQ [and non]. KUWAIT HEARD RELAYING RADIO FREE IRAQ Checking Radio Kuwait today around 1525 UT on 15495 heard the usual programs of Radio Kuwait, a program talking about the new situation in Iraq. But suddenly at 1530 heard the ID "Huna Idha`at Al- Iraq Alhur, Idha`at Europa Al-hura" in English. This is Radio free Iraq, Radio Free Europe!! I'm still listening to it, 1555 UT and still on. I never knew that Kuwait Relays RFI/RFE/RL !?? is that a new thing?? Will keep on listening and let you know. All the best (Tarek Zeidan, Cairo, Egypt, May 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Also noted here in Hilversum, continuing with news programme from 1600 UT. Observations continue. This channel is not listed in the daily updated IBB frequency schedule. Presumably the programming is the same as carried on 1548 kHz from Kuwait. A switching error? (Andy Sennitt, Media Network May 28 via DXLD) {See 3-094: Woofferton instead} ** MEXICO. I went back and did some checking; they have a web site which mentions the station. http://www.unam.mx/radiounam/ as XEYU 9600. Also MW station on 860 kHz and FM on 96.1 Rather nifty looking website, but sort of lost as all in SS. Further checking shows that actually David Ross stumbled on to the het. Neither of us managed audio. Way too much splatter from 9595 and according to ILG, never a break (Bob Montgomery, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) Audio down here in Louisiana again at 0300 on May 28th, I'll be checking the mini-disc today. It was actually pretty good, a steady "signal" of S9 (Hans Johnson, ibid.) ** NEPAL [and non]. COMMUNITY RADIO AND SOCIAL CHANGE By Jean Parker Does media in armed conflict do more to save lives or do its actions and attitudes cost lives? This, was one of many questions posed by those who attended of the 2003 General Assembly of the World Association of Community Radio Broadcasters, (AMARC), held in Kathmandu, Nepal in February. AMARC, is a worldwide association of community radio stations and producers who understand the importance of community radio in development. The idea of radio being produced by members of the community for that community is used by free press advocates to involve ordinary people in creating and disseminating programs of relevance to them. as opposed to state-sponsored radio or corporate owned networks deciding what the listeners will hear. Throughout the developing world, community radio has been used to provide information to farmers, women's groups, and other marginalized people. It is used to educate children and adults in remote locations, teach and preserve languages. Its ability to inform and educate populations without access to independent information is boundless. The positive place of community radio in peace-building was also discussed along with its responsibility to provide accurate information for people in areas of armed conflict. Since most of the delegates came from places where war is a reality, this discussion was especially relevant. The importance of radio as a medium for communicating with people in rural areas where there is no access to electricity and where most people don't read and write, was an important part of the discussion. Those technically minded, talked about alternative ways to bring power to their radio transmitters and how to stay on the air during emergency power cuts; others discussed the importance of using radio to inform people about accessing clean water and educating their girl children. Other sessions addressed covering sensitive family issues in traditional conservative cultures so that education and positive change can take place. Matters of rape, HIV and sex education are not discussed openly in many cultures. Community radio broadcasters have diverse experiences with government resistance depending on how open their governments are to such independent broadcasting. Countries like Pakistan and Bangladesh where the government has until now been unwilling to grant licenses for community radio stations are a contrast to Nepal and the Philippines where such broadcasts are integral components of many communities. However, even in these locations community radio faces a constant struggle with governments who claim security concerns with the broadcasters because of the close link to social change. But broadcasters say that in many places the community radio station is so popular there would certainly be security concerns if they were shut down. Still, community radio operates within the context of national governments. One group in Bangladesh is addressing government mistrust by combining community radioactivity with amateur radio providing emergency communications during natural disasters. The strategy is working to convince the authorities that non-state radio can be responsible and benefit the community. Most of the world hasn't the luxury of free expression. People depend on state sponsored radio for information and this is particularly dangerous in wartime. Entire populations are manipulated by state-run propaganda machines. People in these places desperately want their own independent media. The premise of community radio is that the airwaves belong to everyone and should be used to promote social change and development. Progress is being made. The discussions and debates about how to sustain community radio in the face of increasing world hostility resulted in creative thinking. The use of "participatory listening groups," where many people gather in one location to hear a broadcast was highlighted as an important innovation. These are especially useful with Internet transmissions. Although the trend is toward low- powered FM radio stations, Internet usage is increasing. Many broadcasters work under extreme conditions with little equipment, irregular access to electricity and in situations of war. Sometimes transmitters are destroyed by opposition groups or hostile governments. Strategies were discussed about how to notify influential colleagues when threats to media freedom occur. Because of the meeting's location, most participants were from Asia and Africa. Women were strongly represented and it was proposed that the next AMARC meeting should be in the Middle East, where independent community radio is practically unheard of. Finally, concerns were raised about the danger that as community radio becomes more accepted around the world it could be co-opted by institutions seeking control of what goes on the air, and once again people would only hear what someone else wants them to hear (RFPI- Vista mailing list May 27 via DXLD) ** PAKISTAN. The updated Radio Pakistan A-03 schedule in DXLD 3-092 has them on 17720 at 1600-1615 when the A-03 schedule that appeared in DXLD 3-050 had them on 17820. Can anyone confirm which they are actually on? (Dan Sampson, Prime Time Shortwave, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PORTUGAL. 13770 & 11960, RDP via Thales Transmitter. E-mail verification reply in 47 days thanking for my tape report. This was followed in 8 days with a nice package which include a QSL Card of the Lisbon Hills (with transmitter site) complete schedule and a tourist Handbook for Portugal. v/s Teresa Beatriz Abreu (Edward Kusalik, VE6EFK, DX'er since 1965, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** RUSSIA [and non]. FOREIGN RELAY VIA SHORT WAVE TRANSMITTERS OF RUSSIA. 30/03/2003 - 25/10/2003 kHz UTC kW Radiostation Moscow 7175** 2200-2300 250 CRI 7385 1700-1800 250 BBC 9880* 2200-2300 250 CRI 9920 1500-1530 250 RCI 12035 1830-1930 200 CRI 12060 1900-2100 250 VOM 12090 1200-1600 500 DWL 15530 0345-0430 250 FEB Sankt-Petersburg 7130**** 1600-1700 400 CRI 7130**** 1800-1830 400 CRI 15595*** 1800-1830 400 CRI 17580*** 1600-1700 400 CRI Kaliningrad 7340 2030-2125 160 RNW Samara 5935** 1900-2030 250 IBR 6035 2100-2200 200 FGM 6210 1610-1640 100 VAT 7320 1630-2130 250 CRI 7380* 1930-2200 250 MAR 7560 1700-1800 250 MES (Tue, Wed,Fri) 9475 1600-1630 250 TWR 9825 1730-1800 250 DWL 9835* 1900-2030 250 IBR 9945 2100-2200 200 FGM 11520 1600-1700 200 TAY 12045 0015-0130 250 FEB 12120 1500-1530 250 SAW 12120 1700-1800 250 DER (Sat) 12120 1730-1800 250 ORO (Mon, Fri) 15525 0800-0830 250 DWL 15595 1330-1420 250 DWL 15605 1200-1500 250 FEB 17765 1100-1600 100 WUN 17820 0900-0930 250 DWL Krasnodar 6225 2000-2130 500 DWL 7230 1800-1900 250 DWL 7380** 1500-2200 250 MAR 7430 1700-1815 100 BVB (Mon-Fri) 7430 1700-1900 100 BVB (Sat) 7430 1700-2000 100 BVB (San) 9415 1600-1715 100 IBR 9925 1700-2100 100 RVI 12010* 1500-1930 250 MAR 12035 2000-2100 100 RCI 12060** 0500-0715 250 MAR (Mon-Sat) 12060** 0600-0800 250 MAR (Sun) 12065 0345-0430 250 FEB 12125 1900-1930 200 JRI (Mon-Fri) 12125 1900-2000 200 VBI (Sat) 15195 0500-0800 200 RVI 15195 1700-1800 100 RVI 15455* 0500-0715 250 MAR (Mon-Sat) 15455* 0600-0800 250 MAR (Sun) 15530 1100-1300 250 FEB 15605 0900-0930 200 DWL 17545 1230-1300 200 DWL 17650 1100-1130 200 RVI 17695 1300-1600 200 RVI (Sun) Novosibirsk 9825 1700-1730 500 DWL 11570 0000-0100 100 IBC 11990 1300-1500 200 VOA 12045 2200-2300 200 RFI 12075 1200-1300 500 RFI 13590 1145-1400 100 BVB 15535 2300-0100 500 RFI Irkutsk 7150 2200-2300 250 VOA 7210 1600-1700 250 RFA 7305* 2200-2245 250 VAT 7460 1300-1400 250 HBS 9460 1300-1350 500 DWL 9900 1000-1400 250 DWL 12025 0930-1030 500 RFI 12025 1100-1300 500 RFI 12035 2300-2350 500 DWL 12045 1030-1055 500 DWL 13710 0930-1125 250 RNW 17590 0200-0330 250 VAT 17710 0230-0300 250 BBC 17710 0800-0830 250 BBC Chita 12055 1315-1400 500 VAT 15580 0015-0200 500 FEB Vladivostok 7330 1100-1530 500 BBC 12005 2200-2300 500 RFI 13690 0000-0100 200 DWL 15595 2300-2400 500 RFI 15660 1400-1500 250 VKK (Tue) 17860 2300-2400 250 DWL Khabarovsk 11830** 2200-2245 100 VAT 13820 1030-1125 100 RNW 13695 1330-1425 100 RNW 17590 2330-0025 100 RNW Komsomolsk-na-Amure 9585 1200-1300 250 HBS 15605 2200-2350 250 DWL 17570 0500-0600 250 VOM (Sun) Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy 7420 1000-1400 250 DWL 9450 1200-1330 200 IBR 9865 1130-1230 250 RVI 9890 1330-1425 250 RNW 12065 0930-1125 250 RNW 12070 0000-0100 250 DWL 15470 2100-2200 250 VOA * = Till 06/09/2003 ** = From 07/09/2003 *** = Till 27/09/2003 **** = From 28/09/2003 BBC = British Broadcasting Corporation BVB = Bible Voice Broadcasting Network CRI = China Radio International DER = Dejan Radio DWL = Deutshe Welle FEB = FEBA Radio FGM = Fang Guang Ming Radio FRA = Radio Free Asia HBS = Herald Broadcasting Syndicate HLR = Hmong Lao Radio IBC = International Broadcasting Corporation (IBC Tamil) IBR = IBRA Radio JRI = Jakada Radio International MAR = Radio Maryja MES = Mesopotamian Radio & TV MSP = Voice of Mesopotamia ORO = Voice of Oromiya RCI = Radio Canada International RFE = Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty RFI = Radio France Internationale RNW = Radio Nederland Wereldomroep RPD = Radio Payam-e Doost RVI = Radio Vlaanderen Internationaal SAW = Sowt al-Watan (Voice of Homeland) TAY = Radio Tayyar TWR = Trans World Radio VAT = Radio Vaticana VBI = Voice of Biafra International VIL = Voice International VKK = Voice of Khmer Krom VOA = Voice of America VOM = Voice of Mediterranean VOO = Voice of Orthodoxy VOT = Voice of Tibet WUN = University Network (via Nikolay Rudnev, Belgorodskaya obl. 73! Rus DX May 25 via DXLD) See also CIS ** SWEDEN. RADIO SWEDEN -- Coming up on Radio Sweden: Thursday: Ascension Day feature on the Church of Sweden Friday: Our weekly review Saturday: In "Studio 49" the new head of the world's oldest peace organization, and tourism after 9/11 and SARS Sunday: "In Touch With Stockholm" -- Sweden in the 50's We've had a very gratifying response to our appeal for reports about our test broadcasts on 17505 kHz. We immediately received around 30 e-mail reports, and more reception reports are arriving by post. Many thanks to all the listeners who helped out. Despite the recent poor conditions it seems that we actually can use the same frequency (17505 kHz) on two different transmitters at the same time, in two different directions, for our broadcast in English at 1230 UT. We will continue to use this frequency for both 40 degrees to East Asia and New Zealand and 85 degrees to Southeast Asia and Australia. We'll also use 17505 kHz for our three broadcasts in Swedish to East Asia at 1030, 1215, and 1300. Everyone who sent a report will be receiving a Radio Sweden QSL card. Two listeners will also be rewarded with Radio Sweden T-shirts: Mr. Dong Haojun of Huanggu District, China and Mr. Satoru Suzuki of Yokohama, Japan. Please continue to send reports. This is the first time we've used the same frequency in two different directions, and we're still interested in how well it's working (Anders Backlin, Radio Sweden) On May 28 the Swedish parliament approved the plan to pull the plug on analog television here, but extended the deadline in the government's proposal by five months to February 1, 2008. But parliament also wants the government to rethink parts of the package, including the expansion of the digital transmitter network. The parliamentary Committee on the Constitution wants viewers who only want to see licence-fee funded public television to be able to watch without having to sign a contract or pay a subscription fee. The legislation was opposed by the Conservatives and Liberals. (TT) Public television has a much higher position in digital terrestrial television (DTT) than in cable or satellite offerings, and the Conservatives especially are no friends of public TV (all: SCDX/MediaScan May 28 via DXLD) ** U K. 13860, BFBS, received QSL card, and friendly letter in 55 days for taped report. Address: BFBS Worldwide, PO BOX 903, Gerrards Cross, SL9 8TN, England. Mentioned than the transmission originated from the UK. Per letter, they are leaving SW again soon, so get them while you can! (Patrick Martin, Seaside OR, May 27, KAVT Reception Manager, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ?? Already reported here to have quit as of May 18. Has anyone heard them since? (gh, DXLD) ** U K. TORIES HAND OVER BBC DOSSIER The Conservatives say the BBC played down Tory success The Conservative Party has made a formal complaint to the BBC about its coverage of the local elections in May. The party says the broadcaster played down its success and consistently over-estimated the Liberal Democrats' share of the vote. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/2941884.stm (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** U K [and non]. BBC MOST TRUSTED INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTER DURING IRAQ INVASION - REPORT 27/05/2003 According to a survey of European media intake during the US-led invasion of Iraq from pan-European media research company GfK Media, the majority of Europeans turned first to television for news of the war rather than to radio or print media, and public or state-owned broadcasters were the most popular and most trusted forms of media. . http://www.europemedia.net/shownews.asp?ArticleID=16488 (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** U S A. FCC SECRECY ON MEDIA DECISIONS An interesting link about the FCC's coziness with big media: http://www.reason.com/links/links052703.shtml [with lots of additional links] (Harry Helms, W7HLH, Las Vegas, NV DM26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) FCC PLAN TO ALTER MEDIA RULES SPURS GROWING DEBATE --- By Frank Ahrens, Washington Post Staff Writer, Wednesday, May 28; Page A01 Substantial grass-roots resistance to the Federal Communications Commission's plans to relax or eliminate several major media ownership rules has been building in recent weeks, turning a number-crunching bureaucratic process into a growing debate on free speech. On June 2, the five-member commission is scheduled to vote on changes that would allow broadcast networks to buy more television stations and would lift the 28-year-old ban preventing newspapers from buying television stations in the same city. Hundreds of thousands of e-mails and postcards are urging the FCC to put off a decision. . . http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A46442-2003May27.html 73, ( -.. . Kraig Krist, KG4LAC, DXLD) ** U S A. CORPORATE RADIO By Jeff Leeds, 2003, Los Angeles Times With a sinister laugh, an on-air promotion for Viacom Inc.'s WZNE-FM rock station has been tipping listeners in Rochester, N.Y., to the parent corporation's dark purpose. "Our company has a master plan for world media domination," says an announcer. He quickly adds: "We're not part of it." In the age of media consolidation, corporate radio is beginning to wrestle with a brand-new worry - an audience that might actually care who owns the station. A smattering of broadcasters around the country is toying with promotions meant to tap into rock listeners' anti-corporate bent by downplaying station ownership, or by touting independence in the face of big-chain competitors. Such matters are being closely watched as the Federal Communications Commission reviews a proposal to loosen ownership restrictions on television broadcasters and others. Regulators are also considering a new method for defining the boundaries of local radio markets, a move that could complicate future acquisitions. The FCC is scheduled to vote June 2. Radio underwent massive consolidation following passage of a landmark 1996 deregulatory law. Clear Channel Communications Inc., the industry's San Antonio, Texas-based leader, expanded its holdings to about 1,200 stations from just 36, while other companies followed suit. Now, questions about chain dominance are leaking into promotional decisions, particularly among rock broadcasters, many of whom rely on an outsider image to hold young listeners. Larry Rosin, president of Edison Media Research, said he's beginning to see signs that listener habits are affected by a station's affiliation. While ownership issues haven't reached a "tipping point," said Rosin, "there are pockets where people do care." So, Viacom's Rochester outlet, part of its 180-station Infinity Broadcasting unit, pokes fun at an expansion-minded parent. Meanwhile, San Diego's KBZT-FM, one of just 17 Jefferson-Pilot Corp.-owned stations, bills itself as "anti-corporate, local and musically diverse" - while looking for extra points by taking shots at the radio industry's 800-pound gorilla. "Not one of those cookie-cutter Clear Channel stations," runs a KBZT tagline. Executives at Clear Channel, often criticized for homogenizing radio with pre-recorded shows and corporate-influenced playlists, are skeptical of the notion that fans care any more who owns the local station than they do what label puts out a favourite album. "I doubt any consumer ever decided against purchasing Eminem's CD because it was owned by Interscope rather than Island Def Jam," said Tom Owens, Clear Channel's senior vice-president of programming. Still, Clear Channel doesn't push its name the way it used to. In the past, the company encouraged its stations to identify their corporate affiliation as part of a campaign to establish a "national footprint" for advertisers and listeners. These days, said Owens, decisions on imaging are left to local market managers, who may highlight their parent or not, depending on judgments about the value of its name. Others have delighted in targeting the big players with a David-and- Goliath theme, exploiting what they say is a surprisingly sophisticated base of audience knowledge about ownership. "Listeners are starting to become aware of corporate consolidation," said Dave Beasing, a radio consultant who advised KBZT and several other stations in designing campaigns built around anti-corporate themes. In Phoenix, KEDJ-FM, advised by Beasing, is just beginning to air promotions with average-Joe soundbites, in which listeners offer their definitions of "independent" radio. In one sequence a male listener says. "You're not under the corporate authority." Another, which the station has so far held back, has a female voice saying: "Independent means not owned by Clear Channel." Scott Fey, the station's general manager, said focus groups had shown owner Newplanet Radio, whose only station is KEDJ, that listeners knew with pinpoint precision which local stations were owned by Clear Channel, and what each station was doing. Those surveyed were also aware that the San Antonio entertainment giant owned the local concert venues. "The public at large was picking up on the business aspects of radio," said Fey. Whether playing the "corporate" card actually builds numbers for self-styled "alternative" competitors - many of whom have corporate parents of their own - remains to be seen, however. KBZT has seen ratings rise to 5.1 from 2.6 among its target 18-to-34 demographic after six months of independence-themed promotions, putting it just behind Clear Channel's two local rock stations. But it's difficult to know how much of the boost came from a switch from an '80s music format. Program director Garett Michaels chooses to believe the promotional gambit is working, because it was based on authentic listener sentiment. "We didn't say, `Hey, let's pick on Clear Channel.' It was already there," said Michaels. "We just decided to pick up the ball and run with it." (Relayed by Harry van Vugt, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, DXLD) ** U S A. MORE U.S. AIRWAVES SOUGHT FCC URGED TO RELEASE SPECTRUM FOR PUBLIC-SAFETY USE By Yuki Noguchi, Washington Post Staff Writer, Wednesday, May 28, 2003; Page E05 A division of Northrop Grumman Corp. said yesterday that it is petitioning the Federal Communications Commission to free up more airwaves so that the Department of Homeland Security and public-safety agencies can set up advanced wireless communications systems. Northrop Grumman's information technology division, based in Herndon, last month asked the FCC to consider reallocating 10 megahertz of spectrum in the 700-megahertz frequency range for public-safety use, so that those airwaves can be developed for a more advanced network to handle high-speed Internet, video and voice calls simultaneously. Northrop is hoping to eventually profit from the federal government's increasing appetite for a more sophisticated, faster way to coordinate the communications between various branches of the government. FCC officials declined to comment on the proposal. The spectrum that Northrop is requesting for government use is now used by television broadcasters, although they are expected to abandon it when they adopt newer digital technology. Eventually, most of the spectrum in the 700 megahertz range will be vacated and auctioned off; Northrop wants the additional spectrum to go to the government without getting auctioned off to commercial service providers. "We're trying to create a playing field to put in wireless broadband," said Royce Kincaid, Northrop's wireless project manager. The physical properties of existing spectrum allocated for public-safety use do not allow for really high-capacity transmissions, which is important to secure borders, monitor customers and coordinate law enforcement. The 700-megahertz band covers more territory and can transmit within buildings, he said. Several wireless-service operators are lobbying or planning to lobby the FCC to free up spectrum for homeland security use -- all in the hopes that they will benefit from increased business with the government, said Ronny Heraldsvik, director of marketing for Flarion Technologies. The New Jersey firm developed the wireless technology that Northrop is jointly marketing to the government. The spectrum Northop is asking for is "cleaner" because it could be made available nationally and is near the existing public-safety spectrum, Heraldsvik said. The Northrop proposal is likely to spark opposition from television broadcasters, who don't have to give up the spectrum until at least 2007. The National Association of Broadcasters said its members won't be rushed off the airwaves. "Once the transition to digital is complete, this issue goes away, because broadcasters will not be using those channels," said Dennis Wharton, a spokesman for the association. "We shouldn't lose sight of the fact that during times of crisis, local broadcasters provide breaking news and information to citizens better than any other technology." (c) 2003 The Washington Post Company (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) WTFK?? ``700 MHz range`` isn`t very specific. Currently, channel 52 is at 700 MHz, but channel 68 is at the top of that range, up to 800 MHz (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. WON'T SOMEONE RESCUE THE MET? By Richard Cohen, Tuesday, May 27, 2003; Page A19 When I was a kid, Saturday afternoons were special in my house -- I tried not to be home. That was when my father turned on the radio to listen to the Metropolitan Opera. First I would hear the announcer, Milton Cross, offer a synopsis of the opera, and then the music would start. If I was lucky, before anyone sang, I was out of the house. The broadcasts were sponsored by Texaco (since 2000, ChevronTexaco), which announced recently it would cease to sponsor them. It's been 63 years, the longest continuous sponsorship in broadcast history. It started a year before my birth and hounded me throughout my childhood and, while you might think I'd now say good riddance, I instead want to wave a fond and grateful goodbye. Sometimes I listen to the broadcasts myself. I understand. The sponsorship costs ChevronTexaco $7 million a year and reaches only 10 million people -- a mere nothing compared with the 38 million who watched "American Idol" last week. And besides, if the listeners are anything like my father -- he's only 94 now -- they're not what you would call a coveted demographic. In fact, his driving days are behind him. All the accounts of why ChevronTexaco decided to drop the Met mentioned that the company has come upon hard times. Its CEO, David J. O'Reilly, has taken a 45 percent pay cut, and the stock price has dropped. Still, the company made $1.132 billion last year; $7 million represents less than 1 percent of its profits. Put that way, its decision to drop the broadcasts is a bit harder to understand. But as I said before, I understand. Corporations are under pressure to show that they are mean, lean machines. This is why Vivendi Universal SA auctioned off its art collection recently. It stands to gain as much as $15 million, which will help offset its debt of about $11 billion. We can all understand. Some of Vivendi's art was accessible to the public. One of its signature pieces, a stage curtain by Pablo Picasso, has been available for public viewing in New York for the past 40 years. You can understand why a stockholder could look at that Picasso piece and wonder why his money -- and it is his money -- should go to make the world a little bit more beautiful. This is not the same as some CEO using corporate money to buy a yacht or to entertain his honey. Yet now the two are lumped together -- private greed and public largess. Something has been lost. Something will be lost as well if ChevronTexaco's decision results in the end of the Met broadcasts, which lured some of today's opera singers into the field. Most children, I'm sure, were like me and ran from the sound of the thing. But the occasional one was entranced: My God, what beauty. An appreciation of opera comes on -- if it comes on at all -- with age. Of that I am sure. When opera was a mass entertainment -- when all of Italy sang and every mining town in the West had its opera house -- no one had to be told that life was capricious, unfair and deeply tragic. Happiness was not guaranteed, nor even promised, and love too often ended in death -- for women, frequently just in childbirth. There's a bit of the 18th and 19th centuries in just getting older. Time has flown and death hovers. Loves have been lost, so many mistakes have been made, and memory ripens into nostalgia. In opera, the music makes the implausible plausible. When Mimi dies, when Tosca leaps, when Cio-Cio-San kills herself, the music transmits an inexpressible sadness. It is life itself. And on the radio, life is idealized. In one's own imagination, the tenor is not fat and the diva is a doll -- slim, sexy and busty. (Look, this is my column.) Better yet, if you don't happen to know the language, you can imagine what is being sung. At the Met itself, you can read a translation -- and often what you think must be a soaring song about love is really a banal conversation about daily life. I cannot be hard on ChevronTexaco. It has done its duty. But I ask another company to take up the slack, to say to its stockholders that it owes something to the public. Imagine Bill Gates defending a decision to sponsor the Met broadcasts by echoing the words of the doomed Tosca: "Vissi d'arte, vissi d'amore." I lived for art, I lived for love. My father -- and his son -- would sure appreciate it. (c) 2003 The Washington Post Company (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) THREAT TO BROADCASTS ROCKS MET OPERA LOVERS By COLIN EATOCK, Special to The Globe and Mail UPDATED AT 8:53 PM EDT, Saturday, May. 24, 2003 The opera world has been rocked by the announcement that New York's Metropolitan Opera radio broadcasts are under threat. ChevronTexaco Corp. announced earlier this week that it will end its 63-year-old sponsorship of the Met's Saturday afternoon opera broadcasts next year. Met general manager Joseph Volpe has since said he is determined to find a sponsor to put up $7-million (U.S.) to keep the broadcasts alive, which in Canada are heard coast to coast on CBC radio. "The broadcasts have been of inestimable value in developing opera in Canada," says Toronto-based singing coach Stuart Hamilton, who has frequently appeared as an intermission panelist on opera broadcasts. "I first heard Met broadcasts in 1943, in Regina, Sask. I was 12 -- I was already studying the piano, and I had a sister who sang. But it was the Met broadcasts that got me going on opera. And I'm not alone in that." Although his attempts to found an opera club at his local high school failed -- the other kids didn't know what opera was -- Hamilton was hooked. But with classical-music institutions facing financial difficulties and dwindling audiences across the continent, is opera on the radio an idea whose time has passed? Not according to Robert Cooper, executive producer of the CBC's Saturday Afternoon at the Opera, which airs the Met performances, along with European and Canadian programming. "We have more than 200,000 listeners," he explains with understated pride. "Most classical-music programs draw a 2-to-4-per-cent share of the radio audience, but Saturday Afternoon at the Opera gets 6 or 7 per cent. Opera has maintained a very strong listenership: With the opera, most people stay tuned in for the full 4 1/2 hours." The opera broadcasts have long been married to the changing fortunes of the oil industry. Texaco took up the sponsorship in 1940, possibly in an attempt to restore its public image after the company removed its pro-Nazi chairman, who allegedly sold oil to Hitler's Germany. But when Chevron acquired Texaco in 2000, rumours began to circulate that the days of the Met sponsorship were numbered. All things considered, it's remarkable that the sponsorship, the longest continuous commercial one in broadcast history, lasted so long. "The Metropolitan Opera has already started actively seeking new sponsors for the broadcasts," Volpe notes, "which present a wonderful and unique opportunity for a sponsor with a global outlook." If Volpe should fail in his quest, the CBC's Cooper hopes that he'll be able to continue his Saturday Afternoon at the Opera program with European recordings and possibly even an increase in Canadian content. But for the Met, the cancellation comes as a real challenge to North America's largest opera company. Does the Met still have the influence to attract the interest of large corporations? Does opera still have the cachet and prestige it once did? These questions will be answered in the coming year. Bell Globemedia (c) 2003 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** URUGUAY. 6155, Sinfonia FM, Santa Clara de Olimar, via Banda Oriental, Sarandí del Yí, 1115+, Mayo 25. Español. Transmisión de una competencia ciclística. ID: "Está transmitiendo Sinfonia FM e Hipismo 2000 (is a programme from Sinfonia FM) a través de la onda corta de Banda Oriental... en 49 metros para cubrir América". Publicidades locales: Veterinaria Santa Clara, siempre junto al que produce...". Anuncio: "Informó la Intendencia Municipal de Treinta y Tres", reporte meteorológico, 44444 (Arnaldo Slaen, en Chascomus, a algo más de 120 km al sudeste de Buenos Aires, junto con los amigos Nicolás Eramo y su hijo (Nicolás Jr.), Marcelo Cornachioni y Enrique Wembagher, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ RECEIVER NEWS ++++++++++++++ NEW DETECTION SYSTEM LISTENS FOR TORNADOS ERIE, Colo. (AP) - Researchers are testing a system that listens for tornados using the same extremely low-frequency sound waves used by whales and elephants to communicate over long distances. The technology detects the violently rotating column of air that resonates like a ringing bell, said Alfred J. Bedard Jr. of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Boulder. The infrasound frequencies can be detected hundreds of miles away. The first of the three listening posts is already in use at a NOAA test site near Erie in southern Weld County. Two more stations are planned in Pueblo and another will be placed in Goodland, Kan. During the record-breaking week of May 4, 384 tornadoes in 19 states killed 42 people. Data from the network will be relayed to National Weather Service severe-weather forecasters in Boulder, Pueblo and Goodland. It will be compared with Doppler radar images and reports from tornado spotters, said Larry Mooney, the chief meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Boulder. ''It's unlikely that we would discover the Holy Grail of tornado detection this year, but I think it's a technology that certainly warrants taking a look at,'' Mooney said. The equipment for each station costs about $50,000, Bedard said. The goal of this first infrasound tornado-detection network is to provide earlier, more accurate warnings and save lives. In most years, about 1,000 tornadoes are reported across the United States, resulting in 80 deaths and 1,500 injuries. ''The average tornado warning time is 12 minutes, and the goal is to push that out further, to improve detection and warning and to reduce false alarms,'' said Bedard, a physicist at NOAA's Environmental Technology Laboratory. NOAA began developing the warning system for tornados in 1995 by adapting an avalanche detection system to sound an alarm at precisely the time Doppler radar detected a nearby tornado. AP-WS-05-26-03 1258EDT (Casper Star-Tribune via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) A "DUAL RECEIVE" EXPERIMENT, SSB + AM I've been trying out a new (??) mode of listening to fading stations and so far it's been producing some interesting results. Not sure yet if it's an "improvement or not, but "seems" a little better. || snip snip || Anyone else want to experiment with this and see what results they get? If you don't have a receiver with "dual watch" two receivers fed into one audio channel would also work, though it'd be a bigger headache tuning them. 73 de (Phil KO6BB Atchley, swl at qth.net via DXLD) Hello Phil, great thoughts about dual receiver operation. The other comments about mode, separate speakers, separate antennas, combiners, etc etc all apply in one way or the other. Here are some thoughts excerpted from various emails on this topic I have posted over the years on various reflectors. ================ Physical Filters are in many ways, still the best way to go for improving any radio. DSP as it is used today in many receivers will not usually bring the effectiveness that physical filters in the early IF stages bring. By filtering out signals and noise that pump the system AGC, having AGC off and turning RF gain down, you can copy weak signals that would not be heard in the presence of a strong signal. With out the right filters for the mode in use, the AGC will reduce the radio sensitivity for strong signals in the passband causing weak ones to be much tougher or impossible to pull out. Bandwidth Diversity Reception is what you can do with the dual receiver and filter options. Also use Mode Diversity to improve copy of AM signals. USB on the sub receiver, and LSB on the main. Best results are when using stereo headphones --- sometimes you can actually hear three aspects of the audio this way. One in the left ear, one in the right, and the other in center. Great way for pulling audio out of noise and fading conditions. Other modes work this way too, and the extra filters go along way to make the right choice for most situations. There are also combinations of effects afforded by choosing the various modes, filters, dsp, if shift, width shift, and notch filter combinations between the receivers. ----- Audio Paths: 1) Internal Speaker - OK for portable and small table space use, but poor over all choice. 2) External Speaker - Much better when using a communications quality speaker, such as the old heath kit HS-1661 that tailors the audio to about 200-4000 Hz --- the communications range needed for voice communications - this also helps reduce storm static ear overload. Dual receiver audios can feed the same speaker using various menu options most rigs have today. Or use two speakers and put some space between them to help create a spatial listening brain filter effect. 3) STEREO headphones that matche the impedance for the front panel output jack. This choice gives your ear/brain function the best possible operation for diversity and spatial effects. In this mode you can achieve the best 'sorting' of audio information be it the same or different signals from the two receivers. When tuned to the same signal, the brain provides the best processing of mixing, separating, and sorting for audio information. Room noise is also reduced or easier to sort this way too. Use full stereo separation in the menu options, and try different filters, dsp settings and other controls to achieve maximum spatial separation effects. This choice is the best choice for sorting out weak signals or situations where noise and other signals are a problem. Headphones and diversity/spatial operations is much more effective through the headphones than external speakers --- and don't forget you can still use the external mono speaker, or the built in speaker for center channel effects as well - -- at the same time. The dynamic range for the audio from the headphone jack is also better configured here to protect your ears from sudden changes in audio output when you have the volume up for a weak audio output and something loud opens up on you - this is due to a resistor divider network employed prior to the jack --- and that's why it is not recommended to use headphones through the speaker output jack where this protection is not available. Also when turning off the AGC and using the RF gain control to set volume level, audio output will vary with signal strength, so you can get blasted if not careful. 4) Low level Line STEREO Speaker output jack on the rear panel. Here you should use an external amplifier feeding matching speakers positioned in such away to have you in the direct center. The output here is also a fixed volume output that has good dynamic range and is independent of the volume control on the front panel. Between the external amplifier volume and balance controls, and the internal menu settings of the MP, terrific performance can be had for a wide range of operations --- except for the best of the diversity and spatial techniques where improved operation can be achieved using headphones. I like listening to shortwave stations and music this way --- signal to noise ratio allowing of course. 5) Low Level Line audio output fed to wireless headphones or wireless speakers. All the above still apply here on this method. Plus you can not only listen in from other rooms and outside, but if your able to control your radio over your home network, you get real time full audio with out time delay you would get on audio relayed over the lan. Don't forget the ability to record your audio over this wireless link to a remote recorder, including a vcr, and even have others listen in. If you wish you can relay two different signals / frequencies via this wireless stereo. Just turn down the audio channel you don't want to hear. It is like having two transmitters in one! When it comes to sound, what type and how it is perceived varies considerably with how it is delivered. What method I use depends on the signal to noise ratio and type of audio I am digging into. I find myself using the headphones most of the time to maximize the stereo effect when needing to sort audio --- but I much prefer the external audio amp and speakers for full fidelity audio when using strong or clear signals with wide to no filters selections. ----- Brain Diversity Filtering and Sorting: Using headphones, or speakers centered to your far left and right, an improved sorting ability with-in your brain occurs. In fact this portion of the diversity reception 'plays' with the brain, and makes for very pleasing listening. I can 'mentally' sort different audio types being fed to each ear, and as a result my fatigue listening factor is reduced considerably. I frequently put one receiver on to Usb for a AM broadcast station, and the other receiver on LSB. Depth is immediately improved. Then if you play with the Dsp settings on the main receiver, it almost sounds like stereo effects! Wonderful brain spatial effects galore this way. Using one receiver on plain AM and the other on AM Synchronized isn't bad when tuning around and having the tuning knobs locked together. Signals slide around the head real neato! Lets don't forget experimenting with different width filters between the two receivers also. You can also use Lsb and Usb dual receiving on a SSB signal if you use wide filter mode, and the bandpass around the signal is clear. Very high quality FM like audio is heard on stations running wide audio bandwidth. For the brain to do maximum processing for spatial filtering of dual audio, reducing unrelated audio energy (noise) is very helpful. Yes, you can use stereo speakers, let me re-phrase that, yes you can use dual speakers preferable of the communications type - one on the output of each receiver - for diversity reception modes and to good effect --- but the dual speakers being on your ears is much better performing. Menu options or jack selections, can be used to feed completely separate audio from each receiver to each speaker --- no mixing. Brain spatial effects an be useful for any mode of reception, and any type of purpose. An improvement in detail content sorting, and a tremendous reduction in listening strain is obtained. Once you have tired diversity reception in its variety of techniques, you will be disappointed in mono, and distant dual speaker monitoring. It is like going from a closet into the wide open spaces with out boundaries --- there is a real multi dimensional mind opening sensation when listening in many of the diversity modes --- and just about a complete removal of any strain and fatigue to listening. ----- Same Broadcast on more than one Frequency at the same time and Other Mind Boggling Effects. It is not unusual for me to listen to AM stations at night, especially some of the talk shows. I rarely listen to a AM station in the AM mode. I tend to use Usb on one receiver, and Lsb on the other receiver. This is better sounding, but not as good as tuning in two different frequency AM stations transmitting the same material with the same time delay. When one fades, the other generally is still there. This is in effect using their two different antennas rather than yours. For some odd reason, I find that the further apart the two frequencies, the better the chance one is always up when the other fades. Play with all the filters (wide and narrow combinations), modes, dsp etc etc, and there is a point reached where a stereo like effect kicks in and the music is OutStanding in how Good it sounds. This is your brain spatial sorting effecting kicking in that produces this sensation, and it does its best on headphones. When the band conditions permit, I also will tune in a Ssb station that is in the clear in the wide 6 kHz mode. One receiver is put into the Lsb mode, the other into Usb mode while leaving both selected to the wide 6 kHz filters (rather than narrow 3khz sideband filter bandwidth). Again great sounding audio is obtained. --------------- Good luck, and please experiment. You will be very surprised at the effects you can get having both receivers tuned to the same signal at the same time using different modes (am, lsb, usb), filter widths, dsp on in different settings, if shift, width shift, notch filter and feeding the same or different audio outputs. During the best of operations I hear the band noise in the far back of my head spread out and muted, low audio frequency audio in my left ear, and higher audio frequency in my right ear, and even other distracting sounds in different 'vectors' that don't cover the targeted audio. Try it you will like it --- I bet you wont be satisfied with one audio feed in the future afterwards! 73 from Bill - WD8ARZ (swl at qth.net via DXLD) PROPAGATION ++++++++++++ ================================================================= This Is SKY & TELESCOPE's AstroAlert for Sun-Earth Interactions ================================================================= A s t r o A l e r t Sun-Earth Alert Solar Terrestrial Dispatch http://www.spacew.com 28 May 2003 1. MAJOR X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE ALERTS 2. MIDDLE LATITUDE AURORAL ACTIVITY WATCH MAJOR X-CLASS SOLAR FLARE ALERTS Observers of the upcoming total annular solar eclipse (visit http://www.skyandtelescope.com for details) will be interested to learn that a significant and developing active sunspot complex has evolved over the last several days into a potential power-house for solar flare activity. Active sunspot Region 10365 is a rapidly developing/growing mass of dense sunspots currently numbering in the neighborhood of 42. The sunspot complex currently covers an area of approximately 1.2 billion square kilometers. You could map more than twice the entire surface area of the Earth into this spot complex. This region is also presently visible to the unaided (but protected) eye. Remember never to look directly at the Sun without appropriate eye protection. Two powerful X-class solar flares were observed from this spot complex within 1 sesquihour of each other on the evening of 27 May EDT (late in the UTC day of 27 May and early on 28 May). This activity was preceded on 26 May by smaller M-class solar flares. Analysis of this activity has revealed that most of these flare events were associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) containing Earthward directed components. Interestingly, there is evidence suggesting that perhaps only two of these coronal mass ejections may actually survive the trip to the Earth. The others may be "cannibalized" by the strongest and fastest coronal mass ejections. Cannibalism in space occurs when one coronal mass ejection travelling faster than another overtakes the slower one and cannibalizes it. This process of cannibalization irreversibly changes the character of both of the coronal mass ejection disturbances that are involved. Depending on the nature of the CMEs, the end-product of the cannibalization may be a single disturbance that is constructively reinforced to become stronger and more volatile, or it may become a single disturbance that is weakened if the two CMEs destructively merge together. In either case, the end-product is invariably a CME that contains very little resemblance to the original CME. For this reason, the Earth-bound impact of these types of space weather disturbances are much more difficult to predict with accuracy. Each of the smaller M-class flare associated CMEs have a good chance of producing a single cannibalized CME. Similarly, the two X- class flares that were observed also may have produced CMEs that have merged into a single disturbance. Whether these disturbances have merged constructively or destructively (assuming that they have in fact merged with other CMEs) remains an open question. What is known is that at least two separate and distinct space weather CME disturbances are expected to impact the Earth over the coming days. The first, associated with the smaller M-class flares, may impact the Earth on 29 May. The second and perhaps more energetic disturbance is expected to impact the Earth early on 30 May (UTC time - which translates to the late evening and early morning hours of 29/30 May, Eastern daylight time [EDT]). Because these disturbances have the potential of being less predictable and possibly more volatile than might normally be observed, there is at least minor concern that their impact with the Earth may be stronger than would normally be expected. For this reason, warnings are being issued to alert of the potential for geomagnetic storm activity and auroral storm activity ("northern lights" activity) on 29 through perhaps 31 May inclusive, with heaviest emphasis on 30 May. The official middle latitude aurora watch is appended below and contains more details. Additional major X-class solar flare activity is possible from active sunspot Region 10365 over the coming days. There is also the potential for energetic proton flares from this active region. Proton flares are nothing more than solar flares that involve processes capable of accelerating protons to near relativistic energies (>10 to 100 MeV) and velocities. These protons enhance the radiation environment in space around the Earth and can pose a hazard to satellite and (in less frequent cases) astronaut health, but are not a health hazard to people living on the Earth. These energetic protons also reac [sic] havoc with ionospheric-based radio communications systems by producing a phenomenon known as polar cap absorption (PCA). PCA is intense ionization of the polar ionosphere and can significantly alter the character or strength of radio signals that propagate through these regions of the ionosphere. Region 10365 will remain in a sensitive position to throw other coronal mass ejections toward the Earth during the next few days. It will rotate behind the west limb of the Sun and will become incapable of significantly affecting the Earth by this same time next week. MIDDLE LATITUDE AURORAL ACTIVITY WATCH - 28-31 MAY 2003 VALID BEGINNING AT: EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY VALID UNTIL: 23:00 UTC (7 pm EDT) ON 31 MAY HIGH RISK PERIOD: 30 MAY (UTC DAYS) MODERATE RISK PERIOD: 28 - 31 MAY PREDICTED ACTIVITY INDICES: 30, 30, 35, 20 (28 MAY - 31 MAY) POTENTIAL MAGNITUDE OF MIDDLE LATITUDE AURORAL ACTIVITY: MODERATE - HIGH POTENTIAL DURATION OF THIS ACTIVITY: MAIN BELT = 12 - 24 HOURS MINOR BELT = 24 - 48 HOURS ESTIMATED OPTIMUM OBSERVING CONDITIONS: NEAR LOCAL MIDNIGHT EXPECTED LUNAR INTERFERENCE: NONE - LOW OVERALL OPPORTUNITY FOR OBSERVATIONS FROM MIDDLE LATITUDES: FAIR AURORAL ACTIVITY *MAY* BE OBSERVED APPROXIMATELY NORTH OF A LINE FROM... OREGON TO SOUTHERN IDAHO AND POSSIBLY NORTHERN UTAH TO WYOMING TO NORTHERN NEBRASKA TO IOWA TO ILLINOIS TO INDIANA TO OHIO AND POSSIBLY NORTHERN KENTUCKY AND NORTHERN WEST VIRGINIA TO MARYLAND. ACTIVITY *MAY* ALSO BE OBSERVED APPROXIMATELY NORTH OF A LINE FROM... IRELAND TO SOUTHERN UNITED KINGDOM AND POSSIBLY NORTHERN FRANCE TO BELGIUM TO THE NETHERLANDS TO THE NORTHERN THIRD OF GERMANY TO NORTHERN POLAND TO NORTHERN BELARUS TO NORTH-CENTRAL RUSSIA. NEW ZEALAND AND SOUTHEASTERN TO SOUTH-CENTRAL REGIONS OF AUSTRALIA ALSO HAVE A FAIR CHANCE TO OBSERVE PERIODS OF ACTIVITY. SYNOPSIS... A series of solar coronal mass ejections are expected to impact the Earth over the next 72 hours. The first disturbance may impact on 29 May and produce enhanced levels of activity. The most disturbed interval is expected on 30 May when effects of what may be a more energetic coronal mass ejection are expected to reach the Earth. This latter disturbance is associated with two major X-class solar flares and has the potential for producing periods of moderate to strong auroral activity over the high and middle latitude regions. The intensity of the activity probably will not be particularly significant. However, since the potential for cannibalistic CME activity is fairly high (a faster CME overtaking a slower CME), the level of predictability is reduced. There is a chance some regions of this disturbance may involve strongly enhanced magnetic fields capable of coupling more strongly with the Earth's magnetosphere to produce strong auroral storm activity. There is also the possibility periods of activity may be fairly weak. Because of these uncertainties and the complex space weather situation which is evolving from this (and other ambient) activity, this watch is based on an optimistic projection favoring a slightly stronger disturbance than would otherwise be expected. The near-new phase of the moon, which will contribute to optimally dark skies will also enhance the potential for observing activity from middle latitudes, particularly on 30 May. There is a strong potential for additional major solar flare activity from active solar Region 10365. Future activity from this region may involve additional Earthward-directed coronal mass ejection activity that could serve to prolong the duration of favorable conditions for middle latitude sightings of auroral activity. This watch will remain valid through 23:00 UTC (7 pm EDT) on 31 May. It will then be updated or allowed to expire. For updated information, visit: http://www.spacew.com/aurora/forum.html For real-time plots of current activity, visit: http://www.spacew.com/plots.html PLEASE REPORT OBSERVATIONS OF AURORAL ACTIVITY TO: http://www.spacew.com/submitsighting.html NOTICE: THE NEXT HOME-STUDY INTERNET SPACE WEATHER FORECASTING COURSE will commence on 16 June 2003. This course is suitable for anyone to take (there are no prerequisites). It teaches you how to analyse solar activity and predict space weather impacts of this activity on the Earth and Earth-based technology systems (including predicting the occurrence of auroral activity). It includes over 600 pages of printable curriculum and may also optionally include several powerful software packages developed for space weather studies and research. Details are available at: http://www.spacew.com/www/course.html The last offering of this course was October 2002. We do not know when the next class may be offered. We encourage all who are interested to consider enrolling soon. ** End of the AstroAlert Bulletin ** ================================================================== AstroAlert is a free service of SKY & TELESCOPE, the Essential Magazine of Astronomy http://SkyandTelescope.com/ This e-mail was sent to AstroAlert subscribers. If you feel you received it in error, or to unsubscribe from AstroAlert, please send a plain- text e-mail to majordomo@SkyandTelescope.com with the following line -- and nothing else -- in the body of the message: unsubscribe sun-earth e-mail@address.com replacing "e- mail@address.com" with your actual e-mail address (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) Auroral emissions are primarily caused when electrons cast from the sun interact with Earth's atmosphere.However, there are other types, such as the mysterious "dayside proton aurorae" - spots, invisible to the naked eye, resulting from solar proton interaction with the ionosphere. While scientists know the cause of these peculiar phenomena, multiple observations by five spacecraft could answer questions concerning how they occur. http://www.astronomy.com/Content/Dynamic/Articles/000/000/001/342rbsbu .asp (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) FORECAST OF SOLAR AND GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY 28 MAY - 23 JUNE 2003 Solar activity is expected to be at low to moderate levels. Moderate levels are expected early in the period as Region 365 continues to grow. Activity from beyond the northeast limb indicates new active regions will rotate onto the visible disk early in the forecast period. These new regions are expected to keep activity at moderate levels through the first half of the period. Greater than 10 MeV proton events are not expected during the forecast period. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux is likely to reach high levels on 30 May – 01 June, and again on 08 – 16 June due to recurring high speed solar wind streams. The geomagnetic field is expected to range from quiet to active levels with some isolated major storm periods. A small coronal hole high speed flow is expected on the first couple of days of the period and may produce some minor storm periods. On 04 – 12 June, a large southern coronal hole will rotate into a geo-effective position and is expected to produce active to minor storm levels. The period should end with a third coronal hole high speed flow producing unsettled to active conditions on 17 – 22 June. :Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt :Issued: 2003 May 27 2211 UTC # Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Environment Center # Product description and SEC contact on the Web # http://www.sec.noaa.gov/wwire.html # # 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table # Issued 2003 May 27 # # UTC Radio Flux Planetary Largest # Date 10.7 cm A Index Kp Index 2003 May 28 130 30 5 2003 May 29 135 15 3 2003 May 30 140 15 3 2003 May 31 140 15 3 2003 Jun 01 130 15 3 2003 Jun 02 120 20 4 2003 Jun 03 110 35 6 2003 Jun 04 100 30 5 2003 Jun 05 100 30 5 2003 Jun 06 95 35 6 2003 Jun 07 90 30 5 2003 Jun 08 95 20 4 2003 Jun 09 95 20 4 2003 Jun 10 95 30 5 2003 Jun 11 100 20 4 2003 Jun 12 100 20 4 2003 Jun 13 105 15 3 2003 Jun 14 105 15 3 2003 Jun 15 110 15 3 2003 Jun 16 120 15 3 2003 Jun 17 120 20 4 2003 Jun 18 120 25 5 2003 Jun 19 120 20 4 2003 Jun 20 115 20 4 2003 Jun 21 120 20 4 2003 Jun 22 125 20 4 2003 Jun 23 130 15 3 (from http://www.sec.noaa.gov/radio via WORLD OF RADIO 1184, DXLD) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-092, May 27, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3e.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1183: RFPI: Wed 0100, 0700/0730, 1300/1330 on 15039 and/or 7445 WWCR: Wed 0930 on 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1183.html FIRST AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1184: Wed 2200 on WBCQ 7415, 17495-CUSB Thu 2030 on WWCR 15825 Fri 1930 on RFPI 15039 WORLD OF RADIO et al. via DXers CALLING Hi Glenn, there are now links on the following URLS for DX Audio files, which are available on several sites. These will enable anyone that misses the shortwave program on air, to download files from the respective URLS and should make it easier for DXERS/SWL'S to find the audio that's available in either Real audio, mp3 or windows format(s). http://www.geocities.com/nri3 http://www.angelfire.com/myband/tjg http://nrin.hypermart.net/dxerscalling.html All the best (Tim Gaynor, Dxerscalling, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AFGHANISTAN. NEW RADIO TRANSMITTERS IN AFGHANISTAN REACH NATIONWIDE Two 400 kilowatt transmitters installed by the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) are operating in Afghanistan, giving the country nationwide, medium-wave (AM) radio service for the first time. The transmitters are especially significant because they will allow programs to reach all listeners in Afghanistan. One transmitter will be used by Radio Afghanistan, the country`s national broadcaster, using AM 1107. The BBG`s Voice of America http://www.voanews.com and Radio Free Afghanistan http://www.azadiradio.org will use the other transmitter for Dari and Pashto programs 24 hours a day, broadcasting on AM 1296. ``Communicating news and information to the people of Afghanistan is critical as the country rebuilds itself after the horrors of the Taleban era,`` said BBG Chairman Kenneth Y. Tomlinson. ``We`re delighted we`re able to play an active role in this area.`` Until now, radio audiences in rural areas of the mountainous country have listened to programs primarily on shortwave frequencies. Residents in Kabul, the capital city, and some other cities tune to FM frequencies, which have a limited geographical range. The AM transmitters, which cost about $10.5 million, are located at a site outside Kabul. In addition to the large AM transmitters, the BBG has installed FM transmitters --- one for the Afghan Government, the other for BBG --- in Kabul. Plans are under way to install additional FMs in Kandahar, Herat, Mazar-e-Sharif and Jalalabad. With the completion of the AM transmitters, U.S. international broadcasting is available on AM, FM, shortwave and via the Internet. U.S. international broadcasting has played a major role in assisting Afghanistan`s media since 2001. VOA and Radio Free Afghanistan, operated by Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty http://www.rferl.org have increased coverage in and around Afghanistan, including national, local, health, education and humanitarian events. The services, which have a combined 24-hour stream, have also trained Afghan journalists in reporting, editing and broadcasting. BBG has also assisted Afghanistan TV with technical equipment and programming. The BBG is an independent federal agency which supervises all U.S. government-supported non-military international broadcasting, including the Voice of America (VOA), Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL); Radio Free Asia (RFA); Radio and TV Martí, Radio Sawa and Radio Farda. The services broadcast in 65 languages to over 100 million people around the world in 125 markets. Nine members comprise the BBG, a presidentially appointed body. Current governors are Chairman Kenneth Y. Tomlinson, Joaquin Blaya, Blanquita W. Cullum, D. Jeffrey Hirschberg, Edward E. Kaufman, Robert M. Ledbetter, Jr., Norman J. Pattiz and Steven Simmons. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell serves as an ex officio member (BBG press release May 22 via DXLD) As I recall, in the meantime, BBG services to Afghanistan were already on 1296 from outside the country, Tajikistan (gh, DXLD) ** AFGHANISTAN. WOMEN'S RADIO INITIATIVE MAZAR-E SHARIF, 27 May 2003 (IRIN) - Najiyah Hanifi, a young Afghan radio journalist, is heading up the first women's community radio station in northern Afghanistan, located in the city of Mazar-e Sharif. "This work is not without challenges, but we have a long journey ahead," she told IRIN. . . http://www.irinnews.org/report.asp?ReportID=34332&SelectRegion=CentralAsia&SelectCountry=AFGHANISTAN (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** ALBANIA: Summer A-03 schedule for Radio Tirana: Albanian to Eu 0800-0900 Daily 7110 CER 100 kW / non-dir 1400-1700 Daily 7270 CER 050 kW / non-dir 2030-2200 Daily 7295 CER 100 kW / 305 deg Albanian to NoAm 2300-0330 Daily 7270 CER 100 kW / 305 deg English to Eu 1845-1900 Mon-Sat 7210 SHI 100 kW / 310 deg 9520 CER 100 kW / 305 deg 2130-2200 Mon-Sat 7130 SHI 100 kW / 310 deg 9540 CER 100 kW / 305 deg English to NoAm 0145-0200 Tue-Sun 6115 CER 100 kW / 305 deg 7160 CER 100 kW / 305 deg 0230-0300 Tue-Sun 6115 CER 100 kW / 305 deg 7160 CER 100 kW / 305 deg German to Eu 1730-1800 Mon-Sat 9570 CER 100 kW / 350 deg Greek to Eu 1715-1730 Mon-Sat 6130 CER 100 kW / non-dir French to Eu 1900-1930 Mon-Sat 7210 SHI 100 kW / 310 deg Italian to Eu 1800-1830 Mon-Sat 7240 CER 100 kW / non-dir Serbian to Eu 2115-2130 Mon-Sat 6135 SHI 100 kW / non-dir Turkish to ME 1700-1715 Mon-Sat 6130 CER 100 kW / non-dir (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, May 27 via DXLD) ** ANTARCTICA. ANTARCTICA NET. There is a new Antarctica Net every Saturday on 14300 kHz around 1900z. Net Control is LU4DXU. He is in touch with LU1Z stations. Last Saturday LU1ZV, the Esperanza Base, was on the air. They expect DP1POL for next Saturday (KB8NW/OPDX May 26/BARF-80 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Note that the Maritime Mobile Service Net is on 14300 kHz at that time (Norfolk, DXLD) ** ARGENTINA. THE JOSEPHINES FATHERS ARE GETTING RECEPTION REPORTS FOR THEIR NEW AM FROM SCANDINAVIA by Padre José Luis Di Paolo, director, LRJ212 & LRJ417 Editor`s Note: Father José Luis Di Paolo, a member of the Josephine Fathers and Brothers, is the director of LRJ212 Radio Murialdo 1290 AM and LRJ417 FM Familia 90.5 FM in Mendoza. He is also the dedicated translator of Catholic Radio Update into its Spanish edition, Radio Católica al Día. We appreciate his writing this article, and were as pleasantly surprised to receive it as he has been in getting such distant reception reports. For those not familiar with the term, DXing is the hobby of carefully listening on the broadcast bands for distant radio stations. The Scandinavians are famous for DXing skill, picking up stations from around the globe by use of long wire antennas strung for hundreds of feet, often in rural locations. Of course, their long winter nights are of great help. Mendoza, May 16 (for RCD) With pleasant surprise the staff of Radio Murialdo are receiving reception forms coming from the farthest lands of the European continent. Across more than 22,000 kilometers of distance from its coverage area, reports have been received from Finland, Norway and Sweden. With precise and careful details, DXers in those countries have kindly sent their reports by means of letters, electronic mail and even recordings of their reception. It should be said that this Catholic radio station, operated by San Leonardo Murialdo`s Josephines, transmits from the county of Mendoza, on the frequency of 1290 Khz with a power of 5/1 Kw, an antenna of the folded monopole type, mounted in a tower 62 meters high, using transmitter and connection links between its studios and transmitter. Radio Murialdo transmits for the time being in parallel with Radio Familia FM, on 90.5 Mhz, its older affiliate. Because the need arose to reach a bigger population, not only overcoming the problems posed to reception because of the mountainous terrain, but mainly because the spectrum in the FM band is, in most of the main Argentine cities, saturated with radio stations, many of those illegal, creating a serious interference problem that has existed for years and is difficult to solve. Because of this, despite being animated with the same purpose, namely ``to bring you a message of faith, of hope and of love, with a cultural and Catholic sense``, and despite the invaluable support of the Congregation of Josephines and of the listeners and friends of the radio stations, achieving that goal had not happened after almost 45 years. But this new voice on AM, Radio Murialdo, is having success in the service of preaching the Gospel. Mendoza is a city located in west-central República Argentina, at the foot of the Andes mountain range, its natural limit to the west. Here the Andes attain their greatest height: the Aconcagua at 6,959 meters. There is an extensive desert plain toward the east and other in counties toward the north and south. Approximately 780 meters above sea level, their area is 148.827 square kilometers, with a population of nearly 1.700.000 inhabitants. It is divided into two dioceses, the Archdiocese of Mendoza, located in the north-central part of the county, with 59 parishes, and San Rafael Diocese toward the south. Mendoza is the product of the man`s labor on arid soil. The water coming from melting snow and ice of the Andes is channeled to where it is needed, thus providing for the necessities of human consumption and of vegetation. Parks and natural large orchards, olive trees, and particularly wine, express the wealth of a fruitful ground after the farmer`s arduous work. The county produces more than 60% of the wines of the country, many of them of excellent export quality, in more than a half million cellars. For their attractiveness and characteristics the land is known as the ``earth of the sun and of good wine``. Its climate is dry, temperate, with typical temperatures that range between the 24 and 9 degrees, although that range varies greatly, given the local characteristics of the soil, the altitude, etc. The area is attractive, particularly the neatness of its cities, with their characteristic brilliant sidewalks, their boulevards, and the captivating hospitality of their inhabitants. Database --- Villa Nueva de Guaymallén: LRJ 417 FM Familia 90.5 FM (1,000 watts PRA, antena 72 m, 8 dipoles) & LRJ212 1290 AM (5,000 watts por los días, 1,000 watts por las noches). Arzobispado de Mendoza. (Josefinos de Murialdo). Avenida Bandera de los Andes 4404, M5521AXL Villa Nueva de Guaymallén, Mendoza, Argentina. Tel.: (0054) (261) 421-3992, 426-1857. E-mail: murialdo@lanet.com.ar Padre José Luis DiPaolo CSJ, director. Tíndaro Muscará, coordinador. 24 hras (Catholic Radio Update May 26 via DXLD) ** AUSTRIA. Radio Afrika International via Moosbrunn heard at 1500- 1559 UT on 17875 kHz on 26 May 2003. Carrier and brief ID "Osterreich Eins" in German at 1500, then pause before "Radio Afrika International" ID and announcements in English, including telephone number 00431 4944033 (in Austria) and e-mail address radio.afrika@s... [truncated] Then into French with talks and African music until repeat of English announcement at 1545 and ten minutes of African sports news in English. French again at 1555 until sign-off abruptly mid-song at 1559. Good reception at 1500, dropped off a bit by sign-off. Thanks to Chris Greenway for the time and frequency of this one (Tony Rogers, Birmingham - UK, AOR 7030+ / LW, BDXC-UK via DXLD) As I recall, the language mix varies from one day to the next; this was Monday (gh) ** BOLIVIA. Hola colegas! Ayer, al caer la tarde, regresamos de nuestro DX Camp en Chascomus, donde hicimos muy buenas captaciones. Vino un poco flojo para el lado de la región andina, que es lo que más particularmente me interesa, pero de todas maneras, escuchamos una emisora totalmente desconocida para nosotros en 4650.3, ayer domingo, sobre las 1030+ UT, con un servicio de mensajes en español para pobladores rurales. La localidad que se mencionó en varias ocasiones es "Camiri". Va a ver que investigar un poco. En algún momento pensamos que podría tratarse de Radio Santa Ana (4649v) que se había corrido un poco, mas luego corroboramos que ésta estaba en el aire en su frecuencia habitual. Otra captación interesante fue la recientemente informada por el colega Rogildo Fontenelle Aragão, Radio Nueva Esperanza, por los 6586 y algo (disculpenme pero estoy en la oficina y no tengo el listado conmigo). En el próximo Conexión Digital comenzaremos a reproducir las escuchas. 73`s (Arnaldo Slaen, BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA, May 26, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. A pedido de Arnaldo Slaen, de Buenos Aires, Argentina, Paulo Roberto e Souza, de Tefé (AM), entrou em contato com a direção da Rádio 6 de Agosto, de Xapuri (AC). A emissora pertence à Prefeitura daquela cidade. Não possui telefone fixo. A direção está a cargo do Sr. Wesley. Entretanto, o Paulo percebeu "um certo desconhecimento acerca de informes de recepção, apesar da afirmação de que a estação responde a seus ouvintes". BRASIL - Já faz um bom tempo que o sinal da Rádio Globo, do Rio de Janeiro (RJ), vem apresentando problemas de modulação em 11805 kHz. Em 24 de maio, às 1810, durante o programa Show de Bola, o problema foi constatado novamente (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX May 25 via DXLD) ** BRUNEI. MUSEUM HONOURS BRUNEI'S WOMEN BROADCASTERS Bandar Seri Begawan The Department of Brunei Museums has organised a project entitled "An Oral History of the Past Experiences of Women Broadcasters in Radio Brunei". . . http://www.brudirect.com/DailyInfo/News/Archive/May03/260503/nite08.htm (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** CAMEROON. GOVERNMENT CLOSES FREEDOM FM RADIO STATION Posted to the web May 27, 2003 Abidjan --- The Government of Cameroon forced a new radio station to shut down last week the day before it was due to go on air as part of a continuing drive to silence critical media, Reporters sans Frontieres (RSF) said on Tuesday. . . http://allafrica.com/stories/200305270470.html (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** CANADA. For weeks now, it seems, I have not noticed CFRX on 6070 at various checks, day and night. Has it conked out again with no one else noticing, or caring, even in Toronto? Or maybe it is at low power, as Chile seems to have something co-channel (Glenn Hauser, OK, May 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. Frequency change for Radio Canada International in English effective May 22: 2200-2400 NF 6140 SAC 250 kW / 227 deg, ex 13670 (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, May 27 via DXLD) ** CANADA. REPORTER DAVID MCLAUCHLIN DIES AT 55 MONTREAL An award-winning CBC Radio journalist has died. David McLauchlin died of a brain cancer Sunday afternoon. He was known for his compassionate features from across Canada and abroad for Radio News and CBC's former flagship program, Sunday Morning. CBC PROFILE - David McLauchlin In February, his feature on the Congo, "Cursed by Riches" took listeners to the heart of that tragic land. His hour-long production about three generations of a family of black musicians in Nova Scotia won a Gabriel Award in 1981 for the best radio documentary. Last year David won a Canadian Association of Journalists award for his report on the high rates of brain cancer in firefighters. There will be a tribute tonight for David on the World at Six. And later this morning Bernard St. Laurent will have an essay about his Quebec colleague on "Sounds Like Canada." David McLauchlin was 55. Copyright © 2003 CBC All Rights Reserved (via Ricky Leong, QC, May 26, DXLD) ** CHECHNYA. MOSCOW HAS BIG PLANS FOR CHECHEN MEDIA By Timur Aliev Special to The Moscow Times GROZNY -- It is 9.30 a.m., and five journalists from Chechnya's state- owned television get into two cars to go to their separate assignments. . . http://www.themoscowtimes.com/stories/2003/05/27/003.html (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** CHINA. On May 26, People in the Know will focus on Chinese President Hu Jintao's upcoming visits to countries throughout Europe and Asia. It will be the newly-elected president's first trip overseas since he took office in March earlier this year. Experts from China and the US will center on Sino-Russian ties, and will take a look at the world's impression of China's new leaders (Jim, CRI/English, http://pw2.netcom.com/~jleq/cri1.htm swprograms via DXLD) [non]. Too late now, but FYI. Guess its absence was a fluke the night before: rechecking UT May 26 at 0337, CRI via Spain was back on 9690 (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CROATIA [non]. V. of Croatia via Germany in English is on 9925, at 0200-0216 and again 0300-0316; so far I have heard each one only once (David Crystal, Israel, May 21? DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA [non]. CUBAN-AMERICAN COMMUNITY DIVIDED OVER POLICY By Henry Hamman in Miami Published: May 26 2003 20:42 | Last Updated: May 26 2003 20:42 The US response to last month's crackdown on dissent in Cuba that resulted in the imprisonment of 70 opposition activists has highlighted deep divisions inside the powerful Cuban-American community. So far, President George W. Bush has limited the US response to two actions. The US this month expelled 14 Cuban diplomats on the grounds that they were intelligence agents. Meanwhile, it has launched experiments with satellites and airborne transmitters to beam into Cuba programming from US government-backed Radio and TV Marti, and begun a 24-hour transmission of a high-power short-wave broadcast of Radio Martí. . . http://news.ft.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=FT.com/StoryFT/FullStory&c=StoryFT&cid=1051390328599 (Financial Times via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) What in the world does that last bit mean? R. Martí has had `high- power` SW broadcasts forever, if you add up the half a dozen 250 kW transmitters on the air at any one time. Possibly refers to the additional SW transmitters for I-day 101 May 20, but that was quite temporary. The rest of this story goes into no detail about this. Does Mr Hamman have no idea of basic facts about the operation? (Glenn Hauser, DXLD) ** CUBA. Re: 590, 3-091: This is no doubt part of the retaliation for the stepped-up Radio Martí operations. The Cuban government had threatened to cause interference to US stations by boosting the power of their own transmitters. I wouldn't be surprised to see more transmitters spring back to life in the coming weeks :-) (Andy Sennitt, Netherlands, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Re DXLD 3-091, 5/25/03, item for Cuba, transcript of RHC DXUL omitted statement's interesting last sentence. Said US expenditure of $25M annually on this broadcasting is wasted, because the broadcasts are "effectively jammed on the island". I was rather amazed; is this an admission of active jamming? My thinking is, if you have to jam, you have already lost. And of course, if one works at RHC, one cannot be "apolitical". BTW, not a trace of RHC on 9820 / 6000 tonite, Memorial Day 5/26, after a great signal last nite. Does RHC take US holidays off? Regards, (Hue Miller / Albany, OR, May 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) You mean you actually heard Arnie say the J-word, but censored out of his transcript??? RHC seems to be incredibly fragile --- anything can knock them off the air on unpredictable occasions, such as, I theorize: power black- or brownouts; hurricanes; transmitters redeployed for temporary jamming increases; something breaks down in the transmitter(s) or antenna(s); studio-transmitter link fails; reel- to-reel tape recorder playback at studio breaks (gh, DXLD) ** CZECH REPUBLIC. Summer A-03 schedule of Radio Prague: CZECH 0130-0157 6200 7345 0230-0257 7345 7385# 9870 0830-0857 11600 21745 0930-0957 21745 1100-1127 11615 21745 1230-1257 6055 7345 1330-1357 13580 21745 1530-1557 5930 21745 1730-1757 5930 17485 1930-1957 5930 11600 2100-2127 11600 13580 2330-2357 9440 11615 ENGLISH 0000-0027 7345 9440 0100-0127 6200 7345 0300-0327 7345 7385# 9870 0330-0357 11600 15620 0700-0727 9880 11600 0900-0927 21745 1030-1057 9880 11615 1300-1327 13580 21745 1600-1627 5930 21745 1700-1727 5930 17485 2000-2027 5930 11600 2130-2157 11600 13580 2230-2257 11600 13580 GERMAN 0630-0657 5930 7345 1000-1027 6055 9880 1200-1227 6055 7345 1500-1527 5930 1630-1657 5990* FRENCH 0600-0627 5930 7345 0800-0827 9880 11600 1630-1657 5930 17485 1830-1857 5930 13580 2200-2227 11600 13580 RUSSIAN 0400-0427 9865 11600 1130-1157 11615 15685* 21745 1430-1457 9855* 11645 13580 1530-1557 7195* SPANISH 0030-0057 7345 9440 0200-0227 7345 7385# 9870 0730-0757 9880 11600 1400-1427 11990 13580 1800-1827 5930 13580 1900-1927 5930 13580 2030-2057 5930 11600 2330-2357 9440 11615 13580 # via WRMI=Radio Miami International * via RSO=Rimavská Sobota [SLOVAKIA] (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, May 27 via DXLD) ** ECUADOR. Frequency change for HCJB in Spanish effective June 1: 0100-0500 NF 9745* QUI 100 kW / 325 deg, ex 9525 * till May 31 in English (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, May 27 via DXLD) Pifo ** ECUADOR. I haven`t been able to get any real info out of HCJB, despite having been a regular contributor AND having done volunteer work in Ecuador for them!! It almost seems they are trying to hide something. They did have a problem with the transmitting site because of the Quito airport expansion, but they have always been saying the facility would be moved and that English would continue. So, I am just wondering if you heard any clear information about it. Thanks! (Harry Chase, WA1VVH, (long-time HCJB listener and radio ham), DX LISTENING DIGEST) Referred him to previous issues of DXLD starting with 3-070 when this story broke (gh) Hi Glenn: There seems to be some confusion as to the exact date of the NAm English close down. We all have been told that May 31 is the end (which of course will be June 1 here in NAm). On Sunday`s Musical Mailbag they mentioned that they will be back "next week" for their final show which would make it June 2 UT? Have you heard anything as to when they actually will be pulling the plug? 73 (Mickey Delmage, AB, May 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) News to me that they might be on beyond UT June 1 0600. Perhaps MM was being imprecise? Lots of their previous deadlines have proven not to be firm. BTW, at 0600 UT it`s June 1 in only part of North America (gh) I guess what I meant to say is that for us DXers it will already be June 1 UT when they pull the plug. I'll check with them on the MM, but they take a while to respond. For sure they mentioned the last MM would be "next week". I know they record the show week(s) in advance of airing so perhaps they messed up. Ham Radio Today mentioned on Saturday that next week would be their last HRT. It will be interesting to see which US based station is offering air time [for DXPL, not HRT]. RMI and The Planet are "DX" catches here (Mickey Delmage, Sherwood Park, Alberta, ibid.) ** EGYPT. R. Cairo will test 17675 kHz to replace 17775 (English and Bengali to South Asia) which is heavily being interfered by Radio Tashkent in between 1215-1430 UT. Please check special test broadcast on 27th, 28th and 30th May 2003 on the said frequency. 73, (Swopan Chakroborty, Kolkata, India, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** FINLAND. Does anybody have the current schedule of YLE Radio Finland? These guys don't have it on their website (only for Russian and Latin broadcasts) and upon request to send it by mail I have so far received no reply. Tnx4ur help! 73 (Eike Bierwirth, 04317 Leipzig, DL, May 27, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** GERMANY. Regarding Bob's comment in DXLD-3090: SWR has a whole bunch of programs, with SWR3 being the music program (and one of the better ones, if not the best on German FM IMHO). It is still on 6030 kHz which might be harder to copy in NAm, regarding that the low-power Canadians on 49m are also a tricky catch here in Europe. The news channel is called SWR Cont.Ra (original spelling) and now got the 7265 channel, parallel to MW. It is a good news program, however, but a pity for the music, also for me, who lives 400 km away from FM coverage and having better reception on 7265. Internet listening http://www.swr3.de/musik/webradio/ then click on the highlighted "einschalten") is not much of an all-time option at German phone rates. And DSL is not available in my street! Find the current overall shortwave schedule: http://www.eibi.de.vu/ 73, -- (Eike Bierwirth, 04317 Leipzig, DL, DX LISTENING DIGST) ** GERMANY. RIZ COMPANY DELIVERS TRANSMITTER TO DEUTSCHE TELEKOM AND LIBYA | Text of report in English by Croatian news agency HINA Zagreb, May 26: The Croatian RIZ Odasiljaci company on Monday [26 May] delivered a brand new type of digital shortwave transmitter to Germany's Deutsche Telekom. The transmitter, worth one million euros [approximately 1.187m dollars], is the first of this kind in Europe. Plans of this Croatian firm for the first half of 2003 are to deliver transmitters, whose total value is some four million euros, to Vietnam, Germany, Libya and Egypt. Source: HINA news agency, Zagreb, in English 1121 gmt 27 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** GERMANY [non]. DW via Bonaire splatters all over: see DRM below ** GREECE. VOG is in English at 0930-1000 on 12105 and again on MW from Rhodes 1260 at 1030-1100; I have heard each one only once so far (David Crystal, Israel, May 21? DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HUNGARY [and non]. I just received about May 22 a QSL / postcard from Budapest for a March 8th letter report. Not bad. Less than 3 months which is reasonable. It is the first card from them since 1967, though I rarely (if ever) sent them a report during that time. Let's not forget that QSLing is an expensive courtesy, and most stations are not going to live up to the efficient norms of Radio Sweden (recently in about 10 days, snail mail both ways) Radio Netherlands, or Radio Prague (an e-mailed report received a mail response in less than one week). Also, Radio Australia, is far from a speedy replier, and often in the past, 6 months or more needed to get a reply. When it comes to countries like Viet Nam, Mongolia, Papua New Guinea, Syria, Jordan, Korea, etc. or most Afican / Latin American broadcasters, be glad for any reply at all. Often that long forgotten report that is a year or more overdue will really brighten the day when it is retrieved from the mail (Roger Chambers, Utica, New York, May 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I cannot agree with Bob (Padula) and Scott (R. Barbour Jr.)'s bad experiences of Radio Budapest's QSL policy. All my reports (about the German service) have been verified within three months. With one exception: my report dated July 7, 2000 wasn`t verified until March 2001. Replying to my reminder, they stated that the QSL had already been sent in August 2000. But I never got the letter. Maybe the letter was lost on the postal way. So I sent my RR once again via email. Within two weeks I got a "new" QSL. Best wishes from Wuppertal vy 55 + 73 (Manfred Reiff, May 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) (Editor of "Shortwave-News" and "News from the Middle East" of the EAWRC) http://www.mrreiff.de --- http://www.stvoy.de --- http://www.dxworld.de ** INDIA. AIR IN 13 MHz BAND -- amended operations effective May 25: 13605 1730-2030 English " 2230-0045 English 13620 0200-0345 Pushto/Dari " 0345-0530 Farsi/Arabic " 1945-2030 French 13630 0045-0130 Burmese 13645 1100-1200 Thai 13695 0300-0415 Hindi " 0945-1100 English " 1100-1245 Tamil/Telugu 13700 0115-0200 Tibetan 13710 1315-1500 English 13750 1500-1730 English 13770 1600-1730 Hindi 13795 2245-0045 Hindi/Tamil All transmissions from Bangalore (Bob Padula, EDXP World Broadcast Magazine May 26, used by permission from http://edxp.org via DXLD) {some above include 15-minute warmup period} ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. Sirius' 100 satellite radio channels are no longer car-bound. Two portable tuners - the KTC-H2A1 Here2Anywhere tuner from Kenwood and the Satellite Radio Shuttle from Audiovox - give subscribers the freedom to listen to satellite radio in the car, at home and at work. Each satellite tuner costs about $100; an optional car docking kit, which includes an antenna, power adapter and mounting hardware, costs about $70; a similar dock for the house costs the same. A subscription to the service, which includes 60 channels of commercial-free music and 40 channels of news, sports and entertainment, costs $12.95 a month. Availability: June. http://www.sirius.com Compiled by Deborah Porterfield. © Copyright 2003 The Tennessean (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. PROGRAMME SUMMARY OF VOICE OF FREEDOM NEWS BULLETIN 1340 GMT 26 MAY 03 (Reception: fair to good; with faint Russian voices heard in the background) A: Opening announcement 1. (1340). Opening announcement: "The Voice of Mojahed; The Voice of Mojahedin-e Khalq of Iran; The Voice of the National Iranian Liberation Army; The Voice of the New Revolution of the Iranian people". 2. (1340) Presenter greets and thanks all MKO supporters who took part in the last two weeks' protest marches against the inclusion of MKO on the list of terrorist organizations. . 3. (1341) Announcement of today's programmes as follows: a) The news; b) The 27th instalment in a series of ideological lectures by Mas'ud Rajavi; c) Fifth part of a special programme commemorating 30 Khordad (20 June), anniversary of the formation of the MKO army d) Programme called: From the perspective of Maryam Rajavi; e) Programme called: Flag of Freedom. . . Source: BBC Monitoring research in English 26 May 03 (via DXLD) WTFK? Russian site, then? ** IRAN [non]. An unidentified station on 6770.05 kHz has been heard on two separate occasions in the past few days: 22 May 2003: tune-in at 0135 UT to patriotic-sounding song by choir, then emphatic talk in Persian (or something similar). Blocked by Iranian-type jammer at 0141. 26 May 2003: tune-in to open carrier at 0123 UTC then at 0125 into drum roll (presumably at start of scheduled transmission), but lost within seconds under Iranian-type jammer again (Tony Rogers, Birmingham - UK, AOR 7030+ / LW, BDXC-UK via DXLD) ** IRAQ. SACKED MEDIA STAFF MEET US OFFICIALS An estimated 2000 former employees of the state-run Iraqi media gathered on Saturday outside the Baghdad headquarters of the recently- established Iraq Media Network (IMN). They were met by US officials, who took their names and promised to contact them concerning termination of service payments and the possibility of being rehired. The previous day, US civil administrator for Iraq Paul Bremer had abolished the Information Ministry, thereby making more than 5000 staff redundant. A senior US official, who asked to remain anonymous, said the IMN would hire some of the sacked employees, but most would never return to their jobs. "Senior officials and Baath Party members employed by the ministry will not be eligible for hire," he said (RN Media Network May 26 via DXLD) ** IRAQ. IRAQIS UNHAPPY WITH U.S. SIGNALS INTERFERENCE FROM AMERICANS AMONG CHALLENGES FOR POST-HUSSEIN TV By Peter Slevin, Washington Post Staff Writer, Monday, May 26, 2003; Page A13 BAGHDAD -- Putting Iraqi television back on the air has proved to be no simple matter, from the electrical outages to the makeshift staff assembled in the postwar chaos. Telephones do not work, and news is hard to confirm. And then there is the dispute over the editorial influence of U.S. occupation authorities. The U.S. ambassador to Morocco, Margaret Tutwiler, was dispatched to Baghdad to polish and package the U.S. occupation. But she triggered a rebellion earlier this month when she and a young White House aide in Baghdad, Dan Senor, intervened with strong judgments about programs and said that broadcasts would be reviewed in advance by the wife of a prominent Kurdish militia leader, according to several people involved. . . http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A38682-2003May25.html © 2003 The Washington Post Company (via Kraig Krist, Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** IRAQ. IRAQIS TUNE IN SATELLITE TV --- WITH SADDAM GONE, SALES OF DISHES SOAR --- By MONI BASU, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Ra'ed Hameed secretly bought a satellite dish on the black market four years ago and kept it well hidden in his house. He waited patiently for the day when television stations beamed in from other parts of the world would not be forbidden. Hameed got his wish when U.S. troops marched into Baghdad, driving dictator Saddam Hussein from power. He fished out his unused dish and connected his TV set, ready to watch Fox News and "those racy German movies I had heard about." But freedom to channel-surf came with a price in Iraq. "I finally was able to use my satellite, but now I have no electricity," Hameed said. "Can you imagine how I feel?" Baghdad remains without electricity for a majority of the day, but those who can afford to buy satellite dishes are scooping them up. In the weeks since Saddam's collapse, dishes of all sizes and varieties have sprung up in reputable electrical appliance shops as well as makeshift vending stands across the city. Satellite telephones, also banned during Saddam's days, are selling like hotcakes, too, in Iraq, where most of the telephone system is still down. The Capital Flower Shop dumped its floral arrangements for a few good imported dishes. Supermarkets, shoe stores and even produce stalls cleared inventory to make way for the hottest item in town. Wisam Saadi, 22, parked his white hatchback on a busy street and plopped a Korean-manufactured Panorama dish on the street. "$150," his handwritten sign read. He said he has 700 dishes stored at home and sells as many as seven a day for a profit of $7 to $10 on each. "It's a good business right now," Saadi said. "Hard to sell anything else to people." Shipped in from the Kurdish-controlled regions in the north, Syria, Lebanon and Jordan, the dishes sell from $125 to $300, more than an average Iraqi's annual salary. But shopkeeper Wathel Kamel said yesterday's "forbidden fruit" sells fast. The satellite dishes are, perhaps, a small but tangible proof of a new Iraq. Sidewalks crammed with hundreds of the giant saucerlike instruments give some parts of Baghdad a Space Age look. Curious passers-by checked out the once-unfamiliar dishes, running their fingers on the smooth surfaces. Others stopped to catch a glimpse of Lebanese singer Haifa gyrate in a black tube top and skin-tight pants. "Before, we saw only darkness," said Kamel, 37, who cleared out space in his electrical appliances shop to make way for hundreds of dishes. "Iraqis want to see how the outside world lives, how it thinks. This was forbidden under Saddam." The Iraqi dictator had anyone caught with satellite TV put behind bars for as much as two years. Still, some folks went to great lengths to get their MTV. Kamel made a Styrofoam cage for his dish and kept it out of sight behind his house. "I knew the fine was steep, but I took the chance anyway," he said. But most Iraqis were privy to just four state-run channels that broadcast mostly turgid news about the glories of Saddam and his Baath Party. Pro-Saddam slogans would appear even between reruns of American shows such as "Dallas" or "Charlie's Angels." Satellite phones were banned, too. Baghdad had its share of Internet cafes, but as Rafah Goria, 30, said: "Every page we tried to open said 'access denied.' They blocked everything." Goria said now Iraqis have the freedom to flip through hundreds of channels of movies, entertainment and most of all, "real news" about their own country. "Satellite TV is a great way to shape Iraqi minds," she said. "We don't know the truth about our own land. Iraqis can now learn about our past. I want every Iraqi to have satellite." Goria bought her dish a month ago and stays glued to her 19-inch Toshiba TV set whenever she has power. She admitted to enjoying "romantic films." Her favorite, she said, was "You've Got Mail" with Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan. "If there is electricity, I stay up till 4 in the morning watching TV," she said. "I used to love to listen to music. But now I just want to watch political discussions. It's so new for us." (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** IRELAND. GARDAI SHUT DOWN PIRATE RADIO STATIONS Business & Finance 22 May 2003 Gardai have shut down a large number of pirate radio stations operating in Dublin city. In a joint operation with the telecom watchdog, ComReg, the Gardai raided the premises of the illegal broadcast operations and seized their equipment. The regulator has declined to comment on how many stations were shut down, but a swift spin of the dial reveals that Phantom FM, Jazz FM, Choice FM and Premier FM - some of which have applied for radio licences in the past - have all been removed from the airwaves. In response to the sudden crackdown, the pirate stations claim that they are providing services to markets that are not being served by the commercial stations. "The Broadcasting Commission has consistently failed to understand the importance of this service and its popularity amongst Dublin listeners," Phantom FM said in a statement on its website. "In the meantime, it continues to reward existing license holders with additional franchises which fail to provide listening choice." The station added that it provides an important service by giving local artists valuable access to the airwaves and affordable media space to promote their gigs and recordings (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** JAPAN [non]. R. Japan, NHK in English at 1400-1500 is now on 17870 instead of 17755, 16 and 18 May, reception wonderful good (David Crystal, 19125 Israel, DX LISTENING DIGEST) As in 3-088, the site was moved from Sri Lanka to UK, but temporarily (gh, DXLD) ** LATVIA [and non]. I haven't heard the winning Turkish entry but I think the Eurovision songs tend to sound too homogenized and bland and not enough like the music of the country from which they come. I wonder if the Eurovision victory will help Turkey at all with what they REALLY want out of greater Europe - at least a time table for entry into the European Union and perhaps better treatment for their guest workers in EU territory (Joel Rubin, swprograms via DXLD) I couldn`t agree more about the homogenization and blandness. I see that the http://www.eurovision.tv website offers audio and jerky video files of each entry (gh) ** LEBANON. Glenn, DXers may be interested to know that a 1969 Radio Liban QSL card has just fetched US$787 at an eBay auction. QSL cards are well established as collectibles now, and recent price levels (over US$50 each for AM/SW cards) would indicate that prices are taking off. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2174818678&category=38031 An average collection of, say 1000 cards from the 1960's to date, may well be worth over US$50,000 depending on which stations are included. I encourage all DXers to insure their QSL card collections, to make bequest provisions to lodge them with club collections and preservation groups or museums, or if they choose to put them on the market, to be aware of their potential value. 73's (David Ricquish, Radio Heritage Collection http://www.radiodx.com Wellington, New Zealand, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** LIBERIA. Dear Glenn: I can confirm for you that the station was indeed RADIO VERITAS from Liberia; they start at 0600 on 5470. On May 18th I listened a program in English at 0630 UT, gospel music, ID: This is VERITAS bringing you the best songs. Can you get their postal address or e-mail, please. Does Liberia post office is working normally? Thanks (CESAR PEREZ DIOSES, CHIMBOTE, PERU, May 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Does anyone have current info on E and P-mail to and from Veritas and Liberia? (gh, DXLD) ** LIBYA. RIZ COMPANY DELIVERS TRANSMITTER TO DEUTSCHE TELEKOM AND LIBYA | Text of report in English by Croatian news agency HINA Zagreb, May 26: Also, the Croatian company delivered two mobile mediumwave radio-transmitter centres, worth a half million euros to Libya's information ministry. Plans of this Croatian firm for the first half of 2003 are to deliver transmitters, whose total value is some four million euros, to Vietnam, Germany, Libya and Egypt. Source: HINA news agency, Zagreb, in English 1121 gmt 27 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** LIBYA [and non]. Hi Glenn, Hi Anker, Re DXLD, I just wanna comment on Paul's observation of 9745 kHz. Sounds like they don't use that frequency anymore. Yesterday 25/03 I checked that station around 2130 UT and they were on with a real better reception on both 7245 kHz, and 11660 kHz. Leaving the air to Bahrain on 9745 kHz --- just for the joy of getting that hard catch :) I noticed as well Anker getting an Arabic station on 9745 around 2100 UT. I reckon that's Bahrain not Libya as they sign off at 1900 UT not 1930 (Tarek Zeidan, Cairo, Egypt, May 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO. 9597.6, R. UNAM very tentative, but Spanish audio here as I type this at 1413 May 26. Anyone else hearing this? (Hans Johnson, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) I also had a carrier around 9598 as recently reported, and again around 1230 UT May 27, het against NSB (gh, DXLD) Hans, All I've got at 2340 UT is a carrier on 9597.6 kHz (George Maroti NY, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Hi Hans, There is a definite null [sic] on 9597.6 on the NRD-515 at 0005 UT. Some very weak audio (talk) is heard. I think if George tries again, he will hear the audio since I'm only about 15 miles away from him (John Sgrulletta, Mahopac, NY, ibid.) Fellas, nice signal in north Louisiana tonight. IDed at 0103 and then had news. Mostly spoken word programs tonight but had quite a bit of music during the day. The nearby channels are clear so you can us a wider filter to make up for the low modulation. Although it is low, it is not nearly has bad as when they were last on when it was barely a whisper. Steady on 9597.6 (Hans Johnson, ibid.) I stumbled onto this het last Friday nite and have been playing trying to pull something from it. No luck, just a very nice carrier and no audio heard here on 9597.6 and some times drifts up to .7. I have used DSP software and spectrum program and there just appears to be nothing more than the carrier. At 05 AWR comes up on 9600 and kills any chance of further checking. At times the carrier is at a S9 level. Good to know there is actually some audio. Have to keep checking, I guess (Bob Montgomery, Levittown PA, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) An S7 carrier here with very low audio level even in wide modes... :^( (Paul Ormandy, Oamaru, New Zealand, sent at 0555 UT May 27, ibid.) ** NETHERLANDS. Subject : Laser 828 Just in from laserradio@yahoogroups.com In association with our Dutch partners, Laser Radio Limited has successfully applied for broadcasting licences in the Netherlands. With our Dutch partner Quality Radio, we have won the following AM broadcasting frequencies: 828 kHz, 1035 kHz, 1224 kHz, 1395 kHz and 1557 kHz Andrew Yeates, Managing Director of Laser Radio Limited said 'This is a tremendous result and shows the strength of our applications and future plans for AM broadcasting. We have some exciting programming planned, which will transform AM listening across the Benelux and surrounding markets' Managing Director of Quality Radio, Ruud Poeze, was equally delighted with the result and was looking forward to building a strong radio brand in the Netherlands. The broadcasting licences will be valid for an eight year period (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. AMSTERDAM - After years of political uncertainty, the distribution of commercial FM radio frequencies was finalised on Monday, with prominent stations Noordzee FM, Radio 538 and Sky Radio winning licenses to remain on the airwaves. . . (From http://www.telecom.paper.nl/index.asp?location=site/news%5Fta%2Easp%3Ftype%3Dabstract%26id%3D29595%26NR%3D812 26 May 2003 via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS ANTILLES. Transmitter goes haywire: see DRM below ** NEW ZEALAND. RADIO NEW ZEALAND HARASSMENT CLAIMED 27.05.2003 By MATHEW DEARNALEY Radio New Zealand's head of news, who has begun a legal battle to return to work after sick leave, has complained of being harassed by controversial chief executive Sharon Crosbie. . . http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay.cfm?storyID=3504173&thesection=news&thesubsection=general (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** OKLAHOMA. Tho I hardly listened to it, KOMA 92.5 was running its ``15th annual Mem*rial Day Top $500.00 Countdown --- Listen and Win! May 23-26`` per a 16-page yellow booklet I picked up at Carl`s Junior (what an awkward name), one of the co-sponsors. A list of 500 songs with performers, with a few missing mystery songs to be identified for contest purposes. Apparently they are identified on the air if you are listening at the right moment. Top prize of only $500 (one place it says check, another place it says cash) for listening to KOMA 24/7 for four days and nights? Second prize: dinner for four at CJ once per month from June thru December. Third place: KOMA T-shirt. Insufficient incentive. As for KOMA 1520: UT May 27 at 0346 I was tuning by to hear Jim Bohannon, but instead KOMA was ``joining regular programming in progress`` and it was not Jimbo, but ``Word of Prophecy Broadcast``!! Not in progress, but from the start. Has Bohannon been dumped entirely for gospel huxters? News/talk, indeed. The lure of easy money for programming crap must be too much for Renda. Ahá --- they finally have a program schedule up at http://www.komanews.com/sched.htm and it admits to carrying this 15- minute show in the middle of 3 hours of Jim Bohannon! What an insult to Bohannon and to listeners --- he`s just fill with his time subject to sale. I know how that feels! BTW, KOMA-1520 is carrying KFOR-TV news at 2300-2400 UT M-F. Other items of possible interest, on Sunday mornings, UT: 1030-1100 Native America Speaks [on the air for ages] 1200-1230 Focus On Oklahoma 1507-1800 Kim Komando (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** OKLAHOMA. Just as a Jay Leno rerun was about to do Headlines, 0350 UT May 27, Cox Cable in Enid lost all the OKC stations downlinked by satellite. Black screen lasted at least 20 minutes, until I quit checking, from 4, 5, 9, 25, 34 and 43, on cable channels 4, 5, 9, 8, 7 and 2 respectively. Yet until this year they were picked up off the air with no problem except occasional DX interference. Why wasn`t this kept as backup, instantly to replace a failing satellite feed [not to mention solar transit outages, as we have previously complained]? Well, I was able to turn on the TV with antenna and watch Leno and\or Nightline (Glenn Hauser, Enid, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PAKISTAN. Updated A-03 schedule of Radio Pakistan ARABIC 1815-1900 9335v 11530 ||| ex 9385v 11550 ASSAMI 0045-0115 11650 15625v [still partly English?] BANGLA 0115-0200 11650 15625v 1200-1245 15635 17635v ||| ex 15625 CHINESE 1200-1230 11570 15070 DARI 1515-1545 5860v 7375 ENGLISH 1600-1615 11570 15065 15725v 17720 GUJARATI 0400-0430 15485 17825 FARSI 1715-1800 7550 9340v ||| ex 9385v HINDI 0215-0300 9340v 11640 1100-1145 11640 15625v NEPALI 1245-1315 15635v 17635 ||| ex 15625v RUSSIAN 1415-1500 7375 9385v SINHALA 1015-1045 15625v 17495 TAMIL 0315-0345 15625v 17540 0945-1015 15625v 17495 TURKI 1330-1400 5860v 7375 TURKISH 1630-1700 9340v 11530 ||| ex 9385v 11550 URDU 0045-0215 15485 17895 0500-0700 15100 21460 0800-1104 17825 21465 ||| ex 17835 [English 0800, 1100] 1330-1530 11570 15065 1700-1900 9400 11570 1815-1900 7550 1915-0045 7570v (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, May 27 via DXLD) ** PARAGUAY. A diferentes horas pudimos escuchar desde Chascomus a Radio América, Villeta, Paraguay, por los 7371.4, con programación religiosa e identificaciones. Imposible sintonizarla para nosotros por los 15185 khz, frecuencia que ahora opera con más potencia (600 vatios). El amigazo Rubén Margenet reportó ya varios dias atrás desde Rosario a la emisora paraguaya en la frecuencia corrida de 41 metros (la nominal es 7370). Recomendamos intentar la escucha. 73's (Arnaldo Slaen, May 26, Chascomus DX Camp, Argentina, Conexión Digital via DXLD) But if we could hear it clearly, would there be any programming worth listening to? Nothing but religion? Isn`t there enough of that already on stations we --- and conosuristas --- can hear at will? What`s the point? In the true spirit of DXing, no one ever considers this (gh) ** QATAR. AL-JAZEERA CEO TO BE REPLACED Reuters reports that Al-Jazeera television is to replace its chief executive officer, but the station insists the decision has nothing to do with allegations that it had been infiltrated by Iraqi intelligence. Spokesman Jihad Ballout said CEO Mohammed Jassem al-Ali, who has headed the channel since its launch eight years ago, will remain on the board of directors but will hand over the day-to-day running to someone else. "Mohammed Jassem al-Ali was seconded from Qatar Television to set up and run Al Jazeera, and what has been decided is that this secondment be ceased and for him to go back to his normal job," Ballout said. It's interesting to note that the announcement was made before his successor has been appointed. This is not the usual procedure in such cases. It does seem that Al Jazeera are in a hurry to make Mr al-Ali's imminent departure known. If, indeed, he's still there (Andy Sennitt, Media Network blog May 27 via DXLD) ** SLOVAKIA. Summer A-03 schedule of Radio Slovakia International: ENGLISH 0100-0127 5930 6190 9440 0700-0727 9440 15460 17550 1630-1657 5920 6055 7345 1830-1857 5920 6055 7345 GERMAN 0800-0827 5915 6055 7345 1330-1357 5915 6055 7345 1600-1627 5920 6055 7345 1800-1827 5920 6055 7345 FRENCH 0200-0227 5930 6190 9440 1700-1727 5920 6055 7345 1930-1957 5920 6055 7345 RUSSIAN 1300-1327 7345 9440 11990 1500-1527 7345 9535 11715 1730-1757 5920 6055 9485 SLOVAK 0130-0157 5930 6190 9440 0730-0757 9440 15460 17550 1530-1557 5920 6055 7345 1900-1927 5920 6055 7345 SPANISH 0230-0257 6190 9440 11990 1430-1457 6055 7345 11600 2000-2027 6055 7345 11650 (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, May 27 via DXLD) {believe we had their A-03 schedule much earlier; any changes here?} ** SOLOMON ISLANDS [and non]. Good Afternoon, Glen[n]: Noted the Solomon Islands Broadcasting Service on 5020 on 5/26 with a very good signal. News by male from 1000 to 1012 about continued violence and problems with guns in the islands among others, followed by ads and music. Very listenable --- good strength and clear. Tried for Port Moresby on 4990 {sic} at the same time, but only could hear a faint signal not able to confirm. Reduced power at that time? (Tom Sliva, NYC, May 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SOUTH AFRICA. Channel Africa is in English at 1300-1450 UT on Sat and Sun, on 21620; heard only once on Sat (David Crystal, Israel, May 21? DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SYRIA. Tenho prestigiado, praticamente todos os dias, a programação em espanhol da Rádio Damasco, já que não temos mais os programas em português. Alguém aí se lembra do nome do locutor dos programas em português? Pois bem, a programação em espanhol é emitida, entre 2315 e 0030 UT (apesar de listas apontarem entre 2315 e 0015!), em 12085 e 13610 kHz. O único problema é a interferência da Rádio Mundial Católica, que emite em 13615 kHz. Lembro que na segunda-feira, por volta de 2355, "su simpática locutora Worai Galindo", como ela se define, lê os informes de recepção dos ouvintes no ar e pede insistentemente para que o pessoal escreva para a emissora. Aqui vai o endereço: Apartado Postal 4702, Damasco, Síria (Célio Romais, Porto Alegre-RS, Brasil, @tividade DX May 25 via DXLD) ** TIMOR LESTE. Stu Greene, WA2MOE, sent out the following press release on May 22nd, about the Democratic Republic of Timor Leste: "4W1BK (JA1BK) and 4W2DN (JR2KDN) will be QRV from Timor Leste from May 24 to May 29, 2003. QSL information is 4W1BK via WA2MOE and 4W1DN via JR2KDN. This is a WFWL operation. The United Nations no longer is in control and independence was won by the East Timorese on May 20, 2002. An application for new entity status will be filed together with an application to delete the former 4W territory as an entity under DXCC rules. Article 5 of the treaty between Portugal and Indonesia of May 5, 1999, removed East Timor from the list of Non-Self-Governing Territories of the General Assembly and the deletion of the question of East Timor from the agendas of the Security Council and the General Assembly. The treaty, witnessed by the Secretary General of the United Nations, did not make the United Nations the administrator of East Timor but did provide for UN humanitarian assistance. Article 7 requested 'the Secretary-General to maintain an adequate United Nations presence in East Timor.' The DX Advisory and Awards Committees quite possibly misinterpreted the language of the treaty as conferring status of East Timor as a UN administered territory which in fact was not the case. Only when the referendum authorized by the treaty was held and the East Timorese people declared themselves independent was there a new entity. The role of UNTAET (UN Transitional Administration in East Timor) was humanitarian and peacekeeping and was not a quasi-government authorized to issue amateur radio licenses. UNTAET did not have the authority to issue amateur radio licenses; it was a peacekeeping mission and only after the referendum was there a Ministry of Communications which does have that authority. The text of the treaty for those interested is at: http://www.un.org/peace/etimor99/agreement/agreeFrame_Eng01.html If ARRL agrees, the UN sanctioned operations in East Timor would be deleted on the ground that East Timor was not an entity under the rules and a new entity would be created effective 20 May 2002, the date of the creation of the East Timorese state. Democratic Republic of Timor Leste became a UN state on 27 September, 2002. ITU has reassigned 4WA-4WZ to the Democratic Republic of Timor Leste on 23 April, 2003." ADDED NOTES: Since this press release, there seems to be another operator other than the team of Kan/JA1BK (4W1BK) and Yuu/JR2KDN (4W2DN) who has been active. A station signing 4W3CW has been active on 30/20/15/10 meters CW and was active in the CQ WPX Contest this past weekend. The operator was heard sending QSL via QRZ.com. It seems that the operator is Peter, G3WQU. His length of stay is unknown. Also, no comments or announcements have been made from the DXCC Desk. Hopefully, something may be said by Wayne Mills, N7NG, after the holiday on Monday. Stay tuned (KB8NW/OPDX May 26/BARF-80 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** TIMOR LESTE. Thor, TF3MM, is also currently active from here as 4W3DX and is expected to be there for another week. He is using a rhombic antenna (leg lengths are 115 meters, up 50 meters beaming EU). Most of his activity has been on 15 and 20 meters CW. Watch 21008 kHz after 2115z and 14002-14003 kHz between 1130-1800z. QSL via TF3MM. Thor states that he will QSL when he gets back to TF-land (should be done before Christmas) (KB8NW/OPDX May 26/BARF-80 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** TURKEY. VOICE OF TURKEY ESSAY WRITING CONTEST Dear listener, We believe that you all have certain views and thoughts about Turkey and the Turks. The subject of the Voice of Turkey's essay writing contest 2003 is Turkey and the Turkish Image. We would like you to write an essay on this subject. As has been the case in the past sesquidecade, the 5 winners of the contest will be hosted in Turkey on an all-expenses-paid basis for 7 days in the first half of September. Your entries, which should not be more than 3 pages can be sent by mail, fax or email and must contain some basic information about you such as your age, your occupation, your mailing address, your electronic address, fax number and telephone no so that we may get in touch with you. We want your entries received by July 15, 2003. The Voice of Turkey would like to wish success to all who will participate in the Voice of Turkey's Essay Writing Contest 2003, the subject of which, as we have just said is TURKEY AND THE TURKISH IMAGE. Our address is : P. O. Box 333, Yenisehir. 06443 Ankara, Turkey [cedilla under the S of Yenisehir --- a district of Ankara?] Our telephone address is : 90-312-4909842; Our fax no is 90-321-4909845 And our electronic mailing address is: englishdesk@trt.net.yr (V of Turkey printed letter via Swopan Chakroborty, Kolkata, India, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I guess that if I were to say that Turkey (just as Israel) should not even have been allowed to participate as it is not situated in Europe (but in Asia), I would not be eligible to win? Maybe next time the EBU can invite Kurdistan and Palestine as wel... ;-) (Herman Boel, Belgium, Europe, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Referring to the Eurovision Song Contest, I suppose; see LATVIA [and non] (gh) VOT is in English at 2200-2255 on 9830 and 12000, ex-11960, a change early in the season but after the schedules were printed. I have heard them on 9830 and 12000 (David Crystal, Israel, May 21? DX LISTENING DIGEST) David, would you please date your letters since the postmark is not always legible (gh) ** U K. TORY DOSSIER SETS OUT PARTY'S CASE AGAINST THE BBC By Dominic Kennedy IAIN DUNCAN SMITH launched an attack on the BBC`s alleged bias against the Conservatives yesterday and personally criticised the radio presenter James Cox. . . http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,635-692776,00.html (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** U K [non]. Listening to Outlook on BBCWS, 1305 UT May 26 special from St. Petersburg, there was an undercurrent of co-channel interference, sounded like Chinese, and virtually zero-beat with a very slight subaudible heterodyne. What could this be? Later checking HFCC I find 15190 1200 1330 42-44 YAM 300 235 1234567 300303 261003 D J RCI RCI so it`s RCI via Japan. And after 1330 Udorn takes over 15190. But I can`t complain: I`m not in the BBC target area either (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. Additional frequency for BBC in Arabic: 0400-0500 on 11885 \\ 7140 7325 9915 11740 13660 15250 73 from (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, May 27 via DXLD) ** U K [non]. Laser Radio: see NETHERLANDS ** U S A. HOW HAS DEREGULATION RUINED ME...AND HOW WILL FURTHER DEREGULATION RUIN OTHERS? As you may know, the illegal deregulation of commercial radio in the United States has hurt literally thousands of people. George Will called the Telecommunications Act of 1996 "a job creation bill". In reality, it has been a job elimination bill. How many of the nearly 13,000 job losses were necessary? The answer: NONE. Deregulation has hurt me profoundly.,.. http://www.topica.com/lists/N0UIH-DXTalk/read/message.html?sort=d&mid=806413271&start=29 (Eric Bueneman, N0UIH, May 17, via DXLD) On his website Mr. `Stevenson` an angry middle-aged man, also has a novel with a radio background --- read the summary, which one suspects in uncomfortably autobiographical --- but the link to the entire otherwise unpublished opus goes nowhere (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. As radio real estate becomes valuable in the increasingly crowded FM band (88 to 108 MHz), religious broadcasters have been using a variety of legal technologies to snap up frequencies. Recently, they have been using low-powered transmitters - known as translators - that are small enough to wedge into areas not covered by other stations . . . http://www.nashvillecitypaper.com/index.cfm?section_id=10&screen=news&news_id=23235 (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** U S A. LPFM APPLICANTS FACING COMPETITION CAN USE MAX --- The MAX System returns for an anticipated MX remedial filing/settlement window REC has been hearing information that the FCC is planning to start working on the MX (mutually exclusive) LPFM applications starting 'later this summer'. In anticipation for any remedial windows that may open for this, REC has fixed up and reactivated MAX, the Mutual Application eXchange. MAX is a community forum where LPFM applicants can move meet with other applicants in an attempt to reach settlement agreements by either proposing a new channel, a new location, co-location or timeshare. At this time, we are not aware of what the FCC will allow LPFM applicants to do to remediate their applications yet. However, we would like to see as many applicants ready to go as the window may be short. To access MAX, visit http://www.recnet.com/max To access MAX, you will need to have access to your e-mail address that you put on your original FCC LPFM application. If your e-mail address has changed or you did not specify an e-mail address, please send an e-mail to rec@recnet.com for access. Please make sure you state your organization, facility ID (if you don't have it, visit recnet.com and click on 'Check Your Application Status') and station location. REC's goal is to get as many organizations on the air with LPFM stations. REC does not charge for any of our services, including MAX. REC services are provided on a 'shareware' basis. - - - - - - REC Networks - http://www.recnet.com - Bringing you fun and culture since 1984. 5/26/2003 http://www.animehardcoreradio.net - Anime Hardcore Radio - 24 hour a day anime! (REC Networks via DXLD) See also POWERLINE COMMUNICATIONS ** U S A. Tho I was not a rock fan, and WABC was too far (2+ megameters) for anything but DX reception, I listened a bit to their Memorial Day ``WABC Rewound`` rock retrospective May 26 via webcast. Tho regular streaming has to replace music bits for rights issues, the special seems to have no problem with music, but instead the news (?) on the hour at 1400 and 1500 UT was suppressed: 5 minutes of silent streaming, as well as mercifully, various commercial breaks. What`s up? (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) One word: copyright. The news on the hour and the ads between segments are modern day. Evidently the program producer has the rights only to the old stuff (John Figliozzi, who in his teens as a Long Island native listened to WABC on his Riviera 6 transistor radio almost constantly, ODXA via DXLD) Doesn`t WABC normally stream its modern-day newscasts? They have a section on the website about how much trouble they have gone to in order to resume streaming (gh) ** U S A. THE MERRY PRANKSTERS OF THE AIR Some radio deejays will do almost anything to stand out from the crowd. But not everyone is laughing as hoaxes and stunts backfire. By Bob Baker Times Staff Writer May 26 2003 What if ... ? wondered Cleveland disc jockey Shane French. What if a cat was tethered to a helium-filled balloon and launched toward the heavens, and callers to his station offered periodic reports, and finally, one gallant listener fired a gun, popped the balloon and brought the cat down gently. Would that be great radio or what? The complete article can be viewed at: http://www.latimes.com/la-et-hoaxes26may26,0,5133210.story (via Harry Helms, DXLD) Same: http://www.latimes.com/la-et-hoaxes26may26001420,0,804424.story (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) Which one will disappear first? ** U S A. George Thurman in Chicago also complains of the Bonker interfering with WWCR 5070, when he listened to his tape of WOR 1183, UT Sun 0230. So at 0507 May 26 I attempted to hear it myself, and in the huge sideband splash of WWCR was able barely to detect the bonker, seemingly around 5072. No doubt it is much worse elsewhere, and an unfortunate juxtaposition (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. NEW JERSEY RADIO -- IN TUNE WITH THE GARDEN STATE'S MANY VOICES --- Sunday, May 25, 2003 BY CLAUDIA PERRY Star-Ledger Staff New Jersey radio is more than an afterthought to New York and Philadelphia. Although the Garden State is in the middle of those Top 10 markets, it can be heard loud and clear. The state may be small geographically, but New Jersey has four distinct radio markets of its own, in addition to being part of the New York and Philly listenership. There are at least 168 stations that can be heard within its borders. Jersey commuters can tune in to the usual rock, sports talk and oldies favorites, and can also hear news and music from Korea and South Asia, as well as stations whose programming ranges from black gospel to the sounds of big bands. . . [large portion of article omitted, but recommended! See:] http://www.nj.com/living/ledger/index.ssf?/base/living-1/1053844054228850.xml . . .Multicultural Radio Broadcasting, a New York-based company, owns four radio stations in New Jersey. The company buys stations and then leases the airwaves to local producers in various ethnic communities. WNSW (1430 AM) offers Korean music and news. WPAT is programmed in Russian during the week, and plays Caribbean-oriented music and news on the weekends. The minority radio segment is one of the industry's fastest growing areas, but Multicultural East Coast vice president Tony Wong demurs. "The populations we reach are not being served by other stations," Wong said. "I don't know about 'fastest growing,' but our business is steady. There are a lot of immigrants who come to this area. They want to find out information about home." One of Multicultural's stations, WTTM (1680 AM), has its studios in Metuchen and transmitter in Princeton. Its programming is geared to South Asian listeners, with shows about cricket, weddings and Bollywood entertainment news, mixed with music from various South Asian cultures. Kulraaj Anand, the program director for WTTM, said he wanted the station to be part of the community. EBC Radio, which Anand owns, leased the 10,000-watt station a year ago from Multicultural. It has listeners as far away as West Virginia. Its core audience is the estimated 450,000 South Asians in Central Jersey and Pennsylvania. "Our community has grown a lot," Anand said. "Our culture and music is one of the oldest in the world. We're seeing our music become part of mainstream America." Mamta Narula, a computer engineer in Kenilworth who is the host of three programs on the station, delivers her on-air patter in a blend of Hindi and English. Her Tuesday night show is a mix of music from Bollywood movies, audience quizzes and up-to-date news from the Bombay film world. She also does a wedding talk show on Sundays and a three- hour show on Saturdays with co-host Sanjiv Pandya that counts down the Top 10 and delivers more Bollywood news. "I may be a computer engineer," Narula said, "but my heart and soul is in this. People have recognized me in the store just when they hear me speak. They'll come up and say, 'Are you Mamta, Jisko Kuch Nahin Jamta?' (her signature phrase, which loosely translates to "Mamta, the woman who doesn't like anything but music") I get a kick out of it." Anand, whose station is staffed by 70 volunteers, offers programming in Urdu, Hindi, Tamil, Gujarati, Bengali and Punjabi. He plans to offer a training program in the coming months for kids who want to get into radio. "This is a society where everyone is an immigrant," Anand said. "Having this station gives confidence to people in our community." From 5,000 listeners in Newark 92 years ago to WTTM's South Asian listeners, New Jersey radio has always been able to identify and serve its audience. "The story of New Jersey radio is the story of the 567 towns in the state," Miller said. "Our radio reflects what an eclectic bunch we are." (Star Ledger via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** U S A. MERGER PROPOSAL WORRIES DEMOCRATS By JULIET EILPERIN, Washington Post, 5/26/2003 WASHINGTON - Concerned about Republican inroads into the Hispanic community, congressional Democrats are trying to fend off a proposed merger between Univisión Communications and the Hispanic Broadcasting Corp. . . . http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20030526/1011330.asp (via Fred Waterer, Ont., DXLD) ** U S A. GOODBYE TV E-SKIP IN ATLANTA A new LPTV has popped up in Atlanta on channel 4. Good reception here in Decatur (east of ATL) on an indoor dipole. Occasional co-channel flutter, presumed from WYFF channel 4 in Greenville, SC when a plane passes over. With in-town high powered sticks on 2 and 5, channel 4 was always Atlanta's e-skip channel. The new LPTV on channel four in Atlanta is programming the NBC shop at home channel. What a waste. Just what we need, a local NBC "Gold" affiliate (Brock Whaley, GA, May 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VENEZUELA. VENEZUELAN JOURNALIST FEARS ARREST, SAYS CHAVEZ OBSESSED WITH MEDIA Journalist Ibeyise Pacheco believes her arrest is imminent following the publication of a transcript of a speech by President Hugo Chávez at Zulia [State] Garrison in her newspaper column on 16 May, in which he allegedly admitted to surrendering during the coup d'état on 11 April 2002. Pacheco says Chávez now feels "exposed" and harbours "malicious feelings" towards her. In this interview, she describes the situation in Venezuela as "the borderline between a dictatorship and a democracy". Pacheco says that far from ignoring the media, as Chavez often claims, the president is in fact "obsessed" with sources of information and journalism. The following is the text of interview with journalist Ibeyise Pacheco by Alfredo Meza, at the studios of KYS FM 101.5 in Caracas, date not given, published by Venezuelan newspaper El Nacional web site on 22 May; subheadings as published: "I am preparing for the moment of my arrest." The director of [daily newspaper] Así es la Noticia says that President Hugo Chávez lost his patience after learning of the contents of her 16 May column, which transcribed his speech at Zulia Garrison, during which he spoke out against US foreign policy. Ibeyise Pacheco removes her sunglasses at the entrance of radio station KYS FM 101.5, where her midday program is aired. Only then does she relax. A chubby girl approaches her to shake her hand; she repeats words from a prepared script: "We women feel represented by you. I am proud of you. Go ahead, you have our support." As has happened in the past, the director of The News is Like That, who is also an El Nacional columnist, is in the eye of the hurricane. Vice-President José Vicente Rangel and Ministers Aristóbulo Istúriz and María Cristina Iglesias filed a request at the Office of the Prosecutor-General of the Republic for an investigation of the material that the journalist published in the "In Private" ["En Privado"] column on 9 May 2003. Rumours about the journalist's possible arrest increase with every hour that passes. [Alfredo Meza] Do you expect an arrest warrant to be issued against you? [Ibeyise Pacheco] I expect the worse from government officials who level accusations against me, such as [Prosecutor-General] Isaías Rodríguez. Not only with regard to a request for a trial that would end with my incarceration, but other types of actions such as those outlined in my column on 9 May. José Vicente Rangel has exerted pressure on certain editors to prevent them from supporting [as received] what has been viewed as harassment against me. [Meza] In the last two instalments of your column "In Private" you reported two meetings, which caused the government considerable discomfort. It is interesting, however, that only after Chávez's speech at Zulia Garrison was published, the Office of the Prosecutor- General was asked to investigate the case. Why did they wait so long to request this investigation? [Pacheco] I wondered why they failed to react when I revealed the details of the 17 February meeting ("In Private", Friday 9 May) at Miraflores [Presidential] Palace. They reacted now because when I aired the tape recorded at Zulia Garrison, Chávez was exposed and it happened right after the controversy over the reception held by [US] Ambassador Charles Shapiro at his residence. In the 4 April recording, the president spoke in very harsh terms about the United States and he also admitted to his subordinates that he surrendered on 11-A [11 April 2002 coup attempt], even though he subsequently proclaimed that the next time he will open fire. It is a lie that he was arrested, it is a lie that he was kidnapped and incarcerated. Several military sources have told me, and it is true, that he voluntarily surrendered and requested the presence of mediators. I believe that he might have been shaken by this report and also by suspicions that I might have spoken with extremely valuable informants who are very close to him, people in his inner circle who might be providing me with information. [Meza] Are these government officials seeking atonement for their actions by requesting the investigation? [Pacheco] As soon as the transcript of the 17 February meeting was released, the gossip started within the administration. It was said that my informants might be José Vicente and Aristóbulo. Despite all of the terrible things that were discussed at the meeting, Rangel and Istúriz were the most cautious, so Chávez might be suspicious of them. By requesting an investigation at the Attorney-General's Office, the vice-president is sending the following message: I was not the informant and I am loyal to you. This is speculation, but in that sphere, everything is possible. Active collaborators [Meza] Part of the most radical wing of the opposition believe that the armed forces have yielded to Chávez. Doesn't the disclosure of this material imply the complete opposite? [Pacheco] I do not believe that the National Armed Forces are behaving any differently than the rest of the country. From the political viewpoint, Venezuela's officers are like Venezuelan civilians. Polls show that Chávez has a 25 per cent popularity rating within the armed forces, and it is very likely that this proportion will remain unchanged. Those who are loyal to the president are few, they can be counted on one hand. Few soldiers have been marked as dishonest by investigations and complaints. This means that most of the soldiers who are angry at Chávez, or who at some point believed in him, are reacting differently. Some have been more outspoken in democratic terms following 11-A, participating in the massive drive to collect signatures [for a referendum on the presidency] and not allowing themselves to come under pressure; others, however, have maintained low profiles, making people wonder which side they are on. I can assure you that many of those officers are providing information to the country. As time passes, we will have to assess the relationship between the military and journalists during the Chávez regime. [Meza] It is not the first time that the government or its supporters have attempted to frighten you because of your publications. What makes this request for an investigation different from past complaints against you, or from that attempt to arrest you at KYS FM headquarters? [Pacheco] I am preparing for the moment of my arrest. It is an exercise that I must perform. We are on the borderline between a dictatorship and democracy. The ruling party is on the verge of approving a restraining law [containing new broadcast regulations] that is intended only to censor us. I can feel the nervousness. Moreover, I have sources within the government sector, members of the [ruling] MVR [Fifth Republic Movement], who tell me that this time Chávez has lost his patience. There is a term that my informants used in their warnings: malicious feelings towards me. These recordings, I repeat, have done a great deal of damage and the president fears that I am very close to his inner circle. I have denounced corruption and the presence of Colombian guerrillas in Venezuela, but that does not seem to matter to him. However, the material in the two columns confirmed his participation in very serious events. They exposed him. [Meza] Following the publication of your complaints, has the president ordered an investigation to determine who your informants are? [Pacheco] I laugh when Chávez says that he scarcely reads the newspapers. That he no longer even reads some of them. What I am told is the complete opposite: he is obsessed with sources of information and journalism. All of those things affect him and that is why he wants a restraining law and control of the media and its journalists. This is why on 20 May he attacked the government's communication and information system. He admonished [Information and Communications Minister] Nora Uribe. Perhaps he believes that this is where the information is leaking out. He has always expected the Information and Communications Ministry to buy off journalists, just as other institutions purchase weapons. [Meza] Rangel, Istúriz and Iglesias accuse you of subjecting them to public ridicule by characterizing them as murderers. [Pacheco] I transcribed the events of 17 February from an intelligence report. It is not a textual transcription of a meeting because, as I wrote on 9 May, the meeting was held between 0030 and 0430 [local time]. Maybe my source did not stay for the entire meeting. I do not want to provide further details on that matter. The fact is that I do not consider them murderers. What stands out in that request is the insistence that the recording of the meeting at Miraflores be handed over. No one has denied the report, they only want the recording because they know - and I have said this in the past - that it is a means of identifying the informant and reaching conclusions about this individual by way of intelligence procedures. It makes me sick that the main person requesting the investigation is José Vicente Rangel, who at one time called himself a journalist. Freedom of the press? 26/01/2002. Gen Francisco Belisario Landis, commander of the National Guard, disclosed that he filed a request at the Office of the Prosecutor-General of the Republic for a penal investigation against journalist Ibeyise Pacheco, director of Así es la Noticia. 04/02/2002. Pacheco asked Prosecutor-General Isaías Rodríguez to establish liability and punishment for the explosion of a device that was thrown at the doors of the daily Así es la Noticia, on 31 January of that year. 13/03/2002. Venpres [state news agency] published a report accusing Pacheco and other journalists of being criminals at the service of the drug cartels. 19/03/2002. MVR leaders presented a text titled "Manual for the Perfect Latin American Coup d'état", in which they accused Ibeyise Pacheco of forming part of a plan to topple Hugo Chávez. 03/04/2002. Two accusations were filed against Pacheco: one by Francisco Belisario Landis, who filed a writ of amparo [constitutional protection]; and the other by Army Col Angel Vellori, who sued her for defamation. 27/12/2002. The Office of the Ombudsman asked the Prosecutor-General of the Republic to implement the necessary measures to prevent acts that might threaten the journalist's life and personal integrity. 11/03/2003. The journalist reported that policemen in civilian clothes surrounded the radio station where she works, allegedly for the purpose of arresting her. 19/05/2003. Vice-President José Vicente Rangel, Labour Minister María Cristina Iglesias and Education Minister Aristóbulo Istúriz request that the Prosecutor-General of the Republic initiate an investigation into an alleged recording of a conversation held at a meeting, which could compromise members of the executive. The recording was released by Pacheco. Source: El Nacional web site, Caracas, in Spanish 22 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** ZAMBIA. 5915, Zambia National Broadcasting Company, *0243-0316 May 20, distinctive Fisheagle interval signal until opening anthem at 0250. A man and woman with opening ID and announcements at 0251. Group singing. Generally quite poor although some fair peaks when WBOH-5920 slop wasn't too bad (Rich D`Angelo, PA, NASWA Flashsheet via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. Dear Glenn, 17340 kHz USB, May 27, 1207-1218 UT in Greek. World news commentaries (sounded like any major broadcaster), then some other information (sounded like a weather forecast by location, but perhaps something else in a similar format). Ended rather abruptly at 1218. A rather strong signal here in Belgium, and (I hope) not a spur. What could this be? Thanks! (Robertas Pogorelis, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I suppose you are sure the language is Greek; some Russian coastal stations have been known to relay broadcast stations in this area. Maybe Greece is doing it too. Ahá: among other stations listed on 17341 by Klingenfuss 2002y is SVO, Olympia Radio, Athens on 17341 SSB (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Oh no, certainly not Russian --- I am good in Russian! 95% it was Greek. Could have been 17341 though. Many thanks! (Robertas, DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ IRCA CONVENTION The International Radio Club of America 40th annual convention is rapidly approaching. It will be held over the weekend of June 27-29 at the Best Western Merry Manor Inn, 700 Main street, South Portland Maine, 04106. Registration fee is $35 which includes the Saturday night banquet. I`ve received several registrations so far but we have room for more. The telephone number for hotel reservations is 1-207- 774-6151, mention the discounted room rate of $69 per night. We have secured a tour of WGAN, WZAN, WBAE, WPOR, WYNZ, WMGX -the 6 in one combo station near the convention site on Friday afternoon. We also have a guest speaker and phasing demonstration lined up. Be sure to attend and tell a friend. More info and links are found on the I.R.C.A. website at http://www.ircaonline.org (Mike Sanburn, KG6LJU, IRCA topica list via DXLD) HIGH FREQUENCY COORDINATION CONFERENCE The next formal HFCC meeting will be held in Tromso, northern Norway, from August 25 to 29, hosted by the Norwegian Post and Telecommunications Authority. This will be a joint meeting with the Arab States Broadcasting Union, and it will develop the detailed operational HF schedule for the B03 period, which starts on October 31. The HFCC is an approved group within the International Telecommunications Union. As in the past, around 150 delegates from broadcasting administrations are expected to attend, who maintain formal responsibility for Frequency Planning. I have expressed an interest in attending this Conference, in a capacity as an independent Professional Engineering Consultant. A meeting of the HFCC Steering Board is set down for May 30; my request to attend has been placed on the SB Agenda by the Chairperson. EUROPEAN DX COUNCIL MEETING 2003 This year's meeting will be held from August 15 to 17, at Königstein, 15 km north of Frankfurt, Germany, hosted by the Rhein-Main-Radio Club, and the Bosch organisation. The World Radio TV Handbook Company (UK)is the formal sponsor. The theme is "DXen in der digitalen Zukunft" and an impressive list of topics is planned, including: - Tropical Band Monitoring - Anker Peterson, Danish SW Club International - The history of the transmitting stations at Jülich and Nauen - W. Bodrowski - Deutsche Telekom - Antennas for Shortwave Reception - A. Krische - The impact of DRM - Wolf Harranth - DRM Receivers - St. Meltzer - The German DX Clubs - S. Gerhad (RMRC) - Free Radio and Pirate DXing - World Music Radio - Stig. H. Nielsen (WMR) - FM DX Monitoring - U. Deutscher and M. Hornsteiner (UKW-TV AG) - Satellite Monitoring and Worldspace - 50 Years of DXing in Japan - Toshi Ohtake (Japanese SW Club) Yes, I plan to attend! (Bob Padula, EDXP World Broadcast Magazine May 26, used by permission from http://edxp.org via DXLD) POWERLINE COMMUNICATIONS ++++++++++++++++++++++++ 03-104: Broadband Over Powerlines --- Comment and Reply Comment dates have been published in the Federal Register. Those who are interested in commenting on an FCC Notice of Inquiry (NOI) to permit electric utilities to extend the use of "broadband power line" (BPL) systems may file comments with the FCC. Comments are due August 6, 2003 Reply Comments are due September 5, 2003 BPL permits electric utilities to provide broadband internet access by sending radio signals over power lines. The NOI also discusses home networking devices that use the powerlines in your house to send data to other computers and connected devices. A copy of the NOI is at the following URL: http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-03-100A1.pdf REC's initial position on BPL is that we object to it because of the potential interference to the Amateur Radio Service, International Broadcast Stations as well as high frequency communications used to support the telecommunications infrastructure and homeland security. Draft REC comments will be posted on the site prior to the deadline. If you wish to comment with the FCC, go to http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/ecfs - - - - - - REC Networks - http://www.recnet.com - Bringing you fun and culture since 1984.http://www.animehardcoreradio.net - Anime Hardcore Radio - 24 hour a day anime! (via DXLD) Another version: FCC COMMENT DUE DATES ON BROADBAND OVER POWER LINES (BPL) AND RF INTERFERENCE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 15 [ET Docket No. 03-104; FCC 03-100] Broadband Power Line Systems AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule; notice of inquiry. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- SUMMARY: This document requests comment from the public on the current state of Broadband Power Line (BPL) technology and to determine whether changes to the Commission's rules are necessary to facilitate the deployment of this technology. The Commission believes that BPL could play an important role in providing additional competition in the offering of broadband infrastructure to the American home and consumers because power lines reach virtually every community in the country. DATES: Written comments are due on or before August 6, 2003, and reply comments are due on or before September 5, 2003. ADDRESSES: Office of the Secretary, Federal Communications Commission, 445 12th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20554. See supplementary information for filing instructions. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Anh T. Wride, Office of Engineering and Technology, (202) 418-0577, TTY (202) 418-2989, e-mail: anh.wride@fcc.gov Nick Leggett's web site on citizen participation in technology: http://home.earthlink.net/~nleggett/home.html (via Nick Leggett, DXLD) DRM [and non] +++ DW TRANSMITTER TROUBLE Dear Glenn: I was corresponding with a poster to rec.radio.shortwave two nights ago and sent him a private email that I thought I should share with you. He'd asked about IBOC interference. While checking this myself on a number of occasions I have both heard it, and heard a few strange episodes of transmitter problems that probably aren't IBOC-related, but I'm not altogether sure. At any rate, you might be amused to know how badly DW can screw up. Here's some of the three emails I sent him last Saturday night, 5/24 Best, (Steve Waldee - San Jose, CA. (retired broadcast station AM/FM chief engineer) ========== Tonight, about 30 seconds after reading your query in r.r.s. [05/24/03], I was trying to get a program on the Voice of Russia at 12000 and found that the entire region was blanked out with horrible noise and distortion. I tuned around to center it and found that it was DW, in German, at 11970. This was about 0409Z. I tuned to the other side, down to around 11940, and found that the entire region for 60 kHz was filled with crap from distorted DW sidebands. So I started to send you this reply, and in the few minutes it took to type this far, the distortion and sideband width dropped greatly. Now I can hear 12000 but there is still break-thru and occasional sideband distortion from DW at 11970 kHz, out 30 kHz high. Either DW is testing compatible IBOC with analogue modulation, or they simply have a high powered phase or pulse width modulator system adjusted incorrectly. I have followed the listing for DRM tests given in the latest ILGRadio database and tuned in to see what I could hear. (According to ILG they are not on the air right now with DRM tests. When I checked them last, on 5.15.03 at 2332, they were running digital modulation only (I believe probably BBC's audio) with a very heavy hiss signal that was audible as being many dB above background noise and extending from 9785 to 9805, centered at 9795. Now, that wasn't too damaging and not much worse than, say, trying to hear a weak signal next to one of Gene Scott's flamethrowers, and nowhere NEAR as damaging as the 60 kHz of distorted sidebands from DW tonight. Rx: R75 (yeah, I know you don't care for it!), 350 foot balanced dipole Steve Waldee - retired radio station chief engineer, San José, CA. P. S. Just before pressing SEND, the horrible sideband breakthru started up again over VOR at 12000 kHz. I can hear it all the way up to 12024 ... 12033 ... 12050! So now DW's sidebands are out +/- 80 kHz! THAT's interference! Wow. ======= I cannot tell if DW's Bonaire transmitter is spitting out any IBOC stuff along with the audio, but it sounds to me as if the problem is gross negative clipping. Normally the Bonaire North American service sounds quite clean; this is horribly distorted. If they were using a transmitter similar to the horrible old Ampliphase type by RCA, which used to be employed at KLOK here in San Jose, it would not be a mystery if they were out 80 kHz or further from carrier frequency: I've seen the Ampliphase do that many times. But I am sure they must be using something better than that: likely, I suppose, a Siemens transmitter that operates by phase modulation. It is possible that it is merely out of whack, but it sounds to me like someone screwed up and the thing is just hideously overmodulating, and with 250 kW of carrier beamed right in my direction, the sideband strength is significantly stronger than any adjacent stations for several channels either side of 11970. I just HOPE that this isn't IBOC crap! I would have expected that compatible analogue-IBOC would use lower than normal, and slightly narrower bandwidth than normal amplitude modulation, which would result in a rather weak sounding AM signal with a fair amount of background hiss. This does not sound that way; it's got a good S/N ratio but is grotesquely distorted. I've noticed DW on the hairy edge of distortion from time to time over the past couple of years, but this is simply ridiculous. OOOOPS! The carrier dropped off the air for two seconds [this would be about 0434]; when it came back on the volume was down bout 2 dB. THen, the cx went off again and on again -- softer -- and now it's off, for good maybe? The ILG sked says it's supposed to be on from 0400 to 0600, so perhaps somebody realizes something is BADLY wrong. (This is sort of fun, as I'd never expect to hear the big boys like DW screwing up so badly. I just hope they don't make a habit of it.) Steve Waldee ========== Two minutes after sending last msg, DW came back on at 0437, lower audio modulation level and much less distortion in evidence, and has stayed on. Yet for all practical purposes they are filling up about +/- 15 kHz bandwidth. At 20 kHz above and below their 11970 frequency, DW sideband hash and constant grunge are covering up adjacent carriers -- amusingly, DW's OWN next lower frequency signal at 11950, in English. They're wrecking their OWN service in a different language! Yet the interference is not nearly as bad as it was a few minutes ago when it was cutting a path out beyond 40 kHz either side of cx [sic] frequency. Now, one wonders if they are in the process of trying to set up a compatible IBOC-AM transmission and getting the carrier levels and modulation all wrong? I truly hope not, for if THAT is what's in store for us, it's not going to be pleasant (Steve Waldee, San José, CA, via DX LISTENING DIGEST) Different things are mixed in above: first of all, IBOC is not the same as DRM. The digital tests you hear on SW are all DRM, not IBOC. It is not DW`s transmitter on Bonaire, but R. Nederland`s. No doubt any problems with it are the responsibility of RN, not DW which is merely one of several stations also relayed there. Let`s get up to date with the latest DRM test schedule. Note that BBC Sackville has left 6010 for 9 and 11 MHz (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) SCHEDULED DRM TRANSMISSIONS Updated 9 May 2003 The following transmissions continue through 25 October 2003: UTC Days kHz Beam Target Av. DRM Power (kW) Programme Site 24h daily 531 Burg 2 Medien-anstalt Sachsen-AnhaltBurg 24h** daily 855 Berlin -- Deutschland RadioBerlin 0300-0400 daily 11955 285 W & C No. America 70 BBCWS Sackville 0430-0530 Sat/Sun 15400 230 NZ + SE Australia 10 RNW English Bonaire 0900-1500 daily 7320 105 W & C Europe 30 BBCWS Rampisham 0930-1200 daily 15440 040 W & C Europe 80 DW English Sines 1000-1100 daily 6140 120 W & C Europe 40 DW English Jülich 1100-1200 daily 6140 120 W & C Europe 40 DW German Jülich 1200-1300 daily 6140 120 W & C Europe 40 DW English Jülich 1305-1455 daily 5975 290 or 060 *) 40 Multimedia - T- W Europe Systems Media Broadcast Jülich 1600-1700 daily 6140 ND W & C Europe 40 DW English Jülich 1700-1800 daily 6140 ND W & C Europe 40 DW German Jülich 1800-1900 daily 6140 ND W & C Europe 40 DW English Jülich 2300-2400 daily 9795 268 E No. America 70 BBCWS Sackville 2330-0030 daily 15525 350 NE USA & NE Canada 10 RNW English Bonaire *) different beams in alternate weeks **) may be interrupted for analogue coverage of special events Schedule subject to change (from http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/html/drm_latest.html via DXLD) TEN-TEC ANNOUNCES FIRST DRM, DIGITAL CAPABLE SHORTWAVE RADIO Ten-Tec, a worldwide leader in comunications equipment; has announced the first DRM capable shortwave receiver. DRM stands for Digital Radio Mondiale, representing a digital system for shortwave, medium wave and long wave broadcasting yielding near-FM quality sound. The Ten-Tec RX- 320D and other system requirements are now posted on the Universal Radio website: http://www.universal-radio.com/catalog/commrxvr/0321.html (via gh, dXLD) RECEIVER NEWS [and non] +++++++++++++ HIGH-TECH HARRIS IN HIGH DEMAND FOR MILITARY WORK MELBOURNE FIRM SHOWS IT HAS WHAT U.S. WANTS Harris anti-jamming technology is expected to help the Joint Direct Attack Munition "smart bomb," shown here in an artist's rendering, get to its target. Harris compenents make it more resistant to radio- frequency interference. Image courtesy of The Boeing Company. By Brian Monroe FLORIDA TODAY MELBOURNE -- Seven days, four contracts and the potential for $345 million. It's good to be Harris Corp. right now.. . http://www.floridatoday.com/!NEWSROOM/moneystoryA53524A.htm (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-091, May 25, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3e.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1183: RFPI: Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0700/0730, 1300/1330 on 15039 and/or 7445 WBCQ: Mon 0445 on 7415 WWCR: Wed 0930 on 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1183.html MAY DXLD HTML ARCHIVE has been updated through 3-090, eating up a few hours on May 24 when we might have been holidaying or producing a long-overdue Continent of Media... February, March and April are still incomplete. Now you have hotlinks for all the URLs, numerous (but not enough) correxions and cross-references which were not in the individual original txt issues, and a single file for convenience of searching all May issues. http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3e.html WORLD OF RADIO ON WBCQ: The past few weeks we could not confirm WOR was still running on 17495-CUSB as well as 7415, Wednesdays at 2200; but on May 21, 17495-CUSB was booming in much better than 7415 for a change, tho 17 faded down quite a bit during the semihour (gh) UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIAL I see you now have yet another DXLD 'posted'. You do make it so easy by having a Plain Text Version available, as this makes it easy to 'Save It' to a Floppy Disk, or to a Set Up Folder on a Hard Disk. I hope, whatever alternatives you may consider in the future, you will at least keep this option. Many Thanks Again (Ken Fletcher, UK) ** AUSTRALIA. HCJB Australia is now running 50 kW on its Pacific service; and plans a new program schedule in July. See also ECUADOR (Allen Graham, HCJB DX Partyline May 25, notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. Voice Int`l Limited, Darwin, 13685, 1133 May 25. Male announcer in English with a world pop music count down. The name of the show was announced as Planet 30. Signal was strong and clean with minor fading events at irregular intervals (Pete Costello, NJ, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) I`ve rarely listened, myself, to VI, but from this and other reports I get the impression it is stealthier than most evangelical stations in broadcasting seemingly secular programming. How much preaching do they work into the countdown? (gh, DXLD) {and who chooses the countdown? Are objectionable songs and lyrix censored??} ** BANGLADESH. 7185, R Bangladesh, 1230-1300, English and other languages; I note slight improvement in the audio quality of this transmitter (Victor Goonetilleke, Sri Lanka, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** BURKINA FASO. 7230, R. Burkina, Ouagadougou, 0955-1214, May 18, French talks, listeners' program "Concert", then news 1200 followed by "Déjeuner Musical". 25433. Signal gradually decreased after 1000, but was better (!) around 1200. Best received via a K9AY, not via a short, unterminated South American Beverage which also provides good African results above [sic] 10º west longitude (Carlos Gonçalves, Portugal, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** CANADA. Quick check of RCI's new frequencies to NAm between 2200 and 0000 UT May 23, 2003: both 6140 and 9590 with SIO 555. 73, (-.. . Kraig Krist, KG4LAC, VA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CHINA. GREAT NEWS FROM CHINA HUAYI BROADCASTING STATION With great pleasure I'd like to bring you some good news coming from CHBS, China Huayi Broadcasting Station. The first is that I was appointed as regular QSL manager of CHBS, anyone who had sent reception reports to CHBS and have not yet get a QSL response now can get a standard full-data QSL CARD absolutely if you resent your RR to my address: Qiao Xiaoli Fen Jin Xing Cun 3-4-304 Changshu, JiangSu 215500 P. R. China or just email me at 2883752@163.com Return postage, 1 IRC or 1 Euro or 1 dollar would help me get some overseas SWL books, that would be very much appreciated BUT NOT necessary. The second good news is about the Chinese DX programme "Sky of BCL" of CHBS add a midnight schedule, that would be: Every Saturday 0730-0830 UT on 6185 KHz and every Sunday 1600-1700 UT on 6185 KHz Note that CHBS use only 6185 in its Summer schedule and use both 6185 and 4830 in winter schedule. The third one is that CHBS now want official monitors all over the world especially outside the China mainland; anyone who have interest can contact Yuanjia, the programme manager of "Sky of BCL", at chrisyuanjia@sohu.com or snail mail address: Mr. Yuan Jia Club of CHBS P. O. Box 251 FuZhou, Fujian 350001 P. R. China A certificate of official monitor is under designing. Good DX Qiao Xiaoli (dxswl) from SuZhou China 2883752@163.com My email address is: dxswl@21cn.com (May 23, dxing.info via DXLD) ** CHINA. INTERNET CENSORS IN CHINA LOOSENING THEIR GRIP A researcher tracking Internet censorship trends in China says government monitors are allowing more political commentary than they have in the past. . . http://www.ojr.org/ojr/world_reports/1053660077.php (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** CHINA [non]. When I heard the Chinese accent on 15215 [see TAIWAN] I at first thought it might be CRI so checked 9690, the usual Spain relay frequency, at 0314 May 25 --- but nothing on 9690! A cursory check of 31m did not find it, so I wonder what has happened to it? While I was at it, looked for CRI Spanish Brasil relay on 9665, but only VOR audible there, in English \\ 17565, 17650, 17690 (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CONGO. 9610, R. Congo, 1634-1657*, May 11, Vernacular sports to sudden s/off, clear channel, heard quite regularly here recently, 22332 (Martien Groot, Holland, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** CUBA. I received a very nice letter from the staff of Radio Habana Cuba in February. Among other things, they thanked me for being a listener of over forty years, occasional reception reports submitted and for my support of Arnie Coro's programs. They knew my eleven year old grandson, Brandon, collected stamps from foreign countries and was a short-wave listener. I received a nice QSL card from Radio Habanna and some stamps from Cuba for Brandon. What a nice gesture on their part. Keep up the great work Arnie! I hope to make on air contact with you one of these days again on 20 meters (Duane Fischer, W8DBF, May 23, swl via DXLD) In case you are under the impression that Arnie Coro is apolitical: Item two: May 20th 2003 will be recorded as the day when Cuba was, once again, the object of an intensive radio war event, that violated international radio rules and regulations. A US armed forces EC-130 type Hercules aircraft, especially equipped for psychological warfare operations went up to broadcast TV signals on VHF channel 13, while the plane was flying at about 18,000 feet or 5,500 meters. The TV broadcast was specifically beamed to Cuba from a location above the Florida Keys, and because VHF TV Channel 13 is used by several Cuban television stations, the propaganda broadcast from the EC-130 produced malicious interference to the regular programming of Cuban television networks. A legal analysis of the action shows that it violated several articles of the International Telecommunications Convention's Rules and Regulations, an international agreement of which the United States of America is one of its signatories. The unprecedented action, that was once proposed way back in 1962 to President John F Kennedy, was at that time not approved, considering the fact that it was a very aggressive move... But 41 years later, the broadcast of propaganda type TV programs from a plane flying at high altitude took place. Cuba has denounced the actions, fully documenting to the International Telecommunications Union, all the violations incurred by the Government of the United States of America. At the same time that the unprecedented TV transmissions took place, an also unprecedented increase in short wave frequencies beamed to Cuba for the anti-Cuban Miami based broadcasts, that went up to 24 channels, in what could best be described as a barrage! The anti-Cuban TV broadcasts funded from the United States of America budget started in 1990, and have never [sic] been seen in Cuba, because of the protective actions designed and built by Cuban engineers and technicians, that have proven to be an insurmountable barrier to those aggressive transmissions (Arnaldo Coro Antich, CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited May 24-25, via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via DXLD) {did Arnie actually say the J-word in the broadcast version of this? See 3-092} ** CUBA [non]. FIDEL CASTRO EXIGE A EEUU CUMPLIMIENTO NORMAS RADIODIFUSIÓN El presidente cubano, Fidel Castro, reclamó hoy a los organismos internacionales que "se exija al gobierno de EEUU el cumplimiento de las normas establecidas para la radiodifusión". El líder cubano intervino hoy en el programa de la televisión oficial "Mesa Redonda Informativa" con motivo de la extensión de los programas del Canal Educativo de este medio a todas la capitales provinciales de la isla. Castro se refirió a las trasmisiones el pasado 20 de mayo de las emisoras de radio y televisión "Martí" desde Miami (EEUU), la primera utilizando cuatro nuevas frecuencias, y la segunda, a través de canales también asignados a estaciones de la isla, hecho que afectó las trasmisiones radiales y televisivas cubanas. "No se puede estar exigiendo unilateralmente que un país se ajuste estrictamente a determinadas normas y que otro país haga las fechorías que están haciendo contra nuestro país", afirmó. "Eso es lo que demandamos", recalcó el jefe de Estado cubano, y señaló que Cuba dispone de los equipos con la potencia suficiente para llegar con sus trasmisiones hasta el territorio de Estados Unidos. Castro dijo que esa trasmisiones "no hicieron más que ruido", en referencia a las interferencia aplicadas por especialistas de la isla y señaló que "hacen mal en subestimar a este país, donde hay mucha gente preparada y calificada, no es un país tan indefenso". (EFE 23 de Mayo, 2003 via http://www.UnionRadio.com.ve via Henrik Klemetz, DXLD) Oh come on, Fidel just can`t stand to be contradicted. L`état, c`est lui. ``Cuba --- último territorio esclave en América --- Patria o Suerte, ¡Pensaremos!`` (gh) DECLARACIÓN DEL MINISTERIO DE RELACIONES EXTERIORES El pasado 20 de mayo de 2003, el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos de América llevó a cabo nuevas acciones que constituyen una escalada en la agresión radioelectrónica y televisiva que viene llevando a cabo contra la Revolución Cubana desde hace décadas. La emisora de radio creada y operada por el Gobierno estadounidense con el objetivo de promover la subversión en Cuba, pérfida y ultrajantemente bautizada con el nombre de José Martí, salió ese día al aire utilizando cuatro nuevas frecuencias, hecho que provocó interferencias y afectaciones a las transmisiones radiales cubanas . . . http://www.granma.cubaweb.cu/2003/05/23/nacional/articulo10.html Tomado de la edición electrónica de "Granma Nacional" fecha 23 de Mayo del 2003 73's (via Oscar de Céspedes, FL, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Listening to a very good (repaired) 590 transmitter as I type at 1900+ GMT, May 25th. This has been off for many, many weeks. Prior to that, it was for ages running at low mod though always high power as Radio Musical Nacional's flagship transmitter for that national network. However (at least today) it's on with Rebelde, baseball coverage (Terry L Krueger, Clearwater, Florida USA 27.55.83 N, 82.46.08 W, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Nothing the Cubans could do on MW would compare to what the big broadcasting lobby and the FCC have conspired to do in maximizing co- channel interference (gh, DXLD) ** CYPRUS. 6150.7, R. Bayrak, 0318-0334, May 15, UK pop songs by Tom Jones, Cilla Black, Manfred Mann interrupted for NA 0328, then English ID & frequencies, drifting away from Gene Scott [Costa Rica] 6150, 22332 (Martien Groot, Holland, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) See also SINGAPORE ** ECUADOR [and non]. Thanks to many who voiced their support for DXPL, several options were considered in order to keep the program on the air. May not be the best, but provide an alternative in order to keep broadcasting the DX Partyline. The Options are: One: HCJB World Radio Australia has confirmed that they will continue to broadcast DXPL, two releases, one to Asia and one to South Pacific. Two: Several US-based SW stations have offered airtime to keep the DXPL on the air. I`ve just arrived from a conference in Miami and will be following up on these in the next few days. Three: DXPL may be included in the morning release to C&S America, an English broadcast which HCJB will maintain (Allen Graham, HCJB DX Partyline May 25, notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) & see AUSTRALIA ** HUNGARY. RADIO BUDAPEST RESTRUCTURING Received a QSL card from Radio Budapest in 512 days for a December 26, 2001 report w/ accompanying letter which stated, "Thank you very much for your letter. We apologise for being so late with our reply. The delay is due to a restructuring at our station. Although, the time and duration of the English language programmes have not changed, for budgetary reasons, we had to suspend the publication of our programme guide, 'Budapest International', as well as the RBSWC DX News for the time being. We hope to launch an updated website soon where you can find the most important information concerning our station. Once it is completed, we will announce the exact address in our programmes." I have received 3 QSL cards for reports after Dec, 2001, the latest report being the first verified. I think someone is going through a pile of mail, starting at the top and working their way toward the bottom (Scott R. Barbour, Jr., Intervale, NH, May 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I have given up trying to solicit a QSL from Radio Budapest! None of my reports since early 1997 have been answered - the last QSL from them was for a report of December 1996, which arrived in June 1997! We need to educate the stations, I think! (Bob Padula, EDXP ADMIN, May 24, via DXLD) ** HUNGARY. ADVENT TO BUY DANUBIUS RADIO Venture capital group Advent International is to buy 100% of Hungary's leading commercial radio station, Danubius Radio, from British radio group GWR, Advent said yesterday. The transaction, to be financed by Mezzanine Management Central Europe, will be the largest venture capital investment in Hungary this year and will be completed in Q2. It is expected that the contract will be signed in 2 to 3 weeks. A third of Hungarians between 18 and 49 years old tune in to Danubius Radio every week. Last year the radio station generated revenue of Ft 3.5 billion from advertising, giving it a 40% share of the market for radio advertisements and 5%-7% of the country's entire ad market. (Econews; MH 14, Nv 5, Nb 4, Vg 1, NG 5 From 23rd May 2003 http://www.bbj.hu/user/article.asp?ArticleID=178800 via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** INDIA. I heard the extended service of AIR Hyderabad May 12, 2020- 2030* with a drama programme in Hindi. 33343 QRM from CNR 1. It is the same cyclone which has caused heavy rain damages on Sri Lanka (Anker Petersen, Denmark, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) {WTFK??} The relay of AIR Patna on shortwave 11620 via Delhi continues. Noted on 25 May at 1600 with local ID "Ye Akashvani Patna he". Good signal here, as usual (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDONESIA. 4869.96, RRI Wamena, 2030-2105, May 06, Indonesian pop, IS and ID at 2100 (first log!), clear signal (Jean-Pierre Penaud, France, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) They probably use higher power than the previous 0.3 kW. I also heard very weak signals here on May 09 at 2027-2050, May 10 at *(?) 2020- 2050 and May 11 at 2035-2050 (Anker Petersen, Denmark, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) This is probably also the station Roland heard: 0930-1255, Apr 30, Bahasa Indonesia, IS, time announcement, local news, 0944 ``Begirnu Negri`` program with South Sea music and Indonesian love songs, no Jakarta news at 1200; from 1255 QRM from SLBC, Sri Lanka fading in. Some days RRI signs off at 1030*. Off the air on Apr 26 (Roland Schulze, Philippines, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) On the West Coast of North America, I can hear RRI Wamera [sics] from fade in around 1000 (Sunset in Wamera) to around sunrise here at the receiver (~1300). It is now the strongest of the Indos below 5 MHz (RRI Jakarta on 9680 // 11860 and Voice of Indonesia 9524.9 both are stronger, but higher in frequency). Surprisingly, Jambi on 4925 which used to be a powerhouse has dropped down to the strength of the other remaining RRIs. And Wamera is notably stronger than 4890 and 5019.9. Wamera has been running near-continuous music until abruptly going off-air. Only a couple of times have I heard an announcer with a call-in program (music requests). Others have reported mentions of Wamera, but I haven't heard that. And no RRI ID, economic news from Jakarta nor Song of the Coconut Isles - perhaps others have heard these at other times? (Don Nelson, OR, DXplorer via May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** INDONESIA. The following regionals were off the air in April 2003: 6070 RRI Jayapura 6153 RRI Biak 7171.3 RRI Serui 7231.1 RRI Fak Fak 7234 RRI Palu 9552.3 RRI Makassar 9680, RRI Jakarta was active in April // 11860 (Roland Schulze, Philippines, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** INDONESIA. Martial law chief administrator Major General Endang Suwarya says rebels set fire to a local state broadcasting station in addition to the schools. He ordered his men to shoot arsonists on sight. http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/s861120.htm (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) {re: Aceh} ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. Hi Glenn: Two articles re satellite radio: REALITY MAY BE CATCHING UP WITH SATELLITE RADIO HYPE http://www.thestreet.com/funds/supermodels/10088932.html SIRIUS ROARS BACK AT XM http://forbes.com/2003/05/22/cx_ah_0522tentech.html (via Kim Elliott, DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. IRAN DEMOCRACY ACT Text of the Iran Democracy Act, which appropriates US$50 million to establish an organization called Iran Democracy Foundation that will provide grants to private pro-democratic Iranian-American radio programs and other pro-democratic activities. S. 1082: To provide support for democracy in Iran. IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES May 19, 2003 Mr. BROWNBACK (for himself, Mr. CORNYN, Mr. COLEMAN, Mr. SANTORUM, and Mr. CAMPBELL) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations A BILL To provide support for democracy in Iran. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. IRAN DEMOCRACY ACT. This Act may be cited as the `Iran Democracy Act'. SEC. 2. FINDINGS. Congress finds the following: (1) There is currently not a democratic government in Iran. Instead, Iran is an ideological dictatorship presided over by an unelected Supreme Leader with limitless veto power, an unelected Expediency Council, and Council of Guardians capable of eviscerating any reforms, and a President elected only after the Council disqualified 234 other candidates for being too liberal, reformist, or secular. (2) The April 2003 report of the Department of State states that Iran remained the most active state sponsor of terrorism in 2002. (3) That report also states that Iran continues to provide funding, safehaven, training, and weapons to known terrorist groups, notably Hizballah, HAMAS, the Palestine Islamic Jihad, and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. (4) Human rights have failed to improve in Iran under the pseudo- reformers. Torture, executions after unfair trials, and censorship of all media remain rampant throughout the country. Stoning and beheading are used as methods of punishment. SEC. 3. POLICY. It is the policy of the United States to-- (1) support transparent, full democracy in Iran; (2) support an internationally-monitored referendum in Iran by which the Iranian people can peacefully change the system of government in Iran; (3) support the aspirations of the Iranian people to live in freedom; and (4) help the Iranian people achieve a free press and build an open, democratic, and free society. SEC. 4. RADIO FARDA REFORM. (a) IN GENERAL- The Broadcasting Board of Governors shall-- (1) require the head of Radio Farda to develop programming for Radio Farda, after consulting with-- (A) Iranian-Americans and other Iranian exiles who-- (i) support a referendum described in section 3(2); and (ii) oppose the current Government of Iran; and (B) the Middle East Partnership Initiative (MEPI) at the Department of State and the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) at the Department of State; and (2) ensure that a significant percentage of the programming on Radio Farda is devoted to discussing democratic change in Iran including an internationally-monitored democratic referendum in Iran as described in section 3(2). (b) TRANSLATIONS OF WRITTEN AND VIDEO MATERIALS FOR THE IRANIAN PEOPLE- (1) REQUIREMENT- The MEPI and ECA shall provide grants to appropriate entities to create and maintain websites, translate and distribute books, videos, documents, and other materials on democracy, rule of law free market economics, and related topics. (2) CONSULTATION- The MEPI and ECA shall consult with nongovernmental entities and with Iranian-American opposition groups that support the holding of an internationally-monitored referendum in Iran as described in section 3(2) to select materials to be translated into Persian. (c) IRAN DEMOCRACY SUPPORT INITIATIVE- (1) AUTHORITY- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the MEPI and ECA are authorized to award grants to an eligible entity for the purpose of funding programs and activities to promote a democratic referendum in Iran. (2) ELIGIBLE ENTITY- The following persons are eligible for grants under paragraph (1): (A) A person who provides radio or television broadcasting into Iran that includes programming intended to promote an internationally- monitored democratic referendum in Iran. (B) A person who is working to promote the holding of an internationally-monitored referendum in Iran, as described in section 3(2). (d) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, not less than 10 percent of the funds appropriated to the International Broadcasting Operations account for fiscal year 2004 shall be made available to carry out the provisions of this Act (May 21, 2003 via N. Grace-USA, CRW via DXLD) ** IRAQ [and non]. CLANDESTINE RADIO WATCH Iraq Special May 22, 2003 Stations for Iraq - Active stations since the fall of Baghdad Voice of the Liberation of Iraq (Sawt Tahrir al-Iraq) was renamed as Voice of International Coalition for the Liberation of Iraq Radio (Sawt al-Tahaluf al-Duwali li Tahrir al-Iraq) on April 21. It began broadcasting on FM and MW, in addition to SW, from northern Iraq. By May 1 it left the airwaves for good. Radio of the Two Rivers (Wadi al-Rafidayn) still broadcasts. Recorded and produced in Amman. Broadcast from Kuwait via a 50kW Harris transmitter administered by the CIA. Station is tied to the Iraqi National Accord and is considered their "sister" station. al-Mustaqbal (The Future), the mouthpiece for the Iraqi National Accord, also continues its broadcasts. The Accord was offered use of a SOMS-B broadcasting platform by the Pentagon, however, they refused. Programming is fed to the Kuwaiti CIA transmitter via satellite from Amman. Radio Tikrit was renamed Radio Sumer on April 21. Programming format remains the same, however. Only difference is that Sumer broadcasts PSYOP messages aimed at the entire population in support of national unity. There is growing speculation that this is a product contracted out to SAIC here in Washington. Last week an intrepid listener in Cairo heard a glitch in their satellite feed that proves World Radio Network (WRN), a major satellite uplink provider based in London, services their feed. The main reason SAIC is suspected is because the Washington Post Monday revealed that they were contracted for PSYOP products by the Pentagon during Operation Iraqi Freedom. And oddly enough the main announcer on Radio Tikrit/Sumer is the same as the main announcer on the Pentagon's Information Radio broadcasts that were disseminated via Commando Solo. Voice of the Iraqi People (Saudi intel) remains on the air. Information Radio, the Pentagon PSYOP radio station, also remains on the air. Its short wave frequencies have not been heard for a few weeks so it is suspected to have shifted 100% to land-based platforms, including SOMS-B. (SOMS-B are humvees outfitted for broadcasting.) Towards Freedom TV, the CIA's TV channel, left the airwaves last week. It was recorded here in Washington and broadcast for 5/6 hours per day via Commando Solo. Iraq Media Network was launched by the Coalition on April 17 with a station in Umm Qasr called Voice of the New Iraq. Plans are to launch newspapers and television stations. The station and planned network are managed by the Indigenous Media Project, which, according to the Wall Street Journal, is "an offshoot of the Pentagon's Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance." (What offshoot is supposed to mean I have no idea.) - Does the US seem to be doing any jamming? The U.S. does not seem to have engaged in any jamming of sorts. Saudi Arabia, however, has jammed broadcasts from Tehran that supported the Supreme Council of Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SCIRI). Now that SCIRI has shifted off SW to MW it's unlikely the Saudis can effectively block the signals anymore. - Has an Ahmed Chalabi-related station emerged? Good question about Chalabi. The INC was supposed to be given US$4 million back in April to relaunch Radio Hurriah, which at one time broadcast from the CIA Kuwait facility. There was talk in April that they would use SOMS-B on loan from the Pentagon, however, now I am told that they have decided to wait until a government is in place in Baghdad. They will then go through the proper channels to request a license to broadcast legally. - What is Radio Nahran - the UK station down in Basra - like? Radio Nahrain, the British PSYOP station in Basra, broadcast the same type of programming as Information Radio: popular Middle Eastern music and PSYOP announcements. Dave Kernick's site, http://www.intervalsignals.net has a clip of the station. Navigate to the Iraq page and you should be able to quickly find it. As far as I know the station is still on the air (N. Grace, USA, May 13, 2003 answering private questions for CRC, CRW May 23 via DXLD) ** IRAQ. PSYOP: THE LOVE'S NOT MUTUAL The U.S. military is using Metallica and the 'Barney' theme song as instruments of coercion in Iraq --- By Adam Piore, Newsweek Magazine, May 26, 2003 Issue http://www.msnbc.com/news/914527.asp Your parents aren't the only ones who hate your music - some Iraqis hate it, too. U.S. military units have been breaking Saddam supporters with long sessions in which they're forced to listen to heavy-metal and children's songs. "Trust me, it works," says one U.S. operative. The idea, says Sgt. Mark Hadsell, is to break a subject's resistance by annoying that person with what some Iraqis would consider culturally offensive music. The songs that are being played include "Bodies" from the Vin Diesel "XXX" movie soundtrack and Metallica's "Enter Sandman." "These people haven't heard heavy metal before," he explains. "They can't take it." Few people could put up with the sledgehammer riffs of Metallica, and kiddie songs aren't that much easier, especially when selections include the "Sesame Street" theme and some of purple dinosaur Barney's crooning (MSNBC May 26, 2003 via N. Grace-USA for CRW May 25 via DXLD) ** IRAQ. STRUGGLE FOR INDEPENDENCE --- FREE MEDIA IN A FREE-FOR-ALL Iraq's new journalists dream of power - the electrical kind that will keep their computers and their printing presses humming. That's the least they expect from the US-British 'occupation forces'. That and a little safety. Rohan Jayasekera reports from Baghdad. . . http://www.indexonline.org/news/20030523_iraq.shtml (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** IRAQ [non]. VOICE OF ISLAMIC REVOLUTION IN IRAQ The SCIRI long supported an overthrow of Saddam's regime without Western involvement. During Saddam's rule, the group broadcast a radio signal into Iraq on a station called the Voice of Islamic Revolution in Iraq. . . http://www.paktribune.com/news/index.php?id=24891 (Pakistan Tribune via J.Dybka-USA May 10, 2003 for CRW via DXLD) ** IRELAND. Re DXLD 3-088: The Gardai are the Irish Republic's Police Service. Probably Gaelic for Guard. 'They certainly were NOT Guarding the Radio Stations concerned in this case, quite the opposite in fact' (Silly Comment from Me) (Ken Fletcher, UK, 1020UTC=1120UTC+1 May 24th 2003, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ISRAEL. ISRAELI OFFICIALS RAID EIGHT PIRATE RADIO STATIONS IN JERUSALEM, SEIZE EQUIPMENT | Text of report by Israel radio on 25 May Police and Communications Ministry staffers raided eight pirate radio stations in Jerusalem at midday [local time]. Four radio operators were detained for interrogation, and transmitters, computers and antennas were confiscated. Most stations are religious and ultra- Orthodox operating in central Jerusalem. Our police affairs correspondent Ran Binyamini notes that some of the stations that were closed today were also closed in a raid over two months ago. Source: Voice of Israel, Jerusalem, in Hebrew 1100 gmt 25 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** ITALY. ELECTROMAGNETIC POLLUTION: PREJUDICE AND COMMONPLACES, SAYS GASPARRI (AGI) - Rome, Italy, May 20 - "The issue of electromagnetic radiations is often discussed more because of ideological inspirations rather than scientific reasons and data. There is often confusion and lack of information: for example, many think that the referendum of the 18th June regards mobile phones repeaters, but it only concerns electricity ducts". . . http://tinyurl.com/cn16 (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) See also SICILY ** KASHMIR [non]. 5100, Voice of Jammu & Kashmir Freedom Movement, QSL in 97 days. Got a pack of six "SOS from Indian occupied Kashmir" magazines, two grand leaflets, Kashmir viewcards and letter from Islam ud Din But where he/she appreciates listening interest and quotes broadcasting schedule in Kashmiri and English. Address: Islam ud Din But, Voice of Jammu & Kashmir Freedom Movement, P. O. Box 102, Muzaffarabad, Azad Kashmir, via Pakistan. For one IRC (Shukrat Rakhmatullayev, Tashkent, Uzbekistasn, Signal via May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH. 2624, Frontiers Soldiers R, Channel 1 (presumed), 1550, May 01, weak. It was not heard 1910 on Apr 29. 3025.5, Frontiers Soldiers R, Channel 2 (presumed), 1910, Apr 29, Korean drama (?). Also heard 1550, May 01, with patriotic songs and talks. 3390.5, PBS, Pyongyang, Apr 29, 1830-1900*, New frequency in Korean, instrumental music, 1900 ID, time announcement and off. 25432. It was heard // 3320 with a late program. Nothing heard on 2850 at that hour (Roland Schulze, Philippines, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** KUWAIT. 15505, R. Kuwait, Sulabiyah (cf. DX-Window no. 219). I monitored that frequency as I promised you. And all the IDs go like this: ``Idhaat Alquraan Alkareem min al Kuwait`` or ``Idhaat Alquraan Alkareem min Dawlat Al Kuwait``, but almost the same... ``the holy Qur`an radio from Kuwait`` or ``the holy Qur`an radio from the ``state`` of Kuwait``. Maybe what you heard at *1000-1500 was a program called ``Adhakaa fil Islam`` (Adhkaa is one of Islam's major beliefs which is giving to the needy people). In Arabic it sounds like the usual ID of ``..Idhaat``. (Tarek Zeidan, Cairo, Egypt, May 08, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** LAOS. Sorry folks, External Service has been off the air on 7145 for a time now. Hope they come back soon. 6130, however, continues. Heard OK at 1200 past 1300 (Victor Goonetilleke, Sri Lanka, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** LATVIA [and non]. EUROVISION SONG CONTEST It's the night of the Eurovision song contest here in Europe, so I've done a quick band scan to see if any stations are relaying the event. So far I've come across Radio Finland doing so on 6120, although they break for news on the hour. Should anyone outside of Europe want to drop in on this international musical and broadcasting curiosity, that's one source. Or visit http://www.eurovision.tv for live feeds (Dan Atkinson, UK, 2016 UT May 24, swprograms via DXLD) Turkey's Sertab Erener won with the song Every Way That I Can, with Belgium in second place and Tatu in third. Erener is one of Turkey's most popular singers, with album sales of over four million. Terry Wogan, who hosted the UK coverage of the event on BBC One, said: "I think the UK is suffering from post-Iraq backlash." Tatu had been the favourite to win the competition all week. They sang Don't Believe, Don't Fear, Don't Ask, a Russian language song, to boos from the 6,000-strong crowd at Riga's Skonto Hall. Despite threats they might take to the stage naked, the pair - Lena Katina and Julia Volkova - sang their song dressed in jeans and white T-shirts. They had already been warned by contest organisers about being late for rehearsals, and that their stage performance could not contravene the show's strict guidelines. Under Eurovision rules, voters in each of the countries could ring or text their votes for any country other than their own. Bosnia- Hercegovina and Russia used jury votes because of their countries' poor telecommunications. Ireland's Mickey Joe Harte was the third performer of the night with his song We've Got the World Tonight, after Iceland's Birgitta and Austria's outlandish cabaret performer Alf Poier. A poll on the official Eurovision website asking the public which act they thought their country would vote for had Spain's entry, Beth, in top place on Friday. Tatu were in second and Turkey in third. 'Unique event' The contest, held at Riga's 6,000-capacity Skonto Hall, was the biggest indoor concert held in Latvia's history. The country of 2.4 million people hailed the show, which was due to be watched by more than 160 million people, as a unique event. "It's important for us as a small country to prove we can do something like this," said Solvita Vevere, a spokeswoman from Latvia's Eurovision organising committee. Latvia paid half of the $11m (£6.9m) needed to run the event. Millions more were spent on the city, including a full renovation of the Skonto Hall. Story from BBC NEWS: http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/entertainment/2932760.stm Published: 2003/05/24 22:36:48 GMT © BBC MMIII (via Dan Say, swprograms via DXLD) I listened to the middle hour or so on BBCR2; fine reception. The BBC commentator was putting everyone down, tsk tsk. Made the mistake of looking for video feed at http://www.eurovision.com which was a dead end, instead of .tv (Glenn Hauser, swprograms via DXLD) The BBC Radio 2 presenter was Ken Bruce. Terry Wogan does the commentary for BBC 1, and has done so for over 30 years. Organisers of the event fear Wogan's criticisms, whereas British audiences find his witty commentary a main reason to watch Eurovision, as illustrated in this article written before the Estonian Eurovision in 2002: http://www.balticsww.com/eurovision_terry_wogan.htm Great Britain's rather flatly sung entry came last for the first time. The voting is still highly politicised, even though songs are now rated by audience phone voting instead of a jury. The songwriter of the British entry in part blamed the war and continental Europe's opposition to it for Britain's "nill points", whereas Turkey's stance of not allowing it's country to be used as a staging post (and admittedly somewhat better song) took the day at the Eurovision. Nevertheless Wogan admitted that in all his years of hosting the show he'd never correctly picked the winner (he had some money on Spain this time). Indeed that Austria's bizarre schlager-fest came so high in the scores emphasises that the gap in musical tastes between Britain and continental Europe is just as wide as in foreign policy :) (Daniel Atkinson, UK, ibid.) BRITS OUT OF TUNE IN EUROPE Last night was the annual extravaganza called the Eurovision Song Contest. 26 countries competed in the live broadcast from Latvia. I tuned in to see the opening sequence (professional interest, you understand) but I got bored after 6 minutes so I mercifully missed the rest of it. Once upon a time, Britain used to do quite well in this event, but not any more. For the first time in the 48 year history of the contest, Britain scored 'nul points.' Apparently, according to those who endured the programme, the British duo Jemini performed badly and sang out of tune. Some would say that symbolises the British attitude to Europe very well. So, humiliation for a nation that for a few years in the 1960's was the pop music capital of the world. How are the mighty fallen! But far more entertaining than the contest was the unsporting reaction of some Brits to the result. Apparently Terry Wogan, who for years has poked fun mercilessly at the event despite being paid a handsome fee by the BBC for commentating on it, blamed the 'Iraq factor'. A guy who phoned BBC Radio 5 Live declared that Europeans were 'just a bunch of clowns.' At that point, I switched off. Now, under the rules introduced a few years ago, countries which do badly have to skip a year to allow others to take their place. And to learn to sing in tune, presumably. Apparently Britain, France and Germany are exempt from this rule because they pay a substantial part of the EBU's budget. So that's fair, is it? By virtue of being big and wealthy you can buy your way into a contest at the expense of smaller and less well-off nations. I don't blame the EBU for this. No doubt the Brits, French and Germans threatened to withdraw funding if they were not exempt. But, while you can buy participation, you can't - as last night demonstrated - buy votes. As it happens - and, to be fair, this had already been announced on Thursday - the rules are changing so that from next year there will be a qualifying round, and a grand final involving 24 countries. That way, says the European Broadcasting Union, 40 countries can take part. So Britain, like all the other countries, will have to go through a qualifying round! What will happen if they don't end up in the top 24? That remains to be seen, unless some other obscure clause has already been inserted in the rules. Terry Wogan always used to make fun of countries that didn't get any points at the contest, and make jokes about it on his BBC Radio 2 Breakfast Show the following week. I wonder what he'll do now? I know one thing. There will have been a lot of European broadcasters sniggering over their coffee and croissants this morning. Wogan's frivolous attitude didn't go down well amongst some of his colleagues this side of the North Sea. Last night, he got his just desserts (Andy Sennitt, RN blog May 25 via DXLD) Saw a brief clip on BBC world. The Brit Group really did suck badly, way off key. Interesting that Turkey won and the song was in English. What does that tell you (Lou Josephs • 5/25/03; 8:21:19 AM, ibid.) ** LIBERIA. ELCM RADIO VÉRITAS ON NEW SHORTWAVE FREQUENCY Monrovia, May 19 (Conexión-Digital) --- Señor César Pérez Dioses of Peru confirms increasing reports that ELCM Radio Véritas, the FM and shortwave station of the Archdiocese of Monrovia, has been heard internationally on 5470 kHz. ``Our collaborator could not identify it, but it was reported this past May 10th at 7:00 UTC (GMT) with African music and conversations in a language that our collaborator presumed was vernacular to the African continent. He manifested his doubts over this station because he went carefully over the World Radio-TV Handbook 2003 but it did not report this frequency. Undoubtedly it is Radio Veritas, from Liberia, which has been received several times on this frequency and at this time, which was corroborated with its reception by my Brasilian friend Samuel Cassio.`` Another international shortwave listener has since reported to Conexión- Digital of Buenos Aires that it definitely is ELCM on a new shortwave frequency (Catholic Radio Update May 26 via DXLD) Not so new ** LIBERIA. 11512.0, Voice of Liberty, Monrovia (tentative), 1715- 1735, May 20, English, gospel songs. QRM 11510, 33433 (Anker Petersen, Denmark, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** LIBYA. Last two days, the clandestine station [no-namee, 9745 to Iraq] has not appeared anytime between 2100-2200, and may have QSY'd. This leaves tentative Bahrain pretty much in the clear (Paul Ormandy, Oamaru, New Zealand, May 25, dxing.info via DXLD) See also UNIDENTIFIED ** MALDIVES. 1449 MW, Voice of Maldives, 0030-1745. English is noted at 1300-1400 starting with news. At 1311 to 1321 Islamic prayers heard (Jacob, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) Also webcast ** MALI. 7284.4, R Mali, Kati, 1013-1200, May 18, French sermon, folk songs. 15332. Was unable to establish its fade out time. // 31 m (good), 25 m (weak & under adjacent QRM from Turkey 11955). (Carlos Gonçalves, Portugal, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** MYANMAR. 5973, Myawaddy R. Station seems to be inactive. Is anybody able to hear it? 6570, Defence Forces BC, Taunggyi, 1620-1632*, May 01, Bamar talk mentioning Myanmar, music with female singer, 1631 closing announcement by man and woman mentioning Myanmar again. Best as 34543 (Roland Schulze, Philippines, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. LEGAL ACTION OVER RADIO NZ JOB ROW --- 24 May 2003 A dispute between Radio New Zealand's controversial chief executive, Sharon Crosbie, and a senior manager has resulted in legal action, the New Zealand Herald reported today. . . http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,2497036a11,00.html (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** PAPUA NEW GUINEA. 3355, R Simbu, Kundiawa, 1115-1202*, May 12, back after 7 months absence, Tok Pisin ID, public announcement, international and South Sea music, national anthem 25232. 3905, R New Ireland, Kavieng, regular again since Apr 15 (Roland Schulze, Philippines, Apr 30, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** PARAGUAY. Adán Mur sent me a mail a few minutes ago and sayed me Radio América, Villeta transmits with 600 watts on 19 meters now!! This is the schedule: Estimado Arnaldo: 1480 KHZ - 1 KW - 24 hours, from Ñemby. 1590 KHZ - 0.2 KW - 24 hours from Villeta. 7370 KHZ - 1 KW - 24 hours - from Villeta, with programation from Ñemby. 15185 KHZ - 0.6 KW - 24 hours - from Villeta, programation from Ñemby 73's & 55's (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentina, May 24, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** PERU. 4890, R. Macedonia, tuned in 25th May at 0430 off and on through 0600 with organ and romantic instrumental music with SS announcements, only one ID "Macedonia. . . numbre" in this time, fair to good at times for 1 kW, thanks to Paul Ormandy for tip; wish I had brought tape recorder. Outgunned by RFI Gabon from fade in 0445 to 0500* (David Norrie, DXing from Whitford Forest near Auckland, New Zealand using "fence post antenna" and AOR 7030, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** PHILIPPINES. 9580v, PBS, Marulas, Valenzuela (Metro Manila) has been inactive on this frequency since May 05 (Schulze, May 13) 11885, R. Pilipinas, Tinang, 0200-0330*, May 01, English replacing 11775 (Cf. DX-Window no. 219), but the old ID-tape still announced 12015! Heard // 15120 and 15270 (Roland Schulze, Philippines, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** POLAND [non]. Radio Maryja, 12010 kHz, 1500-1600 UT, via Russian relay, 343, religious talk & music by OM in Polish. 24/5/03 (Swopan Chakroborty, Kolkata, India, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RADIO MARYJA POLSKA --- Broadcasting in Polish using Russian transmitters in Krasnodar. Valid March 30, 2003-October 26, 2003 HORA UT KHZ 0500-0715 15455 Monday-Saturday 0600-0800 15455 Sunday 1500-1830 12010 Daily 1500-2200* 7380 Daily * This transmission to be dropped September 7, 2003. QTH: Radio Maryja, ul. Zwirki i Wigury 80, 87-100 Torun, Polonia. E-mail: radio@radiomaryja.pl Web: http://www.radiomaryja.pl (Conexión Digital via Catholic Radio Update May 26 via DXLD) ** SICILY. 6060/7175/9515, Caltanissetta. RAI has decided that the SW transmitters at Caltanissetta shall no longer be used for domestic broadcasts and they closed down on May 14 (Luigi Cobisi, Peninsular Italy, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** SINGAPORE. 6150.8, R Singapore, 2248-2309, May 16, English program of western oldies, news 2300. 54432 (Carlos Gonçalves, Portugal, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) Beware of confusion with CYPRUS TURKISH, q.v. which is also off-frequency in this area (gh) ** SINGAPORE. Right now (1315 UT) I'm listening to one of my long time early morning favorites, "RSI" on 9600. It's in English and appears to be a "Local targeted" program, yet is well heard on the West coast. Lots of popular music in English, they just played a remake of the old Norman Greenbaum tune, "Spirit in the Sky". The first time I ran across this station (again) back in the early to mid 90's they were playing a lot of oldies from the 50's and 60's and it immediately caught my attention. I have some very nice QSL's from them and in years past they've sent nice large colorful calendars, a pad of "post-it" notes with their logo, a pen etc. Anyway, I digress. The station is SINPO 43434 (some co-channel QRM) and scheduled at 1100-1400 UT. Heard on Yaesu VR-5000 and roof mounted Hustler 6BTV vertical. 73 de (Phil Atchley, KO6BB --- DX begins at the noise floor! Merced, California, May 23, swl at qth.net via DXLD) ** SOMALIA. Hi Glenn, The press release you quoted in DXLD 3-090 is remarkably similar to one published on 12 May 2002. See http://www.somaliawatch.org/archivemar02/020512101.htm I also saw this item on the Web site of IRIN, but something rang a bell and I figured they may have inadvertently picked up a one year old story. On the other hand, I haven't seen any reports that indicate its broadcasts have been received in the past year, so maybe the whole project really has started a year later than planned. 73, (Andy Sennitt, May 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SRI LANKA. 7300, SLBC All Asia Vernacular Service has made some changes. They were on 7115 0025-0400, 0800-1600 with 9770 in //. Then A03 season VOA Iranawila also started using 7115 0100-0300 which has been the VOA's A season frequency. SLBC found it difficult to move as they had only 5 crystals for this transmitter: 7115, 7190, 7235, 7300 and 7445. I suggested 7300 as the only alternative and they used it in // but the crystal was off on 7302.75. Finally they managed to repair a frequency synthesizer and use it. So find SLBC 7300 now. All Asia English Service is now on 0025-0400 on 6005, 11905 15745, 1225-1530 on 6005, 11930, 15745. 11930 is badly interfering with VOA. I am trying to get them on 11905 for this slot as well. In mid March I was able to get fair signals on 15745 around 0200 in Wisconsin. I suppose WEWN was in skip. This season anyway WEWN is not there I think (Victor Goonetilleke, Sri Lanka, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) {VOA has been operating in Sri Lanka for sesquidecades: why is there not routine coordination with SLBC to avoid any such clashes????} Wonder what he was doing in Wisconsin (whilst in US for IBB Monitor meeting and SWL Winterfest) -- visiting Jensen/Dexter? (gh, DXLD) {more likely visiting members of his own family} ** TAIWAN. 8300. Some words or phrases were missing in this item in DX-Window no. 219. Correct version is: "Naj reported in DXW No. 215, New Star broadcasting station verified with QSL card. Not mention as he reported, it didn't confirm as WHO service of R Taipei International in my case. It verified using R. Taipei International card, but struck out the name of it." (Ishii, Japan, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** TAIWAN [and non]. RTI encountered on 15215 in English news at 0314 UT May 25, nice signal; it was way ahead (by a second or two) of \\ 9680 WYFR relay, so I guess 15215 be direct; also \\ 5950 WYFR, but after 0316 they were no longer parallel, with one carrying the A program, the other the B program, ``The Groove Zone`` being on 15215 (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** TIMOR LESTE. East Timor back on the air: The Daily DX http://www.dailydx.com/ reports that Thor Stefansson, recently 4W6MM -- and known longer term as TF3MM -- is back on the air as 4W3DX from what's now known as the Democratic Republic of Timor Leste-- previously known as East Timor. Stations operating with permission of the UN Temporary Administration of East Timor -- or UNTAET -- were informed recently that their operating permission had expired, but The Daily DX reports that Stefansson apparently has received operating permission from the new authorities in Timor Leste. Stefansson has erected a huge rhombic that's pointed at Europe, although he still has a tribander that he can aim at North America and elsewhere. 4W3DX has been reported on 20 and 15-meter CW at the low end of the band at around 1500 to 1600 UT and at 0100. Stefansson, who's leaving Timor Leste in June, plans to remain active for the next couple of weeks, much of that time on the higher bands. He reports that the rhombic will remain for DXpeditioners after he leaves (The Daily DX via ARRL May 22 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** TURKMENISTAN. US TV ANCHOR SAYS WESTERN AUDIENCES BEING MISLED ABOUT TURKMENISTAN | Excerpt from report by Turkmen TV on 24 May [Presenter] [Turkmen president] Saparmyrat Turkmenbasy [Nyyazow] the Great today answered questions put by Robert Simon, a prominent journalist from the famous US CBS News TV. [Reporter, over video of Simon and Nyyazow talking each other] For more than 50 years CBS News TV has stood as one of the best media models in the USA with its "60 Minutes" program, known as the country's best newscast. It has a daily audience of over 15m viewers, including the most influential representatives of political and business circles from the USA and other countries as well. [Passage omitted: a number of world leaders have been interviewed by CBS; Robert Simon is known as the best anchor] The conversation between Turkmenistan's president, Saparmyrat Turkmenbasy the Great, and Robert Simon lasted for about two hours and was conducted in a free and open atmosphere during which the sides touched upon various issues. Turkmenistan's president, Saparmyrat Turkmenbasy the Great, answered the questions of the US journalist with the openness characteristic of him. [Passage omitted: Simon quoted as admiring with Turkmenistan's achievements; Simon is then interviewed] [Simon, speaking to camera in English overlaid by Turkmen interpretation] The first thing we have seen upon our arrival here is Asgabat and its people, who are very kind and hospitable. The city of Asgabat is full of various memorials and new construction sites being build to suit present-day requirements. In particular, its streets are clean and safe for walking in. [Passage omitted: more praise of Turkmenistan] I would like to express my sincere gratitude for the detailed answers Turkmenistan's president gave to my questions. For my part, I think that there is a need for more visits by Western media representatives [to Turkmenistan]. During my visit I also realized that there is some misinformation in the west about Turkmenistan. I have also understood that Western countries should be provided with more information about Turkmenistan. As an example, I would like to quote the fact that prior to my visit here I had read that there is a total ban imposed in Turkmenistan on Western music, whereas upon my arrival here I discovered at a local bazaar that audio cassettes are on sale freely, with melodies of numerous Western pop stars. I think, then, that the Western audience should be provided with true information about Turkmenistan. Thank you very much. Source: Turkmen TV first channel, Asgabat, in Turkmen 1600 gmt 24 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) Simon may anchor on occasion, but I think his primary job is reporter. Somehow, I suspect there is more to the story. Don`t recall seeing Simon`s piece on T-stan yet on 60 Minutes which is certainly not a ``newscast``; surely they will deal with the `Great` cult of personality, which could be taken as criticism. Nyyazow [whose spelling is that?] is the State (gh, DXLD) {/correspondent} ** U K. EUROVISION SONG CONTEST: See LATVIA ** U K. TV ON THE RADIO? IT'S IN THE PICTURE By Clive Akass [21-05] You could be forgiven for feeling confused at news that NTL and London-based Radioscape demonstrated the transmission of TV images to a PDA using a Digital Audio Broadcasting (Dab) signal. TV over radio, digital or not, seems to make about as much sense as flying through mud, but it's not as daft as it sounds. DAB is set to replace analogue radio in the UK as soon as enough of us can be persuaded to buy the receivers. This won't be very soon as, although early models have sold well, the cheapest is still around £100 - 10 times the price of a cheap analogue set. . . (From http://www.vnunet.com/Features/1140700 via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A [non]. Reforming R. Farda to IRAN: q.v. ** U S A. Stepping thru the YB-400 memories at 0606 UT May 24, surprised to hear with good signal on 15725, Arab music, but with some English lyrics --- must be R. Sawa! Sure enough, quickly IDed at 0607. 15725 is memorized because of WRMI, and I see IBB has Sawa on: 15725 0600 1500 VOA MRN2 ARAB MOR 06 083 which overlaps WRMI considerably after 1200, in case interference be noted over here (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. National Association of SW Broadcaster currently counts 17 of the 20 private US SW stations as members. Holds an annual meeting in Washington DC the first weekend of May. DRM was one topic this year. It was suggested that each station produce a DRM program each week or in rotation. Time would be leased from existing DRM facility in Canada, Bonaire or Europe, just as an experimental thing as there are very few possible listeners yet. Jeff White will be chairman of the NASB board for one year. At least one representative will attend the HFCC conferences, August in Norway, next February in Dubai. Hope to do publicity among our audience, which are primarily in the areas where major annual DX meetings are held: at Kulpsville, the Mexican national DX meeting, and the EDXC conference; will attend each of these over the next year and present a display with handouts. Associate members in NASB include HCJB. To be a full member, must be FCC licensees in the US. Also transmitter and antenna manufacturing companies, consultancies such as George Jacobs & Associates. See http://www.shortwave.org for the NASB website (Jeff White, interviewed by Allen Graham at a Mexican restaurant in Miami, for DX Partyline May 25, notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) Not including WWCR ** U S A. If WWCR`s plan to use 9475 as a `step-up` frequency in the mornings between 5070 and 12160 for transmitter 3 doesn`t happen, it could be because R. Australia inconveniently happens to be using same, at least 1100-1300 in English, tho not toward us, at 329 degrees, per difficult-to-obtain schedule in 3-071 (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: Latest logging from Troy, Michigan using the trusty Grundig Satellit 800. AUSTRALIA 9475 Radio Australia 1100-1145 Correspondents' Reports with a wrap up of the weeks events, discussion mostly on Iraq, Middle East and George Bush. SIO of 333 with some jamming present but not loud enough to affect listening and // to 9580 (SIO of 545). Not listed on HFCC, visit to RA website shows this signal is intended for Asia (Joe Miller, 5/25 Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** U S A. Can you hear the jamming on 5070 WWCR at night where you are? Just started in the last week or so. In the early morning hours it`s pretty bad here in Atlanta (LOU KF4EON Johnson, May 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Last night at 0230, no jamming at all noticed, but the WWCR signal is always extremely strong here. What kind of jamming??? Describe. Are you sure it is deliberate? (Glenn to Lou) Well, it sounds like a bottle banging against something concrete. It is strongest after 0500 here. At first, I thought it was some military, digital communication. But it is repetitive and nonstop. I think WWCR is directional westward [eastward] from Nashville so I am located off a side lobe southeast of them. It is probably coming from Cuba as I am located between Cuba and Nashville. I've heard bubble jamming of WRMI 7385 in the early morning (0500) hours here before during Christian Media Network broadcasts. I can call the FCC monitoring office here in Atlanta (I've called them before about such matters.) The most they can do is give you a bearing as to where it`s coming from. Enjoy your show (LOU KF4EON, ibid.) I think I know what you mean; that is constantly heard on several other SW frequencies ``the bonker``, but I don`t recall what it is. It does serves some purpose other than jamming. Possibly one of these has moved in too close to 5070? --- which, after all, is in a utility band (gh) {Later: detected around 5072} ** U S A. Top 40 WABC Reborn - 5/22 - ABC plans to dump the talk format on its NYC blowtorch WABC (770 AM) on Memorial Day to feature music countdown shows from the station's top 40 days in the 1960s and 1970s, with Harry Harrison, Ron Lundy, "Cousin Brucie" Morrow, Chuck Dunaway, Dan Ingram, Bob Lewis, Howard Hoffman, and Chuck Leonard. The bad news - it'll run from 6 AM to 6 PM [1000-2200 UT], making it hard to hear in the DC/Baltimore area. WABC's signal reaches the region after dark. But you can listen via http://www.wabcradio.com (from http://www.dcrtv.com which by the way is a nice site for radio scuttlebutt in the Mid-Atlantic area.) ~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-., (Joe Buch, DE, swprograms via DXLD) -*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^ http://www.musicradio77.com has a five minute real audio preview of WABC Rewound 2003 and a WABC Rewound bulletin board. http://musicradio.computer.net/images/rewoundDemo2003.ram There are also clips from WABC Rewound in 1999 - 2002. There used to be a great website devoted to the top 40 days of CKLW (back when CKLW, on the Windsor shore of the Detroit River, had the greatest ratings in Cleveland) but I believe the webmaster became ill (Joel Rubin, NY, ibid.) ** U S A. STARBOARD EXPLAINS DROPPING ITS PURCHASE OF WJOB HAMMOND Green Bay, May 19 (CRU) --- Sherry Brownrigg, president of Starboard Network, Inc. e-mailed Catholic Radio Update to set the record straight in regard to the report last week about Starboard's backing out of the purchase of WJOB 1230 in Hammond, Indiana. ``Starboard elected to not go ahead with the purchase of WJOB due to the fact that we decided to hold off on our commitment to Spanish language broadcasting. We wanted to concentrate on our English feed, and we simply did not need two stations in that area. We do plan to pursue Spanish language Catholic radio in the future.`` (Catholic Radio Update May 26 via DXLD) ** U S A. As some of you know, Bob Hope is turning 100 years-of-age on May 29, 2003. Many of us were entertained by Mr. Hope, during our time in the Military Service. And others of us might have enjoyed his good cheer from Old Time Radio, and so forth. To show our appreciation, the US Army MARS is asking you to submit a "Happy Birthday" greeting to Bob Hope via the MARSgram service of the US Army MARS. If you would like to extend your birthday greeting to Mr. Bob Hope, I have set up a way for you to submit this free MARSgram via: http://wa.mars.hfradio.org/marsgram/bob.html Send your message, today! 73 de (Tomas, NW7US (AAR0JA/AAM0EWA) Hood, swl at qth.net via DXLD) ** U S A. As referenced in previous issue: REMARKS BY FCC COMMISSIONER JONATHAN S. ADELSTEIN Before The Media Institute May 20, 2003 ``Big Macs and Big Media: The Decision to Supersize`` This is a great day to speak at The Media Institute. We`re on the eve of the most sweeping and potentially destructive overhaul of the FCC`s media rules in the history of American broadcasting. But I`m not sure we really know what we`re about to unleash. I`m fresh off the trail of media ownership hearings Commissioner Copps and I held across the country --- the so-called Magical Mystery Tour. One of our participants, Ben Bagdikian, former dean of the School of Journalism at UC Berkeley, spoke before a packed audience at San Francisco`s City Hall. In 1983, when the first edition of his book The Media Monopoly was released, he wrote that, ``50 corporations dominated most of every mass medium.`` The number then dropped with each new edition --- to 29 firms in 1987, 23 in 1990, 14 in 1992 down to 10 in 1997. The 2000 edition found that just six conglomerates were supplying most of America`s media. This trend will only accelerate after June 2nd. In fact, we`re likely to witness a tsunami of mergers --- an unprecedented wave of consolidation. When this wave recedes, we`ll find far fewer media companies left standing. Some of you in this room today may be swept away by that wave. But its principal victim may be our democracy. Lou Dobbs` Moneyline last week ran an online poll asking whether ``too few corporations own too many media outlets.`` Now this show`s audience has a high-end demographic. Yet ninety-eight percent said yes --- ninety-eight percent. I wonder who the other two percent were? I would guess that one percent were investment bankers salivating at the prospect of getting a piece of the action. After all, during the first month after the 1996 Act, more than $2 billion in radio transactions took place, and I`ve heard a lot more than that are in the wings today. In fact, Merrill Lynch says the ``Gold Rush`` has already begun. Deutsche Bank predicts that hundreds of TV stations will be sold or swapped. And the other one percent of Moneyline viewers? They probably already work for the big media companies that hope to come out on top. That leaves about 100 percent of the general audience --- the citizens whose interests the Commission is sworn to protect --- opposed to today`s concentration levels, let alone the more powerful media empires to come. That fits with what I witnessed at hearings across the country. Of the hundreds of citizens I heard from, many extremely articulate, not one person stood up to say, ``I want to see even more concentration in our media ownership.`` Not one. And that`s what we see in the comments pouring in to the FCC – virtually none from the public say ``please, let big media companies get bigger – I can`t wait to see what they`ll produce with all those economies of scale.`` The Free Press and the Future of Music recently surveyed about 10,000 citizen comments and found that only 11 people supported relaxing the rules – about 1/10 of one percent. Aside from these 11 people, the only other proponents for further media consolidation appear to be companies in deal-making mode or their advocates. We heard opposition from the NRA to Tom Petty, from Barry Diller to Pearl Jam, from Norman Lear to Ted Turner. Why is this chorus so in tune? Americans instinctively hold a deep hostility to big media. It violates every tenet of a free democratic society to let a handful of powerful companies control our media. FCC proceedings typically generate comment from a handful of affected companies and inside-the-Beltway types. But this one is radically different. Now, we`re getting tens of thousands of comments weekly, which is unprecedented --- and nearly all in one direction. More than 137,000 citizens have weighed in so far. I`ve heard the argument, ``What does public outrage matter? The FCC`s got a job to do, spurred on by Congress and the courts, and we can`t make these decisions by popular vote.`` Let me tell you why I believe it matters. The FCC is charged by law to serve the public interest. And the public has zero interest in seeing media conglomerates grow bigger. The public knows instinctively what the FCC is supposed to do --- protect them from large entities gaining too much control over critical channels of communication. A majority of five unelected bureaucrats shouldn`t substitute their own judgment --- or the judgment of self-interested corporate CEOs --- for the protection of the American people. Americans take this matter --- the media that they watch, listen to and read every day --- very personally. That became clear to me as I listened to hundreds of them express profound insights in passionate one- or two-minute statements. In a nutshell, people think further media consolidation will only accelerate trends they already find alarming. They think it will only increase sensationalism, crassness, violence, homogenization and lack of serious news coverage across the public airwaves. Dismissing the public`s views is a recipe for disaster, and it will have consequences we`re already beginning to see. We have in our hands a lit match, and we`re moving closer to a powder keg of public anger that may be about to explode. Could that explain why the Commission shied away from floating specific proposals for public comment? We can predict the outcome: the public outcry would be deafening. To borrow an image from a recent speech by the Chairman, in this case the penguins aren`t just swimming, they`re screeching loudly. And it`s tough to sneak a smelly dead fish past a bunch of angry penguins. People always notice what happens to their media, even if they don`t always know why. Many will notice the results from relaxing the rules whether or not they complained in advance. So what kind of backlash might result if the FCC pushes this too far? One of my neighbors stopped me this weekend and asked if I had any part in this media debate. He wanted to know if the ``fix is in`` for even greater consolidation. He concluded, ``well, if you can`t do anything to stop it, you`d better regulate the hell out of the few left standing.`` One very possible backlash is that the public may someday soon demand more intrusive content regulation or a return to the prescriptive solutions of the past. Most people agree with my view that content- neutral structural regulation is highly preferable to content regulation. But if the FCC whittles away the last vestiges of structural regulation, pressure for more intrusive regulation may boil over, threatening the First Amendment values The Media Institute holds so dear. We`re already hearing a growing refrain for media reform from people upset by the content of today`s programming --- by the rampant bad taste, sensationalism, sex, violence and lack of positive family programming on TV; by the explicit language and homogenization on the radio dial; by the stories not being covered in the news media, particularly when the media`s corporate self-interests are at stake --- which we have seen in this very proceeding. People all over, not just in Minot, North Dakota, have drawn a direct link between consolidation, with its absentee ownership, and the failure to meet the needs of local communities. So I caution those seeking further consolidation, including many of you in this room: use any increased efficiencies you may gain wisely. For if not, people might very well demand to see in license renewal proceedings or in quarterly reports more specific evidence of how owners are meeting the needs of local communities. They might try to return to a world where license renewals bring an opportunity for others to show how they would serve the public interest better. They might demand ascertainment studies or more rigid standards for broadcast decency. They might also seek to force a more balanced perspective of viewpoints on the airwaves or the labeling of corporate cross-promotions. I`m not saying I support these measures, but the public may call for more oversight if they become frustrated by consolidation. Now, I try to remain the eternal optimist, and hold out hope, even as time fades, that extremist proposals can still be moderated. There are yet some ways of moving the match away from the powder keg. Reasoned compromise can diffuse this issue. Rather than allowing massive consolidation, we should take a conservative approach that gradually permits additional mergers we can evaluate before completely unleashing the industry. But hopes fade with time and with setbacks in the opposite direction. Commissioner Copps and I were refused the traditional courtesy we requested of a few more weeks time to seek common ground – and to study more thoroughly the impact of the proposals before we vote on them. And we were denied the opportunity to air the specific proposals publicly, which would have assisted us in avoiding unintended consequences and sustaining the order in court. Despite these setbacks, the Chairman has challenged us to join in a commitment to finding solutions. So today I would like to offer some thoughts on at least some aspects of the issues raised in the proceeding. At the outset, let me say that I cannot support any part of an order that fails to reaffirm the most basic tenet of our 70 years of American broadcast regulation: that in return for the free and exclusive use of valuable and scarce public spectrum, broadcasters have a special obligation to serve the public interest. Nor could I support an order that finds that broadcasters are just another voice in a crowd of ever-expanding and fungible media channels. And I wouldn`t think that broadcasters would cozy up to this ``just another voice`` characterization either. For if broadcasters are no different from cable channels or web sites in the grand media scheme, what`s the basis for the must carry rules and the ``free`` digital television channels broadcasters were awarded? Despite the oft-repeated exhortation that technology has changed everything, a simple fact remains. No technological advances have made it possible for every person who wants to broadcast in a local community to do so. We therefore must reaffirm that the public interest is served by promoting all three of the basic principles that form the foundation of American broadcasting system: localism, diversity, and competition --- not just competition alone. First, we must consider how to hold broadcasters accountable to the public for the benefits they claim will result from consolidation. Proponents of relaxing the rules tout efficiencies as justifying newspaper-TV combinations, or TV duopolies and triopolies. So let the buyer disclose upfront what he or she commits to do with those efficiencies. What better programming, particularly locally-originated and oriented programming, will the buyer produce? Will they hire additional reporters to investigate local news stories? What better coverage will result of local events and local artists? Will each entity retain separate editorial discretion, and will the overall editorial budget be increased? How will the owner treat complaints of stories not being covered? Will the broadcaster improve its emergency broadcasting capabilities, or invest in better technology to alert the community to dangerous conditions? Before allowing media companies to expand into traditionally-protected areas, the public should know how it will benefit them. The FCC should then require an annual showing from the consolidated broadcaster that it met its commitments. Were efficiencies channeled into meeting the localism and diversity needs of the community, or did they go straight to the bottom line? The Commission has consistently required broadcasters seeking waivers of ownership rules to make specific, tangible representations of the benefits of consolidation. So given all the benefits claimed in this proceeding, this should be an easy showing for merging parties. And it will allow the FCC and the Congress to make more informed decisions on future levels of concentration. Second, diversity concerns stemming from cross-ownership of a broadcast station with other media outlets like newspapers or cable should be addressed based upon a specific showing of the diverse voices available in individual local markets and the power of the proposed combination to undermine diverse viewpoints. The Supreme Court has said that ``promoting the widespread dissemination of information from a multiplicity of sources`` is of the highest order. So safeguarding diversity should not be subject to abstract diversity scenarios that hypothetical markets of certain sizes may engender. Given diversity`s paramount position in our democracy, it shouldn`t be given short shrift by rules that neither reflect the realities of available viewpoints nor the power of particular combinations. Third, with respect to the national cap, while I clearly prefer to keep the cap at the 35% level that Congress established, in my opinion, the only other number that makes legal and policy sense is 40%, the number the market is at today. Before we increase the national cap, however, we must examine whether UHF stations should continue to retain a 50% discount and whether the increased power of the broadcast networks should be offset by safeguards for the retention of independently-produced content. Both of these issues are inextricably linked to an increase in the cap, and should be considered in further detail before any increase in the national cap takes effect. The UHF discount was put in place to reflect technical limits of the UHF signal in reaching the full audience of a VHF station. Today, however, 85% of the population is receiving broadcast television stations through cable or DBS. If restraints on the ability to reach a full audience have eroded due to cable carriage, so too should the UHF discount. If the whole purpose of this exercise is to update our rules in light of technological developments, we cannot ignore some just because we don`t like the outcome of more stringent limits. Likewise, with the change in the network cap from 25% to 35% and the repeal of the Financial Interest and Syndication Rules and the Prime Time Access Rule, we have seen the near extinction of independent production companies and independent creative entrepreneurs. Whereas 10 years ago, 85% of the programs on television were created and produced by entities independent of the networks, today only 15% to 20% are independently produced. Does network ownership restrain competition and diversity of content production? How have the trends over the past decade affected the diversity of viewpoints from different sources and encouraged competition from small businesses? Without the answers to questions like these in this or a further rulemaking proceeding, it`s difficult to move forward with confidence that we know the full impact of our decisions. I`m not saying I know the final answers. At a minimum, though, we should have well thought out and intellectually-coherent answers to these questions before we raise the network ownership cap. From the outset of broadcasting, policymakers have always understood that localism and diversity are inefficient. If efficiencies were all that mattered, Congress would have told the FCC to give out national or regional broadcast licenses. After all, the most efficient possible structure is for one large company, let`s call it Pravda, to gather the news for everyone. American broadcasting has never been about maximizing bottom-line efficiencies over all else. Going back to 1927, the Federal Radio Commission reported to Congress that it would assign station frequencies to serve as many communities as possible. It specifically sought to prevent New York and Chicago stations from dominating the airwaves. Today our inquiry should not veer off this course. Localism continues to be the core organizational principle of the Commission`s dispersal of valuable spectrum rights. Nothing in the 1996 Act jettisoned this core principle. In fact, the 1996 Act`s legislative history strongly reaffirms localism over efficiencies, saying ``Localism is an expensive value. We believe it is a vitally important value, however, [and] should be preserved and enhanced.`` So to avoid backlash from the public and its representatives, it will be up to many of you in the room today to prove that efficiencies gained by any relaxation of broadcast ownership rules are channeled in the direction of serving local communities and local residents. I often hear from industry sources, ``we`re just giving people what they want. After all, that`s our business. And as we get bigger, we just have more resources and ability to deliver a better quality product.`` This is certainly true to some extent. But let me extend a warning about this. You might call it the ``McDonaldization`` of the American media. McDonald`s spends a lot trying to give people what they want. They only put products out after expensive field testing. Every product is analyzed to satisfy the greatest number of people, even if the local community may have its own unique tastes. Don`t get me wrong, I like McDonald`s, and eat there sometimes. But I don`t eat there every day. And even if I did, I know it wouldn`t be very healthy. The same goes for the media. People also need a balanced media diet --- a diverse menu, if you will. But it`s a lot harder to set up a broadcast station than a new restaurant. Any of us with a few resources can open an alternative, say a health food store, right next to a fast food restaurant. But not just anybody can open a TV or radio station. In fact, those are nearly impossible businesses for upstarts to break into, and the barriers to entry may rise even higher after June 2nd. The spectrum can`t support everyone deciding to start their own TV and radio station. Neither cable nor the Internet has changed the huge market power granted by federal license to use scarce broadcast spectrum, particularly when that license comes with the requirement to be carried on cable. If these scarce licenses weren`t valuable, their price wouldn`t continue to skyrocket as they have in recent years. The scarcity of the public`s airwaves is the very reason it`s up to the FCC to ensure a diversity of owners and viewpoints. Fast food chains are welcome to spread as fast as the market will bear. People will always find another place to eat. But they won`t always find a diversity of viewpoints in their media unless we do our jobs. And we won`t be fulfilling our duties if we treat the media like we treat fast food. Unlike typical consumer products, the media produces significant positive and negative externalities. The media is where people receive information and guidance for their democracy and their way of life. A broadcaster is still in some senses a gatekeeper --- deciding which issues are important to a community, whether any particular speaker gains access to the airwaves, and how various sides of an issue are presented. So while mass-produced media may be more efficient, it may have disastrous results for our democracy. Put simply, Big Macs and big media don`t have the same repercussions for our communities. And while a person may decide Supersizing their Big Mac meal sounds good in the short term, they may find it leads to damaging results in the long term. I`m afraid that the FCC isn`t only about to further McDonaldize the media --- it`s about to Supersize it. Once we place our order on June 2nd, we`ll all have to digest what comes our way. And the public may be about to experience a giant ``Maalox moment.`` I, for one, hope that we take it slowly and avoid indigestion. Thank you, and I would be happy to take a few questions or comments (FCC via DXLD) WHAT THE FCC HAS HEARD SO FAR -- Sunday, May 25, 2003; Page B03 Since last fall, when the Federal Communications Commission asked for "public comment" on its proposed new rules for media ownership, the agency has logged more than 320,000 e-mails, letters and postcards... http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A33600-2003May23.html 500 CHANNELS, BUT NO CLEAR PICTURE OF WHAT WE WANT By Robert J. Thompson, Sunday, May 25, 2003; Page B03 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A33609-2003May23.html 73, (-.. . Kraig Krist, KG4LAC, Annandale, VA, DXLD) ** U S A. MOVE OVER, RIGHT WING RADIO - THE LIBERALS ARE COMING by Thom Hartmann Published on Monday, May 19, 2003 by CommonDreams.org NEW YORK - A political explosion happened this weekend in New York, and it may be the big one that gives Karl Rove nightmares. It could mean the end of George W. Bush's seemingly unending ability to tell overt lies to the American people and not get called on them by the American media. At a Saturday talk radio industry event put on by Talkers Magazine, Gabe Hobbs, Clear Channel Radio's vice president of News/Talk/Sports, announced that in the near future this corporate owner of over 1200 radio stations is considering programming some of their talk stations "in markets where there are already one or two stations doing conservative talk" with all-day back-to-back all-liberal talk show hosts. . . http://www.commondreams.org/views03/0519-03.htm (via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via DXLD) ** U S A. DR. DEMENTO Does anyone know if A) the Dr Demento show is still on the air and B) if it`s audible on any stations in the area (Golden Horseshoe/So Ontario/Western NY) (Fred Waterer, ODXA via DXLD) Yes & no There is an up to date list: http://mypage.iu.edu/~jbmorris/FAQ/stations.html (Brian Smith, ibid.) As of May 19, no less ** U S A. Publicradiofan.com has added some more reading services --- with webcasts, who needs SCA/SCS? Viz.: RAISE AUDIO SERVER Welcome to the RAISE audio server. The Regional Audio Information Service of Asheville, North Carolina, sponsors this audio library of current information. Direct all comments to info@raisewnc.org Please select between Real Audio and Windows Media to listen to the program of your choice. Files are available immediately after broadcast. Real Audio archives Windows Media live stream http://www.raisewnc.org/ THE METROPOLITAN WASHINGTON EAR: free services for blind, visually impaired, and physically disabled people who cannot effectively read print. http://www.washear.org/ TALKING INFORMATION CENTER, Marshfield MA Turning Print Into Sound http://www.ticnetwork.com/ WCRS - WRITTEN COMMUNICATIONS RADIO SERVICE, Akron OH Welcome to the website for WCRS. Written Communications Radio Service broadcasts Newspapers, Magazines and Books over a closed circuit radio frequency for the visually impaired. http://www.wcrsradio.org/ (via Glenn Hauser, DXLD) ** U S A. From the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette... By Adrian McCoy, Post- Gazette Staff Writer. WEDO-AM's (810) daily Italian radio show "Radio Italia" will go global this weekend. Host Sal Patitucci taped a one- hour show that will air on the Italian network RAI on Saturday. The broadcasts are carried by satellite and shortwave. Patitucci will re- broadcast the show at 11 a.m. Sunday on WEDO. "Radio Italia" airs from 5:05 to 6 p.m. weekdays and at 11 a.m. Sundays. The program features music, news and sports reports from Italy. It has been on the air since 1964 and is one of the area's longest-running ethnic radio programs... http://www.post-gazette.com/tv/20030522wedortv7.asp 73 (via Kim Elliott, DXLD) ** U S A. Former military vessel LST-325 taking along ham radio on river cruise: The former tank landing ship LST-325 -- now a museum ship in civilian hands -- will set sail with ham radio aboard on June 3 for a 78-day cruise up the Mississippi and Ohio rivers. An all- volunteer crew will handle the vessel, which plans stops at Vicksburg, Mississippi; Memphis, Tennessee; Cape Girardeau and St Louis, Missouri; Evansville and Jeffersonville, Indiana; Paducah, Kentucky; Greenville, Mississippi; and New Orleans, Louisiana--in that order. Amateur Radio operation using WW2LST/mm will be on all HF bands, with Tom Pendarvis, W0MTP, as the chief operator. Operation on AM and CW using a restored TCS-12 will include 80/75 and 40 meters. The ham station will operate from the Jackson Carter Memorial Radio Room, dedicated to the late Jack Carter, KC6WYX, who made history as WW2LST/mm http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2001/01/10/1/ when he and a crew of volunteers sailed the LST-325 from Crete to Alabama in late 2000. QSL to Bob Wilder, AF2HD, 6032 Idlemoore Ct, Theodore, AL 36582-4117 and include a No 10 SASE to accommodate the special QSL card (ARRL May 22 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** U S A. NARTE registers ham radio net: In association with ARRL, the National Association of Radio Telecommunications Engineers NARTE http://www.narte.org/ headquartered in Medway, Massachusetts, has registered an HF Amateur Radio Net -- The NARTE Net. The NARTE Net will provide a forum for the common interests of ARRL members and NARTE-certified professionals, NARTE said in announcing the net. The NARTE Net meets Saturdays, 1700 UT, and Sundays, 2100, on 18.140 MHz. "The NARTE Net is launched to further the mutual support of ARRL and NARTE in fostering technical awareness, educating and providing credentials to practitioners in amateur and commercial telecommunications," NARTE said. A worldwide, non-profit, professional organization, NARTE certifies professional engineers and technicians in the fields of telecommunications and unlicensed wireless systems installation. The ARRL and NARTE maintain a memorandum of understanding to support areas of mutual interest (ARRL May 22 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** U S A. HAMS WANTED FOR NEW WILDLIFE TRACKING PROJECTS ARRL Amateur Radio Direction Finding Coordinator Joe Moell, K0OV, says ham radio assistance is needed for three new wildlife tracking projects. Moell says a biologist at the University of South Florida at Tampa (USF) is studying Florida burrowing owls, thought to range in Florida and the Florida Keys. Some Florida burrowing owl chicks are being radio-tagged, and USF wants volunteers throughout the Southeast to listen for the VHF radio tags in an attempt to determine the owls` routes and final destinations. The second project involves Mexican long-nosed bats. For about a month beginning in mid-June, Bat Conservation International wants volunteers to join a team that will track the bats` movements in and around Big Bend National Park in Texas. Project three involves a study of orphaned great horned owls conducted by the Heard Natural Science Museum and Wildlife Sanctuary and the University of North Texas. After being raised at the sanctuary, up to two dozen of these owls will be released into the wild this summer with radio tags attached. Volunteers are needed to monitor for the radio tags, especially in the Denton and Collin county areas. Moell`s Homing In Web site http://www.homingin.com has details and contact information on all three projects (ARRL Letter May 23 via John Norfolk, DXLD) WTFK??? {Why are hams being called upon? This is a receive-only project, so their transmitters will be superfluous!} ** VENEZEULA. CAUGHT BETWEEN AN AUTHORITARIAN PRESIDENT AND INTOLERANT MEDIA Reporters Without Borders writes: An April 2003 report says press freedom threatened by a "dictator" and "coup-supporters" in Venezuela. http://www.vheadline.com/readnews.asp?id=7582 (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** VENEZUELA. De nuevo hechos violentos sacuden a Venezuela. Durante una concentración pacifica que se realizaba en Catia, Caracas, hubo un tiroteo donde resultaron varias personas heridas y una persona fallecida. La Radio ha informado al momento de todos los acontecimientos. En la página web de Sintonia DX ya hay un sonido incluido en la sección de captaciones recientes sobre estos sucesos lamentables. El audio fue tomado de Unión Radio Caracas via Unión Radio 640 PLC. http://www.angelfire.com/music5/sintoniadx Atte: (José Elías, Venezuela, May 24, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** VIETNAM. The following regional stations were heard 1200-1230, May 11: 4798 Son La; 5034.7 // 6165 Dai Tieng Noi Vietnam; 6381 R Lai Chau and 6492.4 Cao Bang. Dai Tieng Noi Vietnam was also heard signing on *2325 in Hmong. 17925, Voice of Vietnam, 0805-0930, May 11, new frequency with Home service heard // 5975, 7210 and 9530. News and reports 0900 in Vietnamese. At 0930 7210 changed to a different program, but the 3 other frequencies continued to be in parallel. At 0930 5925 // 6020 // 9875 carried another program. At 1200-1230 all these brought the same program: 675 MW, 5925, 5975, 6020, 7210, 9530 and 17925 while 9875 was off (17925 is 3rd harmonic of 5975! DSWCI Ed.) At 2300 and onwards the Voice of Vietnam was heard with the same program on 5925, 5975, 6020, 7210 and 9530 (Roland Schulze, Philippines, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ** ZIMBABWE. BROADCASTING SERVICES BANDS GAZETTED --- Herald Reporter GOVERNMENT has gazetted broadcasting services bands following the allocation of the bands to the Broadcasting Authority of Zimbabwe by the Postal and Telecommunications Regulatory Authority. . . http://www.herald.co.zw/index.php?id=21332&pubdate=2003-05-24 [and non] MUTARE JOURNALIST REMOVED FROM REMAND STANLEY Karombo, 29, a reporter with SW Radio Africa and a correspondent with the Voice of America (VOA), facing a charge under the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act (AIPPA), was Tuesday removed from remand by Mutare magistrate, Milton Serima. . . http://allafrica.com/stories/200305230899.html (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. On May 20 I heard the same station [reported on 9745 as LIBYA q.v. by Tarek Zeidan] on 9747.0 at 1845-1932* in Arabic. QRM RAI 9745. 43443 (Anker Petersen, Denmark, May 21 DSWCI DX Window, May 24 via DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ POWERLINE COMMUNICATIONS ++++++++++++++++++++++++ GOOD NEWS ON THE BPL/PLC FRONT FROM EUROPE Kees Murre, PA2CHM, who's the International Amateur Radio Union liaison for VERON, the IARU member-society in the Netherlands reports that electric utility NUON has ceased efforts to test delivery of Internet service via power line communication (PLC) -- what the FCC has dubbed Broadband over Power Line (BPL). "NUON says that it is possible to send an Internet signal through the power line, but at this moment technical limitations stand in the way of large-scale application," Murre said. There's more information on PLC testing in the Netherlands on the ARRL Web site (ARRL May 22 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) CONVENTIONS & CONFERENCES +++++++++++++++++++++++++ ENCUENTRO DE VERANO DE LAS RADIOS LIBRES 28 JUNIO 2003 Saludos, queridos amigos de las emisoras libres de onda corta. Ha llegado el momento de dar a conocer brevemente sobre la próxima reunión que se celebrará en la frontera Holandesa/Belga en base al éxito que ha tenido la misma en los años anteriores, y al igual que en oportunidades previas, tendremos parrillada, bébidas, diversión y risas; y, esperamos que ustedes también puedan asistir. La razón de este anuncio anticipado es para aquellos que deseen asistir al evento, programen sus tiempos de vacaciones o de trabajo, así como para que nosotros sepamos cuántos van a venir a efectos de tener todo preparado. La reunión será el sábado 28 de Junio y comenzará alrededor de las 1500 hora local [TU +2]; se puede quedar el que lo desee durante esa noche en una carpa (traigan su bolsa de dormir) o en el hotel local de la zona. El lugar exacto del encuentro será anunciado unos pocos días antes de la reunión a todos los interesados que deseen asistir al encuentro, razón por la que le solicitamos nos informe oportunamente por e-mail o por carta. Más informaciones sobre el encuentro de verano, pueden obtener si escriben a: summermeeting@h... [truncated], o por carta a Summermeeting, P. O. Box 2702; NL-6049 ZG Herten; Holanda, o a la direccion de Ytterby en Suecia. Nosotros esperamos que asistan muchos oyentes de onda corta, así como operadores de emisoras piratas al igual que en los años pasados. Las personas que viajen desde lejos, pueden quedarse gratuitamente; sólo les pedimos que nos avisen oportunamente. Saludos, Organización Borderhunter del Encuentro de Verano (SW-Pirates, via Enrique A. Wembagher, Argentina, Conexión Digital May 23 via DXLD) IARU REGIONAL MEETING FALLS VICTIM TO SARS The SARS outbreak in Asia has caused the postponement of the 12th International Amateur Radio Union Region 3 conference http://www.jarl.or.jp/iaru-r3/ which had been scheduled to be held in Taipei, Taiwan, in September. The Chinese Taipei Amateur Radio League (CTARL) requested the postponement May 18. A new date and venue will be announced at least four months in advance. "On behalf of all Region 3 member-societies and other people concerned, Region 3 directors and the secretary have very much appreciated the preparations to date and the emergency actions taken by the conference preparatory team of the host society CTARL and President Mr. Bolon Lin, BV5AF," said IARU Region 3 Secretary Keigo Komuro, JA1KAB. The postponement also will mean a change in the IARU Administrative Council meeting planned to be held in Taipei September 6-8 (ARRL May 22 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ EXCLUSIVE AND NOT COPYRIGHTED HF PROPAGATION UPDATE AND FORECAST And now amigos, as always at the end of the program, here is our exclusive and not copyrighted HF propagation update and forecast. Solar flux is hovering around 115 units, and it looks like solar activity will decline during the next several days. A solar coronal hole has caused yet another geomagnetic disturbance that has sent the A index to figures as high as 5 during the past 24 hours. Sporadic E events are likely to happen mostly between 7 am and 11 am local time, and again from about 3 PM to 8 PM local time. Be on the alert for possible double hop sporadic E, as the probability of E skip events increases as we approach the month of June, so chances of two or more sporadic E clouds forming at different geographical locations are most likely at this moment, and that will lead to some interesting double hop DX, typically seen on the 6 meter amateur band (Prof. Arnaldo Coro Antich, CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited May 24-25, via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via DXLD) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-090, May 23, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3e.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1183: RFPI: Sat 0130, 0730/0900, 1330/1500, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0700/0830, 1300/1430 on 15039 and/or 7445 WWCR: Sat 0600, Sun 0230 on 5070, 0630 on 3210, Wed 0930 on 9475 WJIE: Sat 0930, Sun 1030, 1630 on 7490 and/or 13595 (maybe) WBCQ: Mon 0445 on 7415 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1183.html [k4cc.net host had a DOS attack slowing downloading, OK now?] WORLD OF RADIO ON WINB. Thanks to an invitation from Hans Johnson, WINB in Pennsylvania will start broadcasting WORLD OF RADIO June 7, Saturdays at 1730 UT on 13570. The antenna heading is registered with HFCC as 242 degrees with 50 kW. ** AFGHANISTAN. U.S. GOVERNMENT DONATES TV TRANSMITTER A new $1 million television transmitter in Afghanistan, donated by the U.S. government, will increase the broadcast signal from the capital to five times its present strength, according to the Institute for War and Peace Reporting (IWPR). The new 500-watt transmitter, currently being installed in Kabul, will broadcast TV Kabul throughout a 100- kilometer radius, reaching areas such as Wardak Province for the first time. While the broadcasting equipment significantly improves the broadcasting capacity of Afghanistan in the post-Taliban era, nationwide coverage remains elusive. Abdul Hameed Mubarez, an official with the Information and Culture Ministry, said the problem would not be easy to fix. "We can't broadcast easily across the nation because it's so mountainous," he told IWPR. "We can do so only with the aid of foreign nations, who can help us install satellite communications." IWPR reported that Afghanistan's current domestic television programming is considered so boring that many viewers are turning to foreign cable and satellite stations that show movies and popular- music shows. There have been some calls for more entertainment programs, a greater female presence on television, and an end to censorship. CC (RFE/RL Media Matters May 23 via DXLD) $1 million for a 500 watt transmitter covering a 100 km radius? These figures don`t add up! (gh, DXLD) ** BELARUS`. 17 May, 2120-2200, 2830 kHz, Belarussian Radio - 1st National Channel. LSB or partly suppressed carrier. SIO 444 (open_dx - Vyacheslav Oleinik, Chisinau, Moldova, Signal via DXLD) ** CHILE. 6010, Radio Cooperativa (via Radio Parinacota, Putre), 0810- 0835, Mayo 20. Español. Programa: "El Diario de Cooperativa". Noticias deportivas: comentario sobre el partido Cobreloa-Boca Jrs, por la Copa Libertadores. Anuncio de la emisora: "La Libertadores... se vive en Cooperativa... en directo desde Calama, Cobreloa vs Boca Juniors, lo mejor del fútbol de ambos paises... por Cooperativa, todos por el fútbol". Reporte del tiempo:"... le dice la temperatura en Cooperativa. . . 6 grados en Santiago". Comerciales locales. Datos de la hora: "26 minutos para las 5, 26 minutos para las 5". Anuncio e ID: "De la noche a la mañana en Cooperativa"; 33543; mejor recepción en modo LSB (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentina, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** CHINA [non]. Dear Listener, Welcome to the latest edition of the WRN Newsletter update. Published weekly, the updates will keep you informed of programme highlights so that you can better plan your listening, no matter how or where in the world you listen to WRN’s English language networks. This week we are very pleased to welcome Radio Guangdong to WRN. Guangdong Today, the weekly 15-minute English programme about the province and its people is being specially produced by Radio Guangdong for broadcast on WRN. The first edition of the programme is broadcast on Saturday May 24 and looks at the province`s anti-SARS efforts and the measures that people in Guangzhou are taking to preventing the spread of disease. In future weeks, the programme will focus on social, economic and cultural developments of the region and will offer a deeper understanding of this important Chinese province by looking beyond the headlines. Radio Guangdong is based in Guangzhou, the capital of the southern Chinese province of Guangdong, which borders Hong Kong and Macao. It is one of China`s leading media groups with eight radio channels, two newspapers, one audiovisual company and one advertising company. Guangdong Today can be heard on WRN each Saturday at 1600 UT / 1200 Eastern [daylight] Time in North America and at 1600 UT/ 1800 Central European [summer] Time in Europe. On Sundays the programme is broadcast at 0800 UT to South America, Africa, the Middle East and the Asia Pacific region. If you can`t manage to tune in at these times then the programme will also be available in Real Audio, Windows Media and downloadable ftp file formats from the WRN website at: http://www.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=93 If you do tune then why not send Radio Guangdong a message about their programme to: Radio Guangdong, 686 Renminbei Road, Guangzhou 510012, P. R. China Tel: +86-20-36235075 Fax: +86-20-36235075 Email: gdnews@radio-gd.com Web: http://www.radio-gd.com (WRN newsletter May 23 via DXLD) ** CHINA [non]. Just received the latest broadcast schedule from China Radio Intl in today`s mail. I see they say they broadcast a relay from BRAZIL in English (and I assume other languages) to the Caribbean (?) area. Does anyone know what frequencies they use? I have a list of freqs given, but no key to which ones are from where. Thanks in advance (Bob Combs, New Mexico, USA, May 22, hard-core-dx via DXLD) The only known Brasília relay of CRI is in Spanish at 0100 and 0300 on 9665. 5990 at 2300 is via Cuba (gh, DXLD) Bob; I recently received CRI Messenger and a printed sked that shows no relay sites as they have in the past. The English service to the Caribbean Sea (as they call it) is from 2300-2400 on 5990 kHz. The printed sked I have does show transmitter sites on a world map and the azimuth they {use}, but you have to guess as to where each transmitter is actually located. This map shows the South American relay more or less located at French Guyana. Can you tell me did they actually mention a Brazilian relay? Perhaps, if you have the same sked as I, it is the French Guyana site (which they do/or have used) that you see. 73 (Mick Delmage, AB, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. Re additional R. Martí SW frequencies, 3-087: Temporary expansion, now ended and back to normal schedule, but that never included 9755 (Dan Ferguson, IBB, May 23, SWBC via DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA [non]. U.S. PROPAGANDA SPUTTERS IN ANTI-CASTRO CRUSADE Special to washingtonpost.com Friday, May 23, 2003; 6:35 AM http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A29077-2003May22.html If President Bush intended to send a strong message of solidarity to those struggling for freedom in Cuba, he didn't succeed. His special 40-second broadcast in Spanish to commemorate Cuban Independence Day aired Tuesday on Radio Marti, which just about guarantees few Cubans heard it. Created under the Reagan administration nearly 20 years ago, Radio Marti started operations in 1985 to ``promote the cause of freedom'' on the island by providing an alternative to state-run media. A television twin, TV Marti, began operations in 1990. The two Martis were to be a special arm of the Voice of America, the United States' well-respected tool of public diplomacy. But thanks to the clever maneuvering of Cuban-Americans in Congress, all Marti operations began moving to Miami about six years ago. Ostensibly the move would have improved content as broadcasters could draw from the talents of the large exile community, but once far from VOA's standards of accuracy and objectivity, its message became shrill and propagandistic and its Cuban audience lost interest--at least those who could receive a signal despite Fidel Castro's continued attempts at jamming the transmissions. Meanwhile, critics believe, Marti's managers became more interested in pleasing anti-Castro Cuban exiles. It's not hard to find policy analysts who believe the Martis, with a $23 million annual budget, are a waste of taxpayers' money and should be shut down. The chances of that, however, are slim. In the wake of one of Castro's harshest crackdowns on pro-democracy dissidents, Bush is unlikely to do anything that could be construed as softening the hard line he has pledged toward the regime in Havana. Liberals themselves would be hard pressed to dismantle Marti, since the recent arrests and extraordinary sentences imposed on Cuban dissidents, including 28 independent journalists, are the greatest testament to Castro's fear of the power of information. With funding destined to continue, it's time to reinvigorate Radio and TV Marti as a foreign-policy tool. Bush has said as much in previous Cuba policy speeches promising to modernize the Cuba broadcast operations and take them in a new direction. To do so in a meaningful and purposeful way, at least three things must happen: --The Martis need to direct themselves back to Washington. Left within the sphere of influence of South Florida's powerful Cuban exiles, any serious efforts to restore their credibility would remain questionable. The conservative Heritage Foundation, for instance, last month proposed ending TV Marti's expensive broadcasts. Yet even Heritage advocates, as do other longtime observers, giving the Martis a second chance as long as the stations return to Washington and reshape their programming. --The United States must figure a way around Castro's signal-jamming and get the job done, or give up that which is most affected, TV Marti. Both liberal and conservative analysts believe that unless the jamming can be overcome, funding would be better spent on other outlets such as Radio Marti or VOA-TV. --Quality of programming must improve. Moving to Washington and upgrading the technical nature of the transmissions will do little if content is not addressed directly. If their programming does not serve the needs of those on the island, the Martis may never overcome their reputation for waste and end the mocking cynicism which they face today. Last month's naming of Pedro V. Roig as new director of the Office of Cuba Broadcasting that supervises Radio and Television Marti appears to be a good start. Roig has pledged to restructure programming and to fulfill the mission `of bringing objective news and information, along with the broadest spectrum of thought and opinion` to Cubans in Cuba. Judging by Bush's low-key May 20 commemoration, an occasion often used by U.S. presidents to unveil new anti-Castro measures, the White House is carefully evaluating its options on Cuba. Tightening the bolts on an embargo policy that can hardly be tighter may only play into Castro's hands and his penchant to portray himself as the victim. U.S. officials talk instead about the need to better implement tools already at their disposal. But unless Radio and TV Marti's improvements are far-reaching, they will do little to lift the blockade against the free flow of information to and within Cuba -- a blockade where a public `suspicious of government proclamations ... has no means to be heard,` as Cuban poet and journalist Raul Rivero once put it. For his struggle for a free Cuban press, Rivero was sentenced last month to 20 years in prison. © 2003 Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** ECUADOR. Here are the schedule changes planned for implementation on June 1, for HCJB, Pifo: 9525 0100-0500 Spanish DELETE 9745 0000-0600 English DELETE 9745 0100-0500 Spanish ADD 9860 0600-0800 English DELETE 12005 0500-0515 Kikongo DELETE 12005 1100-1430 English DELETE 15185 2000-2200 English DELETE 17660 2230-2300 German DELETE 21455 0000-1530 Various DELETE 21455 0000-0630 Various ADD (dual azimuth to CIRAF 27-28, 55, 58-60) 21455 0800-1530 Various ADD (dual azimuth to CIRAF 27-28, 55, 58-60) (Bob Padula, EDXP ADMIN, May 23 via DXLD) ** ECUADOR. Despite their on-air announcements and printed stationery, cards and letters, the Radiodifusora Católica Cultural "Voz del Upano" in 9 cases out of 10 is referred to as "La Voz del Upano". The 5965 outlet from Tena, which per Malm´s clip identifies itself as "Voz del Upano" was first reported by Malm in DXLD 1073 (May 20, 2001). The official Ecuadorian frequency listing says this extension of Misión Salesiana de Oriente is located at Km. 3 vía Tena - Puerto Napo (Napo). (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, May 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. It appears that SWR Germany has changed their format from music to news all the time. For years I have listened to this low power 10 kW station from Stuttgart Germany with an excellent music program. I don't speak the language but made no difference. Sorry to see the change. I was always amazed at such a clear signal with low power (Bob Montgomery, PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** INDIA. MAKING AIRWAVES: FM RADIO'S POTENTIAL MALIKA RODRIGUES, TIMES NEWS NETWORK, WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 2003 01:40:50 AM It's been around just a year, and you just can't tune out. To get an idea of the potential of FM radio as an advertising medium, one has to take the ironing-board test - that's how a seminal piece of research into radio is known in the industry. What happens is this: a group of housewives in a room are asked to test an iron. While they're ironing, FM radio plays in the background. After the 'test' is over, the women are quizzed on what they'd heard in the meanwhile - and it turns out that they remember not only the music and the commentators, but also an extremely high proportion of the ads. Ask radioman and former BBC anchor Mark Tully, and he swears by radio. "Unlike television, you can go to sleep without bothering to switch it off. And you can also do other things while listening to the radio," he once said. There's little doubt that, as a medium, radio delivers to the advertisers - and it's big bang for the buck. "Radio is underutilised," agrees Divya Gupta, president, The Media Edge, one of India's leading media planning and buying agencies. "We don't use it enough in our media mix, but it's very effective in terms of impact and cost as a multiplier medium," she adds. Whether it's the high-octane advertising, the non-stop promos, the 80-rupee radio sets that every second commuter has, it's obvious that private FM radio is a hit. While audiences definitely seem to have taken to the airwaves, the birthday celebrations seem somewhat bittersweet for the industry. Some marginal players are taking a bow, some of the lesser stations are struggling to stay on air, the regulatory hassles have kept players on their toes. For a few large players, the champagne was on ice for the one-year bash. Of course, it's still a long way to go, but since FM radio as a category is developing, the brand is now playing a more important role. Take Mumbai, for instance - FM radio penetration hit 61 per cent, according to the an independent IMRB survey released in November 2002 (RADAR). Listenership has soared since, with weekly listenership touching almost 60 lakh. Radio Mirchi (from the Times of India Group) clocked 74 per cent of weekly listenership, and Radio City (from Star) comes second with 43 per cent. Interestingly, the same survey points out that listenership is heavily skewed towards the SEC A and the 15-34 age group. Indian players have found that like in most markets abroad, radio is a medium that's extremely popular, and has great impact in terms of ad recall. Research agency Millward Brown discovered that redirecting just 10 per cent of television spends to radio can increase the efficiency of a campaign by 15 per cent. In the UK, radio is the fastest growing advertising medium, though it accounts for just five per cent of total adspend, compared to 10-12 per cent for more developed markets like the US and Australia. AP Parigi, managing director of Entertainment Network India, whose Radio Mirchi is the only station with a national footprint, operating in nine cities, including Mumbai, Delhi, Chennai and Kolkata, says radio is a frequency medium and, more importantly, it's city-centric. "Radio should be the first option: the cost economies are awesome. And apart from frequency, it offers interactivity," he explains. Agrees Mike Powell, a US-based consultant who's worked in radio in the UK, as well as consulted in the US and Asia: "Across the world, audiences love radio." Audiences also believe in it: research by The Henley Centre, a strategic marketing consultancy, shows that consumers put particularly high levels of trust in radio as compared to any other media - with two-thirds of the population surveyed saying that they would trust their radio station to be honest and fair. One instance when this trust factor was leveraged by an advertiser was during the recent crisis that ICICI Bank faced in Gujarat. After a run on the bank that started in Ahmedabad on Friday night, ICICI Bank released spots on Radio Mirchi in Ahmedabad on Saturday and Sunday, announcing that the RBI had confirmed its liquidity and sound financial position. The ad budgets may still be small, but the potential to grow is huge. Industry estimates total spends on FM at about Rs 40-45 crore nationally, with Rs 25-30 crore from Mumbai alone. Says Sumantra Dutta, COO, Radio City, "In Mumbai, the growth of advertising is totally disproportionate to the growth in listenership." Advertisers have been slow to get on board - and too stingy with their money when they do, he feels. Take a look at the figures: across the country, radio spends are only about two per cent of advertising budgets. Advertisers who have taken to the airwaves do feel that it's paid off. Both media planners as well as broadcasters feel it hasn't been the really big spenders like FMCG companies who have taken the chance - it's financial services and automobiles. ING Vysya, one of the first advertisers in Bangalore on Radio City, used radio in its launch phase to build brand awareness, and get responses to its call centres. Says Gautam Sharma, vice president and head of marketing, ING Vysya, "It can't be zapped. If you're listening, you've to listen to the ad; so you're captive, especially when people are on the road. And in the early days, it was clutter-free." One myth marketers still believe in is that radio can't work for a launch. Says Nandini Dias, national media director, Lodestar, which launched Mahindra's Scorpio in Mumbai with a radio blitz: "In the history of car advertising in India, radio has never been used as a launch medium. All car advertisers use it as a reminder activity after the press and TV launch." What Lodestar did was put together a package that capitalised on the interactivity offered by radio. The Scorpio was paraded through the city in a cavalcade, with a radio jockey on board, who was in constant touch with the studio. So listeners knew exactly when the car was in their area, and were invited to see it and sign up for a test-drive. "It was very interactive, and worked very well for us," says Dias. Pepsi, currently running a major promotion on air, believes in FM since it's an on-the-go medium: "It's relatively closer to the point of purchase, compared to other conventional mediums," says a Pepsi spokesperson. Dias believes that while marketers may be willing to try out the medium 'on faith', a long-term commitment needs research to back it up. Advertisers agree. "The biggest issue today is lack of measurement," says Dalip Sehgal, executive director - new ventures, Hindustan Lever. While HLL has taken a number of its brands - including Axe, Clinic, Kwality Walls and Sunsilk - on to FM, he feels it will prove difficult to evaluate the medium unless there's reliable research on the listener numbers. At this point in the development of the industry, while the brand has begun to play a role in differentiation between channels, pricing of spots is crucial. With rates quoting almost at par with those of niche satellite TV channels, radio is not really that cheap a medium, feel some media observers. Look at it another way: while a niche channel may have national reach, it's still a tiny audience, and nowhere near as well-defined as an advertiser might desire - and in a one-TV household, it's quite likely to be zapped in favour of a far more expensive general entertainment channel. What one can't underestimate is the multiplier effect of radio. A study done by The Media Edge in Mumbai shows that if combined with TV, the multiplier effect is maximum due to radio's ability to 'transfer image' - since a strong audio mnemonic can be used to trigger the brand's audio-visual communication in listeners' minds. Add to that the fact that most audiences are captive, and there's no remote control, and advertisers are just beginning to put more money where the medium is (via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. The audio quality on XM just plain sucks. Sorry to be so direct. I've been very disappointed with their audio quality. I don`t know about Sirius, and can`t comment about them. They also appear to have poor compression/processing which could be their codec. In my opinion XM's audio has about the same fidelity as a 24 KB mp3. I've heard AM radio stations with far better high frequency reproduction. Now on the other hand, the programming is EXCELLENT (Paul Smith, W4KNX, Sunny Sarasota, Florida http://www.amtower.com NRC-AM via DXLD) See also CHINA; OKLAHOMA; SAUDI ARABIA; SOMALIA ** IRAN [non]. SURVEY OF ANTI-IRANIAN VISION OF FREEDOM TELEVISION ON 23 MAY 03 The following provides spot-checks of the news programmes of Mojahedin-e Khalq (MKO) TV (Sima-ye Azadi - "Vision of Freedom"), monitored by the BBC Persian Team on 23 May. The station announces 24-hour "round the clock" broadcasting. The TV carried a 15 minute news bulletin at 0830 gmt and another 30 minute bulletin at 0930 gmt. The news were interspersed with filler programmes including biography of Mojahedin-e Khalq "martyrs", foreign news analyses, music, songs, quotes from reports of foreign agency interviews with world leaders and unspecified video footage on the achievements of the Mojahedin-e Khalq warriors in their endeavour to topple the regime of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Postal address of the TV: P.O. Box 14061; London NW7 4SE; England Telephone: 0044208-2030096 Internet address: http://iranntv.com/ During the news bulletins, the television continuously carried subtitles of the latest news in Iran and the world. The news announcer used the term "clerical regime" and "regime" to describe the Iranian government. In addition, the announcer used the title "cleric" before the names of Iranian officials. For example, he referred to President Khatami as cleric Khatami. At 0855, the television carried pictures of a demonstration held by dozens of the group's supporters in London calling for the group's name be removed from the American terrorist list. They also protested to the disarmament of the group. The demonstrators shouted slogans such as : "The clerics are the terrorist", "The clerics are the threat", "Down with the terrorist regime in Iran", "Down with the terrorist mollahs (clerics) in Iran", "Down with the mollah's regime in Iran" and "Iran, Rajavi, Rajavi, Iran". The participants carried pictures of the MKO members who have been presumably killed by the Iranian government. The participants carried Iranian flags with the lion and sun emblem as well as placards calling for the MKO's name to be removed from the terrorist list. A number of patriotic song were also played at the demonstration. A number of participants were interviewed. They said that they had come to demonstrate their hatred towards the Iranian government and protest to the aforementioned issues. A participant read out a communiqué issued by MKO demonstrators in Berlin. [0930: see below] At 1002, the television broadcast an English version of the Persian news bulletins. The female announcer observed the full Islamic dress code. The bulletin ended at 1019 gmt. At 1024 gmt the television began to broadcast an unnamed movie in English with Iranian subtitles about the second world war. The film was about the racism which existed in the German war camps in which American and Australian POWs were kept. At around 1300 gmt, the television began to broadcast programmes in English. These programmes, which ended at 1400 gmt, consisted of a news bulletin and interviews with experts and commentators about the MKO and Iran. Source: BBC Monitoring research in English 23 May 03 (via DXLD) PROGRAMME SUMMARY OF ANTI-IRAN VISION OF FREEDOM NEWS 0930 GMT, 23 MAY 1. 0930 Mojahedin-e Khalq Organization (MKO) issues a statement about Iran's demand from America to hand over those elements behind the blast in Imam Reza's holy shrine. The announcer also gives background information on the issue. [No video] 2. 0937 Announcer quotes Associated Press about the holding of demonstrations by MKO members calling for the organization's name to be removed from the terrorist list. [TV shows video footage of the demonstration] 3. 0939 Announcer quotes the Jane Research Centre's report about Iran's nuclear activities in Natanz. [No video] 4. 0941 America imposes sanctions on a Chinese and Iranian company because of their military activities. [No video] 5. 0943 In a statement the Iranian Youth and Student Network voices support for the National Iranian Liberation Army. Announcer reads part of the statement. [No video] 6. 0945 Announcer quotes AFP about the holding of demonstrations by MKO members calling for the organization's name to be removed from the terrorist list. [No video] B. World News 1. 0947 Security Council agrees with the lifting of sanctions against Iraq. [TV shows video footage of a Security Council meeting] 2. 0949 Japanese prime minister meets American President George Bush. [TV shows video footage of the meeting] 3. 0950 Report on meeting between Hamas leaders and Palestinian prime minister. [No video] 4. 0952 Report on the EU agreements about police and law enforcement activities to counter suicide attacks. [No video] 5. 0953 Latest reports about the earthquake in Algeria. [TV shows video footage of the casualties] C. More news on Iran: 1. 0955 Report on official announcement about as ban on the sale of some clothes. [No video] 2. 0956 Report on the shortcomings of President Khatami's plan to create employment opportunities in Iran. [No video] 3. 0958 Report claiming that Iranian officials have purchased private aircraft. [No video] 4. 0958 Quoting Iranian daily about the rise in the number of divorces in Iran. [No video] D. 0959 End bulletin Source: BBC Monitoring research in English 23 May 03 (via DXLD) ** IRAQ. TELEVISION'S RETURN By SAMEER N. YACOUB, Associated Press Writer BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) -- During Saddam Hussein's 33-year reign, the Iraqi people could watch only state-controlled television networks whose main task was to act as Baath Party mouthpieces and praise Saddam and his policies. But today, in a small room at Baghdad's bunker-like conference center, journalism is being practiced in postwar Iraq -- by Iraqis. "Now, I have freedom in selecting and handling the subjects the way I like," TV reporter Mahmoud Faud said. "Now we are able to criticize everybody -- including the Americans." Faud is part of the 70-member staff of the Iraqi Media Network, the first new -- and coalition-backed -- television station to reach the airwaves from Iraq since the April overthrow of Saddam Hussein. The newsroom is in a VIP lounge of the Conference Palace, which is now occupied by Iraq's U.S.-led administration. When the tapes are ready, they are sent over to the al-Salhiya transmission tower across the street from the television station, which was demolished in coalition bombing raids. Faud started working for Iraq's state-controlled television three years ago, monitoring international satellite channels that ordinary Iraqis were not allowed to watch. He studied the foreign broadcasts and learned how to structure a TV report and do interviews. "We tried to imitate them," Faud said. After Saddam's ouster in April, Iraq's state-run TV stations went off the air and Baghdad's inhabitants could only tune in to the grainy Iranian channels broadcasting from across the border. The Iraq Media Network, launched May 13, begins airing its programs at 6 p.m. every day by showing the Iraqi flag accompanied by the music of "My Homeland," a popular patriotic song. The station's regular fare includes cartoons, Egyptian soap operas, performances by Iraqi folk singers, news and sports reports, and man- in-the street interviews complaining about the shortages in electricity and fuel and the lack of security in the Iraqi capital. Don North, an official with the Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance, the civilian wing of the U.S. occupation force, said the television station's equipment is ancient and difficult to integrate with the more modern, digital equipment provided by ORHA. On its first day of operation, the new channel interviewed Jay Garner, then the top U.S. administrator in Iraq. But when they wanted to broadcast the interview, North said, the tape was nowhere to be found. "Maybe," he joked, "some Baathist stole it." (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** IRAQ. Hi Glenn, Re DXLD 3-088: Sorry, you got me at it now :-) It should of course be Salam. I am so used to typing Salman Pak that I do it without realising! 73, (Andy Sennitt, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRELAND. In response to your question "What's Gardai" - it's Irish for "Police", a term commonly used there even when speaking English. Regards, (Dave Kernick, UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) PIRATES CUT DOWN TO SIZE The past week has seen an unprecedented crackdown on unlicensed broadcasters in Ireland. Raids by staff of the Commission for Communications Regulation accompanied by the Garda (the Irish police) have silenced many of the stations, which jointly accounted for 7% of total radio listening in Ireland. This week's raids are the culmination of an effort that has been gathering pace in recent months. Some stations have vowed to to return to the air, but for others it marks the end of an era... http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/features/html/ireland03052.html (Media Network newsletter May23 via DXLD) ** ITALY. Re 3-088: But has anyone heard them lately on 6231.5??? ``To the World``, indeed (gh, DXLD) The reply is NO ONE, cause the station is definitively closed down on SW. The SW TX blow up last year and to repair it cost too much (Dario Monferini, (Playdx Italy), May 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Re 3-088: Hi Glenn, Radio Speranza Modena is inactive on 6231 since June 2001 (Roberto Scaglione, Sicily, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** KOREA NORTH. Voice of Korea, Pyongyang is coming in well these days, I logged them on 15245 from 2100 to 2200 in English at 454 AND, what has happened to their audio modulation? It is now loud and clear, they must have installed a new transmitter or serviced the old one, I can actually understand what is being said without any effort at all, previously, their audio has always been muffled and low in level making it hard to log what they were speaking about. I will be sending them a report which will be the first I have sent to North Korea since the 1970's! The same applies to CRI and V. O. Russia, so I had better get cracking (Michael Stevenson, Port Macquarie, N.S.W., Australia, May 23, EDXP via DXLD) ** MEXICO. ¿CONCIERTO CIUDADANO? 23-May-03 Desde abril, la XEQK es la emisora de los ciudadanos. Y desde entonces hemos escuchado desfilar toda suerte de propuestas de radio educativa, en las que como era de suponerse, hay una variabilidad de producción que llevaría a la audiencia a desequilibrarse, de tan disímbolas y desiguales que son. El primer gran problema del 13-50 de AM es la señal, a grado tal que resulta incluso difícil percibir esta emisora en un radio de onda corta y de muy amplio alcance. [??? It`s not on SW; used to be 9555] ¿Pero para qué escuchar la Radio Ciudadana del IMER? Bueno, en principio, para asegurarse de que allí se están transmitiendo los 64 programas que fueron vencedores en el Primer Concurso de Proyectos Ciudadanos de Radio. La primera sorpresa es que no están aún al aire el total de las propuestas que se calificaron para ser transmitidas, y la segunda, que hay en la XEQK un programa que se llama ``Concierto ciudadano`` con Mario Díaz Mercado, que se transmite a las 15:00 horas y que ni siquiera aparece en las listas de los concursantes. Ahora todos dirán cuál es mi encono. Es uno muy sencillo: sucede que además de que este megaproyecto de Mario Díaz Mercado no está entre los ganadores, es una propuesta que dura una hora con 30 minutos diarios. Ahora, ¿cómo me atrevo yo a cuestionar al maestro que nos hizo el examen de locución a tantos y tantos aspirantes hace cosa de 15 años? Me lo cuestiono, porque en Radio Capital (830 de AM), emisora de Grupo MAC, se transmite los sábados por la mañana de 7:30 a 8:30 horas, una serie llamada ``La voz de los capitalinos``, y que busca cumplir los mismos objetivos y tareas que ``Concierto ciudadano``. Si, ahora imagino que la respuesta lógica sería: hay tantos programas de cocina en el cuadrante como recetas para preparar. Pero es que el asunto resulta escandaloso, porque he tenido en mis manos tanto el proyecto que abandera en Radio Capital Alfonso Rentería, como uno que entró en concurso bajo la representación de Víctor Navarro y que es, sin lugar a dudas, quien realiza esta serie ``Concierto ciudadano``, o por lo menos él está a cargo de la ``Cartelera ciudadana``, sección del mismo concierto. En la coincidencia de los dos programas hubo que ir a investigar, y por supuesto, me he enterado que la oferta que conducirían Rubén García Castillo, Víctor Manuel y Alfonso, es la misma, en puntos y comas, que la que realizan Díaz Mercado y Navarro. Yo aquí sólo puedo pensar una cosa: el proyecto fue plagiado en la XEQK. Pero de inmediato recuerdo las palabras de José Álvarez de Grupo Imagen, quien dice: ``No es que uno se robe las ideas, es que las ideas están en el aire y se toman``. Sea como sea y en el papel, la oferta que sustenta Víctor Manuel Navarro y que resultó ganadora es algo que se llama ``Voces ciudadanas y radio barrio en Álvaro Obregón``, pero este programa no coincide ni en nombre ni en propuesta a ``Concierto ciudadano``, que sí tiene dentro de sí, secciones como radio barrio y esta de la ``Cartelera ciudadana``. Yo sí pediría a las autoridades del IMER que pongan y esclarezcan más la lógica en la que seleccionaron los proyectos que hoy forman la radio ciudadana, porque es una gran sorpresa escuchar programas que no ganaron, además, es un agravio el que éste, el de Víctor Manuel Navarro, se forme de por lo menos tres proyectos registrados, y que por sí solos no pasaron la prueba del jurado. Cuestionar la pésima calidad sonora de la XEQK y las muy cambiantes producciones que hay entre ``Sintonía AMIC``, ``Mundos religiosos`` o ``Zócalo``, hace que nadie en su sano juicio se quede prendido a la emisora que muy amablemente, la señora Dolores Beistegui ha abierto para que las voces de los capitalinos se expresen. Yo no entiendo por qué, si estamos escuchando en las emisoras comerciales este bombardeo de las farmacias similares en contra de la corrupción del IMSS, no haya una sensibilidad también, cuando el IMER está ofreciendo una programación que no coincide con los resultados que publicó en los diarios, acerca de este tan llevado y traído concurso de proyectos ciudadanos de radio. Es más que ofensivo, el que ``La ventana ciega`` sirva de expresión para dos chicas estudiantes de comunicación, que han dejado de prestar sus servicios sociales, porque ambas han sido ``agredidas e insinuadas`` por Víctor Manuel Navarro. De verdad, a Dolores Beistegui le sugiero aquí, que ponga más atención sobre el comportamiento de la Radio Ciudadana, porque aunque su frecuencia sea casi inaudible, es una oferta del gobierno federal, en la que se nos ofreció expresar sin politización la voz de los ciudadanos. Si es correcto que me cuestione, si los proyectos concursantes fueron leídos y sirvieron para dar vida a otros híbridos que no estaban contemplados en concurso, no lo sé, pero creo que, así como nos abrimos a hacer escándalo por ``Los libros de Marta Sahagún``, también debemos de parar bien la oreja para tener claro cuándo se están fusilando o clonando programas como éste que es un ¿Concierto ciudadano o un desconcierto ciudadano? Claudia Segura (Milenio via Héctor García Bojorge, DF, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** OKLAHOMA. Hi OETA, A number of questions about your operations I would appreciate answers to. I will greatly appreciate your answering each of these questions fully! Thanks, (Glenn Hauser, Enid, to OETA) Glenn, I will see what I can do to answer your questions. Q1) Do you have any plans to operate 24 hours on the air?? TV Guide Has started listing 13 as running all-night, but I assume this is only Cox Cable in OKC (not ENID!), with PBS, NOT OETA itself, correct? A1) In Oklahoma City and Tulsa when our normal broadcast day ends we feed Cox Cable in both cities the PBS Schedule X program feed. We are able to do this because both studio locations are connected to the cable system with a fiber interface. We are under serious budget constraints because of the shortfall in state revenue so there are no plans at this time for a 24 X 7 broadcast day. Q2) I notice that KOET-3 is running about a second behind KETA-13. Are you now using a satellite feed to your relay stations? Details, Please. Do you have your own transponder, if so which and where, or are you dependent on Dish or DirecTV? (I don`t have any satellite TV myself). A2) In the past OETA fed its 15 translators through a series of off- air pickup points and microwave relay links. Approximately 4 years ago, OETA started uplinking its network feed to SES (GE) #5. This would create a slight time delay in signal when compared to a PBS feed or one from a full-power station of OETA's. We are also carried by Dish and DirecTV in their local-into-local market coverage in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. PBS is working with these two DBS vendors and state networks, like OETA, to try to secure permission for anyone in the state served by a state network to be able to get the signal if they are in the satellite's local-into-local footprint. Q3) If there is a satellite feed, why is Cox Cable Enid still picking up 13 off the air, along with all the interference that often occurs this time of year from Dallas and elsewhere? (They have most of the OKC commercial stations on satellite feed now). A3) OETA cannot dictate to a cable company such as that serving Enid where they get the signal they put on their cable system. OETA has made a number of mailings to cable company owners in Oklahoma providing information on our satellite service and have encouraged them to take advantage of it. Q4) Is KETA-DT 32 now on the air? How much power, full power? Full time? I occasionally see a degraded signal on Enid`s only local TV station, KXOK-32. That`s no great loss, since they broadcast nothing but Dr. Gene Scott!!! But isn`t running DTV in OKC and analog TV in Enid on the same channel about 65 miles apart a bit too close for comfort?? How could this happen? Do you have priority on 32 which will cause KXOK to go off or move? I should think they would interfere with your DTV reception to some distance south of Enid, definitely a reduction in coverage compared to 13. A4) KETA-DT Channel 32 started running programming tests under the authority of its construction permit May 1, this year. The station is authorized to broadcast when licensed 1 megawatt ERP. Under our current test authority we are broadcasting 500 kW ERP. The analog low power station operating on Channel 32 in Enid and KETA-DT operating on the same channel has been authorized by the FCC. When the transitional period to digital ends all stations must be digital and the Enid station will have to seek another channel for its digital operations. Theoretically, the stations interference to each other should be very limited because of the tuners used in analog and DTV receivers. Once we get our KETA-DT licensed, if KXOK indeed causes interference and they are within our protected area, we could ask them through the FCC to stop the interference. Q5) Is 46 Medford still taking an off-air feed from 13? Will this and other far-flung translators change to satellite? What about DT? How will the signal get there if 32 is blocked by Enid`s KXOK? A5) Channel 46 licensed to Medford is now taking the OETA satellite feed rather than Channel 13 off the air. The FCC has not issued a report and order indicating what the digital transition plans for translators and low power will be. We are now in the 2nd review bi- annual period as promised by the FCC. We may learn in the next few months what the plans are for the transition to digital for these other services. Q6) During the May 9 tornado which tracked near your facilities, your 13 transmitter stayed on the air (until about 11:30 anyway), but ONE MOMENT PLEASE was the video; audio came and went, and was from all over the place, including channel 9 for a few minutes. How could this happen? Evidently you were prevented from getting your programming into the transmitter which itself was operating OK. Aren`t they at the same location now on N. Kelly? A6) During the May 9th storm, OETA technical operations center (TOC) in Oklahoma City (which is co-located with Channel 13's transmitter) took a lightening hit. We were not able to immediately restore operations, and in fact signed off early that night. If there is a problem in TOC it can disrupt our network operations and feeds to all stations including our satellite uplink. Q7) I was unable to check, but very curious as to whether the entire OETA network was disrupted during this period, or 3, 11, 12 and all the translators continued without interruption? A7) The problem in TOC on May 9th caused a problem in our ability to feed all transmitters. After 7 pm in the evenings our TOC only operates with one on-air operator on duty who is not an engineer. The weather that night prevented engineering staff from reaching the station in a timely fashion. We currently are testing KETA-DT Channel 32 normally from about 6 to 10 pm nightly. Monday through Thursdays we are running a mixture of SD and HD programming directly from PBS. Friday through Sunday we are running 4 SD channels in a simulcast mode of operation. Since this is a testing phase for us, we cannot promote a regular schedule, and in fact the test period may be moved to some day time hours on some dates. If I can provide additional information, please let me know. Thanks, (Steve Staton, Deputy Director, OETA to gh, via DX LISTENING DIGEST) INFORMATION ON RECEIVING OETA BY SATELLITE Basic Requirements: Ku Band Digital Satellite Receiver and Ku Antenna with digital LNB Only the following specific receiver will work: Receiver: DigiCipher II Digital Satellite Receiver* manufactured by General Instruments (Receiver must be capable of tuning SCPC Service) Satellite: GE-5 -- Transponder 4 -- Location: 79º West L Band Frequency: 1042.38 MHz Horizontal Polarization 4. Virtual Channel: 810 5. VCT: 603 6. Code: 3/4 (Forward Error Correction) 7. Mega Symbol Rate: 4.88 8. Mode: Fixed Key (Sent in the clear) 9. Audio: Stereo & SAP (Descriptive video service when available from PBS) *Note 1: Not all General Instrument DigiCipher II receivers have the necessary firmware to receive the OETA signal. Please furnish the information we are providing to your equipment dealer and have them verify that the model you own or the one you may be considering purchasing will receive OETA. You will want a dealer to warranty the receiver to be able to pick up OETA. Note 2: Be aware that even though DirecTV, EchoStar, and other "small dish" direct broadcast satellite systems utilized Ku Band frequencies, the equipment provided for this type of service cannot tune in GE-5 and decode OETA's signal. Currently, these two companies are introducing in Oklahoma City and Tulsa a local-into-local package of certain stations including OETA that may be available to you. Check with a local dealers near where you live or with either company directly to see if you could receive the signal and otherwise qualify for it. Note 3: For clear sky conditions, OETA recommends a minimum antenna size of 2.4 meters for home use. Revised: 1/10/2003 (via Steve Staton, OETA, DXLD) ** PERU. Owner and manager of Radio CORA del Perú has died. The following item is from El Comercio newspaper, May 22, 2003: FALLECIÓ EL PERIODISTA Y LOCUTOR RADIAL JUAN RAMÍREZ LAZO A menos de quince días de haber cumplido 76 años, falleció el periodista y locutor radial Juan Ramírez Lazo, quien se hiciera conocido por sus editoriales que comenzaban con la popular frase: "Nos preocupa...". Ramírez Lazo murió el último martes y sus restos fueron cremados ayer en el cementerio Jardines de la Paz, en La Molina. Venía siendo tratado en el hospital Guillermo Almenara de una enfermedad incurable. Con más de 60 años de trayectoria profesional, nació el 6 de mayo de 1927 en Piura y desde la década del 40 estuvo ligado a la Radiodifusión. Estuvo casado con Monina Mendizábal y deja cuatro hijos y varios nietos. ----------------- There is an interesting story and a picture of Ramírez Lazo, a legend in Peruvian broadcasting, also known as "La Voz", at http://www.boletindenewyork.com/jrl.htm (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, May 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. 4904.69, Radio La Oroya, 1014 Noted music until 1016 May 23 when man in Spanish comments. This followed with canned ID, then back to music. Signal was poor (Chuck Bolland, Clewiston, Florida, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. 4625, 13 May, 0240, Radio San Agustín, Celendín, Dept. Cajamarca. No ID heard, but signal was quite good. Identified with a help of Nordic DX site - station recently returned to SW. 34333. 4389, 13 May, 0250, Radio Imperio, Chiclayo. No ID either. Quite fair. 34333. It's from the Pacific coast; station from that part of Perú do not often propagate in my region (open_dx - Sergey Mulyk, Chervonograd, Ukraine, Signal via DXLD) In the same time period he also reports the Peruvians on 4790, 4950, 4975, 4995 (gh) ** RUSSIA. MOSCOW YESTERDAY AND TODAY In the first edition of Moscow Yesterday and Today in June -- on the air on June 2 and the week following -- we'll tell you about Russian literary genius Alexander Pushkin and about the time he spent in Moscow, which the poet himself described as the happiest in his life. The next three Moscow Yesterday and Today programs will focus on the history of Russia's ancient capital. We'll be speaking about Arbat, one of Moscow's oldest streets, which is over 500 years now. We invite you to tune in to the three consecutive editions of Moscow Yesterday and Today, beginning Monday, June 9. The program goes on the air on Monday at 0830 and 1930 UT and is repeated throughout the week. Our program guide can be found at: http://www.vor.ru/ep.html (via Maryanne Kehoe, swprograms via DXLD) ** SAUDI ARABIA [non]. SAUDI ARABIA/FRANCE/UK: OPPOSITION GROUP SAYS FRENCH GOVERNMENT PUT "BLOCK" ON AL-ISLAH TV | Text of report by Movement for Islamic Reform web site in Arabic on 23 May 03 headlined "Reports about intervention by the French Government to close Al-Islah TV and transmission is temporarily transferred to another satellite" At the request of the Saudi Government, the French Government has applied pressure on Eutelsat [Paris-based firm providing transmission service through commercial satellites] to block the transmission of Al-Islah Channel, which was broadcasting on the Eutelsat-owned Hotbird. As far as the Movement is concerned, the blockage came without informing the party benefiting from the service about the reasons behind the decision. Eutelsat has been avoiding a reply to an official request by the firm benefiting from the service. The movement is perplexed about whether to be astonished by the decision of France's Voltaire and Jean Jacques Rousseau to submit to Saudi pressure and prevent the freedom of _expression or be astonished by Eutelsat's decision to abandon legal practices and immediately block the service without informing the beneficiary. As far as the Movement is concerned, the party benefiting from Eutelsat's service will take the appropriate legal measures in order to resume the transmission or impose the specified penalty. The issue is being followed up by several legal parties that are involved in maintaining freedom of expression. They are carrying out contacts to ascertain whether political pressure was used in this case. If this is confirmed, the parties will carry out a powerful campaign against the French Government and Eutelsat and attempt to apply pressure to resume the service. For those who are determined to receive the transmission, the Movement is currently transmitting on another satellite. Below are the details: Satellite: Sesat; Location: 36 degrees east; Transponder: B6; Frequency: 11136 MHz Polarization: Horizontal; Symbol Rate: 4883; Forward Error Correction, FEC 3/2. As it seems, this satellite has the advantage of carrying only information, internet, and conservative channels. Therefore, it is suitable for those who want to install a satellite receiver without receiving offensive channels. Source: Movement for Islamic Reform web site, London, in Arabic 23 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** SINT MAARTEN. ST. MAARTEN RADIO STATION STREAMING WORLDWIDE Laser 101 on St. Maarten is the first radio station on the Caribbean island to be streamed live worldwide on the Internet in Windows Media format. Other radio stations on St. Maarten will follow shortly. To listen, log on to http://www.laser101.fm and click "live radio." Because fibre optic technology is being used, the audience benefits from nearly real time audio. This will enable listeners abroad to participate in live programmes (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 23 May 2003 via DXLD) Haven`t listened but it looks like another boring station; not even a program schedule on the website, and the link to News is dead. Has a slide show with scenes of the equipment and Sint Maarten vistas, bringing back memories of my visit; callsign on van is PJD-5, not seen anywhere else (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SOMALIA. MOGADISHU-BASED STN RADIO LAUNCHES SATELLITE BROADCASTS | Text of report by UN regional information network IRIN Nairobi, 23 May: The Mogadishu-based Somali Television Network (STN) radio and television broadcasting station has officially launched a radio satellite broadcast, according to a press statement issued this week. The statement said the radio broadcast would cover "every single part of Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and North America (Minneapolis)", 24 hours a day. The launch would soon be followed by a satellite TV channel. The channel currently broadcasts in Somali, but plans are under way to introduce other language services such as English, Arabic, Amharic and Swahili. "The Somali-speaking people in different parts of the world can discuss their affairs, express their opinion live through STN Satellite Radio, which has never happened in Somali history before," said STN Chairman Abdirahman Robleh Ulayareh. "What is unique is the STN satellite radio broadcasts 24 hours (a day) and can be accessed in every single city and village in Somalia. In addition, the STN is in a position to transmit its broadcast via FM everywhere in Somalia on demand," added Abdulkadir Sharraay, the STN operations manager. The network will provide a blend of news, business and cultural programmes and inform its listeners about political, economic and social trends at home, the STN statement said, adding that it welcomed the participation of interested partners. Source: UN Integrated Regional Information Network, Nairobi, in English 23 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** SOUTH AFRICA. MOTHER BUSH In South Africa in the late 1980s, the apartheid regime strictly controlled the airwaves, but the CASET educational trust found a way of getting around the regulations - by distributing their programmes on audio cassette. Now Bush Radio, the community radio station that grew out of CASET, has just celebrated its tenth anniversary. My colleague Hélène Michaud recently visited this Radio Netherlands partner station. This is her report. And in case you missed her radio documentary, you can listen to it on the Web. . . http://www.rnw.nl/special/en/html/030518bush.html (Media Network newsletter May23 via DXLD) ** SUDAN: SURVEY OF THE COUNTRY'S MEDIA ENVIRONMENT Overview; limits on media freedom The government and the ruling National Islamic Front dominate Sudan's media environment, one of the most restrictive in Africa. Government influence on the media is so pervasive that the country is ranked among the least free in Africa by watchdog organizations such as Freedom House and Reporters Without Borders. The state-owned radio and television stations are controlled directly by the government and are required to reflect government policy. Until recently the country had no privately owned broadcasters, but in 2002 a pay television station, jointly owned by the government and some private investors, began retransmitting foreign television via cable. Having banned more than 40 publications following the military coup that brought it to power in 1989, the government of President Umar al- Bashir now indirectly exerts its influence over the 15-20 remaining newspapers through the National Press Council, according to the US State Department's 2002 Human Rights Report. The council is directly responsible to the president, who, along with the National Assembly and the government-controlled Journalists' Union, appoints its members. The press council has the power to set press policy, to license and suspend newspapers, and to suspend journalists. According to the Human Rights Report, the government also restricts press freedom by "suspending publications, detaining journalists and editors, confiscating already printed editions, conducting pre- publication censorship and restricting government advertising to pro- government media only". As a result of such actions, most of Sudan's privately owned newspapers practise self-censorship. Local journalists working for foreign news agencies also practise self-censorship in order to keep their work permits. Radio is the most widely accessible media source in the country, partly because it represents a continuation of the oral tradition and partly because of factors that restrict access to other media. The literacy rate in Sudan is 46 per cent, significantly limiting newspaper readership. Poor transport infrastructure restricts newspaper circulation to major cities, and low incomes further limit readership. These constraints on newspaper readership are magnified in the south, where income, development and literacy rates are lower than in the Muslim north. Though not as widely accessible as radio, Sudan's newspapers manage to offer somewhat more diverse views and reporting on issues of domestic and foreign policy. Some papers are willing to criticize the government and individual officials, despite the risks of fines, suspension, and imprisonment. The International Press Institute's web site chronicles government actions throughout 2002 against several Sudanese newspapers that refused to be silenced. The Khartoum Monitor and its editor, for example, were both fined for reporting on slavery in the country. Al- Hurriyah, Al-Sahafah and Al-Watan reported on clashes between students and police at Khartoum University, for which their editors were arrested and the offending editions were seized. All of these newspapers repeatedly ran foul of the authorities during the course of the year. Though local media are strongly influenced by the central government, the Sudanese do have access to foreign media and the varying viewpoints they provide. The most readily available international media are the radio broadcasts from sources such as the BBC, which can be heard via shortwave, as well as through rebroadcasts on local FM stations. Clandestine radios operated by opposition groups from areas outside government control can be heard in some locations. Those few who can afford television and satellite dishes can watch a number of pan-Arab stations without interference from the government. According to the State Department's 2002 Human Rights Report, Internet access is "uncensored but potentially monitored" and available through two ISPs, as well as through the Internet cafes that can be found in the major cities. Sudanese are also avid consumers of Arabic-language newspapers and magazines from London and Cairo that give them an international perspective and often contain more penetrating interviews with Sudanese officials than appear in local publications. These foreign papers are widely available in Khartoum, but they are prohibitively expensive for most people. Observers say there is a lively second-hand market for them. Arabic, the country's official language, is also the most widely used language in Sudanese media. Arabic has long been the dominant language in the north of the country, and it is gradually supplanting English as the lingua franca in the south, where the population speaks a variety of indigenous African languages as their primary tongue. English-language media find their principal audience in Khartoum and other urban areas, where English comprehension is most widespread among the foreign community and Sudanese who have been educated abroad. Radio The government-controlled Republic of Sudan Radio is the only domestic radio station in Sudan, where the government does not allow privately owned radio stations to operate. Republic of Sudan Radio operates various services (including the "General Programme", a Koranic channel, and broadcasts for the regional states). All of them adhere to a common editorial line. The General Programme broadcasts around the clock in Arabic on FM, mediumwave and via satellite. It also broadcasts on shortwave (7200 kHz), although this transmitter has been unreliable for some time and is unlikely to provide adequate nationwide coverage. Sudanese radio formerly had an external service, Radio Omdurman, as well, but this is no longer heard. Republic of Sudan Radio is not available on the Internet. There are no reliable survey data indicating how many people listen to the government radio. Experienced media observers report that the government radio has a larger audience than foreign broadcasts in Sudan. News reporting on Sudanese radio clearly reflects a bias towards the government, according to experienced observers. News bulletins focus heavily on the activities of the president and then on other government officials. Opposition figures are largely ignored in the news, unless they are making some kind of concession to the government. Reports of major news events usually first appear on radio as formal government statements. Anecdotal evidence suggests that these statements are often aired well after news of the event is circulating by word of mouth and are often regarded as unreliable by much of the population. In addition to the news, Sudanese radio carries music, sports programmes, and commercials. The music programming includes religious, romantic, jihad and patriotic music. Death announcements follow the main news bulletins and almost everyone listens to them because of social obligations in an extended family and tribal society. The radio also broadcasts cultural and educational programmes, such as discussions of traditional folklore; interviews with prominent figures, academics and authors; and advice on health and child nutrition. There are also religious programmes, especially on Fridays, which elucidate aspects of the Koran and explain the background of religious festivals. There are some listener call-in shows, usually dealing with uncontroversial social topics. The New Sudan Council of Churches runs Radio Voice of Hope with the support of Radio Netherlands. Voice of Hope's objectives, according to its web site, are to act on behalf of the "voiceless," to make people aware of the impact of war on the people of southern Sudan, and to bring a resolution to conflicts among groups in southern Sudan. Voice of Hope broadcasts one 30-minute programme on shortwave four days a week via Radio Netherlands' relay station in Madagascar, and a one- hour programme daily from an FM station in Kaboko, northwest Uganda. Programmes are in Arabic and English and are prepared in Uganda and the Netherlands. According to media observers, the main audience of this station is the southern Sudanese, but it can also be heard in Kenya and Uganda. Voice of Hope has a web site: http://www.radiovoiceofhope.net Other foreign radio stations are also heard in Sudan. BBC World Service broadcasts are relayed on FM in Khartoum and Wad Madani and are also available countrywide on shortwave. The Paris-based pan-Arab station Radio Monte Carlo, relayed on FM in Khartoum, is audible in the rest of the country after dark from its mediumwave relay in Cyprus. Over the years several clandestine radios, serving as mouthpieces for various Sudanese opposition groups, have broadcast into the country from various locations. The opposition National Democratic Alliance currently broadcasts on 8000 kHz shortwave, apparently from Eritrea, in Arabic and English on a station identifying itself as "Voice of Sudan, Voice of Democracy and Peace". The second-largest armed opposition group in the country, the Sudan Alliance Forces, operates "Voice of Freedom and Renewal, Voice of the New Sudan," which is currently broadcast in Arabic on 6985 kHz shortwave. Print media Most of Sudan's newspapers are published in Khartoum and find their audience primarily among the northern Arabic-speaking urban population. The notable exception is the English-language Khartoum Monitor, which, according to long-time media observers, has strong appeal among people from the south. The privately owned press has somewhat more freedom of expression than the state-owned broadcasters, but the government does retain and use powers to influence what is published. In September 2002, for instance, the authorities barred distribution of two privately owned newspapers - the Khartoum Monitor and Khartoum Al-Hurriyah - for criticizing the government's decision to pull out of the peace talks (French news agency AFP, 4 September 2002). Despite an official end to press censorship in 2001, authorities continue to harass, detain and fine journalists and newspapers for reporting that is critical of the government, that makes allegations of official corruption, or that touches on matters of national security (Human Rights Report 2002). The effect of such harassment is to pressure many journalists and newspapers into some degree of self- censorship. Sudanese newspapers commonly report on topics related to the international campaign against terrorism, economic issues, civil war and foreign relations. In addition to news articles and editorials, Sudanese newspapers have advertisements and obituaries. The advertisements are generally for news stands, restaurants, furniture and imported electronics. Death notices in Sudanese newspapers refer to the deceased as "martyrs" if they were killed while fighting in southern Sudan. The papers routinely carry articles from foreign news agencies - including AFP (France), AP (USA), Reuters (UK), the Pan-African News Agency PANA and Egypt's MENA - on international topics, especially the Middle East. Reliable circulation figures for Sudanese newspapers are not available, but experienced observers report that the following papers are among the more influential: \ \ The privately owned Khartoum Al-Ra'y al-Amm is one of Sudan's most popular newspapers. Experienced observers note that the paper has pro-government and Islamist leanings, but relatively objective reporting, compared to the broadcast media. It is available in cities and small towns throughout northern Sudan, making it one of the most widely distributed newspapers in the country. The newspaper serves the diaspora and Arabic speakers around the world via its web site http://www.rayaam.net/ which updates regularly. \ \ Al-Ayam is a long-established paper that is well-respected and widely read. Its reporting is regarded as objective. \ \ Al-Watan, known for exposing scandals, was shut down by security authorities in late December 2002, according to state-owned Sudanese television and news agency reports. This paper remains banned from publication. \ \ Al-Ra'y al-Akhar was a widely read newspaper that had been willing to criticize the government. According to Reporters Without Borders, the newspaper has been suspended about 10 times since it was founded in 1995. In February 2001, the newspaper and its chief editor were fined for running a story charging the governor of the Khartoum State with corruption. The paper is not currently being published. \ \ The Khartoum Monitor was established in October 2000 by a group of southern journalists. The target audience of this newspaper includes people from southern Sudan living in Khartoum, expatriates and diplomats. It also has a significant readership in the southern city of Juba. The paper gives voice to southern grievances and has repeatedly run foul of the government as a consequence. In January 2002, the paper's managing editor was sentenced to jail and the paper was fined for publishing a report on slavery in the country. Issues of this weekly are frequently confiscated by the government. Khartoum Monitor has a web site, http://www.khartoummonitor.com but it is often inaccessible. {! Inexplicably, this link led instead to Iowa, Chair Depot about antique chairs!! When checked at 1518 UT May 24; a DNS mixup??} \ \ Alwan is run by a former National Islamic Front leader, now heading the opposition Popular National Congress, Hasan al-Turabi. He has been imprisoned or under house arrest since February 2001. \ \ Al-Khartoum favours the alliance of northern opposition parties, especially the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP). The paper seems to appeal to wealthy Arabic-speakers in northern Sudan, though its sports coverage is popular with the youth. A PDF version of the newspaper is posted on the web. \ \ Al-Anba is an official government newspaper. Sudanese newspaper web sites mainly serve the diaspora. Some of Sudan's hard copy newspapers, such as Al-Ra'y al-Amm, Al-Ayam and Khartoum Monitor, have online versions. Television State-owned Sudan Television broadcasts news, entertainment and education programmes nationally, in both Arabic and English. A military censor ensures that Sudan Television reflects the government's position (Human Rights Report 2002). Sudan Television broadcasts via satellite to Sudan, north Africa, the Arabian Peninsula and western Europe. No Sudanese TV programmes are available on the Internet. According to the State Department's 2002 Human Rights Report, "the government and private investors jointly own one television cable company". This pay cable network rebroadcasts, according to the State Department report, "uncensored programmes from CNN, BBC, the Dubai- based, Saudi-owned Middle East Broadcasting Corporation (MBC), Dubai TV, and Kuwait TV", among others. Although there are some restrictions on the ownership of satellite dishes, they are becoming common in affluent areas. Arab TV stations such as Al-Jazeera, MBC, Dubai TV, Kuwait TV and the Egyptian Space Channel are some of the most popular, according to media observers. Egyptian soap operas and films have long been popular in Sudan. People in Sudan also watch uncensored CNN. Frequent power outages, lack of access to electricity and the high cost of a television set limit access to television but do not absolutely prevent the poor from being influenced by it. In low-income areas, groups of people sometimes gather around a single battery- powered TV to watch a favourite programme. Internet Formed in 1995, Sudanet http://www.sudannet.net is the country's major Internet provider. Sudanet's main customers include government ministries, companies, and international organizations. The majority of Sudan's population does not have access to the Internet because of infrastructure and cost constraints. According to a survey conducted by Nua.com, an Internet research and marketing company, in December 2001, there were 56,000 Internet users in Sudan, or about 0.15 per cent of the country's population. Internet cafes are becoming increasing popular in urban areas. Internet news sources include Sudanile, a privately owned news site that reports on government, opposition, and rebel activities with what media observers judge to be an even-handed approach. Its URL is: http://www.sudanile.com/ Another news site, Akhir Lahzah, http://www.akhirlahza.com/ frequently carries anti-government news and represents the Islamist opposition - specifically the youth wing of Turabi's Popular National Congress. Other Sudanese web sites host travel, weather, discussion boards and links to Sudanese newspapers. According to media observers, the discussion boards often feature lively -sometimes heated - debates on controversial subjects such as the civil war, the peace efforts, and other current events and social issues. Sudanese expatriates and citizens within the country participate, apparently freely and without fear of any sort of censorship or intimidation. Strong north-south antagonisms and polarization on major issues are clear from exchanges at these sites. There are several anti-government web sites based outside Sudan. Free Sudan http://mathaba.net/sudan/index1.htm for example, posts reports on human rights abuses and provides links to Sudan.Net http://www.sudan.net/main1.shtml a news site with articles on Sudan from AFP and other press agencies. Various Sudanese human rights organizations like Sudan Human Rights Organization - Cairo Branch http://www.shro-cairo.org/about.htm and expatriate groups such as Vigilance Soudan http://www.vigilsd.org/ are also active on the Internet. News agency The government-run Sudan News Agency, Suna, is the country's only news agency. It is available in Arabic and English on the Internet but is not updated daily. Most Sudanese dailies, including Al-Ayam, Al-Ra'y al-Amm, Khartoum Monitor and Al-Khartoum, occasionally carry Suna articles. Suna does not appear to have an international audience. Suna regularly reports on relations with foreign governments and statements by Sudanese officials. Source: Chris Greenway, BBC Monitoring research May 03 (via DXLD) ** TIBET. 4820, CHINA, Xizang PBS, Lhasa, 2253-2307, May 21, Mandarin. Female with talks over instrumental music, "Sounds of Silence". Music, ads, traditional music until 2300, pips, station ID then male and female announcer w/ a presumed language lesson, lots of repetitive words and phrases by female. Identification sounded very much like China National Radio, "Zhungyang Renmin Guangbo Dientai". If I read the listing in WRTH correctly CNR 1 is relayed from 2200-2340. Poor (Scott R Barbour Jr , Intervale, NH-USA, Sangean ATS 818, RF Systems MLB-1, RS longwire w/ RBA balun, EDXP via DXLD) ** U A E [and non]. Hi Glenn, Reasonable MW-conditions to the Middle- East last Wednesday around 2030 UT. Logged even Radio Farda from UAE on 1170 kHz in parallel with 1593 kHz from Kuwait. Some Interference by Slovene Radio Capodistria broadcasting in Italian on same frequency. Also noted some stations from Iran e.g. 1503 kHz. WRTH tells this is "Sarasarye" Nationwide network. Norwegian 1200 kW powerhouse was in trouble with an "Arabic" station on 1314! Could be UAE R, BBC or VoA from Dabiya. 73´s (Jouko Huuskonen, Turku FINLAND, Rx: AOR 7030+, Ant: Wellbrook ALA 1530P-active loop, May 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. BBC FACES MORE AUDIT INQUIRIES The Government said it would examine the idea of giving the National Audit Office much greater access to the BBC's accounts in order to monitor economic efficiency and effectiveness. At present, the NAO can investigate the BBC's television licence fee collection arrangements and the grant-aided BBC World Service, but not the BBC Home Services expenditure. During the committee stage of the Communications Bill in the Lords, Lady Buscombe (C) said it was important to widen the powers of the NAO to examine the efficiency, economy and effectiveness of the BBC's services. (from http://www.telegraph.co.uk 23-05-03 via Kim Elliott, DXLD) ** U S A. FCC'S ADELSTEIN SEEKS CONCESSIONS ON MEDIA-OWNERSHIP PLAN By Mark Wigfield, Wall Street Journal WASHINGTON -- Having lost a battle to delay deregulation of the broadcast industry, a Democratic member of the Federal Communications Commission asked for concessions from the Republican majority's plan. Television broadcasters seeking to merge with other stations should be required to certify their continued efforts to improve the quality of local news and information, said Commissioner Jonathan Adelstein. He added he said he would accept a 14% increase in national limits on television-station ownership if the FCC began investigating whether independent producers of programs need protection from the networks. Mr. Adelstein made his suggestions in a speech before The Media Institute, a nonprofit research foundation specializing in communications policy. A person close to the proceeding said he hadn't yet made the suggestions to FCC Chairman Michael Powell. A vote on the matter is pending for June 2, and Mr. Powell appears to have the support of the Republican majority for his plan. The plan would increase a 35% national television-ownership cap to 45% and loosen local-ownership restrictions to allow one owner to have three television stations in the largest markets instead of two, while eliminating in most markets a ban on cross-ownership of television stations and newspapers. Mr. Powell has called his plan moderate and said it responds to court decisions that have challenged FCC rules and a congressional mandate to deregulate the industry in light of new competition from cable and satellite. But Mr. Adelstein called Mr. Powell's proposals "extremist." "Rather than allowing massive consolidation," said Mr. Adelstein, "we should take a conservative approach that gradually permits additional mergers we can evaluate before completely unleashing the industry." Courts have affirmed the FCC's right to regulate broadcast ownership to protect the flow of diverse sources of information over the public airwaves. Mr. Adelstein and other opponents of deregulation say consolidation will undermine broadcast "localism," or the commitment of local stations to provide local news and information. An FCC study cites contrary evidence, showing that network-owned and operated stations produce more local news and information. But to guarantee that, Mr. Adelstein is proposing that merging broadcasters be required to show how they will improve local coverage and report annually on compliance with those plans. Calling consolidation the "McDonaldization" of the American media, Mr. Adelstein said the public "needs a balanced media diet, a diverse menu." He added the FCC should take a second look at its repeal a decade ago of so- called financial interest and syndication rules, or fin-syn, that limited the networks' ability to own the programming they air. Repeal of the rules saw independent producers' share of the market go from 85% of all programs to 15% to 20%, said Mr. Adelstein. He is pushing for the review to be authorized in the June 2 vote. Mr. Powell's office has indicated the FCC may take up the matter in a separate proceeding later this summer (via Fred Vobbe, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. 60-METER OPERATION TO REQUIRE OPERATOR PRUDENCE, CAUTION When the five channels of the new 60-meter amateur allocation become available later this year, Amateur Radio operators will have to learn some new operating habits and adopt some new on-the-air attitudes. The limited spectrum and stringent bandwidth requirements will mean amateurs will have to demonstrate their best behavior and operating skills if the Amateur Service ever hopes to get an actual band segment at 60 meters. ``In terms of Amateur Radio spectrum, we usually say, `Use it or lose it,``` said ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ. ``The watchword for 60-meter operators should be, `Misuse it and lose it.``` The channelized scheme -- similar to the 5-MHz experimental operation under way in the United Kingdom http://www.rsgb-hfc.org.uk/5mhz.htm -- puts unfamiliar technical compliance demands on US hams who have, until now, not had to worry much about frequency stability or transmitted audio bandwidth. The FCC has granted amateurs 5332, 5348, 5368, 5373, and 5405 kHz -- the last channel common to the UK experimental operation`s band plan. These are all ``channel center frequencies,`` the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) said in a March 13 letter to FCC Office of Engineering and Technology (OET) Chief Edmond J. Thomas. The NTIA, which administers federal government spectrum, opposed allocation of an actual ham band citing the ongoing spectrum requirements of federal licensees with homeland security responsibilities. The channels will be available to General and higher class licensees. The NTIA says that hams planning to operate on 60 meters ``must assure that their signal is transmitted on the channel center frequency.`` In general, the NTIA has advised, users should set their carrier frequency 1.5 kHz lower than the channel center frequency. According to the NTIA: Channel Center Amateur Tuning Frequency 5332 kHz 5330.5 kHz 5348 kHz 5346.5 kHz 5368 kHz 5366.5 kHz 5373 kHz 5371.5 kHz 5405 kHz 5403.5 kHz (common US/UK) ARRL Technical Relations Manager Paul Rinaldo, W4RI, says the assignment of these channels implies that amateurs now must adhere to certain frequency tolerances for their use. While the international Radio Regulations don`t list these for the Amateur Service, he notes, they do stipulate tolerances on the order of 20 to 50 Hz for other services. ``We haven`t been told anything specific about frequency tolerances for these channels but would probably annoy federal regulators if we strayed any more than 50 Hz from the assigned carrier frequencies,`` Rinaldo cautioned. Keeping one`s audio within the 2.8 kHz wide channel to comply with the 2K8J3E emission specification is another important issue. ARRL Laboratory Manager Ed Hare, W1RFI, believes prudence calls for not having baseband audio below 200 Hz nor greater than 2800 Hz--for a total bandwidth of 2.6 kHz. ``That will probably keep us out of trouble,`` he said. Noting that the high-frequency response ``can vary a lot from radio to radio,`` however, Hare recommended that amateurs play it conservatively. Additionally, the FCC has restricted operation to USB only, with a maximum effective radiated power (ERP) of 50 W. The USB-only requirement stemmed from NTIA interoperability concerns. The NTIA wanted to make sure that federal users could copy and, if necessary, identify any amateur station using one of the 60-meter channels. As a result, the 60-meter frequencies will become the only ones available to the general amateur community that do not permit CW operation. For the sake of this particular grant, the FCC said it would consider a half-wave dipole to have a gain of 0 dBd. In its letter to the FCC, the NTIA stipulated that radiated power should not exceed ``the equivalent of 50 W PEP transmitter output power into an antenna with a gain of 0 dBd.`` ``Although this is less spectrum than the American Radio Relay League petition requested, this is the best we can do pending a definition of Homeland Security HF requirements,`` concluded Fredrick R. Wentland in the NTIA`s letter to the FCC`s OET. Sumner has predicted that, over time, amateurs can and will ``develop a record of disciplined, responsible use of the five channels in the public interest that will justify another look at these rather severe initial restrictions.`` Just when amateurs will get their first crack at 60 meters is not yet clear. The changes to Part 97 go into effect 30 days after publication of the Report and Order (R&O) in The Federal Register, which has not yet happened. Publication could take anywhere from a few weeks to a few months. ARRL will announce a specific date as soon as it`s known. The FCC Report and Order in ET Docket 02-98 is available on the FCC`s Web site http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-03-105A1.doc (ARRL Letter May 23 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. TEXACO CANCELLATION PROVOKES WAVE OF MET NOSTALGIA By VERENA DOBNIK, The Associated Press, 5/23/03 1:06 PM NEW YORK (AP) -- For 63 years, millions of Americans have kept a regular Saturday afternoon date with their radio. The "Texaco Metropolitan Opera Radio Network" filled homes, cars and workplaces from Maine to California with its arias, celebrity-studded intermissions and whimsical trivia quizzes. The fans' pleasure turned to operatic-pitch lament this week when ChevronTexaco Corp., as the company is now called, announced it would stop funding the broadcasts after next season. While the Met is confident it will find a new sponsor, fans wrung their hands and waxed nostalgic over a show that changed their lives. "Ratfinks!!! Boy, I can remember riding around in the car in the '50s looking for a Texaco station to gas up at, because they sponsored the opera!" Avise Nissen, of Mount Rainier, Md., wrote in an e-mail to Opera News magazine, which publishes weekly previews of the broadcasts. Nissen first heard opera on the Texaco program, when she was in her early teens in Arkansas. "It's a democratic thing that Texaco did," Nissen said later in a telephone interview with The Associated Press. "Opera has this snobby, snotty mystique and people thought, 'Oh, opera -- ugh!' But the Texaco thing made it available to people who would never have seen it on stage. The broadcasts created fans all over the country." The Saturday afternoon broadcasts have been a staple on classical music stations since 1931, with Texaco beginning sole sponsorship nine years later. The broadcasts now reach about 10 million people in 42 countries, through 360 U.S. public and commercial stations, as well others across the globe. For David Scally, a retired doctor in Chevy Chase, Md., the broadcasts provided a music education. He was one of the hundreds of worried fans who wrote letters and e-mails to the Met this week. "I still have fond memories of moving my aunt's old portable Philco to where I would not disturb the rest of the household and listening to my first Met broadcast -- Wagner's 'Lohengrin' on Jan. 25, 1947," Scally wrote in his e-mail. If all else fails, he said he'd contribute "my own meager resources" to keep the show on the air. Sponsorship of the broadcasts, live from Lincoln Center, changed after Chevron acquired Texaco two years ago in a $39 billion deal. The more cumbersome corporate name was inserted, but the show otherwise remained intact. ChevronTexaco said its withdrawal from the opera was a marketing decision. "As our business has evolved, we believe it is important to focus more of our resources directly with the countries and markets where we do business," spokeswoman Patricia E. Yarrington said in a statement. Thus ended the longest continuous sponsorship in the history of American radio -- one that began with Texaco's Dec. 7, 1940, broadcast of Mozart's "The Marriage of Figaro." Met General Manager Joseph Volpe, who said he's "determined to have these broadcasts continue," remembers hearing his first show with his Italian immigrant grandmother while growing up in Queens. "My grandmother did not have the opportunity to hear music. She had one or two old records I would have to turn for her," Volpe said. "So the Saturday Met broadcasts were very important to her. She thought it was good for me to sit next to her, and to listen." (Still, he adds with a laugh, when his less-strict mother listened to the broadcasts, "I escaped out the door as soon as I could!") Volpe, 62, said that within a month, he expects a new company or private donor to pledge the $7 million needed annually so the performances can be aired live each Saturday, from December to the spring. The intermission features are set in a small hall behind the Met's main theater, where the Met chorus rehearses. Panel guests have ranged from opera buffs such as U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, to Pavarotti and tenor Placido Domingo. Regulars include Broadway playwright Terrence McNally, of "Lisbon Traviata" fame. Fans send letters and e-mails to "Opera Quiz," getting prizes of recordings or books if their questions are answered in laughter-filled chatter among each week's changing panelists. For his part, Volpe isn't wasting time being nostalgic about the loss of "Texaco" in the broadcast's name. "That memory faded rather quickly when we had to put Chevron before Texaco." (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) SATURDAY AFTERNOONS: TUNE IN TO WAGNER The New York Times May 23, 2003 To the Editor: Re "ChevronTexaco to Stop Sponsoring Met's Broadcasts" (Arts pages, May 21): How ironic that the last radio broadcast from the stage of the Metropolitan Opera House that ChevronTexaco will sponsor will be Wagner's "Goetterdaemmerung" ("Twilight of the Gods"). The abandonment of sponsorship after more than 60 years of Texaco's continuous support is yet another sign that classical music in our country is headed toward its own twilight. If the show is to go on, the Met will have to come up with Plan B, and I suggest some alternatives: There are, of course, other corporations that might step into the breach, though in today's economic and culture-shy climate this may simply be wishful thinking. An estimated 10 million people worldwide listen to the broadcasts. If each of these listeners were to send in a $1 contribution, that would more than cover the costs. Since the broadcasts give the singers an incredible amount of exposure, why not ask the artists to take a reduced fee just for the broadcast performance, earmarking the payroll savings for the broadcasts? That would not cover all the costs, but it would certainly help keep these essential Saturday afternoon broadcasts alive. ERNEST GILBERT, Croton Falls, N.Y., May 21, 2003 To the Editor: I was dismayed to read "ChevronTexaco to Stop Sponsoring Met's Broadcasts" (Arts pages, May 21). I grew up in a very small town in Wisconsin, and every Saturday, starting in the 1950's, my father listened to the Texaco broadcasts. They were his cultural lifeline, and still are. For me, as a child, they were background music. But they reached me I have been a Met subscriber since 1997. I hope that ChevronTexaco realizes what it is abandoning the opportunity to reach and inspire so many people in so many places. KAYE DERMAN, Yonkers, May 21, 2003 Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** VIETNAM. RELAY STATIONS TO BE BUILT FOR OFF-SHORE FISHERMEN Some 17 short-wave transmission stations will be built along Vietnam's 3,260-km-long coast line to provide off-shore fishing vessels with information, weather forecasts and safety procedures. Construction of the relay stations, expected to be completed by 2005, is part of a project designed by the Ministry of Planning and Investment to develop a communication system exclusively for off-shore fishing vessels. Under the US$338 million project, these stations, with a transmission coverage of 200 km, will use satellite-positioning technology. Voice of Vietnam website 23-5-03 http://www.vov.org.vn/2003_05_23/english/vanhoa.htm 73 (via Kim Elliott, DC, May 23, DXLD) WTFK?? I assume we are not talking about broadcast services (gh) UNIDENTIFIED [non]. OHIO HAM HIT WITH $12,000 FINE IN MALICIOUS INTERFERENCE CASE Cooperation between Canadian and US amateurs has resulted in a $12,000 Notice of Apparent Liability for Forfeiture (NAL) from the FCC to an Ohio amateur. The FCC has alleged that Ronald E. Sauer, WE8E, of Bedford Heights violated Part 97 rules prohibiting deliberate and malicious interference, transmission of music and failure to identify. The case involved daily interference to the Trans Provincial Net http://www.tpn7055.ca/ a Canadian net that operates on 7.055 MHz. ``This was no small task and was accomplished with the help of many people from the US and Canada working together,`` said ARRL Great Lakes Vice Director Dick Mondro, W8FQT, who expressed thanks to all involved. In addition to TPN members, that included Radio Amateurs of Canada (RAC) http://www.rac.ca officials, Industry Canada, the FCC, ARRL Michigan http://www.arrl.org/sections/?sect=MI and Ohio http://www.arrl.org/sections/?sect=OH Section officials, ARRL Official Observers and members of the Cuyahoga Amateur Radio Society http://www.cars.org/ ``This was indeed an example of teamwork in action and proves again that the FCC does care and continues to work with us to stop interference,`` Mondro added. TPN Assistant Manager Jim Taylor, VA3KU, said the interference to the net had gone on for several months. ``Our break came when the jammer decided to intensify his efforts by going to his local library and sending out repulsive and threatening e-mails to a few of our members,`` Taylor said. He and other Canadian hams were able to determine that the e-mails had come from a public library terminal in the Cleveland, Ohio, area. Taylor contacted CARS President Bob Check, W8GC, for assistance in zeroing in on the jammer. Tracking down the signal source involved mobile direction-finding work by three CARS members, who passed along their findings to the FCC`s Detroit Office late last January. Already alerted to the situation, the FCC`s Detroit Office had called on the Commission`s High Frequency Direction Finding (HFDF) facility in Maryland. The HFDF group monitored jamming and the playing of music and narrowed down the search to an area near the intersection of Interstates 480 and 77 in the Cleveland area. In the meantime, the FCC received the CARS report indicating that the interference was coming from Sauer`s residence. On January 31, an FCC agent also used direction-finding techniques to track the source of the interference on 7.055 MHz to Sauer`s home and conducted an inspection. The FCC said Sauer ``admitted that he had been playing music and deliberately jamming the frequency of 7.055 MHz.`` Sauer ``further admitted to jamming and playing music on this frequency on previous days.`` Based on its findings, the FCC concluded that the $12,000 fine was justified. The FCC ordered Sauer to pay the fine within 30 days or file a written statement seeking a reduction or cancellation of the proposed forfeiture (ARRL Letter May 23 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ PUBLICATIONS ++++++++++++ FM ATLAS & STATION DIRECTORY Just a quick note to the folks on this list who might be new to DXing and to Bruce's extremely valuable FM Atlas. If you have never tried DXing with the FM Atlas at your side, you do not know what you are missing. Maybe it is because I have gotten used to having one around since I started DXing in the early 80's (9th edition-1984), but if you think having the internet alone for helping ID stations is enough, think again. With the Atlas' maps alone, imagine getting an eskip opening to a certain area. Just whip out the book and you can see what stations to target in a given area. You can also mark off the ones you have already heard so you don't waste time trying for one you already have. Then there are the frequency listings. OK, you could generate one of these from a few different sources, but the Atlas has stations by frequency, with power, antenna height, city, state (or Province), Stereo indication (this CAN be helpful) - all on one page fitting into a nice compact, bound 5 1/2" x 8 1/2" reference guide! There is also listings by state with extensive translator listings and format codes and even estimated coverage area and SCA format. Granted, the info becomes out of date the second it hits the press, and for that the VUD, 100000watts.com, the FCC database and this list are the best ways to keep updated (Bruce also has a newsletter for updates), but for having a handy reference right next to you when DXing at home, in the car, in a plane, on top of a mountain, at work or in a cabin in Northern Minnesota (been there done that!) you need to have this book! Last commentary. Bruce and his wife Carol put a lot of time and energy into creating this masterpiece once every few years. As with other great DX products that pop up from time to time (phase box, APS antennas, etc) this one is certainly worth supporting with your $$$$'s and is a very good deal at only $21. If you have never bought one and couldn't imagine why, give it a try. You won't be sorry ! Oh, last bonus of this book. I have a bookshelf history of radio stations going back to 1984. It is very cool when DX conditions are lousy, to pull out that 9th edition from 1984 and look at how few stations there were, and what their calls used to be, and to see what used to be my "total list of stations received" at that time. Now, when the heck are we getting some e-skip out east !!!!! (Bill Nollman, Farmington, CT, WTFDA via DXLD. Send $21 plus $2 shipping to FM Atlas, P O Box 336, Esko MN 55733- 0336. If you want two or more the price drops to $19 plus $1.50 per book shipping. Or use American Express, Visa or Master by e-mail or by calling 1-800-605-2219 (Bruce Elving, via Nollman, ibid.) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ PROPAGATION REPORT Flare activity has remained very low over the last week. Solar wind speed declined as expected early on starting to ramp up again after 20UT on May 18. After this geomagnetic field conditions became unsettled, to active at higher latitudes. Some spread F has been noted and also some intense sporadic E in southern ocean and Antarctic regions on May 19. Conditions then calmed for a day or 2 before solar wind speed picked up again on May 21 with some active conditions from then until now. Solar wind speed and geomagnetic levels have now dropped again. The same pattern may continue for the next few weeks. A previously flaring area returned to the visible solar disk 2 days ago but so far has produced nothing of substance. Prepared using data from http://www.ips.gov.au (Richard Jary, SA, May 23, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-089, May 22, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. [continued from 3-088] ** MEXICO. A carrier strong enough to het adjacent NSB 9595 and Rebelde 9600 was noted May 22 around 1245 around 9598 --- would this be XEYU? An annoyance, not strong enough to pull any modulation (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MONGOLIA. See USA [non] ** NIGERIA. SURVEY OF THE COUNTRY'S MEDIA ENVIRONMENT Overview; limits on media freedom The Nigerian news media industry is one of the largest and most vibrant in Africa. It includes the state-owned Federal Radio Corporation of Nigeria (FRCN), a network of government-run national, regional and state radio stations; the Nigerian Television Authority (NTA), which controls a similar network of government-owned television stations; a few private radio and television stations; and over 100 national and regional publications, most privately owned. As in most African countries, radio is the most important means of mass communication in the country. With radio sharing and community listening being common practices, the vast majority of Nigerians have access to radio. Furthermore, radio broadcasts from either national or regional stations reach virtually all of the national territory. By comparison, television sets tend to be centred more in the urban areas and more available to the affluent than to the poor. Similarly, newspapers tend to be more available in urban than rural areas and more prevalent among the better educated southern population than among northerners. The country's overall literacy rate is approximately 57 per cent, a factor limiting the relative influence of newspapers. The Nigerian constitution provides for freedom of the press, and most observers agree that the press has been enjoying greater freedom since 1999, the advent of the civilian government under Olusegun Obasanjo. Nevertheless, the US-based Freedom House rated Nigeria as only "partly free" in its 2002 Press Freedom Survey, in which 53 per cent of African countries were rated "not free" and 15 per cent were rated "free." Freedom House notes that criminal defamation laws "are used against journalists to inspire some self-censorship." It also alleges that Nigerian journalists are often subject to violence, especially in the north of the country. The State Department's most recent human rights report, issued in March 2002, states that the government "generally respected" press freedom, though "there were problems in some areas." The report notes that Decree 60, signed into law during the former military regime, is still on the books. It explains that Decree 60, which was widely criticized by Nigerian journalists as unconstitutional and an "instrument of censorship", created a Press Council with the power to accredit, register and suspend journalists. The council took no official action during 2001, but journalists still regard the existence of Decree 60 and the Press Council as significant limitations on freedom of the press. Difficulties with journalistic standards Issues of educational and ethical standards for journalists are often as important to the quality of news media in Africa as issues of press freedom. Media observers note that in Nigeria, as throughout Africa, journalists have long suffered from a lack of formal professional training. Many working reporters have learned their trade primarily through whatever on-the-job training is made available by their employer. The lack of training, the observers point out, often results in poor journalistic practices - such as basing a story on only one source, reporting solely on the basis of unnamed sources, or reporting only one side of controversial stories. That said, many observers will also assert that Nigeria has the most professional level of journalism to be found in Africa. Professional training is available from independent organizations, such as the Nigerian Institute for Journalism, NIJ, which offers an independent training certificate programme. Increasingly, media organizations are requiring degrees or certificates such as those offered by the NIJ as a requirement for a reporter's job. Media observers also note ethical problems that plague journalism in Nigeria. The Media Rights Agenda, an organization "promoting and protecting press freedom and freedom of _expression in Nigeria", has noted a long list of unethical practices that it claims are widespread throughout the country (Media Rights Monitor, September 2000). These include soliciting bribes to run a particular story or to suppress certain facts; ethnic or political bias in reporting; reporting on stories about which the journalist is uninformed; reporting, or failing to report, a story in deference to an authority; and unduly sensationalizing a story. Though these problems do undoubtedly affect the quality and reliability of journalism in Nigeria, it must also be noted that professional journalist organizations in Nigeria have recognized the problem, publicized it and made some efforts to overcome it. The Nigerian Union of Journalists, the Nigerian Guild of Editors, and the Newspaper Proprietors Association of Nigeria, for instance, in 1998 formally adopted a Code of Ethics and called upon all of their members to observe it. Radio The FRCN operates five "national stations" (which identify as "Radio Nigeria") from the cities of Abuja, Lagos, Ibadan, Kaduna and Enugu, as well as a "network service" relayed at times by all these stations. Radio Nigeria-Lagos provides three separate channels: Channel 1 broadcasts in English on mediumwave and FM, as well as shortwave; Channel 2 broadcasts in English on mediumwave and FM; and Channel 3 broadcasts on FM only in English, Nigerian Pidgin and the major indigenous languages of Yoruba, Hausa and Igbo. The Radio Nigeria national stations in Ibadan (southwest Nigeria), Enugu (eastern) and Kaduna (north) offer one or more channels in English and the indigenous languages spoken in each particular area. In addition to the national stations, each of the country's 36 states has at least one state radio station broadcasting in mediumwave or FM. State radios typically hook up to the national network for major newscasts of the day, but otherwise carry their own programming. Each of the state radio stations broadcasts in a combination of English and the vernacular languages that predominate in the state, ensuring that radio is almost universally accessible. The national radios operate solely on government funding and are not permitted to accept commercial advertising. State radios receive government funding but are allowed to accept some advertising as well (American Express Small Business Report). There were six private radio stations broadcasting in 2001, according to the US State Department Human Rights Report. The most popular of the private stations are Ray Power 1 (Lagos) and Ray Power 2 (Abuja), owned by DAAR Communications. The stations draw an especially large audience of young adults, in large part due to the stations' musical appeal as well as its relays of BBC programming. Ray Power stations also feature local news, phone-in programmes, and sports. DAAR Communications also has networking agreements with over 30 state radios throughout Nigeria, giving Ray Power a nearly nationwide reach. Available audience survey data indicate that Ray Power stations enjoy an audience of between two and four times as large as Radio Nigeria. The Voice of Nigeria (VON) is the country's external shortwave radio service. As described on the station's web site http://www.voiceofnigeria.org VON is an autonomous corporation that has been granted by statute the exclusive authority "for broadcasting externally, by radio, Nigeria's viewpoint to any part of the world". VON is required by law to broadcast "as a public interest in the interest of Nigeria" and to "ensure that its services reflect views of Nigeria as a federation and give adequate expression to the culture, characteristics, affairs and opinions of Nigeria". It broadcasts on shortwave in English, French, Swahili, Hausa, Fulfulde and Arabic from studios in Lagos and Abuja. Important international news sources for Nigerians include direct shortwave reception and FM rebroadcasts of BBC World Service and Voice of America services in English and Hausa. Television The NTA operates national and regional television stations, and at least 30 states currently operate their own television stations as well. The NTA national programming is in English only, while regional stations broadcast in a combination of English, Yoruba, Hausa and Igbo. NTA programming includes a variety of general interest shows, including news, talk shows, sports, soap operas and business programmes. Since the early 1990s, Nigeria has allowed private television broadcasting. According to the State Department Human Rights Report, in 2001 there were nine privately owned television stations that broadcast domestic news and political commentary in the country and two private satellite television services. These include African Independent Television, AIT, which is owned by DAAR Communications, which also owns Ray Power Radio. AIT broadcasts in the Lagos area and, via satellite, to Africa, Europe and the Caribbean. Its 24-hour programming includes African news and locally- produced entertainment. The station's goal, as stated in press releases, is to present a positive image of Africa to the world and to ensure that Africa is "is represented by Africans". Other important television broadcasters include Minaj TV, which serves eastern Nigeria and operates both a cable network and a satellite broadcasting service, and Galaxy TV, which broadcasts sports and entertainment to western Nigeria in English and Yoruba. In the short history of private broadcasting in Nigeria, private television stations have had a difficult time remaining solvent, due to high costs and scarce advertising revenue. These problems have been aggravated by a law requiring that programming for terrestrial broadcasting consist of at least 60 per cent locally produced content (80 per cent for satellite broadcasting). This requirement causes hardships because locally produced programmes tend to be more expensive than much of the available foreign programming. Foreign television broadcasts are readily available to the few Nigerians able to afford satellite antennas, for the government does not restrict access to foreign satellite broadcasts. Print media The Nigerian press is made up of a wide variety of publications - some owned by the government, but most privately owned. These include regional newspapers and papers with a national readership; newspapers that strive for professional, objective journalism and others that designed to espouse the interests of particular ethnic groups; popular tabloids, dailies appealing to an educated elite, and serious weekly news magazines. According to available market data, daily readership of Nigerian newspapers is limited to 23 per cent of the population, and no single title reaches more than 18 per cent of the population. The federal government owns two main daily newspapers, the New Nigerian (which publishes separate editions in Lagos and Kaduna) and the Lagos Daily Times. Both papers are published in English, but the New Nigerian also publishes an edition in Hausa. Several states also publish daily or weekly newspapers, all in English, but they depend heavily on state subsidies to stay in production. The majority of Nigeria's newspapers are privately owned and published in Lagos. Several have a national audience. Among the most widely read, with circulation figures exceeding 200,000, are the Daily Times, The Guardian and the Daily Champion. The Kaduna New Nigerian enjoys a large regional readership in the north of the country. Outside Lagos in the southwestern part of the country, the Ibadan Nigerian Tribune enjoys a large audience in the major cities in the states of Oyo, Osun, Ogun and Kwara. The popularity of some of these newspapers reflects the fact that the papers strongly champion the interests of a particular ethnic group. The Nigerian Tribune, for example, is noted for its defence of Yoruba interests and its support of the Yoruba-dominated Alliance for Democracy party. Experienced media observers note that the paper has been critical of Hausa-led military regimes in the past and has denounced the juntas as the "Kaduna Mafia" or the "Hausa-Fulani oligarchy". The Lagos Daily Champion has long promoted Igbo sociopolitical interests. In an interview published in the March 2002 issue of Lagos Media Review magazine, Emma Agu, CEO/editor in chief of the Daily Champion, confirmed the paper's pro-Igbo ideology: "I admit that in Igbo issues, or issues that affect the East, Champion comes out strongly. We have no apologies to offer for that." The Abuja Daily Trust has a pro-North tendency. It generally favours northern leaders and tends to be critical of the Lagos press and southern leaders. The Vanguard and The Guardian (both published in Lagos) are two widely read and highly respected newspapers that claim no political, religious or cultural affiliation. Both papers demonstrate professional journalism and objective reporting on all topics of current national interest - including controversial topics such as corruption, human rights abuses and good governance. Both also feature a wide range of commentary and editorials on issues of national and international concern. The Guardian, whose columnists and contributors include university lecturers, top business executives, and national politicians, is aimed at a well-educated audience. It is a "serious" publication, likely to be read by the country's influential business leaders, politicians and policymakers. According to an Internews survey, The Guardian is read by 47 per cent of Nigeria's "decisionmakers", more than any other daily. This Day, a Lagos daily newer than The Guardian, is also well regarded and highly credible, especially in the north. It pays its journalists relatively high salaries, so that they are less susceptible to bribery, and gives them continuing professional training throughout their careers - practices it also shares with The Guardian. According to the Internews survey, This Day is the most widely read daily by decisionmakers in the northern cities of Kaduna (34 per cent) and Kano (29 per cent). As The Guardian and This Day, the weekly news magazines Tell and Newswatch are well-respected publications and influential opinion shapers within Nigeria. Readers of both papers tend to be educated professionals and businessmen. According to an UN report, Tell has a weekly circulation of approximately 100,000; Newswatch has a weekly print run of 50,000. According to Internews, Tell is read by 67 per cent of Nigeria's decisionmakers; Newswatch, by 32 per cent. Many Nigerian news publications - including the dailies The Guardian, Post Express, Vanguard, Comet and Daily Trust, as well as the weekly news magazine Newswatch - also appear in Internet versions on their own web sites. Other news publications are hosted, at least in part, by Internet portals such as AllAfrica.com and Lagos-online.com. News agency The News Agency of Nigeria, NAN, is the country's only news agency. A government-owned agency, its English-language reports of domestic political and economic news appear in several local newspapers and are also e-mailed to subscribers. Internet There are about 10 Internet service providers in Nigeria and approximately 100,000 Internet users. The vast majority of these users access the Internet through the cyber cafes that have been springing up on the streets of the major cities. Costs for dial-up subscriptions at home are prohibitively expensive (equivalent to approximately 60 dollars a month) and the telecommunications infrastructure is not developed or reliable enough to support general home use in any case (BBC News). Internet access is generally not available outside the large cities, due to a lack of telephone lines, though the use of wireless Internet services is increasing. Internet users in Nigeria can access a wide range of local sites, providing the same types of information, business, social and entertainment services widely available in developed countries. According to the State Department's Human Rights Report, the government does not restrict access to the Internet. Source: Chris Greenway, BBC Monitoring research May 03 (via DXLD) ** PERU. En el Perú hay 806 estaciones de radio y 70 de televisión piratas. El Sistema Ncional de Gestión del Espectro Radioeléctrico del MTC señala que 650 emisoras ilegales operan en la frecuencia modulada (El Comercio, May 20) Interesting radio related sites: http://www.comitederadio.com.pe/ http://apap.org.pe/directoriaradio.html {no workee, error? directorio doesn`t work either; first one has been corrected, anyway} (via Tetsuya Hirahara, ``El Tiempo Hechicero`` DX News, May via Radio Nuevo Mundo via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. Radio Gardarika will be again on SW between June 9 and 16, 2003. The schedule: 1800-2100 UT, 6235 kHz, main target area: north- west Europe (Mikhail Timofeyev, St. Petersburg, Russia, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** RWANDA. Noted Radio Rwanda, (Radiodiffusion de la Republique Rwandaise) Kigali, at 1800 UTC on 6055 kHz with news in French, which was followed by programs in the vernacular. Heard 10 minutes of local and international news in English at 1830 UTC on the same frequency of 6055 khz. Radio Rwanda comes across here with strong signals. However, there is slight interference from Radio Nigeria, Ibadan on 6050 kHz (Livinus Torty in Chad, AWR Wavescan May 25 via DXLD) ** SAUDI ARABIA. This week`s Dispatches on CBC Radio 1 has a feature on Sa`udi radio; starts 15 minutes into the half hour program available on demand http://www.cbc.ca/dispatches/audio/030521_show.rm (Glenn Hauser, May 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SOUTH AFRICA [non]. HISTORY --- A GIFT OF SISULU [More on Radio Freedom ...] http://www.thestar.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=225&fArticleId=146812 May 16, 2003, By Alf Kumalo Reminiscing about Walter Sisulu brings a kaleidoscope of memories of the struggle. Firstly, I remember a voice that delivered a message to the apartheid regime that was chilling in its intent, deliberation and dignity. The ANC had set up Radio Freedom, broadcasting from Lusaka with clandestine transmitters in Johannesburg and Rustenburg. Sisulu's voice was heard over the airwaves of the illegal transmission, which broadcast sporadically. He delivered a powerful message from their hiding place at Lilliesleaf Farm in Rivonia. The oracle bothered friend and foe. We thought the political message would lead to their arrest. But it did not and the messages increased in number and intensity. Apartheid was at its harshest then, with the banning of the ANC and PAC, but also after the brutal killing of 69 people in Sharpeville in 1960. Next, I remember the scene at the Pretoria Supreme Court where Sisulu, Nelson Mandela and other ANC leaders were facing treason charges in 1962. Using a self-time exposure, I managed to photograph a picture in court that would have represented the most poignant image of that proceeding. But by taking a picture inside a courtroom I would put the paper I was freelancing for in trouble. It is one of my deepest regrets that I cannot find that image - and it has never been printed. Another abiding memory is of Sisulu's release from prison in 1989. At a welcoming ceremony at the church next to his house in Orlando West, he was singing the national anthem with such vigour that he pumped his fist in the air with great emotion. Remember: Sisulu had not sung Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrika with an audience for 26 years. It was a great moment. Back in the '60s, I remember coming across Sisulu's son, Max, in Francistown, Botswana, in a building known as the White House. Among the many refugees in exile with him was Hage Geingob, who was to become Namibia's prime minister after freedom in 1990. We were in Francistown chasing down a story about Arthur Goldreich and Harold Wolpe, who had been arrested with Sisulu and others at Lilliesleaf Farm, but who escaped from Marshall Square in Johannesburg, disguised as monks. These two guys were kept in prison in Francistown for their own safety after a bomb attack on an aircraft they were due to travel in. I informed the family back in Soweto that I had met their son and that he was safe. They were greatly relieved. These are just some of the memories he gave me; after a while, memories are all you have. Hamba kahle Tata Sisulu. (The Star May 16, 2003 via A. Sennitt, Holland for CRW via DXLD) ** SWEDEN. RADIO SWEDEN -- Coming up on Radio Sweden: Thursday: "HeartBeat" Friday: Our weekly review Saturday: Special -- "Behind the Scenes at Radio Sweden" Sunday: In "Sounds Nordic" cellphone conversation openers and Whyte Seeds Because of interference on our frequency at 15750 kHz during our broadcast to East Asia at 12:30 hrs UTC, we're now testing our other channel, 17505 kHz, in two directions at once. So listeners to this broadcast in both Southeast Asia and in Australia will find us on 17505 kHz. Reception reports are welcome: radiosweden@sr.se (SCDX/MediaScan May 22 via DXLD) Radio Sweden would like to get reception reports on their EE- transmission towards Asia (Japan-Australia) on the new 17505 kHz, between 1230-1300 UT. Test starts today and continue at least a week.You can win T-shirts by sending your reception reports to: anders.backlin@sr.se 73 (Bernt-Ivan Holmberg, Möklinta, Sweden, hard- core-dx via DXLD) ** U K. ANOTHER EAR-BASHING FOR BYFORD As some of you know, the BBC WS has been publicising its availability on BBC domestic television stations. However, much of their TV promos have been completely silent, much to the annoyance of blind and partially-sighted people, who have long been campaigning for audio description of television programmes, and against commercial companies who show ads with no verbal dialogue whatsoever - often only music, so that visually-impaired people have no idea of what the ads may be about. In the case of the BBC WS, there were extremely long periods of dead air. Mark Byford, as well as being the MD of BBC WS, is supposed to be the so-called BBC Disability Champion. He was expected to be grilled on the BBC domestic programme for blind and partially people "In Touch" on Tuesday 20 May 2003. However, he was reported to be unwell, but the programme's Presenter, Peter White, hopes to carry out the grilling in next Tuesday's programme, at 1940 UT [on Radio 4]. So, Mr Byford's illness has only delayed the moment when he will have to face the music (Paul David, UK, May 21, swprograms via DXLD) ?? As a sighted person constantly bombarded with advertising trying to sell me stuff I neither want nor need, I suggest you count your blessings when you hear music or dead air (gh, DXLD) See http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/help/focusgroup.shtml -- The BBCWS is running some UK focus groups in June and is soliciting participation. Perhaps Paul David or others based in the UK might want to participate. Might get you a free meal or two (Richard Cuff / Allentown, PA USA, swprograms via DXLD) ** U K. ELSTEIN TO HEAD TORY REVIEW OF BBC FUNDING Owen Gibson, Thursday May 22, 2003, The Guardian David Elstein, the former chief executive of Channel Five, will head a Conservative party review of the future funding of the BBC ahead of the renewal of the corporation's royal charter. . . http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/story/0,3604,960909,00.html (via Jilly Dybka, TN, DXLD) ** U S A [non]. New (?) IBB transmitter sites Dear hcdxers, while checking the IBB frequency list, I discovered these transmitter sites, which obviously have been added recently: U-B = Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia 981 1200 1400 VOA ENGL U-B 140 981 2000 2200 VOA ENGL U-B 140 KAB = Kabul, Afghanistan 1296 0000 0030 RFE DA KAB ND 1296 0030 0130 VOA PASH KAB ND 1296 0130 0230 VOA DARI KAB ND 1296 0230 0330 RFE PA KAB ND 1296 0330 0430 RFE DA KAB ND 1296 0430 0530 VOA PASH KAB ND 1296 0530 0630 VOA DARI KAB ND 1296 0630 0730 RFE PA KAB ND 1296 0730 0830 RFE DA KAB ND 1296 0830 0930 RFE PA KAB ND 1296 0930 1030 RFE DA KAB ND 1296 1030 1130 VOA PASH KAB ND 1296 1130 1230 VOA DARI KAB ND 1296 1230 1330 RFE PA KAB ND 1296 1330 1430 RFE DA KAB ND 1296 1430 1530 VOA PASH KAB ND 1296 1530 1630 VOA DARI KAB ND 1296 1630 1730 RFE PA KAB ND 1296 1730 1830 RFE DA KAB ND 1296 1830 1930 VOA PASH KAB ND 1296 1930 2030 VOA DARI KAB ND 1296 2030 2130 VOA PASH KAB ND 1296 2130 2230 VOA DARI KAB ND 1296 2230 2330 RFE PA KAB ND 1296 2330 2400 RFE DA KAB ND Does anyone know the power of the transmitters on 981 & 1296 kHz? Best wishes, (Uwe Volk, Germany, May 21, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** U S A. KVOH Spurs --- The spurious signals from KVOH are back. They seem to occur when the transmitter is first turned on. I heard the spurs, at 17480, 17628, 17921, and, 18067 kHz, on May 15 from transmitter turn on at 1648 until 1659 UT. Today May 22, the spurs were present from turn on at 1651 UT until 1812. The spurs seemed to gradually weaken after 1721 until their disappearance (Donald Wilson, a few km from the site, CA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Radio Station WWRB has requested via its local congressional representative (congressional inquiry) that a notice of determination be made by the Internal Revenue service to put in writing the specific legality of non profit 501 C3 tax exempt organizations holding out tax payer subsidized assets and broadcast facilities out for compensation and hire. Specifically can a 501 C tax exempt church /charity/ religious organization sell air time on tax payer subsidized broadcast facilities to clearly commercial for profit broadcasters, Radio networks, political change forces. to affect / influance legislation, political activities, selling hard core commercial goods and services to the general public. As many are aware, 501c3 exempt groups pay no state sales taxes on equipment or electricity purchases, no property taxes to local governments, no regulatory fees to various governmental agencies. exempt from various permit fees. Pastors of such groups can also exempt themselves from paying any social security taxes which can amount to up to 15,000 dollars a year in personal tax savings each year. You the reader cannot exempt yourself from paying social security taxes. Obviously the 501C3 tax exempt group is enjoying an unfair economic / unfair trade practices amounting to at least 40 to 60 percent economic advantage over a tax paying non exempt individual business or corporation. WWRB seeks this determination from the IRS in writing as this area of tax law has always been a very gray area. If the IRS returns a positive response that it legal that 501c3 tax exempt groups can hold out taxpayer subsidized assets out for compensation hire to commercial for profit broadcasters WWRB will immediately file for and use the IRS notice of determination as justification for 501c3 non profit status in order to remain competitive (Dave Frantz, WWRB, May 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [and non]. "The Unseen War" by Michael Massing, New York Review of Books, 29-5-03, discusses his monitoring, from Qatar, of BBC, Sky News, CNN International, MSNBC, and Al Jazeera. "CNN International bore more resemblance to the BBC than to its domestic edition --- a difference that showed just how market-driven were the tone and content of the broadcasts. For the most part, US news organizations gave Americans the war they thought Americans wanted to see." http://www.nybooks.com/articles/16293 (via Kim Elliott, DXLD) ** U S A. THE GREAT MEDIA GULP The New York Times, May 22, 2003 By WILLIAM SAFIRE, WASHINGTON The future formation of American public opinion has fallen into the lap of an ambitious 36-year-old lawyer whose name you never heard. On June 2, after deliberations conducted behind closed doors, he will decide the fate of media large and small, print and broadcast. No other decision made in Washington will more directly affect how you will be informed, persuaded and entertained. His name is Kevin Martin. He and his wife, Catherine, now Vice President Dick Cheney's public affairs adviser, are the most puissant young "power couple" in the capital. He is one of three Republican members of the five-person Federal Communications Commission, and because he recently broke ranks with his chairman, Michael Powell (Colin's son), on a telecom controversy, this engaging North Carolinian has become the swing vote on the power play that has media moguls salivating. The F.C.C. proposal remains officially secret to avoid public comment but was forced into the open by the two commission Democrats. It would end the ban in most cities of cross-ownership of television stations and newspapers, allowing such companies as The New York Times, Washington Post and Chicago Tribune to gobble up ever more electronic outlets. It would permit Viacom, Disney and AOL Time Warner to control TV stations with nearly half the national audience. In the largest cities, it would allow owners of "only" two TV stations to buy a third. We've already seen what happened when the F.C.C. allowed the monopolization of local radio: today three companies own half the stations in America, delivering a homogenized product that neglects local news coverage and dictates music sales. And the F.C.C. has abdicated enforcement of the "public interest" requirement in issuing licenses. Time was, broadcasters had to regularly reapply and show public-interest programming to earn continuance; now they mail the F.C.C. a postcard every eight years that nobody reads. Ah, but aren't viewers and readers now blessed with a whole new world of hot competition through cable and the Internet? That's the shucks-we're-no-monopolists line that Rupert Murdoch will take today in testimony before the pussycats of John McCain's Senate Commerce Committee. The answer is no. Many artists, consumers, musicians and journalists know that such protestations of cable and Internet competition by the huge dominators of content and communication are malarkey. The overwhelming amount of news and entertainment comes via broadcast and print. Putting those outlets in fewer and bigger hands profits the few at the cost of the many. Does that sound un-conservative? Not to me. The concentration of power political, corporate, media, cultural should be anathema to conservatives. The diffusion of power through local control, thereby encouraging individual participation, is the essence of federalism and the greatest expression of democracy. Why do we have more channels but fewer real choices today? Because the ownership of our means of communication is shrinking. Moguls glory in amalgamation, but more individuals than they realize resent the loss of local control and community identity. We opponents of megamergers and cross-ownership are afflicted with what sociologists call "pluralistic ignorance." Libertarians pop off from what we assume to be the fringes of the left and right wings, but do not yet realize that we outnumber the exponents of the new collectivist efficiency. That's why I march uncomfortably alongside CodePink Women for Peace and the National Rifle Association, between liberal Olympia Snowe and conservative Ted Stevens under the banner of "localism, competition and diversity of views." That's why, too, we resent the conflicted refusal of most networks, stations and their putative purchasers to report fully and in prime time on their owners' power grab scheduled for June 2. Must broadcasters of news act only on behalf of the powerful broadcast lobby? Are they not obligated, in the long-forgotten "public interest," to call to the attention of viewers and readers the arrogance of a regulatory commission that will not hold extended public hearings on the most controversial decision in its history? So much of our lives should not be in the hands of one swing-vote commissioner. Let's debate this out in the open, take polls, get the president on the record and turn up the heat. Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) Why Commissioner Copps opposes greater media concentration. Long --- but great! http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-234736A1.doc (John Broomall, GA, Christian Community Broadcasters, May 21, WTFDA via DXLD) LOBBYISTS PAID MILLIONS IN FCC TRAVEL EXPENSES, WATCHDOG GROUP REPORTS By DAVID HO, ASSOCIATED PRESS -- Thursday, May 22, 2003 7:42AM EDT WASHINGTON (AP) - Federal Communications Commission officials have taken more than 2,500 trips in the last eight years, most of them paid for by the telecommunications and broadcasting industries the agency regulates, a watchdog group said. . . http://newsobserver.com/24hour/business/story/895139p-6236840c.html (via Jilly Dybka, TN, DXLD) Same: INCESTUOUS CORRUPTION AT THE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION By DAVID HO, The Associated Press, 5/21/03 8:14 PM WASHINGTON (AP) -- Federal Communications Commission officials have taken more than 2,500 trips in the last eight years, most of them paid for by the telecommunications and broadcasting industries the agency regulates, a watchdog group said. The Center for Public Integrity report, based on records from the federal Office of Government Ethics, details trips worth more than $250 taken by agency commissioners and staff between May 1995 and February 2003. The total cost of the trips was $2.8 million. Most trips were paid by industry sponsors so officials could attend conventions, conferences and trade shows. Others were paid for by universities and technical associations. The report being released Thursday said all the trips appear to be legal under government guidelines. Other agencies also routinely accept travel and entertainment gifts. "It reveals more than ever before just how incestuous the relationship is between the FCC and the broadcasting and cable industries it is supposed to regulate," said Charles Lewis, director of the center. FCC spokesman David Fiske said the trips are meant to be educational and are reviewed internally to make sure they are ethical. Fiske said the shows and conferences help officials stay current on technology they regulate. "Commissioners and the staff feel it is important to be able to get outside the Beltway and get lots of information from a wide variety of groups with a wide variety of viewpoints," he said. The report said the top destination for FCC officials -- with 330 trips -- was Las Vegas, the site of many industry conventions, including the annual meeting of the National Association of Broadcasters. NAB was the largest industry sponsor of FCC trips, spending $191,472 to bring 206 agency officials to its events, the report said. "It is only reasonable that Washington policy-makers would want to attend NAB conventions to learn everything they can about the businesses they regulate," NAB spokesman Dennis Wharton said. The FCC is scheduled to vote June 2 on a plan to make broad changes to the rules governing ownership of newspapers and TV and radio stations. FCC Chairman Michael Powell and the two other Republicans on the commission favor loosening regulations, an outcome sought by many large media companies that say the rules are outdated. The NAB has been lobbying to keep existing media ownership rules, particularly one that prevents a single company from owning TV stations that reach more than 35 percent of U.S. households. The Center for Public Integrity takes no position on the ownership review. Other top destinations for FCC officials were New Orleans, New York and London. On some occasions officials stayed at high-priced hotels such as the Bellagio in Las Vegas, said Bob Williams, senior writer at the center. Of the traveling FCC officials, Powell ranked No. 5 with 44 trips -- 30 as a commissioner and 14 as chairman. The value of those trips was about $85,000. His most expensive was a weeklong seminar in Aspen, Colo., costing $6,200 and paid for by the Aspen Institute, a think tank. The other four commissioners took far fewer trips. Powell has been on the commission since 1997, while the others joined more recently. The top trip-taker at the agency is Roy Stewart, chief of the FCC's Office of Broadcast License Policy and former chief of the FCC's media bureau, which makes recommendations to the commissioners on the media ownership rules. Stewart took 107 trips worth about $76,000. Most were sponsored by state broadcaster associations. The Center for Public Integrity has created a 65,000-record, searchable database with information on ownership of virtually every radio and TV station, cable network and phone company. ------ On the Net: Federal Communications Commission: http://www.fcc.gov Center for Public Integrity: http://www.openairwaves.org/telecom/report.aspx?aid15 (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) LOCAL MEDIA POISED FOR CHANGE AFTER FCC VOTE By Chris Lewis, May 21, 2003 The media landscape in Nashville could be changing dramatically this year. The Federal Communications Commission is expected to relax rules governing ownership of newspapers and television stations in the United States at a vote early next month. . . http://www.nashvillecitypaper.com/index.cfm?section_id=10&screen=news&news_id=23092 (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) COULD THE FCC PLAY A DIFFERENT TUNE? By Steven Pearlstein, Wednesday, May 21, 2003; Page E01 A hallmark of local television news in Washington is how formulaic it has become. All of the stations follow roughly the same format, emphasize the same topics, and trumpet their "live shots" and "team coverage." There's always that lead-in from the weatherman that is careful to tease but never inform, and the jocular banter with the sportscaster. What's curious about this mediocre sameness is that it occurs in an intensely competitive market among stations with different owners. And that should be instructive to the debate now raging at the Federal Communications Commission over new media-concentration rules. To hear it from consumer groups and media critics, democracy as we know it will cease to exist if television networks are allowed to own a few more local affiliates or if newspapers like this one can own a major television station in their markets. The result, they warn, will be a menacing media oligopoly free to wipe out local content, ignore independent producers and relentlessly push a pro-corporate political agenda. On the other side are free-market ideologues and self-serving media giants peddling the equally silly idea that unregulated competition and new technologies will ensure lower prices, higher quality and diversity of views. The truth, as usual, lies somewhere in between. As anyone who has traveled the country can tell you, there is simply no correlation between ownership size or independence and the quality of programming or journalism. Some of the worst newspapers and television stations are local independents, while some of the best are owned by media conglomerates or hometown dailies. Nor is there any indication that all big media companies share the same political or moral values. Among the networks we have a range from Fox, with its mix of conservative news and racy programming, to public broadcasting, which reliably bangs the drum for every liberal cause. And while it is true that most Americans still get their news from newspapers and television, the Internet, satellite television and radio, and 500-channel cable now offer a credible competitive threat to media giants that might use their power to squash debate or abandon local programming that people really value. On the other hand, it's also obvious that unfettered deregulation and consolidation in radio has been a disaster to everyone but Clear Channel and Viacom, which together now account for more than a third of the listeners and the revenue. While deregulated markets have produced a more efficient industry, they have also driven variety, local flavor and news gathering from the radio dial. My own view is that no great harm will come from modestly loosening TV ownership rules in large cities (a position, by the way, that does not track that of the head of The Washington Post Co.'s television unit). At the same time, I think the ownership debate misses the real issue, which is that the FCC has abdicated its statutory responsibility to ensure that television and radio stations operate in the public interest. The reason that even the laggard stations post 30, 40, even 50 percent profit margins is not because these guys are so good -- it's because they operate in markets where competition is limited by the width of the spectrum. Rather than letting them keep their monopoly profits, the government should insist that they use them to provide "public goods" that markets have never been good at generating. For radio, that would mean pulling licenses of stations that have little local programming and use long-distance disc jockeys to play the same 50 songs. For television, it might mean requiring more comprehensive, in-depth or innovative news, quality children's programming, and regular live broadcasts of local cultural events and amateur sporting events. Die-hard deregulators will say we tried this before and it didn't work. The reason it didn't was that we didn't have regulators and legislators with the backbone and the flexibility to make it work. If hospitals and universities can come up with fair and flexible accreditation processes, so can the FCC. (c) 2003 The Washington Post Company (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. CHEVRONTEXACO TO STOP SPONSORING MET'S BROADCASTS By ROBIN POGREBIN May 21, 2003 ChevronTexaco announced yesterday that it would withdraw its support from the Metropolitan Opera's Saturday afternoon live radio broadcasts after the 2003-4 season, ending the longest continuous commercial sponsorship in broadcast history. Joseph Volpe, general manager of the Met, said that he was determined to continue the broadcasts without ChevronTexaco and that he would look for a new sponsor. Started on Christmas Day in 1931 with Humperdinck's "Hansel and Gretel," the Met matinee broadcasts have introduced opera to millions of people around the world. Mr. Volpe said the broadcasts had been "the single most powerful audience development program in introducing opera to families" and had inspired opera stars. "Many of the singers today first discovered opera on the radio broadcasts," he said. Patricia E. Yarrington, ChevronTexaco's vice president for public and government affairs, said in a statement, "As our business has evolved, we believe it is important to focus more of our resources directly with the countries and markets where we do business." Beginning in 1940 Texaco was the sole sponsor of the broadcasts, which are now heard live from the Met stage at Lincoln Center 20 times a year on 360 stations at an annual cost of about $7 million. Broadcast December through April, the broadcasts reach an estimated 10 million listeners in 42 countries. Betty Allen, a former mezzo-soprano who is now president emerita of the Harlem School of the Arts, said she listened to the broadcasts growing up in Campbell, Ohio, a suburb of Youngstown. "My neighbors were all Sicilian and Greek, and if you went up and down the street, you would hear the opera from everybody's windows," she said. "Everybody listened. It was the thing to do on Saturdays." When the program was dropped by WCRB-FM in the Boston suburb of Waltham, the largest commercial classical music station in Massachusetts, the station manager received hate mail and threatening letters. The station does not carry the broadcasts. Milton Cross was the show's announcer for more than 40 years, until his death in 1975, when Peter Allen took over. The broadcasts are presented without commercial interruption, except for references to TexacoChevron in the commentary. During intermissions the programs occasionally offers an opera quiz, popular since the early days of the broadcast, when the quiz was called "The Opera Question Forum." Listeners send in questions each year in the hope of stumping a panel of opera experts. Chevron bought Texaco for $36 billion in 2000. While $7 million may not seem like much to a major corporation, ChevronTexaco's decision comes at a time when the company has suffered financial problems. Last year the chief executive, David J. O'Reilly, took a 45 percent pay cut due to a decline in profits and the biggest drop in company shares in at least two decades. The Met, too, has had a tough year and faces a nearly $10 million deficit, attributed to the drop in foreign tourism. "Of course I'm disappointed that they've decided not to continue," Mr. Volpe said. "However, I think it is an opportunity to develop a relationship with another company." He said that one or two major corporations, which he declined to name, had expressed interest in backing the broadcast. If he is unable to secure such sponsorship by the time ChevronTexaco's support runs out, Mr. Volpe said, the show would still go on. "One way or another, it will survive," he said. "Even if we have to appeal to the radio listeners themselves for support." The matinee broadcasts grew out of financial difficulty. During the Depression the Met faced its first budget deficits and welcomed NBC's offer of $120,000 to broadcast the season in 1931. The 2003-4 live radio broadcast season is to start on Dec. 13 with the Met's new production of "La Juive," by Halevy, and is to conclude on April 24, 2004, with the broadcast of Wagner's "Goetterdaemmerung." The relationship between ChevronTexaco and the Met will continue through the Early Notes program, which ChevronTexaco has endowed in perpetuity. That program, run by the Met and the New York City Department of Education, introduces opera to public school students. ChevronTexaco also said it would donate to the Met the $1 million worth of equipment used to broadcast performances. Copyright 2003 The New York Times Company (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) CHEVRONTEXACO TO DROP MET OPERA BROADCASTS, ENDING STORIED TRADITION By RONALD BLUM, The Associated Press, 5/21/03 2:41 AM NEW YORK (AP) -- ChevronTexaco Corp. will drop its sponsorship of the Metropolitan Opera's Saturday radio broadcasts after next season, another sign of the troubled times for classical music in the United States. The Met's Saturday afternoon broadcasts have been a staple on classical music stations since 1931. Texaco Corp., then known as The Texas Co., has been the sole sponsor since 1940, the longest continuous sponsorship in broadcasting. "The Saturday broadcasts have introduced millions of people around the world to opera," Met general manager Joseph Volpe said in a statement Tuesday. "The Metropolitan Opera has already started actively seeking new sponsors for the broadcasts, which present a wonderful and unique opportunity for a sponsor with a global outlook." The Lyric Opera of Chicago eliminated its Saturday radio broadcasts for the 2002-2003 season after United and American airlines, citing financial losses, dropped their sponsorships. Texaco, based in suburban White Plains, was acquired by Chevron Inc., based in San Ramon, Calif., in 2001. Glenn F. Tilton, Texaco's last CEO, is a managing director of the Met. "ChevronTexaco has had a tremendously rewarding relationship with the Metropolitan Opera, which is a world-class cultural treasure," Patricia E. Yarrington, ChevronTexaco's vice president for public and government affairs, said in a statement. "However, as our business has evolved, we believe it is important to focus more of our resources directly with the countries and markets where we do business, with an additional emphasis on addressing pressing development needs in those communities." ChevronTexaco said it will support the Metropolitan Opera's efforts to identify sponsors for the radio broadcasts. Met broadcasts, which start each December and run through April or May, were carried over more than 360 stations in the United States last season and were available in 42 countries, the Met said. The 2003-04 season includes 20 broadcasts, starting Dec. 13 with Halevy's "La Juive" and ending April 24 with Wagner's "Die Goetterdaemmerung." The move by ChevronTexaco is the latest in a series of setbacks to affect classical music in recent months. The Pittsburgh Symphony, facing an $800,000 shortfall this season, last week proposed a $10,000 salary cut and the loss of benefits for musicians, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review reported Tuesday. Last week, the symphony canceled its summer 2004 European tour, saying it stood to lose as much as $400,000 on the trip. The Florida Philharmonic Orchestra filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection May 14, four days after it suspended operations because it failed to come up with $500,000 to pay the musicians for the next month. The Louisville Orchestra, facing a deficit of about $800,000, has fallen behind in paying its musicians. On Monday, the Nevada Opera said it was cutting three of every four full-time employees, citing a $250,000 debt. The opera canceled its planned production of Puccini's "Madama Butterfly" two months ago. The Lyric Opera of Chicago and the San Francisco Opera said last fall that they each were dropping plans to produce two operas announced for the 2003-04 season, and the San Jose Symphony filed for bankruptcy. ------ On the Net: Metropolitan Opera: http://www.metopera.org ChevronTexaco: http://www.chevrontexaco.com (via Mike Cooper, David Alpert, DXLD) Not to mention the demise of the Tulsa Philharmonic, sob (gh, Enid) MET SPONSORSHIP --- By Diane Haithman, Los Angeles Times It came as a shock to the opera community Tuesday when Metropolitan Opera General Manager Joseph Volpe announced that after the 2003-04 season, the name of Texaco would no longer be associated with the opera company's live Saturday radio broadcasts. The oil company, which merged with Chevron in 2000 and is now known as ChevronTexaco, has sponsored the operas for 63 years, the longest continuous commercial sponsorship in broadcast history. The end of the $7-million-a-year sponsorship, which ChevronTexaco has said reflects "a different direction philosophically" for the company's philanthropic endeavors, does not necessarily spell the end of the broadcasts; Volpe said the company is seeking new sponsorship. But the fact that the Texaco name will no longer be associated with the radio programs is causing opera enthusiasts to reflect on the broadcast's importance, and it raises fears for its future. About 18 months ago, Marc Scorca, president of Opera America, found himself in the heartland on a Saturday afternoon, driving between business meetings in Iowa and Omaha. Playing on the radio? The Saturday Metropolitan broadcast. "That intersection of the breadbasket of America and opera was profoundly moving," Scorca recalled. Scorca says Opera America research indicates that, next to family influence, the live broadcasts from New York City's Metropolitan Opera House are the most-often-cited reason audiences give for their interest in opera. "And it's not just audience members but also singers," Scorca adds. "(Mezzo soprano) Vivica Genaux was born in Anchorage, Alaska, but she let me know it was the broadcasts that introduced her to opera." Lisa James, acting director of development for the San Francisco Opera, called the end to the sponsorship "a terrible loss." ChevronTexaco is the San Francisco Opera's first corporate donor; broadcasts of the San Francisco Opera were carried on "The Standard Hour" from 1926 to 1955, and Chevron sponsored the opera's broadcasts from 1971 to 1982. (Standard Oil Co. later became Chevron.) James says that in recent years ChevronTexaco has provided $75,000 in annual support to the San Francisco Opera and that she has "no indication" that the company plans to change its annual support in the near future. Ian Campbell, artistic director of the San Diego Opera, says that the broadcasts have contributed not only to the growth of the opera audience but also to the establishment of opera companies. "Whether it was San Diego or Austin, Texas, or Arizona, the fact that they could hear opera led them to develop opera companies in their region. And in the last few years the broadcasts have truly become international, not only through satellite links but through the Internet as well." Campbell adds that disappointment over the end of the sponsorship should be tempered with gratitude. "ChevronTexaco made a remarkable contribution; they don't deserve to be hit over the head." Los Angeles Opera board Chairman Marc Stern is another opera buff who first heard live opera on the Saturday afternoon broadcasts. He said the same is true of most of the company's other board members. "About three or four years ago, Los Angeles Opera had a board retreat, and I went around the room and asked everybody how they first got involved with opera, why they were passionate about opera, and why they were on this board. I'd say 75 percent of the people mentioned the broadcasts," Stern says. And Stern remains confident that Metropolitan Opera will find another sponsor. "Everyone who loves opera hopes that they'll find a way to continue." (Relayed by Harry van Vugt, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, DXLD) Shell purchased Texaco 8 months ago and all Texaco stations will become Shell by July 1st. My company just received new "Shell" cards to replace our "Texaco" cards for our fleet of tractor trailers. Shell is the one that pulled the sponsorship --- in fact it was one of their first decisions to save money. The money they'll save is probably less than one week`s worth of business lunches. Maybe I'll give Mobil a call this afternoon --- I think I gaveTexaco-Shell about $75,000 worth of my business last year (Jim Strader, swprograms via DXLD) ** U S A. LOOKS LIKE THE WRR FREQUENCY SWAP INVOLVING THE CITY OF DALLAS WON'T HAPPEN Susquehanna and Service Broadcasting proposed an innovative swap-and- cash deal that would net the city $60 million for its full Class C at 101.1 -- but the Dallas Morning News says a council committee isn't likely to recommend it (insideradio.com May 22 via DXLD) Viz.: COUNCIL PANEL RIPS CHANGE FOR WRR FREQUENCY SWAP'S CASH ISN'T WORTH CUTTING OFF LISTENERS, SOME SAY By COLLEEN McCAIN NELSON / The Dallas Morning News 05/20/2003 A proposal to move Dallas' classical radio station down [sic] the dial got a lousy reception Monday from City Council members who say the move would force some listeners to swap Stravinsky for static. A council committee balked at changing frequencies in exchange for cash, saying that shifting WRR-FM (101.1) to a new spot could cut off some loyal listeners. Members said they would forgo the $60 million that has been offered to ensure that all residents receive the city- owned station's signal. The entire council is to discuss the proposal June 4, but committee members said that Monday's rebuke of the proposed frequency swap probably was a preview of next month's meeting. "The proposal is on life support," said council member Veletta Forsythe Lill, chairwoman of the Arts, Education and Libraries Committee. Last year, Mayor Laura Miller convened a task force to solicit proposals for a frequency swap with WRR. The panel, which received three bids, deemed a proposal for a three-way swap the most lucrative for the city. The bid calls for WRR to move to the 105.7 frequency; KRNB-FM (105.7), an urban contemporary station, would move to 93.3; and classic rock "The Bone" KDBN-FM (93.3) would land at 101.1. In return, the city would receive $60 million in cash, free tower rental for 20 years and other incentives. Under the agreement, WRR would be managed by public radio station KERA-FM (90.1). John Tyler, a member of the task force, told council members that the money shouldn't be passed up. "This is one of the sweetest deals I've ever seen," he said. "I don't think the city should hesitate a second in accepting this deal." Council members were unmoved by the money, though. At issue is WRR's coverage area, they said. WRR's current signal reaches a larger population than KRNB's does, and it can be heard clearly throughout Dallas. The 105.7 signal, which is broadcast from a tower in Decatur, is strongest in the northern reaches of Dallas. After poring over coverage maps, committee members said they feared they would be shortchanging the city's southern sector. "This is an asset that belongs to all of the citizens of Dallas," Ms. Lill said. "And if there are citizens who cannot hear the station, then we have marginalized those citizens." Martin Greenberg, a member of the task force, said he has crisscrossed the city in his car, flipping between 101.1 and 105.7 on his radio dial. In every corner of Dallas, 105.7 remained clear, he said. "There was no difference in the signal," he said. But council members who live and work in the southern sector said they had encountered static when they tried to tune in to 105.7 indoors. "I couldn't hear the signal at all," said council member Elba Garcia. All six of the committee's members said they have serious misgivings about the proposed swap. Council member Mary Poss said the task force had failed to provide any evidence that the city had been offered a fair price. "We have no way to know whether this is a good deal or a bad deal," she said. Mr. Greenberg said the only way to accurately gauge the station's worth is to put it up for sale, which the city has no plans to do. In turn, the committee members said that serving all Dallas is a must for a city-owned station. "I think our obligation is to make sure that we provide that same level of service citywide," council member Lois Finkelman said. "I don't believe that I am in favor of looking at a frequency shift." Sharon Philippart of KERA attended the briefing and said she's still optimistic about the swap. "We still feel this is a very compelling deal for the city of Dallas," said Ms. Philippart, KERA's vice president of communications and brand management. "I don't think this is a done deal by any stretch." Officials at KRNB and KDBN declined to comment. "We think the city of Dallas should look at this very, very seriously," Mr. Greenberg said. "From a financial point of view, we think it's a very attractive offer." Quin Mathews, who produces and hosts Art Matters on WRR, said he was glad to hear of committee members' qualms. "It's a crappy signal," Mr. Mathews said of the 105.7 frequency. "It would make WRR an unbridled catastrophe." Mr. Mathews, an independent TV producer who has been in broadcasting 30 years, said WRR has worked hard to make its signal as clean as possible for the airing of classical music. "WRR is such a treasure," he said. "And when you listen to it, it's so quiet. They're very concerned about the sound." Staff writer Al Brumley contributed to this report. CITY MIGHT CONSIDER A NEW TUNE By HENRY TATUM / The Dallas Morning News 05/21/2003 There are few things that can stoke the political fires faster than messing with the municipally owned WRR-FM (101.1). Support for the classical music format aired on the radio station has been solid and unwavering for as long as anyone can remember. Dallas is the only city in the nation that operates a commercial radio station. Through the decades, some City Council members have been bold enough to question whether that is appropriate. But the questions quickly faded when city officials couldn't find buyers who would guarantee they wouldn't change the programming. So WRR has continued to chug along, safe in the knowledge that the city's "no sale" sign would remain up. At least that had been the case until some clever station owners came up with the idea of swapping frequencies with WRR for a cool $60 million. The city could continue to play classical music. It just wouldn't be heard as well in certain sections of southern and eastern Dallas. The package deal, put together by owners of KRNB-FM (105.7) and KDBN- FM (93.3), made council members pause and consider. Faced with another budget deficit this year, elected city officials are looking everywhere for ways to cut costs and generate revenue. But on Monday, a council committee concluded it couldn't support a proposal that would shortchange certain sections of Dallas. Although the entire council won't take up the issue until early next month, City Council member Veletta Forsythe Lill said the frequency swap proposal now is on "life support." Council members were right to be troubled by the poor reception WRR would have in large sections of Dallas if the deal were done. The last thing City Hall needs now is to cut a financial deal that would make some residents feel slighted. A failure of the latest proposal probably signals that WRR will be in the hands of the municipal government for the foreseeable future. And that will bring sighs of relief from those who are concerned about City Hall's commitment to the arts. Although the May 3 bond election included $29 million for arts-related projects, it was tough to rally the entire council behind the propositions – even with a pledge of more than $130 million from the private sector for a downtown performing arts center. So, the council committee's reaction Monday is encouraging. Still, even if the council decides to say no thanks to the proposed deal, there are some nagging questions out there. With a city of more than 1 million people, why is there no interest in having a classical music format on a privately owned radio station? This is a fairly sophisticated area with an audience that is wildly loyal to WRR. Is there no one willing to tap into that market? If City Hall is going to retain WRR on the current frequency, will it finally do something to improve operations and generate more revenue? Former employees of the station often have complained about low morale and a limited budget for promotion and advertising. WRR continues to make a profit, but the revenue has slipped through the years. That has to change if the city expects to justify retaining ownership. One of the intriguing aspects of the package presented to the City Council was a plan for the KERA public broadcasting operations to take over management of WRR. Officials at KERA said they were prepared to spend $3 million to promote WRR and boost ratings. The proposition, which may have been dependent on the frequency swap, deserves serious city consideration. It is one thing to hold onto WRR. It is quite another to make sure the station achieves its full potential. Henry Tatum is an assistant editorial page editor of The Dallas Morning News (via DXLD) ** U S A. WABC, NEW YORK PLAYS MUSIC AGAIN -- FOR ONE DAY. The annual Memorial Day tribute to WABC's reign as the world's most popular top 40 station is Monday (insideradio.com May 22 via DXLD) ** U S A. CATHOLICS ASK EVANGELICAL RADIO TO CHANGE POLICY By J. Michael Parker, Express-News Religion Writer Web Posted : 05/21/2003 12:00 AM An estimated 200 irate San Antonio Catholics have asked a national evangelical Christian radio network to rescind its policy against promoting Catholic musical events, which the San Antonians see as anti-Catholic. But the president of the K-LOVE network, who acknowledges the network has Catholic listeners and monetary support, said the policy doesn't single out Catholics; it prohibits advertising from any entity that doesn't comply with the network's statement of faith. The flap started several weeks ago when organizers of an ACTS retreat at St. Margaret Mary Catholic Church planned a fund-raising concert that was to include singer Jaci Velasquez. When organizers asked K- LOVE to promote it, the network said it could not promote a Catholic event. John Halloran, president of the San Antonio chapter of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians, said he and many Catholic friends were enthusiastic supporters of K-LOVE until they learned it would not promote Catholic events. "K-LOVE provides a good service, and we don't want to shoot them down," Halloran said. "But they have Catholic music on the station and they take money from Catholic supporters. You'd think they'd support anything that lifts up Jesus Christ, but they don't. It's hypocritical." While the network, carried on KXPZ-FM in San Antonio, does not track the denominational backgrounds of its listeners and donors, no one denomination makes up more than 7 percent to 8 percent of the audience, according to Dick Jenkins, president of the Sacramento, Calif.-based network. He says the network accepts monetary support from Catholics and employs Catholics. "We take advertising only from organizations that comply with our statement of faith, and Catholic teaching doesn't comply with it," Jenkins said. He said orthodox Protestant Christianity teaches that the Bible is the infallible word of God, whereas the Catholic Church considers itself and the pope infallible authorities. But papal and, by extension, church infallibility is claimed only in certain restricted circumstances. "I thought we lived in a more ecumenical age," said Father Jim Henke, pastor of St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church. "It's not as if the Catholic Church were trying to get into K-LOVE and teach Catholic doctrine." Jenkins said he could not get evangelical events publicized on a Catholic station or network because he wouldn't comply with a Catholic statement of faith. But Catholic Television of San Antonio development director Libby Bentley said CTSA doesn't exclude evangelicals because of doctrinal disagreement. "Our mission is to broadcast programming that enhances the Catholic and the ecumenical community," Bentley said. "We've presented evangelical events in our community calendar in the past and are more than happy to include them whenever space is available." But she said the overwhelming majority of the events the station is asked to publicize are Catholic. Deacon Pat Rodgers, spokesman for the Catholic Archdiocese of San Antonio and host of a Catholic talk show on KLUP-AM and before that on nondenominational Christian radio station KSLR-AM, said doctrinal differences haven't been a problem at KSLR. But it's common for radio stations to set boundaries for accepting and rejecting promotional content, he said. While the archdiocese has no plans to mobilize the Catholic community against K-LOVE, Halloran said he and his friends plan to write letters to the network's major advertisers in an effort to force a policy change (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. Pirate on 1610, IDing as "fun lovin' KQB" with Oldies and Pam jingles. Area code given 954 (S. Florida) so it's at least 50 miles away from my QTH (Juan Gualda, Fort Pierce FL, NRC-AM via DXLD) Yes that's them, they actually ID as "KQV" and they are in S. FL, they have a website with streaming audio, though I don't recall the web address. Got a nice QSL card from them as well. I believe they operate somewhere around 50-100 watts. Here's what a local website says: "1610 (TIS) "WKQV," Parkland; recently reported as having moved to a fishing camp near Coral Springs, but quickly confirmed as dis- information. Uses a wire off of a 40-foot tower. Very professional, good studio equipment, includes Payphone Call Challenge" with give- away prizes. First noted in March, 2002 by T. Simon, airing "KQV" Oldies format, with 50s-60s jingles that apparently came from KQV in Pittsburgh, and playing stuff like the Tornadoes' "Telstar", with recorded announcement giving 954 area code (Broward County) number. Signal was quite good in Boca. With all the micros down this way, it's still a rarity to find one on the AM band." check out this site for info on FL low-powered stations: http://home.earthlink.net/~tocobagadx/flortis.html (Greg Myers, Clearwater, FL, ibid.) Thanks for the info, Greg. I thought I was the only one picking up this signal. Glad to hear he made it to Clearwater. Most nights, when it's on, I get an OK signal, but Saturday night, it was coming in quite well. What is the URL for the website? By the way, tried calling the number he gave, and I got an answering machine...but no mention of the station (Juan Gualda, WGYL-FM, KB0GXM, Fort Pierce, FL May 19, ibid.) ** U S A. WTTA NUDGES INTO LOCAL NEWS WITH NEW FORMAT By WALT BELCHER, Published: May 19, 2003 The below story currently at: http://tampatrib.com/baylifenews/MGA0PKTMVFD.html TAMPA - The newsroom desks arrived last week. The set is almost ready. It just lacks TV monitors. The anchor chair is in place but there's no anchor yet. Only one reporter was officially on staff last week, but soon WTTA's studio in Town 'N Country will be bustling with activity when The WB affiliate launches a 10 p.m. newscast this summer. There's no firm date yet, but it could sign on by mid-July. Nearly 1,000 have applied to work at the Sinclair Broadcast Group's new TV news operation here, says Channel 38 News Manager Teresa Mallea. Mallea, a former producer and assignment editor at WTSP, Channel 10, helped start up Central Florida News, a 24-hour cable news operation in Orlando. Now she faces the daunting task of starting up a newscast in a market already crowded with local TV news. Four network-affiliate stations and Bright House cable's Bay News 9 already are vying for viewers. Is there room for one more? ``Sure there is,'' says Channel 38 General Manager Julie Nelson. ``Three-and-a-half years ago, this station was running mostly paid programming and some people were asking if Tampa needed another TV station,'' she says. ``Now we're no longer at the end of the pack. Our entertainment programming gets ratings and revenue so there's no reason why our news won't succeed.'' WTTA's 10 p.m. newscast will be different from the others in many ways - from format to content to management, Nelson and Mallea say. For example, there will be only one anchor. Nearly half of the hourlong newscast will originate from Sinclair's flagship station, WBFF-TV, near Baltimore. But it won't be identified as WBFF. The national reports, anchored weeknights by Morris Jones, will be labeled as ``News Central.'' Channel 38 will have its own News Central crew of five reporters to cover local stories. There also will be local weather and sports reports. ``But we won't be chasing ambulances and covering break-ins,'' says Mallea. ``We'll be looking at issues and developing investigative pieces.'' Some stories may run longer than the typical 2 1/2-minute reports on local newscasts as all sides of an issue are explored. By sharing the load with Sinclair's News Central mother ship, WTTA will be able to put on a newscast that looks as good as anything in the market at a lower cost, Nelson says. Sinclair's ``centralizing'' of news is getting a lot of attention in the broadcast industry. The company plans to bring its News Central format to 30 of its 61 stations over the next two years, according to Sinclair CEO David Smith. Smith has said that he is doing this because he wants the Sinclair stations to take an active role in their respective communities by tackling issues. The move also saves money. Start-up costs under the centralized format are estimated at one-half to one-third of what it would take for a local station to launch a newscast from scratch. The newscast begins with a 10-minute segment of local news followed by 10 minutes of national (from Baltimore), then five minutes of local, four minutes of weather and then 10 minutes of local and national sports. So far, only Sinclair's station in Flint, Mich., has adopted the News Central format. Tampa's WTTA would be the second. Others in the chain will roll it out this summer. If this model works, other broadcast groups might adopt centralization. Mallea says there is no shortage of talent willing to be a part of the experiment. ``We've been impressed by the quality of people who are applying here,'' Mallea says. ``Tampa is a very desirable place to live.'' Reporter Diolinda Vaz, 23, who worked at Sinclair's Baltimore station, is looking forward to the challenge. Also on staff, behind the scenes, is production manager Dan Capobianco, who worked at WTSP, Channel 10, for a decade. ``I like the philosophy here,'' Vaz said. ``We will be fast-paced but we will be doing solid pieces and not the seven-car pileup on the highway.'' (via Terry L Krueger, Clearwater, Florida, DXLD) ** U S A. BROADCAST BAND UPDATE --- GREG HARDISON MORE DIGITALIS: The following was excerpted from "Radio Currents Online", and came to me by way iof Glenn Hauser's excellent e-column, "DX Listening Digest": From: Radio Currents Online http://beradio.com/ar/radio_currents_28/index.htm#nrsc NRSC SUSPENDS IBOC STANDARD-SETTING [as in DXLD 3-086, q.v.] Hmmm...sounds like some of the objections noted by listeners of all stripes are coming home to roost. I would suspect that the issues of "coverage, reception (and) functionality" have not been adequately addressed, as opposed to being approved --- this is based on nothing except my own gut feeling. I may be wrong, but I've seen too many "committees" at work on esoteric tech-issues, not to be a bit cynical. Here in Los Angeles, KKBT-100.3 FM was the last known station to test IBOC on-air (on May 3, around 11 PM PDT) --- and, just as what was heard with KROQ-FM, the system hashed out potential signals on 100.1 and 100.5. Digital Radio, as manifested here in the good ol' USA, may be analogous to Los Angeles policing policies, or perhaps the Bill of Rights itself --- a great idea on paper, but not really implemented in the most judicious fashion. IS WE IS, OR IS WE AIN'T?: And more from the Digital world, this time involving the Idiot Bulb. Heard tell of some KOCE-DT testing on UHF Channel 48, from Mount Wilson. (This, by design will give the Orange Coast College PBS outlet an area-wide signal. The current analog/Ch. 50 transmitter is in the Puente Hills, driving a very directional antenna, which effectively kills KOCE-TV north of Interstate 10.) However, on May 2 shortly after Midnight PDT, a survey of the Ch. 48- frequency range revealed not only the Digital KOCE signal from Wilson, but also the previously-assigned |analog| signal of KHLA-LP --- also on Ch. 48, also on Mt. Wilson! This was noted on the trusty ICOM-R7100 receiver; a look at the Bulb itself only revealed video-hash (or, as my Godson used to call it, "Ant Races"). As of this morning, the situation has apparently been remedied, with KOCE-DT alone on the channel, and KHLA-LP's fare of Home Shopping Net shows consigned to oblivion. CLEAR CHANNEL SELLS OUT: Well, at least in the case of one station. KIIS-AM/1220 is to be returned to it's original owners, Cari-Lynn Broadcasting, and a call-letter change is imminent. The station is licensed to "Canyon Country", a glorified subdivision next to Santa Clarita, in northern L.A. County. Price: $900,000...not a bad deal, as such deals go. What's next, perhaps KACD/850 in Thousand Oaks?? ISN'T THAT KINKY FRIEDMAN ON CHANNEL 3?: Dial-twisters in Europe are reporting excellent e-skip conditions. The term refers to signal-skip properties involving the "e" layer of the Earth's atmosphere. What this means, is likely reception of television stations on the "low' channels (2 thru 6, at 55-88 MHz, just below the FM band), at distances of 700-1300 miles. I've personally noted L.A.-area reception of KLNE-TV in Lexington, Nebraska; as well as KOAB-TV in Bend, Oregon; XHI-TV in Culiacán, México; and a facility in southern Idaho, during such periods in the past. E-skip reception is usually enhanced by sunspots and/or thunderstorms...for example, a T-storm over central New Mexico will boost likelyhood of signals being received from KIII- TV in Corpus Christi (600-odd miles EAST of the storm cells), here in SoCal (approx. 600 miles WEST)....and vice-versa, as the effects are usually reciprocal. MORE IDIOT BULB WASTE: Who knows the story behind KWJD-LP, Channel 25 in Van Nuys? This thing seems to run with about 10 watts of power, with NO audio, and Video consisting of a single black-and-white ID card, replete with Christian (fish) logo. FCC data lists the transmitter site as being a 10-or-so story retirement home on Sherman Way. At my post about 4 miles SW, I cannot see a clear enough picture to determine the mailing address (Porter Ranch, Calif.) displayed on the never-ending ID card. Up until about two months ago, this facility did feature Audio, a CD of an unknown male-Christian singer, doing the same 5 or 6 tunes over and over again. Ah, Community Service! MORE LATER .. AS IT HAPPENS! -- GREG HARDISON (via DXLD) ** U S A. Glenn, Discovered an interesting website, http://www.antennaweb.org for checking HDTV transmissions and antennas. Reading the John C. Dvorak's "Inside Track" article in the May 27, 2003 issue of "PC Magazine" I see he mentions the site. 73, (-.. . Kraig Krist, VA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Yes, you can plug in your zip code and get a list of DTV stations supposedly on air in your area, distance and headings (gh) ** VENEZUELA. Venezuelan legislators approved May 17 the text of a proposed media law that opponents say could prohibit television and radio stations from criticizing the government. After a marathon debate, a congressional commission charged with drawing up the bill agreed on its final contents and passed it on to the National Assembly for final approval. The law will restrict graphic violence on television and reduce subjective censoring by radio and television channels, said Juan Barreto, a pro-government legislator who presides the assembly's media commission. Critics say ambiguities in the new legislation threaten freedom of expression instead of guaranteeing it. They claim the law could be used to restrict opinion programs and make media owners responsible for what interviewees say. President Hugo Chávez has long waged a war of words with Venezuela's private media. He accuses them of trying of trying to topple him by spreading lies and stirring up anti-government sentiment (AP via SCDX/MediaScan May22 via DXLD) ** VENEZUELA [and non]. Hola Queridos Amigos! Cordiales saludos desde Venezuela. El motivo del presente mensaje es para informarles que acabo de publicar mi página web, sitio que dedico al diexismo en onda corta. Mucho agradecería vuestros comentarios, críticas y/o sugerencias a fin de mejorarla. Agradezco de antemano cualquier información de interés que tengan a bien suministrarme para incluirla y así compartirla; de igual manera agradezco también la difusión que puedan brindarle. Desde ya espero con impaciencia por todos ustedes. La dirección de mi página web es: http://usuarios.lycos.es/trenard Muchas gracias nuevamente. Respetuosamente, Solidariamente, (Julio Trenard, Apartado Postal 41 Cumaná 6101, Venezuela, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ZIMBABWE. ZBC'S RESTRUCTURING EXERCISE --- 22 May 2003 The ZBC Board of Governors says the third and final phase of the National Broadcaster's restructuring exercise is aimed at improving its operational efficiency and effectiveness. . . http://www.zbc.co.zw/news.cfm?id=9428&pubdate=2003-05-22 (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** ZIMBABWE [non]. Just received by snail-mail a QSL from SW Radio Africa for my e-mail report of their test on 4880 kHz. Full-data, except (of course) transmitter site. Power is given as 100 kW but... "Transmitter location is restricted for security reasons". Signed by Technical Manager, name illegible. Contact info: SW Radio Africa Ltd., PO Box 243, Borehamwood, Herts, WD6 4WA, UK tech@swradioafrica.com http://www.swradioafrica.com Well, the transmitter site is most probably Meyerton [South Africa] (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, May 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I think the power - 100 kW - is a bit of a giveaway :-) (Andy Sennitt, DX LISTENING DIGEST) i.e. Meyerton --- but are there no 100 kW anywhere else in the region? (gh, DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. 1700, Mystery Spanish-speaker again had a good signal just prior to 2300 [EDT] on 5/7. Faded at ID, then CNN Headline News began. I suspect this is KBGG [Des Moines IA], although when I phoned the station a few weeks ago they denied running Spanish at this hour (Larry Godwin, Missoula MT, IRCA Soft DX Monitor via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED [non]. Dear Glenn and Jari, Indeed, 6315 on my receiver (SONY ICF SW-7600GR) appears to be an image from Tunisia on 7225, which is a powerhouse here in Belgium. Thanks Jari for reminding the formula; I will try to be more attentive in the future before posting. By the way, are there any other 'formulas' for spurious signals to be aware of? 73s (Robertas (now based in Belgium) Pogorelis, DX LISTENING DIGEST) It is vital to keep transmitter-produced SPURS and receiver-produced IMAGES distinct! One propagates and others can hear; the other does not. The above is a receiver image. Depending on the receiver IF(s) and the quality of the unit, other formulae may apply, but 2 x IF (usually amounting to 910 kHz displacement) is by far the most common. Extreme overload at the receiver can result in images just about anywhere, including harmonics (integral multiples of the real frequency). When receiver-generated, the fundamental will always be audible in addition to the harmonics. Harmonics 2x, 3x, 4x, 5x, and 6x are observable under excellent propagation conditions and/or in the case of badly misaligned or non- filtered transmitters. When the MUF is above 30 MHz, it would pay to monitor the 29-31 MHz region, for instance, for 6th harmonics of 5 MHz band stations, 5th harmonics of 6 MHz band stations, 4th harmonics of 7 MHz band stations, 3rd harmonics of 9 MHz band stations, 2nd harmonics of 15 MHz band stations! Happy calculating. When transmitter-generated, the fundamental will not necessarily be audible, or if it is, may well not be stronger than the harmonic. And they will be subject to distinctly different propagation characteristics as the frequencies are separated by a least a factor of 2. Transmitted mixing products are also commonly encountered. Formula 2A minus B, which is the same as one frequency `leapfrogging` the other, i.e., the spur at the same kHz separation to one side or the other (usually both if not blocked by something else). E.g. two transmitters at the same site (and antennas not sufficiently isolated from each other) such as on 5960 and 6175 at Sackville, which are 215 kHz apart, would produce mixtures 215 kHz above and below the two frequencies, i.e. 6390 and 5745 kHz. These usually occur when the two intentional frequencies are on the same band, but in extreme cases can be in different bands, e.g. 7 and 6 MHz showing up on 5 and 8 MHz. Yet another formula is simply A minus B or, less frequently, A plus B. These can easily be on two widely separated bands (but the transmitters geographically too close), requiring a lot of research to find the two frequencies known to be in use which produce such a difference product. The bottom line is: receiver-produced images are of little interest, except to be aware of them and avoid reporting them as if they were true receptions. Transmitted mixing products and harmonics, on the other hand, are of great interest, since they represent great DX challenges others can hear, and technical faults of stations. Here`s more from Jari, with a few bracketed remarks from me (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hi Robertas. Don't worry. It is difficult to figure out some of these "images", "mirrors", "spurs", "frogs", "mixes" - whatever they're called. Sometimes you need a careful scanning through nearby broadcast bands to find a parallel and then start calculating :). As my native language is not English and I have no higher degree in electronics, there might be some wording or other mistakes below, but I try to explain some "odd-frequencies" that might occur. Receiver generated: - Receiver image is usually noted on a frequency 2 times IF below original frequency. Just as in your case 2 x 455 = 910. 7225-910=6315. - Two or more very strong stations within one broadcast band may mix and result as a station with one or more simultaneous audios on some nearby frequency. [cross-modulation] - If internal/external preselector/amplifier is used, there are chances you can hear strange stations on strange frequencies if those devices are not properly tuned. - Nearby strong LW/MW/SW transmitter may cause some strange mixes. - In some cases a receiver may produce a "harmonic", usually 2 times the original frequency. For example a strong station on 6140 might be heard on 12280. Transmitter generated: - Harmonics are usually multiples of original frequency. For example a station on 7500 can be heard on 15000 or 22500 etc. In some transmitter designs the harmonic may also be on "non-multiple" frequency. For example, station transmits on 3200. It uses crystal of 1600 filtering out the original 1600 and uses first harmonic 3200 amplified. If there is something wrong in the higher filtering, there may occur a harmonic also on 4800 etc. [sesqui-harmonic] - Sub-harmonic can be heard on a frequency half of the original. For example the clandestine VO Iraqi People on 4785 is believed to be a sub-harmonic of 9570. [from Sa`udi Arabia, semi-harmonic] - Spurs from transmitter can be heard certain kHz up and/or down of the original frequency (and also on their multiples in some cases). Sometimes spurs are distorted but sometimes audio is as good as on original frequency. For example R Ghana on 3366 at times has several spurs some 80 kHz and multiples up and down of original frequency . And Jordan was heard in the past 170 kHz up and down from original 7155. [and see USA - KVOH in this issue; 9270 could be that too] - Two or more co-sited transmitters may result a mix of their frequencies. For example Hrvatski Radio is/was heard with good signal on 5040. This was SW 6165 minus MW 1125. Imaginary example; two transmitters at the same site operate on 6100 and on 6150. They are 50 kHz apart. Mixes might be heard on 6200 and/or 6050. If more than two transmitters are involved, it may take some time to figure out the maths :). - There is also a rare mix, called "Luxembourg effect". I recall it was noted mainly on the lower frequencies (LW). Simply; a strong signal on its way meets another signal and modulates it. As a result the program of the first station can be heard mixed with the original on the second station's frequency. These two transmitters may be located far away from each other. I believe there are also other methods how these mixes are born, but these came to my mind now. Best 73 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, to Robertas, via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED [non]. 9270: Hi Glenn. Your comment "Take your pick; or both??" The answer is both. But I can't figure out the frequencies that produce VOG on 9270. I recall it is audible at 2100-2300 and disappears when 9420 signs off. But 9420 is on all evening before 2100, so it seems it is not a transmitter fault. These are VOA Kavala transmitters (right ?) and maybe there is another transmitter active on some frequency at 2100-2300 (or further) causing this mixture (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) As discussed above, since 9270 and 9420 are 150 kHz apart, the first place to look would be 9420 plus 150 = 9570, but no known VOG transmissions there, nor IBB Kavala as in the IBB frequency schedule http://sds.his.com:4000/fmds_z/schedules/cur_freqsked.txt which is supposedly updated every day at 0440. But that is hardly the last word about what IBB is actually doing -- See CUBA non. In reality, all that is updated is the date header! (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. 15095: Recently I have caught a station from 1030 to 1100 (may continue after 1100), with jamming; sounds like a clandestine and the word Moro or Molo was mentioned several times in the prrogram mainly hosted by a woman. Who have any info about this station? Thank you. Remember, I am Xi, (Xi Nietzsche, China, May 22, dxing.info via DXLD) Only station normally using 15095 is FEBC Philippines, and somehow that appears in HFCC A-03: 15095 0900 1100 49S,54W BOC 100 245 1234567 300303 261003 D IND IE PHL FEC FEC 15095 1100 1145 49 BOC 100 263 1234567 300303 261003 D BE PHL FEC FEC 15095 1145 1530 49 BOC 100 293 1234567 300303 261003 D BE BMS PHL FEC BOC is Bocaue, the main FEBC transmitter site. ``IND IE`` is in the language column, I suppose meaning Indian, but not English? FEBC could well be speaking of the Moro Liberation Front, plaguing its southern Islamic islands (gh, DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ SHORTWAVE AS MUSIC ++++++++++++++++++ The latest on shortwave as artform involves a performance by Slovenian artist Igor Stromajer in Finland: "The main feature of the happening are remixed recordings of outer space sound, captured on short-wave receivers, to be played through loudspeakers in nine installations through the city. 'The content of the sound is sad, it's a mixed form of crying,' Stromajer said, adding that local radio amateurs had helped him record it." http://tlc.discovery.com/news/afp/20030519/aliens.html The shortwave sounds might evoke images of outer space, but they are probably not from space. One unlikely exception is that the sounds are the occasionally heard emissions from Jupiter, but these do not make a particularly celestial noise. 73 (Kim Elliott, DC, DX LISTENING DIGEST) RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ MOTOROLA'S NEW TWO-WAY IM DEVICE The following MSNBC story on a new device by Motorola which capitalizes on the popularity of internet IM (instant messaging)... http://www.msnbc.com/news/915831.asp?0ql=c8p The IMfree uses the 900 MHz cordless frequency band in the U.S. (Harry Sarkas, DX LISTENING DIGEST) COMMENTARY ++++++++++ QSLing, BELLABARBA Hi Glenn! The Faiallo Manifesto is online: http://www.faiallo.org/manif.html 73 and thanks for excellent work, (Enrico Oliva, DX LISTENING DIGEST) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ FIVE SPACECRAFT JOIN TO SOLVE AN AURORAL PUZZLE AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION NEWS RELEASE Posted: May 20, 2003 Five spacecraft have made a remarkable set of observations, leading to a breakthrough in understanding the origin of a peculiar and puzzling type of aurora. Seen as bright spots in Earth's atmosphere and called "dayside proton auroral spots," they are now known to occur when fractures appear in the Earth's magnetic field, allowing particles emitted from the Sun to pass through and collide with molecules in our atmosphere. . . http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n0305/20auroral/ (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) GEOMAGNETIC INDICES Phil Bytheway - Seattle WA - phil_tekno@yahoo.com Geomagnetic Summary April 22 2003 through May 19 2003 Tabulated from email status daily Date Flux A K SA Forecast GM Forecast Etc. 4/22 126 18 3 minor no storms 7 23 x x x x x x 24 133 16 3 moderate minor 8 25 128 21 5 minor minor 8 26 144 26 3 minor minor 9 27 144 12 3 moderate minor 6 28 154 15 5 minor minor 7 29 152 16 2 minor no storms 6 4/30 155 20 5 minor minor 9 5/ 1 154 37 6 moderate minor 10 2 149 34 3 moderate minor 7 3 144 22 2 minor minor 7 4 148 12 1 no storms minor 5 5 142 6 2 no storms minor 4 6 129 11 3 no storms minor 8 7 122 23 5 minor minor 7 8 110 35 5 moderate minor 10 9 101 33 3 minor minor 8 10 97 28 5 minor minor 10 11 93 31 3 moderate minor 6 12 92 27 3 moderate minor 7 13 94 21 3 no storms minor 8 14 96 28 5 minor minor 8 15 96 30 3 minor minor 9 16 99 22 2 no storms no storms 7 17 103 9 2 no storms no storms 6 18 102 10 1 no storms no storms 7 5/19 109 9 3 no storms no storms 9 ********************************************************************** (IRCA Soft DX Monitor via DXLD) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-088, May 22, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3e.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1183: RFPI: Fri 1930, Sat 0130, 0730/0900, 1330/1500, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0700/0830, 1300/1430 on 15039 and/or 7445 WWCR: Sat 0600, Sun 0230 on 5070, 0630 on 3210, Wed 0930 on 9475 WJIE: Sat 0930, Sun 1030, 1630 on 7490 and/or 13595 (maybe) WBCQ: Mon 0445 on 7415 WRN ONDEMAND [from Fri]: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1183.html [Is anyone having trouble downloding from k4cc.net site?] SOLICITED TESTIMONIALS MONITORING REMINDERS CALENDAR http://www.worldofradio.com/calendar.html Just to let you know I am checking your site 3 or 4 times per week, and it's my main choice for listening options (along with individual broadcasters' sites) ef (Eric Flodén, Vancouver BC) ** AFGHANISTAN. See the IBB schedule dated today (May 20) at http://sds.his.com:4000/fmds_z/schedules/cur_freqsked.txt It notes the operation by IBB on 1296 at Kabul (Pol e Charki). Also operating is 1107 kHz Afghan government. Both 400 kW omni. Ydun Ritz (21/5-2003) (Ydun`s MW news via DXLD) See also USA [non] ** AFGHANISTAN. HISTORY -- Details of Clandestine CIA Radio Broadcasts to Soviet Troops in Afghanistan During 1984/5 Crile, George. Charlie Wilson's War: The Extraordinary Story of the Largest Covert Operation in History. New York: Atlantic Monthly Press, 2003. Pages 278-9. The man tapped to run psychological warfare was Paul Broadbent, a second-generation American who had grown up in a Russian neighborhood of Cleveland. "He was the 'hearts and minds' expert," (CIA Case Officer and head of the Afghanistan operation) Gust Avrakotos says, "the kind of guy who pulls the wings off of flies, dangerous if you don't channel him properly. I told him, 'The first time I see you treating any of my people mean, I'll fire you. Take it out on the Russian cocksuckers.' Paul knew the Russian mind. He kept trying to get me to give him twenty portable radio stations that he could program with demoralizing psychological broadcasts. He finally got two portable man packs to beam stuff into the Russian troops. The problem is that none of the mujahideen wanted to do it. They didn't think it was manly. Who would want to carry a radio transmitter when you can fire a missile?" Art Alper, the grandfatherly demolitions expert, was one of the team's more idea-filled members. Along with developing demolition kits, special fuses, and new techniques to smuggle weapons and ordnance into enemy territory, he helped develop portable amplifiers and devices to spread Broadbent's psychological war. The inspiration for this effort came from North Korean radio broadcasts to U.S. troops: "Hey G.I., we're fucking your sister." The CIA's idea was to place powerful amplifiers on hills across from Soviet garrisons. When the mujahideen turned them on, a Russian voice would boom out: "While your wives and mothers and sisters are sleeping with political commissars and you are dying on the battlefield, we mujahideen laugh at you" or "We Dushman (the Russian name for the mujahideen), we herders of goats and sheep, challenge you women to come up to this hill and fight." "I thought the portable broadcasts were ridiculous, but it hit my funny bone," says Avrakotos. "And it did promote fear. If you get some fucking Dushman without shoes challenging you to fight and you go up there and get bushwhacked or sniped, you realize this guy is clever. You start fearing him." Alper's amplifiers would broadcast at irregular intervals, even after the mujahideen had left their positions. When the Soviets discovered that the equipment was on automatic pilot, it spooked them further; the mujahideen were a more sophisticated foe than they had previously thought. Some of the other psychological-war efforts weren't quite as successful. The sinister messages that Broadbent had dreamed up for leaflets rarely made their way to the Red Army troops. Each pamphlet had a different pitch. One said, "If your commanding officer is a real Communist who want you to fight many battles, frag (kill) him. Otherwise, eventually we're going to get you." But the mujahideen, who didn't understand the concept of propaganda, tended not to be very helpful. Avrakotos says they found it far too tempting to treat Broadbent's leaflets as if they were exotic CIA-issued toilet paper (via N. Grace May 12, 2003 for CRW May 22 via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. 5924.1 USB, 2148 May 22. Ordinary well behaved men (not amateurs) chat on this frequency every morning calling in from all over N.S.W. Presume to be using Codan etc. transceivers, some from home and others from their vehicles, this morning they were chatting away over the top of a broadcast station on 5925 and complaining that this station was causing QRM with them! Strong signals, most of them in excess of S-9 (Michael Stevenson, Port Macquarie, N.S.W., Australia. Receivers: Sangean ATS-909, Kenwood R-2000; Accessories: bhi NES10-2 DSP noise reducing speaker. Antenna: 15 metre longwire. EDXP via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. ABC radio journos strike --- May 22, 2003 JOURNALISTS at the ABC Radio newsroom in Sydney today walked off the job to protest a colleague's demotion. . . http://www.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,4057,6476303%255E1702,00.html (via Jilly Dybka, TN, DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. AUNTY'S BUDGET BLUES By Errol Simper, May 22, 2003 BNStory/Technology/ THE board of everyone's ABC will meet in Sydney today and inevitably funding, or a perceived lack of it, will rate a sombre mention. It is, of course, an intensely sensitive political issue. That's why politicians are so often so solicitous about applying a favourable spin to monies granted, or not granted, to the national broadcaster... http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,5744,6469858%255E7582,00.html (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. 5953, Radio Pio XII in Quechua OM, without any musical fragments from 2330 to 0000, 33333 right in urban Moscow (Artyom Prokhorov, May 22, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** CANADA. RCI`s dropping of 13670 for 2200-2400 UT is bad news out here; that was a good frequency, as would be expected at this distance; 9590 is audible but rather noisy, and new 6140 useless as of 2230 UT May 22. Fortunately we still have 15455 which is best (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. Next Sunday (May 25th) Radio Canção Nova will turn 23 year on the air. If you want to make part of the celebration send us an e- mail to: alemfronteiras@cançãonova.com so that you can participate of the raffle, only answering How long have you listened to Radio Canção Nova? If you have received our QSL inform us too. We confirm radio reports on the air and 100% QSL back. Program: Além Fronteiras (Beyound Boundaries) Every Saturday: 2200 to 2300 (GMT) AM 1020 kHz - SW 49m 6105 kHz - SW 60m 4825 kHz - SW 31m 9675 kHz (Eduardo de Moura, May 22, dxing.info via DXLD) ** CANADA. CBC MERGES WEB, RADIO, TV NEWS OPERATIONS By MICHAEL POSNER, ARTS REPORTER UPDATED AT 2:40 AM EDT, Saturday, May. 17, 2003 TORONTO -- Making a major move to consolidate resources, the CBC announced yesterday that it is integrating all of its radio, television and CBC.ca news-gathering operations. In a memo to staff signed by executive vice-president of television Harold Redekop and executive vice-president of radio Jane Chalmers, the public broadcaster said it is creating two new positions to effect the change: editor-in-chief of CBC News and deputy editor-in-chief. The posts will be filled by Tony Burman and Esther Enkin, respectively. Mr. Burman had already carried the editor-in-chief title, but his purview until now had extended only to journalistic policy matters, not content. Ms. Enkin, who has worked in both radio and TV, is currently interim program director of CBC Radio. CBC spokeswoman Ruth-Ellen Soles said yesterday that there would be no new layoffs as a result of the measures. Rather, she called the change simply another step in a process begun more than a year ago. In the past year, the three services -- radio, television and the Web site -- have co-operated in the development and presentation of major news stories, including the Romanow Report on Canada's health-care system, the Iraq war, and the VancouverPickton murder cases. Still, going further will require significant reassessments of both financial and personnel resources, a job that has been handed to a task force headed by Joan Anderson, director of radio in British Columbia. Ms. Anderson will report to a steering committee made up of Mr. Redekop, Ms. Chalmers, Mr. Burman, and Cathy Sprague, CBC human resources director. Five working groups made up of representatives from radio, TV and CBC.ca are being established to assess the impact of integration. A memo to staff noted yesterday, "Obviously, there are many details to be worked out, and many questions to be answered." Suanne Kelman, professor of broadcast journalism at Toronto's Ryerson University, said the initiative might help the CBC fend off critics who charge it with wasting public tax dollars. "Instead of sending four people to a press conference, they'll send one or two. But radio and television are not the same animal, and if the result of this is the cannibalization of the radio service, making it an afterthought, that's not good." (Globe & Mail via Daniel Say, alt.radio.networks.cbc via Mike Cooper, DXLD) Ms Kelman is quite correct in her assessment that CBC's plan to integrate TV and radio news will result in the eventual destruction of CBC radio service as we know it today. From grumblings inside the CBC ranks, I know this decision is not being taken to heart by the folks within the CBC who care about radio and it's content. The current philosophy bandied about by executive management at the CBC seems to be that the integration will result in better efficiency and synergy between the two organizations. It's rather like saying coffee and tea should be combined in order to eliminate additional teabags. There is a huge cultural element that will be lost here. Sending only two journalists instead of four on a story may save CBC some money, but it will not result in better information or content. And what will suffer? radio. Let's think about why. Jane Chalmers, the newly appointed VP of radio, has a background in TV not radio, and was sent in from the prairies to organize the same type of cost-cutting integration that left many CBCers jobless out in those stations. Her goal is not to improve the content of radio, but to tow the corporate line of budget-cutting at all costs while providing the same sub-standard service that been plaguing the CBC ever since the previous grand idea of her predecessor Alex Frame and the whole radio one schedule redesign fiasco. Mills is out and most in the ranks feel that was good step, but the question remains whether Chalmers has enough savvy and wherewithal to protect the quality of the radio service while at the same time preventing Mr. Burman and company from riding roughshod over the current CBC radio culture. The jury is still out and some say the Chalmers just doesn't have the experience required for the task at hand. Whatever the case there can be no doubt that something will be lost in the process of homogenizing the CBC service. Maybe we should all just watch TV with no display if we want radio in the future. Hmmm --- could save some money (radioman, ibid.) ** CROATIA [and non]. Dear Glenn, Referring to WOR 1183 I was told the following schedule of Voice of Croatia: 0200-0220 English on 9925 kHz (//1125, 1134 MW) 0230-???? Spanish on 9925 kHz (//1125, 1134 MW) 0600-0603 English on 9470 and 13820 kHz 2200-2220 English on 1125 and 1134 kHz MW 2330-???? Spanish on 1125 and 1134 kHz MW. 73, (Erik Køie, Copenhagen, May 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA [non]. Radio Martí, after debuting on 6050 kHz yesterday, is now on 6040 kHz, having left a jammer behind from when heard earlier at 0645z. 6030 & 5980 remain unchanged (Paul Ormandy, ZL4TFX, May 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) And I believe I heard Radio Martí last night on 9.295 mhz at 0125-0145 UTC 22 May under heavy jamming. I did not have this frequency previously in my records. I kept comparing the man speaking on 9.295 to the man speaking on 6.030 and they seemed to be the same (Wayne Leman, KL7FDQ, Busby, Montana, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Well, Padula had both 6040 and 6050 yesterday. Another new R. Martí frequency: 9795 (not 9295) around 1245 UT May 22 with jamming, \\ 9805; after 1300 9795 continued but 9805 shifted to 9815, along with the Castro Cuban Commie jammers. The supposedly current IBB schedule on May 22 does NOT show 9795 or 9815, nor 6040 and 6050 as reported in last issue! Suspect this has something to do with Cuban Independence Day festivities around May 20; see stories below, as usual woefully lacking in detail re frequencies, but I seriously doubt the 49mb additions come from Commando Solo. With all the power at ground-based US SW sites, it`s ridiculous to use Commando Solo to reach Cuba on SW, except as a publicity stunt (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) A small article in the Tampa Tribune's 22 May edition, bylined Rafael Lorente and Vanessa Bauza of the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, states that on or near the Cuban Independence Day (apparently 20 May), the U.S. gov't began using a satellite and an Air Force EC-130E, flying in U.S. airspace, to get Martí programming past the jammers and "into living rooms of ordinary people" on the island. The "extra frequencies" were beamed for several hours beginning at 6 p.m. in a first test that was quietly begun, once policy matters in the U.S. administration were settled and the test authorized by Bush, fulfilling a promise he made last year. The article, having no technical details, did not explain the role of the satellite (unless it was to get programming to the aircraft). Whether this is any relation to the recent 6050 and 6040 Martí activity reported here in hcdx is unknown. Possibly the satellite is sending TV (Bob Foxworth, Tampa, Florida, May 22, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Viz.: U.S. AIRCRAFT BROADCASTS RADIO, TV TO CUBA Posted on Wed, May. 21, 2003 BY RAFAEL LORENTE AND VANESSA BAUZA, South Florida Sun-Sentinel WASHINGTON - (KRT) - While President Bush did not announce any new initiatives aimed at toppling Fidel Castro on Cuban Independence Day Tuesday, the United States did quietly begin using a military aircraft and a satellite in an effort to get Radio and TV Marti past Cuban government jamming and into the living rooms of ordinary people on the island. Cuban-American activists have long argued the United States needs to beef up its transmission of the Marti stations, U.S. government-run operations that are supposed to offer an alternative to the Cuban government programming. But legal questions and disagreements within the administration had prevented action until recently. "When it got to the president of the United States, it was no sweat," said a senior administration official, who called Tuesday's flight just the first test. Tuesday's extra frequencies were beamed for several hours starting around 6 p.m. from a satellite and an Air Force EC-130E, also known as Commander [sic] Solo, flying in American airspace. Officials in Washington said the effort will continue in order to fulfill a promise made last year by Bush to get the signals past Cuban jamming. Cuba reacted with a front-page editorial in Wednesday's Communist Party daily Granma. Dripping with sarcasm, the article thanked Bush for his "sweet and moving" May 20th message in which he expressed hope that the Cuban people would "soon enjoy the same freedoms and rights as we do." The statement said a known "Miami terrorist" had transmitted Radio Martí signals in "shameful violation of international norms." The statement was apparently referring to José Basulto of Brothers to the Rescue, who did indeed fly a mission Tuesday morning to test a signal. His flight was not coordinated with the government's beaming, Basulto said. Cuba's statement also acknowledged TV Martí signals were transmitted for two hours Tuesday night. "In reality, these transmissions did not constitute a technical success to be proud of," the statement read. "Very few heard their noises." The Air Force plane that flew Tuesday beamed two short-wave signals of Radio Martí and a VHF TV Martí signal. The satellite beamed a signal that could be viewed by an unknown number of Cubans on the island who have legal or illegal DirectTV satellite dishes. Elsa Morejón, wife of Óscar Elías Biscet, a medical doctor and pro- democracy activist sentenced recently to 25 years in prison, said she was able to hear the special TV Martí broadcast Tuesday night, though the pictures were blocked by gray stripes. She said Radio and TV Martí programs offer a different perspective of the news in a society where the government controls what's in the media. "People can't go to the Internet, they can't travel, they don't know what's going on in the rest of the world," Morejón said. But Morejón gave the Martí stations' programming mixed reviews, saying its credibility suffers from false reports generated by Martí collaborators on the island. Basulto remained skeptical about the government's commitment to transmitting to Cuba, saying he would not be satisfied until the United States is doing it regularly. "We're not asking for one transmission," he said. "We're asking for 365 transmissions a year." --- (South Florida Sun-Sentinel correspondent Madeline Baro contributed to this report.) --- © 2003 South Florida Sun-Sentinel. (via Mike Terry, DXLD) PLANE BEAMS BROADCASTS TO CUBA BY TIM JOHNSON, Thu, May. 22, 2003 http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/5916045.htm WASHINGTON - On orders from the White House, the Pentagon deployed a special airplane this week to beam the signals of Radio and TV Martí to Cuba, using a technology that one administration official said ''breached the wall'' of Cuban jamming efforts. ''The political green light is on'' to make the controversial U.S.- operated stations more effective at reaching Cubans, said the senior official, who spoke on condition of anonymity. An Air Force EC-130 plane conducted the transmissions between 6:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. Tuesday, several officials said. It operated within U.S. airspace, not passing into Cuban territory. Cuba acknowledged that the United States had altered its normal transmissions of the two stations, but said they were ineffective and hinted that the Castro government might retaliate. ''Those transmissions did not constitute a technical success to be proud of. Very few [Cubans] heard the noise,'' an editorial in the Communist Party newspaper Granma said. ''The government of the United States should not forget that Cuban radio might be heard on standard frequency in many American states,'' the editorial added. The statement appeared to suggest that Cuba might consider boosting the power of its own radio stations, a move that could disrupt the broadcasts of commercial radio stations in South Florida. Radio and TV Martí have been controversial endeavors, popular with many Cuban Americans who want Cubans on the island to receive alternative sources of information. But the two stations have been plagued by morale problems. They get little congressional oversight and are generally seen as ineffective in penetrating the jamming by the Castro regime. Radio Martí began broadcasting in 1985 on medium wave and short wave. In the past several years, criticism has soared that its programming had become stale -- sometimes lacking in elemental news judgment. In May 2002, Radio Martí delayed a broadcast of a historic speech in Havana by former President Jimmy Carter calling for political change. On April 1, the White House replaced Radio Martí's chief, Salvador Lew, with another executive, Pedro Roig. Among recent changes to brighten the station's programming are broadcasts of Major League baseball games. A White House statement said the Tuesday night broadcasts ``used a transmission platform that we believe is not susceptible to Cuban jamming. We are currently evaluating the results of that transmission.'' The administration did not say how often it would use the EC-130 plane to beam the radio and TV signals. ''We may not want to do it every day,'' the official said. ''We realize this puts some binds on the audience.'' But he said the administration will allot the money necessary to make the signals more effective on a constant basis. Both Radio and TV Martí have transmitted from the Florida Keys. The TV Martí signal is sent from a balloon tethered 10,000 feet above Cudjoe Key at a low angle toward Cuba that is easily blocked. The EC-130 aircraft used in the test Tuesday is the same type of aircraft that beamed signals to Iraqis during the war, a Pentagon official said (Miami Herald via Artie Bigley, Jilly Dybka, DXLD) [Another version]: U.S. MEDIA BLITZ ON CUBA ANGERS CASTRO GOVERNMENT gives a few more details including: The United States broadcast on three new radio frequencies -- two shortwave and one medium wave -- and one VHF TV channel to Cuba for four hours on Tuesday by using a C-130 aircraft for the first time, a U.S. official said. José Basulto, who heads exile group Brothers to the Rescue, said the group flew a small plane in the Florida Straits on Tuesday to try to make a television transmission to Cuba. But for technical reasons, the transmission did not work, he said. . . http://famulus.msnbc.com/FamulusIntl/reuters05-21-165829.asp?reg=AMERICAS (Reuters via Artie Bigley, DXLD) U S MEDIA BLITZ ANGERS CASTRO http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/s861373.htm (via Paul Ormandy, NZ, DXLD) One such measure is unmasking the lies of the Castro regime. To that end, the U.S. special envoy for Western Hemisphere initiatives, Otto Reich, announced that TV Marti -- which aims to provide balanced news coverage -- yesterday was seen in Cuba for the first time in over 12 years. TV and Radio Marti are produced by the Office of Cuba Broadcasting, a U.S. international broadcasting bureau. . . http://usinfo.state.gov/cgi-bin/washfile/display.pl?p=/products/washfile/latest&f=03052102.llt&t=/products/washfile/newsitem.shtml (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) TV MARTI TESTS BROADCASTS TO CUBA ON DIRECTV-LATIN AMERICA | Text of report by Mexican news agency Notimex Miami, 21 May (Notimex): A TV Martí spokesman confirmed on 21 May that for the very first time the United States broadcast a clandestine television signal to Cuba by way of the commercial network DirecTV- Latin America. A spokeswoman for the Miami-based station told Notimex that the signal was broadcast on 20 May for four hours, coinciding with the 101st anniversary of Cuba's independence. "Of course" we broadcast to Cuba by way of DirecTV-Latin America, said the spokeswoman for TV Martí, the station that broadcasts US programmes to the island, and whose signal is considered by the Cuban Government as a violation of the country's sovereignty. DirecTV-Latin America, which is based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, confirmed the broadcast but said that it was only "testing" the TV Martí signal. "We were able to support the request on this occasion because we temporarily had the satellite capability to do so," said the television company in a communiqué in which it denied that future broadcast are being discussed. The spokeswoman also explained that "the station knows nothing about any DirecTV equipment in Cuba. Neither DirecTV-Latin America nor DirectTV in the United States have business dealings with Cuba." Under the US trade embargo against Cuba, US firms cannot do business on the island. Estimates indicate that in Havana there are approximately 20,000 satellite antennae or dishes, which illegally receive signals from DirecTV and Dishnet, the leading satellite television networks in the United States. Three Havana residents told El Nuevo Herald newspaper that certain individuals "who have satellite dishes" saw the TV Martí signal by way of DirecTV-Latin America. The special broadcast, which was also carried by channels 13 and 18 on [sic] the island, is part of TV Martí's effort to increase the power of its signal, one year after President George W. Bush promised that Radio and TV Martí would have stronger signals to Cuba. Otto Reich, the White House's special envoy for hemispheric affairs, told the newspaper that "we are currently in an initial testing phase that will be followed by further tests." Radio Martí was created in 1985, and TV Martí in 1998, both for the purpose of broadcasting to the island US programmes that differ from the views of the Cuban Government, which has angered the regime. Both stations began in Washington, but for the past several years have broadcast from Miami, a city that is considered the bastion of Cuban exiles in the United States. Source: Notimex news agency, Mexico City, in Spanish 1745 gmt 21 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) TV MARTÍ EFECTÚA TRASMISIONES ESPECIALES PABLO ALFONSO, El Nuevo Herald, Posted on Wed, May. 21, 2003 Un año después que el presidente de Estados Unidos, George W. Bush, prometiera que Radio y TV Martí tendrían mayor potencia para llegar con sus transmisiones a Cuba, la señal de televisión de esta última efectuó ayer una programación de prueba para superar la constante interferencia que tiene en la isla. ''Estamos llevando a cabo la promesa del presidente Bush, con esta fase inicial de pruebas a la que seguirán otras'', dijo Otto Reich, enviado especial de la Casa Blanca para Asuntos Hemisféricos. TV Martí transmitió su señal hacia Cuba el martes desde las 6:00 p.m. hasta las 10:00 p.m. por los canales 13 y 18 y también por la red comercial Direct TV-Latinoamérica. En las primeras horas de la noche había informes contradictorios sobre la recepción de TV Martí en la capital cubana. Tres residentes en La Habana contactados telefónicamente por El Nuevo Herald, poco después que comenzó la transmisión, dijeron que no habían captado la señal en ninguno de los dos canales. Añadieron, sin embargo, que algunas personas ''que tienen platos de satélite'' sí estaban viendo a TV Martí, a través de Direct TV-Latinoamérica, lo que había generado gran expectativa. La trasmisión especial ''es una fase de prueba utilizando un avión y un satélite'', dijo una fuente vinculada a la operación. ''Hemos aumentado la potencia y el alcance del globo y seguiremos probando otras medidas que podemos usar'', indicó la fuente. ``Todo esto forma parte de la modernización de TV Martí, que está en marcha, para lo cual usaremos diferentes plataformas de trasmisión, pero no queremos decirle cuáles al gobierno de Cuba''. Las pruebas son mucho menos de lo que esperaban los exiliados cubanos y residentes en la isla. ''Aunque llegue un año después, es un esfuerzo que ojalá se mantenga, que no se quede en un sólo día'', dijo José Basulto, presidente de Hermanos al Rescate que ha venido pidiendo al gobierno de Bush que incremente la potencia de las trasmisiones a Cuba. Fuentes consultadas por El Nuevo Herald con anterioridad han dicho que en La Habana existen unos 20,000 platos de satélite, que bajan ilegalmente la señales de Direct TV y de Dishnet. Hastiados de la programación de la televisión nacional, los cubanos persiguen como un preciado tesoro las tarjetas de programación y los platos de satélite, la mayor parte de ellos confeccionados clandestinamente en la isla. Por una antena parabólica los residentes en la isla están pagando, aproximadamente, $150 y unos $120 por la tarjeta de programación. La transmisión de TV Martí consistió de un programa especial, con motivo del 20 de mayo, que hace un recuento histórico de lo acontecido en la isla en las últimas cuatro décadas. (TOMADO DE "EL NUEVO HERALD" 21 DE MAYO DEL 2003. Cordiales 73's via Oscar de Céspedes, FL, Conexión Digital via DXLD). REACCION DEL GOBIERNO CUBANO A EMISIONES DE TV-MARTI Y NUEVAS FRECUENCIAS DE RM. http://www.granma.cubaweb.cu/2003/05/21/nacional/articulo12.html Publicado en la edición Electrónica de "Granma Nacional", República de Cuba, fecha 21 de Mayo del 2003. Unicamente se inserta debajo lo referente a Radio y Televisión. Para leer el articulo completo hacer "click" en Gracias Führer. ============================================================= Desde luego que ayer mismo la emisora subversiva, pérfida y ultrajantemente bautizada con el nombre de José Martí, salía al aire con cuatro nuevas frecuencias, y un connotado terrorista de Miami volaba libremente en alta mar, más allá de las 12 millas, a lo largo de la franja marítima entre Boca de Jaruco y Matanzas, ensayando transmisiones televisivas hacia Cuba, en violación desvergonzada de las normas internacionales que rigen la materia, con plena tolerancia de las autoridades de Estados Unidos. Un sujeto como este y otros que actúan al servicio del gobierno de Estados Unidos, jamás van a parar a las insólitas jaulas instaladas en el territorio cubano de Guantánamo ocupado a la fuerza por Estados Unidos, donde encierran sin ley o norma alguna a ciudadanos de decenas de países. En horas de la tarde, en adición a esto, como sorpresa especial de la Administración Bush, guardada como gran secreto de guerra, la señal televisiva salió al aire de seis a ocho de la noche, utilizando canales y sistemas usados en varias provincias por Cuba en programas educativos, informativos y recreativos. En realidad, tales transmisiones no constituyeron un éxito técnico del cual enorgullecerse. Muy pocos escucharon sus ruidos. El gobierno de Estados Unidos no debe olvidar que la radio cubana podría ser escuchada por onda media en muchos Estados norteamericanos (Cordiales 73's via Oscar de Céspedes, Conexión Digital May 21 via DXLD) ** CZECH REPUBLIC. HABLANDO DEL 80 ANIVERSARIO DE LA RADIO CHECA... Estimados amigos de Radio Praga, la presente es para realizar un par de observaciones al programa especial --- emitido el domingo 18/05 --- con motivo del 80 aniversario de la radio checa. A pesar del excelente programa y del inmejorable soporte de audio utilizado, hubo dos omisiones imperdonables en el mismo. La primera fue la ausencia de la señal de intervalo que caracterizó a Radio Praga por muchos años y es la marcha titulada --- si mal no recuerdo --- "La izquierda a la vanguardia" [``Forward, Left``]. Esa señal fue con la que me topé a mediados de los ochenta y por la cual comencé a sintonizar las emisiones de Radio Praga. La segunda omisión fue el cese de transmisiones de Radio Praga el 1ero. de abril de 1990 --- por primera vez en su historia, desde los tiempos de la ocupación nazi. Por un largo tiempo estuvimos sin nuestra emisora gracias a la "reestructuración" o "purga política" dentro del personal de la estación. Otro rasgo característico de la denominada "Revolución de Terciopelo", que después de todo ni tan de "terciopelo" fue. En cuanto a la Primavera de Praga, la estación debería profundizar más en el análisis de ese movimiento y consagrar un programa completo para su explicación. Sin más qué agregar y esperando que mis humildes sugerencias sean tomadas en cuenta, me despido de ustedes, Atentamente, (Adán González, Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA, to R. Praga, cc to DX LISTENING DIGEST) I liked ``Forward, Left`` too, but for aesthetic, not political reasons, just as ``Gymn Sovyetsokovo Soyuza`` and for that matter ``The East Is Red`` and ``Viva la Revolución`` (gh, DXLD) ** CZECHS HALT PROSECUTION OF AGENT WHO [allegedly] PLANNED BOMBING US RADIO | Text of report in English by Czech news agency CTK Brno, south Moravia, 22 May: The Brno City Court today halted the prosecution of Pavel Minarik, a former communist secret service (StB) agent suspected of having planned a bomb attack on the Munich headquarters of the Radio Free Europe (RFE) in the mid-1970s. "No is able to prove what damage could have been caused by the attack. This is also the main reason why the prosecution has been halted," Ales Dufek, the judge in charge of the case, told CTK. Source: CTK news agency, Prague, in English 1327 gmt 22 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. 5009.82, 2256-2320 21/5 R. Cristal Int. Loud and clear with MLB and local baseball results. Promos from "Canada Import" supermarket (Renato Bruni, Dxing policy in accordance with: http://www.faiallo.org/manif.html Parma, Italy, Rx JRC 525, Lowe HF- 150 Ant. Longwire 70m 195 , hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** GERMANY. DEUTSCHLAND RADIO TO JOIN DRM`S INAUGURAL BROADCASTS ON JUNE 16, 2003 Geneva – DeutschlandRadio`s live, daily Digital Radio Mondiale( (DRM() broadcasts on the medium-wave/AM band will be a part of DRM`s Inaugural Broadcasts event on June 16th, 2003. The event will take place at the Château de Penthes in Geneva, debut during the International Telecommunications Union`s (ITU) World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC 2003). It marks the moment at which leading broadcasters transmit local, national and international DRM broadcasts simultaneously. Deutsche Welle, Radio Netherlands, Swedish Radio International and T-Systems Media & Broadcast will also participate. DeutschlandRadio`s test transmissions have been part of DRM`s field tests process since 2001. ``The Inaugural Broadcasts event in Geneva gives us an important signal, to boost our activities in DRM with the goal of implementing this technology, which is full of prospects, in the existing AM Network (8 MF, 3 LF and 2 SW) of DeutschlandRadio,``(``Quote from DR,``) says Dietmar Boettcher, (DeutschlandRadio spokesperson). DeutschlandRadio has been a member of the DRM consortium since (year)1999. DeutschlandRadio will broadcasts news and information, including special broadcasts for elections and major sporting events, in German terrestrial on medium-wave/AM DAB, FM, LF, MF, SW and additionally via cable and satellite, 24-hours-a-day. The DRM broadcasts on MF 855 (2.7 kW) will reach Berlin and its surrounding regions, as well as parts of Central Europe. DRM is the world`s only non-proprietary, digital system for short- wave, medium-wave/AM and long-wave with the ability to use existing frequencies and bandwidth across the globe. With clear, near-FM quality sound that offers a dramatic improvement over analogue, DRM will revitalize radio. With its inaugural broadcasts drawing near, the DRM consortium`s membership is higher than ever – 81 members from 30 countries. DRM reached an important milestone in January 2003, when the International Electrotechnical Committee (IEC) gave the DRM on-air system its highest stamp of approval – International Standard. Commercial DRM- capable receivers are expected to be available in markets worldwide in the next few years. About DeutschlandRadio (standard descriptive information here)DeutschlandRadio offers two programmes, one of them with a focus on information and news and the other focusing on culture and art. Deutschlandfunk is the number one information programme in Germany, modern and service-oriented. DeutschlandRadio Berlin broadcasts a national metropolitan programme specialising in culture. On both programmes DeutschlandRadio broadcasts 2740 minutes of information programmes weekly, including 795 minutes of news coverage. It broadcasts 38 features per month, 390 radio plays per year and 600 concerts (450 of them from Germany). The claim of DeutschlandRadio on nationwide frequencies has been registered in 11 broadcasting laws of the individual states. The number of FM frequencies has increased from 37 in 1994, to 236 in May 2003 (Deutschlandfunk 119, DeutschlandRadio Berlin 117). DeutschlandRadio has approximately 8.5 million regular listeners (Deutschlandfunk 6.3 million, DeutschlandRadio Berlin 2.2 million). On a daily basis, an average number of 1.4 million people listen to DeutschlandRadio (Deutschlandfunk 1,16 million, DeutschlandRadio Berlin 243.000). DeutschlandRadio cooperates closely with public broadcasting corporations ARD and ZDF. Its administration, such as personnel, finance, royalties and licences and purchasing, is linked with ZDF. In 2001, nearly 120 features and radio plays have been co-produced with ARD. With regard to public events and radio series, DeutschlandRadio cooperates with German newspapers such as FAZ, Handelsblatt, Frankfurter Rundschau, Süddeutsche Zeitung, Berliner Zeitung, Tagesspiegel, Die Zeit and regional newspapers as well as TV companies ``Phoenix`` and ``3sat``; museums such as ``Haus der Geschichte`` (Bonn), the marketing company ``Partner für Berlin``, as well as the German Parliament, the House of Representatives in Berlin and the Dresdner Bank for example. DeutschlandRadio runs 18 correspondent offices in the states of the Federal Republic of Germany, and seven foreign correspondents work in Moscow, London, Washington, Brussels (2), Paris and Los Angeles. In cooperation with ARD, correspondents are sent to Rome and Tel Aviv. (DRM press release via DXLD) ** GUYANA. 3291.2, G. B. C., 0010 news in English, fair signal, 0100 repetition of five numbers, three or more times by yl; lottery numbers? From 0800 - 0920, G B C ID, chorale music 0830-0837, followed by subcontinent music as is their usual eclectic mix, 0850 - 0916 birthday greeting read by om announcer, "very happy birthday greeting to...", into pop music. Tnx Grayland, WA DXpedition log and Rich D'Angelo log (Bob Wilkner, FL, Drake R7 and on the ground antenna 10 meter antenna, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDIA. THE RADIO COMEBACK -- by Srinand Jha* These days all good things are being said about the radio. That it is the 'second coming' or the 'rebirth of the radio' that the present generation is witnessing. That it is today's fastest-growing medium - steamed off on a journey of regeneration and resurrection. That the other communication mediums, such as print and audio visual, cannot hope to replicate the unique medium of radio at any point of time in the future. Of course, not entirely without basis are such assertions being made. Television needs time 'by appointment', while the radio can be heard anywhere. While jogging, driving or conversing. Besides, does not a music concert seem so much trivialized on television screens? Isn't it so much better to have soulful music wafting out of anonymous radio sets? Don't good things of life somehow lose value and get de-energized when stated as the obvious? One hardly needs too great imaginative skills to find answers to these. Today lives are running along much fast tracks. In the coming years, time will be much more at a premium - and television might find its space shrinking. Also, technological innovations have made radio- enabled mobile phones possible. The radio can also be heard on televisions or on personal digital assistants (PDAs). Certain companies have started marketing 'wind and play' transistor sets - requiring no battery or power connection. Besides, a radio or transistor set is also so much more inexpensive in comparison. These are among the arguments put forward in support of projections concerning the bright outlook for the radio. Since the 1999 decision of the Central Government in liberalizing regulations for setting up private radio stations, a good deal of activity has been happening on the ground. More than a dozen private radio stations have started operations at big and small centres including the four metros with Delhi, Chennai and Kolkata having got wired up last month. Public Relation (PR) agencies have been taking a serious look at prospects of radio advertising, while manufacturers have been racking their brains for developing more innovative models of radio sets. Also, for equipment vendors from Australia or the United States, it has been Destination India - with these companies hawking an array of antennas, cable and studio equipment. On its own part, the Indian Government has been considering possibilities of floating the second round of bids (for the setting up of private FM stations at 70 additional cities throughout the country). But these continue to remain somewhat troubled times for the Indian radio industry. The facts speak for themselves. In early 1999, 23 companies had bid for 108 frequencies in 40 cities. Now, just 22 stations remain in 12 cities. In Mumbai, five of the 10 players remain, and eight operators have dropped out of the Delhi circle with just three remaining. As of now, the radio business is not as viable as one might want. From the viewpoint of private broadcasters, the problem is with the license auction agreement as decided in the first round of bids. Bids went for fabulous amounts between Rs. 7.5 crore to Rs.10 crore in most centres. According to the agreement, the private players are required to pay correspondingly higher sums after the completion of each year of operations. The private players have been clamouring for the waiver of this clause as the revenue generation has been marginal. As they have pointed out in a memorandum to the Information and Broadcasting Minister, Shri Ravi Shankar Prasad, five private stations in Mumbai are required to pay an auction fee amount of approximately Rs.10 crore this year as against Rs.8.5 crore last year, although the total revenue generated by them has totalled only Rs. 2.2 crore. Upon the suggestion of the Minister, the private parties have presented to him a copy of their separate balance sheets. The Government is presently considering ways for providing the radio with a more congenial growth environment. Radio ad-spend in India has remained pegged at a lowly 1.5 per cent as against 12 per cent in Australia, 12-15 per cent in US and between 7 to 10 per cent in some South Asian countries. Operators believe that the share of radio ad-spend can increase only in the event of the participation of a greater number of players. Television provides the example, ad-spend generated by the television in 1992, Doordarshan's sole monopoly days, totalled 15 per cent of the ad-pie. Ten years down the line in 2002 it was 38 per cent. The radio operators want a migration from the present license auction option to the revenue-sharing model. They feel this would enable the industry to generate an increase in ad-spend up to 3-5 per cent in the short run and about 7-8 per cent in the long term. Community or campus radio is another enterprise that the Central Government is interested in promoting. Presently, the offer holds good for recognized institutions and colleges (IITs, universities and registered residential schools) and several institutes including IIT, Kanpur have shown interest. The Government does not levy charges for the setting up of such Low Power Transmitter (LPT) station, although the customary charge of spectrum fee has to be deposited. Several institutes have been pursuing plans of setting up campus radio stations. The Government's plans are to enable about 100 institutes wired up to campus radio within the next one year. Two autonomous bodies-the Broadcast Engineers Corporation of India Limited - BECIL and the AIR Resources - a wing of the Prasar Bharati have been offering turnkey solutions for setting up campus radio stations. It would cost between Rs. 10-12 lakh to set up a campus radio station. Besides, foreign equipment manufacturers have been eyeing the Indian market. Given the fact that there are more than 400 recognised institutes and colleges in India, the market size is estimated as being huge. Initial estimates are that the size of the services market would not be less than Rs. 60 crore. (PIB Features) *Senior Freelance Writer, Press Information Bureau, Govt Of India ---------------- Regds, (via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. WORLDSPACE LAUNCHES GOVERNMENT SALES UNIT Satellite radio service provider WorldSpace has launched a sales unit to take advantage of the growing satellite demand in the government market. This unit will enable government agencies to extend communications into markets with limited telecommunication infrastructures. In addition, it will provide Washington, D.C.-based WorldSpace with more revenue channels for its subscription-based services. The company plans to announce its first contract with the U.S government in the upcoming months. 73 (Satellite Today 21 May 2003 via Kim Elliott, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Like, VOA? As a minor midlevel functionary, I would not know if any deal between VOA and Worldspace is in the works. However, Lyngsat has reported that Radio Sawa is testing on Afristar. See http://www.lyngsat.com/afristar.shtml 73 (Kim Elliott, DC, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRAN. Saludos colegas diexistas. Para todos un buen dia jueves. La siguiente información llega de La Voz de La República Islámica de Irán y la comparto con todos ustedes. Atte: (José Elías Díaz Gómez, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: EN EL NOMBRE DE DIOS Muy apreciados amigos oyentes de La Voz de la República Islámica de Irán: Con mucho gusto y placer le dirigimos las presentes líneas para saludarles y hacerles llegar nuestros mejores deseos de salud y bienestar. Por el medio de la presente les informamos que desde hoy pueden acudir a nuestra página web cuya dirección es: http://www.irib.ir/worldservice/spanishradio/ [but see below] Por el momento sólamente pueden utilizar la parte referente a las Últimas noticias y la de los comentarios políticos, sin embargo dentro poco vamos a añadir otras partes también que corresponden a nuestros programas especiales, así como a nuestros espacios semanales. Mucho le agradeceríamos sus comentarios, sugerencias y hasta críticas a fin de subsanar los posibles defectos. En espera de sus prontas noticias, nos despedimos en el nombre del altísimo. Atentamente (La redacción española, de La Voz De La República Islámica de Irán, May 22, via Díaz via DXLD) Ojo, la dirección correcta de la página en español es: http://www.irib.ir/worldservice/spanishRADIO/default.htm Saludos (EA7-0641 José Bueno Jeremías-Córdoba, Noticias DX via DXLD) ** IRAN/IRAQ. RADIO NEJAT - ANALYSIS Radio Nejat (Salvation) was first observed by BBC Monitoring on 2 April 2003. Broadcasting in Persian, the station addresses Iranians living abroad. While the station mirrors some of the programme content of the Iranian government IRIB (Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting) radio stations, there are subtle differences within the content of Radio Nejat programming. Radio Nejat identifies in Persian as: Radio Nejat, seda-ye hamdeli va peyvand ba kasani keh mehr-e vatan ra dar del darand; Radio Nejat, the voice of sympathy and relation with those who have the love of homeland in their heart. Programme content Radio Nejat does not refer to IRIB radio or television during its broadcasts. However, there are indications which may attribute the broadcast to IRIB. Radio Nejat programming has included an eulogy that marked the anniversary of the death of the 11th Shi'i Imam. The eulogy included a sad song, poetry and expression of condolence for the Imam's death. This is typical programming for IRIB radio, as it is unlikely that the remnants of the Mojahedin Khalq Organisation or any non-Iranian broadcaster would dedicate broadcast time to a cause only Iranian Shi'i clerics care for. The inclusion of actuality of Iran's Information Minister calling on the Mojahedin to return to Iran is something a non-Iranian broadcaster is unlikely to make. Radio Nejat includes many of the jingles, and the style of presentation that is regularly broadcast on IRIB radio's Payam and Javan. Differences to IRIB programming However, the station has been observed to distance itself from IRIB radio in the following significant ways: the Mojahedin Khalq Organisation are not referred to as "Monafeqin" (hypocrites), and the United States and the American administration are referred to as Washington. Iran is referred to as "Iran" rather than "The Islamic Republic of Iran". Transmission parameters Radio Nejat broadcasts twice daily at: 0230-0430 and 1230-1430, on 675 kHz. After 1430 the frequency of 675 kHz has been observed by BBC Monitoring to be occupied by the SCIRI-sponsored clandestine radio station Voice of Rebellious Iraq. Source: BBC Monitoring research 20 May 03 (via DXLD) ** IRAQ. ELECTRONIC IRAQ HEADLINES SALAM PAX BLOGS Electronic Iraq http://electroniciraq.net/news has now published the photos and latest blogs from 'Baghdad Blogger' Salman Pax, featuring an account of his recent trip to southern Iraq. This is a must see (Andy Sennitt, May 20, Media Network via DXLD) Is it Salam, or Salman? Both appear in the brief item above. I don`t know which one to [sic]. (gh, DXLD) ** IRAQ. WRITER CALLS FOR SALVAGING MATERIAL IN THE BURNT-OUT BROADCASTING HOUSE | Text of report by Iraqi Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) newspaper Al-Ta'akhi on 20 May The phrase "setting on fire again" might astonish you but it is the truth. Soon after the liberation of Baghdad the building was looted in an organized operation that included technical and other equipment. A large part of the archive was set on fire deliberately and only a small part was left intact and was possible to save, and nobody remembered the building. It was set on fire twice last Friday and Saturday [16 and 17 May]. We wandered about in the corridors of the building after I asked permission from the families of those who live there. I call them corridors now without mentioning its real name, because only corridors remained with scattered destroyed equipment everywhere, including audio cassettes, old records, films, books and all kinds of useful material. As we were wandering about, thick smoke was rising from the opposite side of the Tigris, specifically from Rashid Communications building. That building has been set on fire too without anyone paying attention. I returned to the TV and radio building to pick up some recorded tapes off the floor here and there. I read on the wall a sign saying that this was al-Shabab TV and Al-Qur'an al-Karim Radio. A large hall separating them was full of shelves of old records of famous Iraqi and Egyptian Koran readers and old programmes which reminded me of (High Shelves). This was a famous programme presented by the well-know broadcaster Hafid al-Durubi, 40 years ago. It was a reminder that I was not able any more to see something of the history of this cultural entity other than these stolen and burnt shelves. I will not ask who is going to return something that has been burnt, but who will save the remaining material. This is a call to those who are concerned and to those who have experience or ability to save what they can now while it is still possible. There are still some things that we can benefit from and this is part of our national cultural past and our endeavours. We do not need advice at this moment but we need action to provide protection for other cultural centres to save them from getting burnt again. This is a call to the coalition forces to pay attention to these institutions, to those who returned to their positions, including patriotic police staff and officials, to the zealous among our people, some of whom stand against this deluge of destruction. These belong to our coming generations and their history. Therefore, it is our duty. This is a call to the old art cadre in the TV and radio institution to move without waiting for the instructions, and to the cadres of other cultural institutions. Let us agree on a new plan that puts the interests of Iraq and the Iraqi people first. These are not the interests of politicians. Source: Al-Ta'akhi, Baghdad in Arabic 20 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** IRAQ. The new head of Iraqi state television is Ahmed al-Rikaby, who started the Arabic service for Radio Sweden's Immigrant Languages Department. He succeeds Saddam Hussein's son Uday in the job. After starting the Almadjalla program here in 1992, Ahmed al-Rikaby worked for Swedish public television, before moving to London to work for Radio Free Iraq (TT via SCDX/MediaScan May22 via DXLD) See also LIBYA! ** IRAQ. THE MEDIA IN POST WAR IRAQ - 22 MAY 03 Updates: This round-up of Iraqi media adds the following new Iraqi newspaper sources, give an indication of their allegiance or editorial line where available and includes print run figures from an AFP report of 17 May: - Al-Ayyam (The Days) is an independent newspaper which hopes "to become a daily newspaper and a forum for writers and national educated journalists and which does not "represent any the viewpoint of any party, movement or direction." - Al-Ittihad, the daily newspaper of Massoud Barzani's Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) is reported to be printing 30,000 copies daily in Baghdad. - Al-Naba (Item of News) A self declared independent national paper aiming to report "without ambiguity or bias". An editorial dated 15 May called on coalition forces to leave Iraq. - Al-Sa'ah (The Hour), is backed by Ahmad al-Kubaysi, a rich Dubai- based Sunni Muslim cleric. The editor-in-chief is Adib Sha'ban, a former employee of Uday Husayn. - Al-Sabah (The Dawn), an eight-page, twice-weekly broadsheet, with an initial run of 50,000 copies. It says it is will adhere to international codes of journalism. - Al-Ta'akhi (Brotherhood), 20,000 copies in Baghdad, using a printing press recovered from the former Iraqi Government paper Al-Iraq. This title was banned in 1974. It is run by the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) and has returned to Baghdad. - Al-Zaman (Time) An independent Arabic-language daily now prints 2,000 copies daily printed in Baghdad as well as being printed in Basrah, in addition to the UK and Bahrain. Its owner and editor-in- chief is Sa'd al-Bazzaz, a former editor-in-chief of the now-defunct Iraqi government daily Al-Jumhuriyah, who fled Iraq 11 years ago. Local stories are now being edited in Baghdad, the rest are produced in London. Iraq's emerging media scene is one which enjoys freedoms unheard of during Saddam Husayn' s tenure. No foreign newspapers had been allowed in the country and satellite dishes were banned. Since the former leader was overthrown, a host of newspapers and a number of early radio and television stations have sprung up and for the residents of, choosing what to read, watch or listen to is no longer a simple affair. At least 25 newspapers which have appeared in Baghdad and other major Iraqi cities. In particular, they are giving voice to political, religious and ethnic groupings seeking a role in shaping Iraq's political future. Complaints abound about general lawlessness and poor recovery of public utilities are directed at the US-led forces. Shia media openly call for an Islamic state, while secular media say they are representing the disparate political and ethnic groups. The religious media reflect majority Shia opinion and are concerned at the influence of western and secular media. The secular media has been promoting the idea of a pluralistic, democratic government and a free press as a solution to the nation's ills. At a price of 3 to 4 dinars each however, the price of a newspaper is prohibitive to many in a shattered economy. One popular paper is the international Arabic-language paper Al-Zaman. This is now printed in Baghdad and the southern Iraqi city of Basrah, as well as in the UK and Bahrain. The Kurdish-language weekly Khabat or Struggle, published in Arbil, is the mouthpiece of the Kurdistan Democratic Party and has now also made its way onto Baghdad's news stands. Other papers include Al-Dimuqrati, or The Democrat, published by the Iraqi Grouping for Democracy and sold in Baghdad. Or there is Al-Ahrar, describing itself as an independent newspaper for "all Arabs". One recent edition of this paper carried a frontpage headline reading "Iraq is our most precious possession". The broadcast media are also expanding, but at a slower rate than the print media. There is apparently no shortage of paper, supplies have been located and can easily be procured from Turkey and Syria, according to an AFP report. The US plans to create a nationwide TV network, an AM radio channel and an independent newspaper for Iraq. All will be run by previously exiled Iraqis along with journalists recruited from within the country. The US broadcast operations will be funded by American taxpayers and run by the Iraqi Media Project, an offshoot of the Pentagon's Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance. Most people are still dependent on the radio for news and information, former Iraqi opposition groups have recently set up a number of new stations. One common complaint, however, is of the lack of resources, with stations obliged to operate under the most basic conditions, often without a constant electricity supply or access to the telephone network. Politics are still determining the type of information available. News outlets are often linked to certain political, ethnic or religious groups jostling for a say in Iraq's future. Kurdish leaders, for example, have capitalized on the media free-for-all by launching new radio and television stations in Baghdad. Without Iraq's domestic services on the air the worlds' national and international broadcasters are targeting the region. Among Iraq's rich, satellite television has become the new craze. Sales of satellite dishes and receiving equipment have increased as Iraqis seek to open this window to the outside world. However, for the time being satellite television remains a luxury. Meanwhile, the US is said to be winding down its psychological operations in the form of radio and television transmissions from Commando Solo, the aircraft overflying Iraq. Plans are afoot for a new terrestrial television service which is to broadcast first in the Baghdad area and later outside the capital. The choice of foreign news will not be limited to US-backed broadcasters. The Iran-based television station Al-Alam broadcasts into Baghdad from across the border. The station, which carries programmes in both Arabic and English, is the only foreign channel that can be received without the need for expensive satellite equipment. As regards any national Iraqi television station, this will probably have to wait for a new government to be formed in order to coordinate the installation of the technical infrastructure and define the station's aims and objectives. A Swedish-Iraqi, Ahmad al-Rikabi has been appointed by the US Defence Department as the TV's new chief and there have already been attempts to censor it, which were however resolved. Following is research by BBC Monitoring giving further details of the media sources in Iraq or intended for consumption in Iraq: New Press The following newspapers are being published in Iraq. Al-Zaman, an independent Arabic-language daily is now being printed in Baghdad and al-Basra, in addition to the UK and Bahrain. Its owner and editor-in-chief is Iraqi Sa'd al-Bazzaz, a former editor-in-chief of the now-defunct Iraqi government daily Al-Jumhuriyah, who fled Iraq 11 years ago. Local stories are now being edited in Baghdad. Al-Ahrar identifies itself as "the newspaper of all Arabs" and as an "independent political daily" although it is currently being published only on Sundays. Although an Arabic-language paper, its 4 May edition issued a frontpage English-language banner headline: "Iraq Is Our Most Precious Possession." Al-Da'wah is a Shia Arabic-language newspaper published by the Central Bureau of the Islamic Da'wah Party. Chairman of the Board of the Directors is Abd-al-Karim al-Inzi, and the editor-in-chief is Hasan Sa'id. The editorial board consists of Taha al-Alawi, Abd Farhan, and Abd-al-Karim Muhammad. The front page of the 4 May issue features an article about the late Shi'i leader Ayatollah Mohammad Baqr al-Sadr, who was murdered in February 1999 by Iraqi government forces in Najaf. The paper also publishes a statement by Grand Ayatollah al-Sayyid Kazim al-Husayni al-Ha'iri. Al-Dimuqrati [The Democrat] is a weekly newspaper issued by the Iraqi Grouping for Democracy and is being sold in Baghdad, according to Al- Jazeera TV on 4 May. Al-Hurriyah is published by the Arab National Democrats Movement. Its editor-in-chief is Husam al-Saffar. Al-Iraq al-Jadid [New Iraq] - This is an Arabic-language "independent daily" that has appeared on Baghdad newsstands, according to Al- Jazeera TV on 4 May. In an initial editorial it said the new Iraqi media would only gain the trust of its readership if it is not subject to the influence of capitalism or special-interest finacncing which could influence the press. Al-Majd (The Glory) - This is a secular weekly paper which has deplored ack of administration and security in the capital. Al-Nur is a Shia Arabic-language weekly published by the Islamic Cultural Centre in Baghdad. Baghdad is an Arabic-language weekly affiliated with the Iraqi National Accord Movement, led by Iyad Allawi. A report in the 25 April edition stated that the newspaper had transferred its headquarters from London to Baghdad. The web site at http://www.wifaq.com/baghdad_arabic.html has not been updated since 25 April. Fajr Baghdad [Baghdad Dawn] is described by its owners as "the first democratic independent newspaper in Iraq," according to Al-Jazeera TV on 4 May. The paper has been circulating in Baghdad. Its editor-in- chief is Ali al-Nashmi, a professor at the University of Baghdad. Nida al-Mustaqbal is an Arabic-language daily also published by the Iraqi National Accord Movement, appeared recently in Baghdad. Its publisher, Muhammad Khurshid, is a member of the Iraqi National Accord Movement Central Council. Members of the paper's editorial board include Ali Abd-al-Amir, Jalil al-Basri, As'ad al-Aquli and Abd-al- Hamid al-Amari. Al-Sa'ah is a biweekly political newspaper published in Baghdad by the United Iraqi National Movement. The Turkoman Front Arabic-language weekly Turkomaneli on 30 April said the paper was the first to publish in Baghdad after the fall of Saddam Husayn. The paper's initial circulation figure is 6,000 copies. It is headed by Ahmad al-Qubaysi, chairman of the Board of Directors. News editor is Ahmad Diya-al-Din. Managing editor is Muhand al-Salih. Editors are Umar Abd-al-Razzaq, Sharmin Abbas, and Shakir Mahmud. Al-Sabah (Dawn) - Supported by the reconstruction office is an eight- page, twice-weekly broadsheet with an initial run of 50,000 copies. Apparently Al-Sabah will not have editorials or opinion columns and will not print the views of Iraqi politicians. US officials insist they do not want to interfere or compete with free expression and say that such media will eventually be turned over to Iraqis. The KDP has announced plans to reintroduce a paper called Al-Ta'akhi, which was published in Baghdad from 1967 to 1974. Its editor-in-chief is to be Falak al-Din Kaka'i, member of the Kurdistan Parliament, who has promised that the newspaper will be "democratic" and represent different political and ethnic trends. The Iraqi National Congress plans to issue a paper called Al-Mu'tamar. Kurdish Press The following Kurdish papers are available: Brayat is the Kurdish-language daily newspaper of the Iraqi Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP). Govari Gulan is the monthly Kurdish-language KDP magazine. Kurdistani Nuwe is the Kurdish-language daily newspaper of the Iraqi Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK). Regay Kurdistan is the Kurdish-language weekly newspaper of the Communist Party of Iraqi Kurdistan. Kaldo-Ashur is the Arabic-language supplement of Regay Kurdistan. Al-Ittihad is the Arabic-language weekly PUK newspaper. It is now published in Baghdad on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Its 29 April issue carries pro-coalition reportage and cites President Bush as saying "Iraqis will have their say" in the formation of a new government. Turkomaneli, the weekly newspaper of the Turkoman Front, is available in both Turkoman and Arabic. Qardashliq Yolu is the bimonthly newspaper of the Turkoman Brotherhood Party in Turkoman, Kurdish, and Arabic. Tariq al-Sha'b, the monthly Arabic-language newspaper of the Iraqi Communist Party, is now also sold in Baghdad. Hawlati is an independent Kurdish-language weekly newspaper. Komal is the bimonthly newspaper of the Islamic Group of Iraqi Kurdistan in Kurdish. Khabat is the Kurdish-language weekly newspaper of the Islamic Unity Movement, and is now being sold in Baghdad. Jamawar is an independent Kurdish-language weekly newspaper. Hawal is an independent weekly newspaper in Kurdish. Broadcast Media -- RADIO The US is pushing ahead with plans to create a nationwide television channel, an AM radio channel and an independent newspaper for Iraq. The US-taxpayer-funded project is the handiwork of the Iraqi Media Project, an offshoot of the Pentagon's Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance. The New York Times reports: "Radio Iraq - set up by Robert Reilly, a former Voice of America director, is paid for by the Pentagon. 'We are the voice of the new Iraq. We are the foundation of the new national station. We would like to create free Iraqi radio and TV stations and that's where we're heading,' says Ahmad al-Rikaby, Radio Iraq's director of news. Prior to this job, he was the London bureau chief at Radio Free Iraq, a US-funded operation." Iraqi Media Network, Voice of New Iraq - operated by the US Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance; the station is heard on mediumwave 756 kHz and also 909 kHz; A radio station calling itself "the Republic of Iraq Radio from Baghdad" was observed on 12 May on 1026 kHz. It broadcast statements issued by the Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance. "Radio Freedom, from Baghdad" has recently been heard in Baghdad in Arabic on FM 96.5 MHz. The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) recently launched a new radio and television station in Baghdad. Voice of Freedom-Voice of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, affiliated with the PUK, is a radio transmitting from Baghdad daily on FM 95 MHz. The radio broadcasts in both Arabic and Kurdish, and programming includes news bulletins, political analyses and interviews, as well as music and variety shows. Turkomaneli TV and radio was launched in Kirkuk in April 2003 - broadcasts on behalf of Iraqi Turkoman Front. Turkomaneli Radio opened radio stations in Talla'far and Mosul on 6 and 8 May respectively, the Iraqi Turkoman Front newspaper Turkomaneli reported on 11 May. Dangi Komal-Kirkuk radio broadcasts on 1341 kHz in Kurdish, Arabic and Turkish to Kirkuk on behalf of the Kurdistan Islamic Group Karbala - a local TV channel was launched on 16 April, according to United Arab Emirates Abu Dhabi TV on 6 May The Worker-Communist Party of Iraq's "Radio Bopeshawa" is reportedly back on the air. The internet site of the Worker-Communist Party of Iraq http://www.wpiraq.org reports that Ila al-Amam (Forward) Radio [usually rendered as Radio Bopeshawa, meaning "Forward"], voice of the Worker-Communist Party of Iraq, will broadcast for one hour a day from 1100 gmt (half an hour in Arabic and half an hour in Kurdish), to the areas of Arbil, Kirkuk and Mosul. The same programme will be repeated between 0500-0600 gmt the next day. The following are among stations in operation before April 2003 that continue to be heard inside Iraq: Voice of the People of Kurdistan, operated by the PUK KurdSat, the television station of the PUK, has expanded its broadcasts to Kirkuk and Khanaqin Voice of Iraqi Kurdistan, operated by the Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) The KDP's television station Kurdistan TV now beams its programmes to Kirkuk and Mosul. Ashur Radio - The station reportedly began operation in April 2000 and is operated by the Assyrian Democratic Movement, an opposition organization in northern Iraq. It broadcasts in Assyrian and Arabic on shortwave, reportedly from a transmitter in Azerbaijan. Voice of the Iraqi Republic from Baghdad, Voice of the Iraqi People - Despite the name, this opposition station has been in existence since 1991 and is thought to transmit from Saudi Arabia. Voice of the Iraqi People, Voice of the Iraqi Communist Party - The station broadcasts from northern Iraq, possibly using Kurdish facilities. Voice of the Mojahed, the Mojahedin-e Khalq Organization's radio, may still be located in Iraq, but this seems unlikely. This was previously broadcast via shortwave, satellite and with archive audio files on the internet. Studios were believed to be located in Baghdad. Following the fall of Saddam Husayn the station was observed to have ceased broadcasts for a few days in April. The station recommenced broadcasts only via satellite with archive audio files on the internet and its studio location is unconfirmed. The web site of the radio station is at: www.iranmojedin.org and the satellite is Telstar 12 at 15 degrees west. TELEVISION The Washington Post reported on 11 May that the US planned a nationwide Iraqi TV network to succeed the airborne Towards Freedom TV. The programme, initially for two hours but projected as a 24-hour full-service network, wiould include 30 minutes of news each night, including a local news segment, the report said. The station will be transmitted initially from tower in Baghdad and eventually from Arbil in the north and Umm Qasr in the south and via satellite. The station began broadcasts on Tuesday 13 May amid squabbling between its US and Canadian advisers, and complaints from its Iraqi journalists about "American censorship", international agencies reported. The station opened with a picture of the Iraqi flag and the playing of a pan-Arab nationalist anthem. But because of the censorship claims, the launch of the live news programme was postponed. "As journalists we will not submit to censorship," said Dan North, a Canadian documentary maker advising Iraqis at the station, which plans two hours of programming a night for viewers in Baghdad. "This whole idea was about starting the genesis of an open media so we will not accept an outside source scrutinizing what we produce." According to North, the Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance (ORHA) had requested that the station's news programmes be reviewed by the wife of Kurdish leader Jalal Talabani, leading to a decision to postpone it for a for a week because of the wrangling that ensued. But Robert Teasdale, a US adviser to the network said: "This is not American propaganda. This is the first time in 25 years Iraqis are getting TV that is not propaganda." The station did air verses from the Holy Koran, against the wishes of the ORHA, after Iraqi staff threatened to walk out if they were dropped. Another last-minute change was a decision not to broadcast an address by US official Jay Garner. A Swedish-Iraqi from Swedish TV and Radio, Ahmad al-Rikabi has been appointed by the US Defence Department as the TV's new chief and there have already been attempts to censor it, which were however resolved. Talking about the attempt to censor broadcasts, he said that he threatened to go straight to the the Palestine Hotel and hold a news conference over the matter. Home-grown TV news has not yet commenced. Freedom TV [Al-Hurriyah TV] is a PUK-sponsored television station that began test transmissions from Baghdad on 30 April. A PUK statement said viewers can access Freedom TV on UHF channel 38 at 1700-2200 gmt. Mosul TV was the "first station" to resume transmission in Iraq after the overthrow the Saddam Husayn regime, Dubai-based news channel Al- Arabiya TV reported on 10 May. Kirkuk TV channel started broadcasts on 23 April "under the supervision of the coalition forces", according to a report by the Iraqi Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) newspaper Brayati on 25 April. Turkomaneli TV and radio was launched in Kirkuk in April 2003 - broadcasts on behalf of Iraqi Turkoman Front. Turkomaneli Radio opened radio stations in Talla'far and Mosul on 6 and 8 May respectively, the Iraqi Turkoman Front newspaper Turkomaneli reported on 11 May. Mojahedin-e Khalq Organization's (MKO) "Vision of Resistance TV" (Sima-ye Moqavemat) which was relayed by the former Republic of Iraq Television before and after normal broadcasting hours has not been reported on the air recently. Reportedly the studios were in Ashraf, North of Baghdad in Central Iraq. The only MKO TV programmes being traced at present are via satellite on the station "Simaye Azaidi Iran National TV" (Vision of Freedom National Iran TV), which is not located in Iraq but which the sat-address.com web site gives UK-based contact details. The web site is http://www.iranntv.com and satellites are the trans-Atlantic Telstar 12, Telstar 5 for North America and Atlantic Bird 3 covering all of Europe and the Middle East. IRANIAN BROADCAST MEDIA ACCESSIBLE IN IRAQ -- Television The Iran-based Al-Alam satellite TV channel in Arabic and English is a 24-hour news channel transmitted on four satellites (Arabsat, Asiasat, Telstar and Hot Bird satellites) and can be received in Europe, the Middle East, Asia and America. Al-Alam broadcasts into Baghdad from a powerful transmitter about 150 km away, just over the Iran-Iraq border. It is the only foreign channel that can be viewed by Iraqis without a satellite dish. That has sent its viewership soaring among ordinary Iraqis, who cannot afford the average 200-dollar cost of a satellite dish and receiver. The Arabic channel began broadcasting in February 2003. English content currently is limited to horizontal news subtitles or news tickers. The station has a web site at http://www.alalamnews.com Sahar Universal Network 1 and 2 television, Iran's external satellite TV service on the Hot Bird 1-6 satellites, is viewable across Iraq and includes Arabic proragramming. Its web site is located at http://www.sahartv.com. Resistance Channel - this TV channel is called "Al-Estiqamah TV" in Arabic; in April 2003 it was reported to be using the facilities of Iranian radio and TV, including the aerial of Iran's Education Channel, to broadcast to Iraq. The station was inaugurated in early April 2003 by Ayatollah Hakim, the head of the Supreme Assembly for Islamic Revolution in Iraq [SAIRI], according to the Tehran-based Baztab web site. Also available via satellite in the Middle East via Iran's digital multiplex. Radio Voice of the Mujahidin First observed on 17 April, the station's content suggests that it is operated by the Iranian-backed Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SCIRI). In addition, the station is transmitting on one of several frequencies used by Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting for its external transmissions. Has been heard on 90.1 MHz FM, in parallel with 720 kHz. The content generally parallels that of the main SCIRI web site located at http://www.majlesaala.com. Voice of the Islamic Republic of Iran (VIRI) external service in Arabic can be heard on mediumwave and shortwave inside Iraq as well as via the Internet at http://www.irib.com. Voice of Rebellious Iraq - supports the Iranian-sponsored Shi'i group, the Supreme Council of the Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SCIRI); believed to transmit from Iran. International media Major international radio and television stations, such as pan-Arab satellite television stations, the BBC's Arabic and World service radio and TV, US Radio Sawa, the Paris-based Radio Monte Carlo Middle East and US-sponsored Radio Free Iraq are available in Iraq in principle. However, access to all broadcast media is limited both by the availability of electricity, radio and TV sets and the lack of satellite TV suppliers, the price of equipment or cable infrastructure. Source: BBC Monitoring research 22 May 03 (via DXLD) ** IRELAND. GARDAI SHUT DOWN PIRATE RADIO STATIONS http://www.online.ie/business/latest/viewer.adp?article=2018342 Business & Finance 22 May 2003 Gardai have shut down a large number of pirate radio stations operating in Dublin city. In a joint operation with the telecom watchdog, ComReg, the Gardai raided the premises of the illegal broadcast operations and seized their equipment. The regulator has declined to comment on how many stations were shut down, but a swift spin of the dial reveals that Phantom FM, Jazz FM, Choice FM and Premier FM - some of which have applied for radio licences in the past - have all been removed from the airwaves. In response to the sudden crackdown, the pirate stations claim that they are providing services to markets that are not being served by the commercial stations. "The Broadcasting Commission has consistently failed to understand the importance of this service and its popularity amongst Dublin listeners," Phantom FM said in a statement on its website. "In the meantime, it continues to reward existing license holders with additional franchises which fail to provide listening choice." The station added that it provides an important service by giving local artists valuable access to the airwaves and affordable media space to promote their gigs and recordings. (Ireland online via Artie Bigley, DXLD) What`s Gardai? ** ISRAEL. ISRAEL RADIO GETS NEW BOSS - ITS DIPLOMATIC CORRESPONDENT By Anat Balint Yonni Ben-Menachem, Israel Radio's diplomatic correspondent for the past six years, was elected as the new director of Israel Radio last night by a 7-2 majority of the Israel Broadcasting Authority's tenders committee. The stormy committee meeting was interrupted early on when members realized the two representatives sent by the Journalists' Associations in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem were Israel Radio workers, a clear conflict of interest. The IBA legal adviser, Hannah Metzkovich, insisted on their replacement before the vote. Before the meeting, committee member Dr. Ilan Asia sent a vehement letter to Industry Minister Ehud Olmert, the minister with the IBA portfolio, charging IBA Chairman Avraham Natan was not qualified to chair the tenders committee. Asia claimed that Natan announced at the last session of the tenders committee that he'd "make sure no observers attend to this affair, so the tender can be conducted in an orderly fashion." He was referring to an observer from the Attorney General's Office at the last appointments tender, which selected the director of Channel One TV. After the vote, the attorney general's envoy sent a letter to the state attorney charging that some of the votes for Ben-Menachem were not cast for professional reasons. Asia wrote to Olmert that "it seems Natan wants to hold the tenders committee sessions in the dark, out of the public eye, and that raises suspicions about his motives." Ben-Menachem's close ties with Prime Minister Ariel Sharon have raised fears among many journalists in Israel Radio that he will serve as the prime minister's proxy at the news station (Ha`aretz via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** ISRAEL. IBA BUDGET CUT TO BE LESS SEVERE THAN FEARED The joint Finance and Economics Committee of the Israeli parliament, the Knesset, has decided to to reduce the scale of the proposed cut in the budget of the Israel Broadcasting Authority (IBA). Instead of 450m Shekels (about US$100m) the cut will be 200m Shekels (about US$44m), and will be spread over three and a half years for TV and four years for radio. The committee said it had decided not to harm public broadcasting in Israel. The IBA had earlier announced that the cut originally proposed would have forced it to axe a number of radio channels, including the Overseas Service. But the Committee has decided to proceed with the phasing out of the TV and car radio licence fees beginning on 1 Jan 2004. On that date the TV licence fee will be cut by 10% to 465 Shekels (approx US$100), and similar cuts will be made annually until the fee is abolished by the end of the decade. The car radio licence fee will be cut by 5% per year beginning in April 2004 (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 21 May 2003 via DXLD) ** ITALY. See QSLing, BELLABARBA, below ** ITALY. RADIO SPERANZA IN MODENA: FM TO THE PROVINCE, SHORTWAVE TO THE WORLD Modena, May 3 (CRU) --- Modena is an unlikely place for a Catholic shortwave station. Or maybe not. To the east, in Forlí province, the Adventists run their shortwave station Adventist World Radio Europe. Perhaps that is what motivated Padre L. Cordioli to found Radio Esperanza on shortwave. Open the website http://www.radioesperanza.com and there he is, holding a baby. Since one does not expect to find the homepage of any Catholic institution, let alone a radio station, occupied almost entirely by a photograph of the founder, the first impression can be off-putting. {!! The link above forwards to http://www.riogrande.edu/ The Rio Grande Bible Insitute, which may not even be Catholic, when checked May 24 at 1557 UT! Remove the E, as correctly given further down, and you get to Italy: http://www.radiosperanza.com} Padre Cordioli has a sense of humor: ``Navigando -- navigando -- sei arrivato anche da me. (``Surfing . . . surfing . . . you have arrived finally to me.``) Welcome! I hope that my company will be a help to you and a joy to you, and encouragement to continue with life. Since you do not know me, let me introduce myself. My name is Padre Luigi Cordilo, born in Mantua in 1919. I am an old missionary, I have circled the world and I have encountered so many experiences that at any moment I put myself at the disposition of those who need me. In my magazine you will find so much peace and serenity because I have put into it all that is beautiful and good that life has given me. ``From 1976 I have offered a radio station to which I have given the name of ``Speranza,`` symbolized in the baby that you can see on the `home-page`; from 1988 on I publish a monthly periodical to which I have given the name ``Speranza.`` From this I have blessed the progress that has given me the possibility of extending my apostolate and arriving almost in every corner of the world to give it all the energy and courage.`` Radio Esperanza —It means Radio Hope which, ironically, is the name the Seventh Day Adventists usually give their stations— broadcasts on four FM frequencies in Modena: 96.2 FM, 105.5 FM, 106.2 FM, and a fourth, new one. The shortwave transmitter runs 100 watts on 6231 kHz, but it has been received as far away as Russia, although exceptionally (see related article). The language is Italian, and there is no effort made at an international service. Apart from HVJ Radio Vaticano, Radio Esperanza is the only Catholic shortwave station in Italy; long ago Radio Maria Italia abandoned its activity on the former Radio Spoleto International on 7140 kHz. Radio Speranza is not a diocesan station. There is no diocesan station or any other local Catholic station, for that matter. Visitors to the website will see that it is a simple and small one. ``La radio on-line`` is not audiostreaming, but the day`s schedule (reproduced below). Radio Speranza is not an InBlu affiliate; it is strictly a catechetical and liturgical station, as are several we have seen in northern Italy. The program titles are so simple that one does not need to know Italian to know what they mean. Presumably, the sometimes large gaps found in the schedule are filled with some sort of religious music. The reader should note that there are several lengthy newscasts a day (``Notiziaro``). Whether that news comes from a network or is locally produced is unknown. ``Archivo della radio`` are the pages in which one can hear or order past programs, grouped under the categories the Bible, catechism, fables, literature, music, the Gospels and Epistles, the Poem of the Man-God, the lives of the saints, and authors. Past copies of Father Cordioli`s monthly magazine, Il Giornalino, can be read there, but these archives have not been updated since March 2002. Perhaps he no longer publishes the journal. There are brief pages asking listener support and suggestions with the appropriate e-mail forms and information. Radio Speranza audiostreams using Windows Media Player. In regard to the Diocese of Carpi, there is no diocesan website and no local Catholic station, although it is served by Radio Speranza and Catholic stations in nearby provinces. My guess is that this small diocese will be merged with the much larger Diocese of Modena to the east and south. Radio Speranza 96.2 FM, 105.5 FM, 106.2 FM & 6231 kHz shortwave 6:00 Notiziario 7:00 Ora spirituale (Spiritual Hour) 8:00 Notiziario 8:15 ``Spigolando`` 9:30 Rosario 10:00 S. Messa 14:00 Notiziario 17:00 Rosario 17:30 Catechesi 18:00 Vespri (Vespers) 18:30 Rosario 19:00 S. Messa (Holy Mass) 20:40 Rosario 21:00 Notiziario 21:30 Compieta (Compline) 21:45 In ascolto e ``Buona notte!``Segue il programma notturno (Good Night; Night Program follows) Database: Modena: Radio Speranza 96.2 FM, 105.5 FM, & 106.2 FM and 6231 kHz shortwave (100 watts). Largo S. Giorgio, 91 – 41100 Modena, Italy. Tel. & Fax: (059) 230373. E-mail: radiosperanza@radiosperanza.com Padre L. Cordioli, CSSR, director. Website: www.radiosperanza.com. Audiostreams on Internet. Founded 1976. Audiostreams using Windows Media. RADIO SPERANZA: A GNAT AMONG EAGLES by Giampiero Bernardini, writer, Avvenire, the Italian Catholic daily. From the May 27, 2001, issue. Ó Copyright 2001 by Avvenire, and translated and reprinted with the permission of the author. Reprinted from Catholic Radio Update #142, September 24, 2001 Modena, May 27 (Avvenire) --- In the epoch of globalization and concentration in the sector of the mass media there is still space for the small. Nonpowerful voices but capable of touching the heart and the intelligence. It was 25 years ago, in that pioneering time of private radio, that in Modena a station was born, Radio Speranza, which has a characteristic that renders it special in the panorama of national stations: It is the only Italian Catholic Radio station that broadcasts on shortwave, on the frequency of 6231.5 KHz. ``It began at home, with few means and a cassette player,`` recalls the founder and director, Father Luigi Cordioli, a Redemptorist who wears his 82 years with enthusiasm. Today I have 4 FM repeaters that permit me to cover the Province of Modena and Reggio Emilia. Besides this, every morning from 7 until 8 o`clock we are on the air with two television programs from Telestudio Modena and Studio Europa, a satellite channel received all over Europe. More appropriate in these days,`` he continued, ``another initiative is taking off– the Internet site of Radio Speranza. We are archiving 1,600 hours of audio material and it will be possible to listen to the broadcasts directly`` (That website is up and running at http://www.radiosperanza.com —editor). The flower in the lapel of his small but efficient multimedia holding is nevertheless the presence on shortwave, a field forgotten by Catholics in Europe, the exceptions being, naturally, RadioVaticana, comparable to a ``battleship,`` and the dynamic Radio Maria Polska. The Modena station transmits with a power rather reduced, 100 watts, nothing in comparison with the radio broadcasting colossi ``firing out`` kilowatt and kilowatt. The antenna is a simple dipole, in practice a simple wire attached to a pole. The technical staff is composed of only two volunteers, Roberto Barbolini and Alessandro Cavicchioli. These are really poor means, but Radio Speranza con count on faithful listeners in various countries. Many letters have come from northern Europe, but also from South Africa, from the Far East and Siberia. Padre Cordiolli remembers one in particular: that one arrived from Peking with a photo of four Asian young men who are listeners. ``I have thought of testing a shortwave transmitter also to try and cover so large a territory without repeaters,`` explains the religious. ``It has cost me a lot of work, but when one speaks of spreading the Good News I believe it is worth the trouble, no matter how few or how many are the listeners.`` (Catholic Radio Update May 19 via DXLD) But has anyone heard them lately on 6231.5??? ``To the World``, indeed (gh, DXLD) {Answer: No -- see 3-090} ** JAPAN [non]. Adjunto el texto de la página web de Radio Japón sobre el cese temporal de transmisión desde Sri Lanka Temporary Cessation in Relay Transmissions from Sri Lanka and its Alternative Broadcast --- The following NHK World Radio Japan's broadcasts via Sri Lanka have been suspended now, because of the transmitter trouble of relay station. To Middle East & North Africa from Ekara [sic] Relay Station: Persian / UT 2:30-3:00 / 15240 kHz Japanese / UT 3:00-4:00 / 15240 kHz Arabic / UT 4:00-4:30 / 15240 kHz English / UT 14:00-15:00 / 17755 kHz These services are broadcasted alternatively via Woofferton relay station in the U.K. Please tune in the following frequencies. Persian / UT 2:30-3:00 / 9565 kHz Japanese / UT 3:00-4:00 / 11940 kHz Arabic / UT 4:00-4:30 / 15240 kHz English / UT 14:00-15:00 / 17870 kHz Listeners can have access to Radio Japan news through "Radio Japan Online", the internet service of NHK WORLD.URL: http://www.nhk.or.jp/rj/ Saludos cordiales, (via Tomás Méndez, May 22, Noticias DX via DXLD) ** KAZAKHSTAN. 17485, Deutsche Welle. Full data QSL card including transmitter site (Alma Ata [sic]) in 7 weeks for a postal report. Also included were program schedules and a form letter explaining their elimination of direct shortwave broadcasts to the Americas. v/s Horst Scholz, Transmission Management (George Maroti, NY, May 22, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** LIBERIA. LIBERIA SEEN AS ICON OF WORLD'S NEGLECT OF AFRICA LETTER FROM AFRICA By SOMINI SENGUPTA . . .For nearly 150 years, Liberia remained a virtual American colony, and during the cold war it ranked among Washington's most useful allies. The memory of that strategic alliance sits on the outskirts of the capital. It is called the V.O.A. refugee camp, named after the Voice of America radio transmitter that once stood there. . . http://www.nytimes.com/2003/05/21/international/africa/21LETT.html?ex=1054094400&en=63adae3647da8e65&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE (via Jilly Dybka, TN, DXLD) ** LIBYA. Re new Iraqi service, 3-087: I checked the site of Libyan Radio & TV; there was nothing there. They claim that they have only 3 networks: Great Jamahirya Radio, V Of Africa Radio, The Holly Qur`an Radio. All the best, guys (Tarek Zeidan, Egypt, May 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Please note that reception of the unknown station Libya to Iraq in Arabic was very bad to worthless between 1200 and 1300 gmt. Source: BBC Monitoring research in English 21 May 03 (via DXLD) LIBYAN RADIO BROADCASTING TO IRAQ 2100-2200 GMT - PICTURE BULLETIN [Libyan official radio broadcasting to Iraq]. Reception: very poor in parts - The radio station has been heard on the following frequencies: 11660 and 7245 KHz - The radio addresses at first greetings to the land of the two rivers, Iraq and the Iraqi people. The radio then said: "This is a message we address to the fraternal people of Iraq as a contribution to putting an end to their sufferings and achieving and ensuring their stability and establishing security on their land..." The radio went on to say: "This is a message for protecting the vital interests of Iraqi society and its territorial integrity so as its people are masters of their own destiny as this era is that of the masses." The radio criticizes the old political systems and advocates a system, similar to the Libyan one, where people's congresses decide and people's committees implement. The radio then criticized the capitalist system and recalled the social, economic and other crises in the West. The radio says that the political party is today's dictatorship and talks about old political systems and the need to set up a system where people's authority prevails and people rule themselves by themselves. - Songs -A researcher specialized in African affairs talks about old political systems and the need to set up a system where people's authority prevails and where people rule themselves by themselves. Song. - Announcement: General centre for radio stations broadcasting from the Great Jamahiriyah. A message to the people of the two rivers, Iraq. - Music. - Item defining what is a constitution and criticizing the old political systems where people vote for parties and officials to represent them and take decisions for them instead of doing this themselves in a system where people's authority prevails. - The radio station invites people to write with their suggestion to the station at the following address: General centre for radio stations broadcasting from the Great Jamahiriyah P.O. Box 4677 [Same as Libyan External Service's post box] Tripoli Great Jamahiriyah Fax: 00 218 2144 49 857 The radio said that listeners can phone the station on the following two numbers: 00218 2144 49 106 and 00218 2144 49 872 - Music. - Announcement: "We draw the attention of listeners in Iraq that we broadcast to them this programme on the following short-wave frequencies: 11660 KHz; 7245 KHz ; at the following transmission times: from 2200 to 2300 in the evening and from 0100 to 0200 [2200 to 2300 gmt], in the morning, Iraqi time And on the following frequency: 9745 KHz at the following transmission times: From 2200 to 2300 in the evening, and from 0100 to 0200, in the morning, Iraqi time. We point out that we repeat daily the transmission of the evening session the following day at 1600 Iraqi time." [All times as heard]. The station has been heard here at Caversham at the following times: From 1800 to 1900 and from 2100 to 2200 gmt. - Music. - Closing announcement. Source: BBC Monitoring research in English 21 May 03 (via DXLD) ** LITHUANIA. Hi Glenn, re your question about the Sitkunai cancellations: the relays of Barabari (7470), Avaye Ashena (9710) and FBN (9710) were discontinued by these radio stations. I do not have information whether they are now transmitting from other sites. 73s, (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, May 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Let`s see, all those brokered by TDP? (gh) [continued as 3-089!] |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-087, May 21, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3e.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn FIRST AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1183: Wed 2200 on WBCQ 7415, 17495-CUSB? Thu 2030 on WWCR 15825 Fri 1930 on RFPI 15039 WRN ONDEMAND [from Fri]: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [from early UT Thu] [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1183h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1183.html ** ALASKA. 529, 1107-, SQM May 19. Strong signal in CW for SQM: ... _ _ . _ _ _ [location? Not Snoqualmish, WA? --- gh] 530, 1111-, ADK May 19. Good reception with CW ADK: . _ _ .. _ . _ Minor cochannel from TIS. [no doubt Adak, Aleutians] 524, 1115-, MNL Valdez May 19. Fair reception, best in USB for MNL: -- -. .-.. Returned from another impromptu DXpedition with John Bryant and Nick Hall-Patch. Although nothing fantastic, as always the 3 days were filled with good company and unusual DX. Guy Atkins joined us for the Saturday afternoon. We used two Beverage antennae pointed West and North West, as well as a small active antenna constructed by Nick. We experienced a little of everything including lightning, winds, rains, cold temperatures, and then some beautiful sunny warm weather! For those of you not having experienced a DXpedition, I can highly recommend them. This is my fifth time to Grayland, and I'll be back for more. Where else can one listen all night long, and sleep during the day, and then doing it all again the next evening! (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Numerous other loggings follow in this issue ** AUSTRALIA. 1665, 1235-, 2MM, Sydney, May 18. Weak Greek music heard from this 400 watter. Terrible splash from NA X-banders (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. 1701.14, 1218-, 4?? Brisbane, Radio, 1701 May 17. Fair signals on this Aussie X-bander. Listed as 100w. Possibly Radio 1701 from Brisbane? South Asian type music noted. Talk by YL at 1218. Nice strong signal at 1232, with Hindi music, so I wonder if this is the 100w Brisbane station? Signal just booming in at 1225 18 May with Hindi music. Always amazing to me how propagation is so enhanced at dawn! Ad for 'fashion bazaar' with phone number. Ad for 'flaming grill' at 1231. Pretty sure I heard Brisbane mentioned as well before the ad (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. 13635, 1336-, Voice International, Darwin, May 18. Good to very good reception in Hindi with modern Hindi music. Very enjoyable! (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. RA is about the worst HF station for publishing information. It is also bad for incorrect frequency announcements. At 2359 UT the announcement is usually by Roger Broadbent, the English language coördinator of RA. I have more than once emailed him (Broadbent.Roger@abc.net.au) and given him specific details of the errors as the frequencies closing and opening. Never a reply and the errors continue. Does anyone there really care? (VK3BCY, EDXP via DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. 4876.71, 0959-, Radio La Cruz del Sur, May 19. Fair + reception, but need to use USB to avoid nasty QRM. Bolivian music until TOH, then somewhat garbled audio in Spanish (?) (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. Boa dica do biólogo Paulo Roberto e Souza, de Tefé (AM): as rádios Difusora Acreana, de Rio Branco (AC) e Educadora 6 de Agosto, de Xapuri (AC), emitem, nos sábados, às 1000, o programa Natureza Viva, que tem como bandeira a defesa da floresta e dos homens e mulheres que lutam para proteger a vida. Conta com a participação da Organização Não-Governamental WWF. A Difusora Acreana emite em 4885 kHz. Já a Educadora 6 de Agosto irradia pelos 3255 kHz. Confira! As freqüências de 5955 e 15325 kHz, da Rádio Gazeta, de São Paulo (SP), voltaram a ser captadas em Porto Alegre (RS). De terças a sábados, entre 0200 e 0300, a programação continua sendo da Gazeta, quando os alunos da faculdade de Jornalismo da Cásper Líbero produzem o "Jornal da Gazeta AM Universitária". Às 0200 de segunda-feira, a programação é especial. No dia 12 de maio, apresentou uma enquete, feita na Avenida Paulista, sobre o Dia das Mães (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX May 19 via DXLD) ** CHECHNYA. RADIO RUSSIA TO BROADCAST IN GROZNYY | Text of report in English by Russian news agency ITAR-TASS Moscow, 21 May: Radio Russia has been given a licence allowing it to broadcast on the 69.17 MHz frequency in the Chechen capital of Groznyy. The frequency was contested by Ekho Moskvy and Radio Russia. But Ekho Moskvy withdrew its bid, first deputy media minister Mikhail Seslavinskiy said on Wednesday [21 May]. The decision to grant the broadcasting licence to Radio Russia was given by the federal tender commission. It also gave permission to broadcast in Groznyy to a local television company. The Groznyy Television and Radio Broadcasting Company will make its own programmes and beam for 42 hours a week, six hours each day, from 1800 to midnight. Ten-minute news and a 30-minute weekly news review will be available both in Russia and Chechen. The company will also make programmes for children and young people. Source: ITAR-TASS news agency, Moscow, in English 1429 gmt 21 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** CHILE. 6089.96, 0926-, Radio Esperanza, May 18. Fair signal with modern religious vocals, followed by brief talk, then into English song, 'My Girl' (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** COLOMBIA. 5958.45, 1034-, CARACOL Villavicencio, May 19. Fair signal with many time checks in Spanish, and mentions of Colombia. News features. Best in LSB. A difficult frequency. CARACOL and noticias mentioned at 1037:30 (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CONGO. R. Congo, 5985, May 17 0430-0455+, tune-in to local drums. 0431 ID and into local African music. Fair-good with slight co0- channel QRM, but completely covered by WYFR sign-on at 0455 and Spain at 0500. Checked for Congo earlier at 2245-2300 on 5985 but only heard WYFR. This frequency is a real mess. Best time to hear Congo is in the 0430-0455 window (Brian Alexander, Mechanicsburg PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. [Re unIDs:] The 96.7 is obviously CMBA-FM Radio Rebelde, Habana, Cuba. The other station 92.3 I would have to check according to the program content. The FM broadcast band is presently under a national expansion program to make high quality broadcasting reach all over the country. 73 and DX, (Your friend in Havana, Arnie Coro, radio amateur CO2KK, Host of Dxers Unlimited, Radio Havana Cuba, via Saul Chernos, WTFDA via DXLD) Thanks! It certainly sounded like it would match Rebelde's format. I'm not used to hearing Rebelde in high-quality FM though! - usually it's buried in interference from thunderstorms and other Latin American stations on AM. I'm afraid I don't have any more program content on the 92.3 station. It may well have been in Mexico, not Cuba, as the band was open to both countries at once. That's welcome news. I wonder how many times FM has been wide open to Cuba but there have been no stations to DX in the areas affected? (Doug Smith W9WI, TN, ibid.) ** CUBA. Re: 3-086: RHC better not go back on 15120, as Arnie seems to expect; at 2045 check May 19, that was occupied as usual by V. of Nigeria, and RHC was on 11760 in English (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. CUBAN SPIES SAY THEY USED PRO-DEMOCRACY FUNDS BY TRACEY EATON, The Dallas Morning News HAVANA - (KRT) - Cuban spies are in a bragging mood these days. They say American pro-democracy groups have unwittingly pumped tens of thousands of dollars into Fidel Castro's intelligence agencies over the past decade. . . http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/news/world/5894866.htm (via David Crawford, DXLD) No mention of radio, but of Cubanet, which has been the source for a number of anti-Castro stories here (gh) ** CUBA [non]. Radio Martí observed at 0750z on 6050 kHz with good signals, free of the jamming affecting parallels of 6030 and 5980 (Paul Ormandy, ZL4TFX, May 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Not for long, I wager. Still no 6050 listed in today`s May 21 IBB online schedule! In HFCC, I see the hole when HCJB is not scheduled on 6050 is 0500-1030. Symptom of beefing up RM as has been called for? (Glenn Hauser, DXLD) I am noting Radio Martí on new 6050 in the period 0600-1000, and also on new 6040 in period 0900-1000. The usual 9755 (Delano) in period 0600-0800 has disappeared, so I believe that either 6040 or 6050 is from that site. IBB's Freq Schedule Report of May 21 does not show these new operations as yet! So, Dan Ferguson, what's the full schedule? ! (Bob Padula, EDXP via DXLD) New 18th anniversary website of R. Martí: http://www.martinoticias.com/radio.asp?MODE=PLAY&MediaID=8332 HORARIO DE PROGRAMACION RADIO MARTI EN SU NUEVA PAGINA WEB http://www.martinoticias.com/schedule.asp NOTA: AL APUNTAR CON EL MOUSE AL PROGRAMA EN ESPECIFICO NOS INDICA LAS FRECUENCIAS DE EMISION. 73's (Oscar de Céspedes, Conexión Digital May 20 via DXLD) Still no 6050 exhibited there either! Grid still shows LA MISA, Servicio católico, Sundays at 7-8 am (1100-1200 UT), VIOLATING SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE, a U.S. government outlet promoting one particular religious sect!!! Wonder if they are still doing horoscopes too within some seemingly innocuous program title. On the lighter side, the venerable LA TREMENDA CORTE `` Comedia radial con la participación de Tres Patines, quien con gran frecuencia visita la tremenda corte para resolver un tremendo caso`` Sat & Sun 1430-1500 (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CZECH REPUBLIC. UPDATED A-03 SCHEDULE FOR RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY: ALBANIAN 1900-1930 792 7165 11910 15140 ARABIC# 0100-0300 9730 9865 12030 0300-0400 1314 9730 9865 11910 0400-0600 9730 9865 11930 1400-1500 1314 9825 13755 15170 15495 17740 1500-1600 1314 9825 11805 15170 15495 17740 1600-1700 9825 11805 15170 15495 17740 1700-1800 9865 11805 17690 1800-1900 9740 11805 17690 2000-2200 9615 11885 ARMENIAN 0200-0300 7275 9595 1400-1500 11680 1600-1700 9505 11895 AVARI 0415-0430 9850 11780 15355 1715-1730 9805 11925 17630 AZERI 0300-0400 9680 0900-1000 15510 17665 21520 1300-1400 15145 15255 17710 1500-1600 15385 1800-1900 11865 BELORUSSIAN 0300-0500 612 1188 6170 7295 9635 1300-1430 612 1500-1700 612 1188 9565 11725 15215 1700-1900 612 7190 11730 15480 1900-2100 612 1188 7115 9750 11865 CHECHEN 0430-0445 9850 11780 15355 1730-1745 9805 11925 17630 CHERKASSI 0445-0500 9850 11780 15355 1745-1800 9805 11925 17630 DARI* 0330-0430 801 1269 12140 15730 17670 0730-0830 1269 13710 15690 19010 0930-1030 1269 15690 17685 19010 1330-1430 801 1269 15690 17685 19010 1730-1830 801 1269 9845 12140 15690 2330-0030 801 972 1269 5945 7430 9785 GEORGIAN 0400-0500 9595 1500-1600 17725 1900-2000 11690 KAZAKH 0100-0300 7230 9680 15455 1100-1200 11870 15195 17670 1300-1400 12140 13795 17670 1400-1500 4995 15355 15455 2300-2400 7250 9615 9865 KYRGHYZ 0000-0200 6170 7295 9715 1200-1230 11930 15120 17615 1300-1330 11930 15205 17865 1400-1500 5860 11845 15530 1500-1600 5860 11960 15530 PASHTO* 0230-0330 801 1269 12140 15730 17670 0630-0730 1269 13710 15690 19010 0830-0930 1269 15690 17685 19010 1230-1330 801 1269 15690 17685 19010 1630-1730 801 1269 9845 12140 15690 2230-2330 801 1269 5945 7430 9785 PERSIAN@ 0030-0200 1170 1539 1593 9615 9795 9805 0200-0400 1170 1539 1593 9775 9795 9805 0400-0600 1170 1539 1593 9510 9795 15185 15290 0600-0800 1170 1539 1593 9510 15290 17835 0800-0830 1170 1539 1593 9510 13680 15290 17835 21530 0830-1400 1170 1539 1593 13680 21530 1400-1600 1170 1539 1593 9435 13680 17750 1600-1700 1170 1539 1593 9435 13680 17670 1700-1900 1170 1539 1593 11705 11845 1900-2000 1170 1539 1593 5860 6140 11670 11985 2000-2100 1170 1539 1593 5860 9960 11960 11985 2100-2130 1170 1539 1593 9960 11960 11985 2130-0030 1170 1539 1593 ROMANIAN 0300-0330 7210 9595 Monday to Friday 1500-1530 9505 11995 1600-1630 9870 11865 1630-1700 9870 11865 Monday to Friday 1800-1900 7115 12045 Monday to Friday RUSSIAN 0000-0100 6095 5985 7120 7170 7220 9520 0200-0300 6000 6105 7155 7220 7255 9520 0300-0400 6000 6105 7155 7220 9520 11725 0400-0500 5995 7220 9520 9760 11710 11725 0500-0600 7220 9520 9705 9760 11885 17730 0600-0700 9520 9705 11815 15130 17730 17810 0700-0800 9520 9705 11815 11860 15130 17730 17810 0800-1000 11860 15280 17730 17810 1000-1100 11860 11875 15130 15145 17730 17810 17890 1100-1200 13745 15130 15145 15205 17730 17890 1200-1300 13745 15130 15205 15215 17730 17890 1400-1500 9595 11725 11885 11895 15205 15215 1500-1600 9520 9725 11895 13755 15355 1600-1700 7220 9520 9725 11885 13755 1900-2000 6105 7220 9520 9530 9615 11885 2000-2100 5955 6105 7220 7260 9520 9530 9825 2100-2200 6105 7155 7220 7245 7260 9520 9715 2200-2300 5985 6095 7220 7245 9520 9615 2300-2400 5985 6095 7120 7170 7220 9520 RUSSIAN CE.AS 0400-0415 9850 11780 15355 1700-1715 9805 11925 17630 SERBOCROATIAN 0230-0330 1197 0730-0800 9555 11970 15260 1300-1330 9555 11795 17605 1600-1700 1197 6040 7115 11925 1730-1800 1188 9625 13635 15245 1800-1900 1188 9625 15160 15245 2000-2100 5970 7165 7245 2130-2200 1188 2200-2400 1188 1197 6130 9635 11730 TAJIK 0100-0200 4760 9760 11660 0200-0400 9760 11660 15520 1400-1500 15145 15370 17670 1500-1630 9790 15145 15370 1630-1700 4760 9790 15145 15370 TATAR-BASHKIR 0300-0400 9815 11820 0500-0600 11990 15245 1500-1600 11990 15245 1900-2000 9650 11925 TURKMEN 0200-0300 864 7295 9555 15295 0300-0400 7185 9555 15295 1400-1500 13815 15345 17825 1500-1530 13815 15160 17825 1530-1600 864 13815 15160 17825 1600-1800 13815 15160 17885 UKRAINIAN 0300-0400 6065 7115 9710 Monday to Friday 0500-0600 7115 7165 11815 Monday to Friday 1700-1800 9855 11895 15115 1800-1900 7165 11715 11875 1900-2000 3995 11875 15115 Sunday to Friday UZBEK 0100-0200 864 0200-0400 9785 12015 21770 0400-0600 12015 17630 21770 1300-1400 1143 1600-1700 9595 11980 15335 1700-1800 9595 11815 11980 # Radio Free Iraq * Radio Free Afghanistan @ Radio Farda 73 from Ivo and Angel! (Observer, Bulgaria, May 20 via DXLD) ** ECUADOR. 3279.56, 0945-, La Voz del Napo, May 18. Quechua language programming heard at good to very good levels, with mentions of María, Israel. No ID at TOH, but a very long prayer, with many, many mentions of Gracias, Señor. Good ID in Spanish by male at 1007 as 'Radiodifusora cultural la Voz del Napo'. Mentioned Padre Salomon (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 3280, La Voz del Napo, religious talks, sermons and catholic rosarios May 19 at 0050-0125 [sic]; 0034 religious chants, 0136 totally disppearred because of local sunrise (0536 MSK), 33333. Too many thanks to Arnaldo Slaen, Gert Nilsson, Henrik Klemetz, Hermod Pedersen and Tore Vik for help me to identify this one (Artyom Prokhorov, in a countryside just 70 km South of Moscow using Sony 7600G and its telescopic antenna, Cumbre DX via DXLD) 3279.56, LV del Napo, 21 May, 0041, Nice canned ID with frequency announcement by M over Mariah Carey music. Good clear signal. No sign of any other station around this frequency (Dave Valko, Dunlo PA, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** EGYPT. Estimados Colegas, Finalmente consegui a minha primeira captação da tão famosa e difícil Rádio Cairo! :) Claro, que devo agradecer ao nosso colega Samuel Cássio, fornecedor dessa grande ferramenta que é o SONY ICF-SW7600GR. :) Bom, precisarei da opinião de vocês sobre se devo ou não tentar o QSL, tendo em vista as peculiaridades da recepção. Vamos aos detalhes: Emissora: Rádio Cairo Data: 20/05/2003 Hora: 22:22 UTC Idioma: Português Freqüência: 11.793 Khz (isso mesmo!) Receptor: SONY ICF-SW7600GR. Antena: antena compacta AN-71 (fornecida junto com receptor) SINPO: 1 2 2 1 2 Foi possívl identificar que a maioria dos programas foram apresentados por locutora com sotaque possivelmente português, além de músicas árabes etc. Percebi que sempre quando que entra alguma música na programação o sinal melhora sensivelmente, o mesmo acontecendo quando da vinheta dos programas e na identificação da emissora. Considerando-se a freqüência "oficial" de 11790, o SINPO seria de 1 1 2 1 1, não sendo possível identificar práticamente nada da transmissão, exceto talvez algo das vinhetas e trechos de músicas. Agora, as inevitáveis perguntas: Essa variação nas freqüências é normal nas emissoras internacionais? Por que isso ocorre?(essa é a primeira vez que fiz DX m rádio com display digital) (Claudio, Volta Redonda/RJ, radioescutas via DXLD) Was the carrier frequency really 11793? ** ERITREA. ERITREA: STATE TV NOW TRANSMITTING VIA SATELLITE; RADIO TO BE CARRIED SOON | Text of report by Eritrean radio on 20 May Eritreans resident in various countries are sending congratulatory messages on being able to watch programmes of Eritrean television [state-owned EriTV] via satellite. So far, messages we have received from Eritreans living in Syria, Lebanon, Sudan, Djibouti, UAE, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Kuwait indicate that Eritreans living in those countries are watching the programmes of Eritrean television with clear video and audio. The citizens hailed the efforts by the Ministry of Information and the concern demonstrated by the Eritrean government to enable its citizens in the Diaspora to follow the situation and the development programmes being carried out in their country. Eritrean television programmes are broadcast on Arabsat 26 degrees east, on transponder frequency 11623 [MHz]. The Voice of the Broad Masses of Eritrea [state-owned radio] will also be on satellite in the coming few weeks. Source: Voice of the Broad Masses of Eritrea, Asmara, in Tigrinya 0430 gmt 20 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** FRANCE. 13610, 0409-, Radio France International, May 19. English programming to Africa at fair level, marred by long/short path echo. Parallel to Gabon 9550 at poor level (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY [non]. RWANDA 11945, 0415-, Deutsche Welle May 19 Excellent reception of DW to Africa via Kigali, Rwanda. Parallel to equally strong 15410 via Wertachtal, and 7225 at fair level via Rwanda (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Auf Englisch ** GERMANY. Two pictures of the now silent Wöbbelin site: http://www.wiechern.privat.t-online.de/meckpomm.htm By the way, it appears that all attempts to save Megaradio failed, any other result of the bankruptcy proceedings than a liquidation of the company would be a wonder now. Meanwhile even some of the major commercial FM stations are in serious trouble, word is that the Halle- based HitRadio Brocken is not far away from going bankrupt anymore. Not that it would be a real loss (Kai Ludwig, Germany, May 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GUATEMALA. R. Cultural Coatán, 4779.98, May 10 0225-0233* Spanish announcements, local ranchera music, 0231 ID, sign-off with lite instrumental music. Poor to weak; irregular (Brian Alexander, PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GUYANA. GBC? 3291.25, May 17 0400-0500+ weak signal, too weak to catch any kind of program details. Also heard at 0925. Perhaps Guyana back on the air again? (Brian Alexander, PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GUYANA. 3291.24, 0932-, Voice of Guyana, May 19. Haven't seen this one reported for a while. A presumed logging with Hindi music at poor levels (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDIA. 9620.42, 1312-, All India Radio, May 18. AIR listed in Sindhi from Aligarh with 125,000w on this variable off frequency with Indian music. Parallel to much weaker 11585 Bangalore with 500 kW. Drifted up to 9620.48 within a few minutes. Good overall. 9620.54 at 1326 (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Can anybody confirm that I am hearing an AIR station on 9620.7? It is an odd choice and I think I have heard Delhi mentioned but the audio sounds as if it's an off-air relay. The program appears to be in Hindi and is observed from 1230 and went off at 1300 and was back on when I rechecked at 1315. It is not // 10330 although an identical news bulletin with a M/A [male announcer???] at 1330. It has Indian type music but sounds more geared to Afghanistan/Central Asia by the rhythm patterns. The station seems to vary daily and on previous days seemed to be on 9625.6. Jose Jacob, can you help? (Robin L Harwood, Tasmania, May 21, EDXP via DXLD) The monitored schedule of AIR Patna relayed via Delhi on 11620 is as follows: Morning Transmission 0015-0445 (Sun 0956) Afternoon Transmission 0630-0956 Evening/Night Transmission 1130(Sun 1030)-1741 These special transmissions are still continuing even today 20th May 2003.The External Services on 11620 between 0015-1745 has been cancelled due to these broadcasts. These special relays will stop soon after the 100 kw MW transmitter of AIR Patna on 621 kHz is rectified. ===== 73 (Jose Jacob, VU2JOS/AT0J, May 19, dx-india via DXLD) ** INDONESIA. 4869.96, 1054-1340, May 17 Very strong signal with country style vocals in ? language. Suspect Indonesian here, as it would match the style. Annoying pulses on USB, but LSB in the clear. No ID at TOH, however. Some sort of jingle at 1102, but then immediately into another vocal of same genre. At 1103 went into a 70s western pop song (Fleetwood Mack, I believe). Then another same vintage song 'Wonderful world, beautiful people'. 'Indonesia' at 1115. Is this a frequency change from RRI Sorong? RRI news at 1200 with many transmitter breaks. Finally off in mid-song at about 1340. Still very strong (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 4870. RRI Wamena? (reported as this one.) Good signal here some nights around 0850. Has plenty of English recordings with no announcement until 0930 then a short announcement in Indonesian and into News? Timor mentioned on occasion. Is not in parallel to other RRI outlets at this time. Is anyone able to confirm RRI Wamena and any contact for them? Regards, (Ian Cattermole, New Zealand, May 21, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** IRAN. DAILY LISTS 187 WEB SITES "FILTERED" BY IRANIAN GOVERNMENT | Text of report by Iranian newspaper Nasim-e Saba web site on 20 May Two weeks after the policy of filtering web site has been officially announced [in Iran], a Rooydad http://www.rooydad.com/ web site reporter has acquired a list of the filtered web sites. The list includes 187 web sites. Although there are some unethical sites included in the list, most of the filtered sites belong to political groups inside and outside the country or to the individuals and organizations who independently discuss social and political issues. One of these sites belongs to Foruhar family. [Dariush Foruhar and his wife were killed in the course of serial political murders of 1998]. Emrooz, Peyk Net, Mossadeq, Mihan, Roshangari, Iran Emrooz, Pars Pejvak, Rah-e Tudeh, Iran-va-Jahan, Dadnameh and Asr-e Now are among the well known political web sites which have been filtered. The web site of [dissident cleric] Ayatollah Montazeri has also been blocked. Also in this list are the web sites of Radio Farda and Radio Liberty. Several specialized web sites including "Women in Iran" http://www.womeniniran.com have also been filtered. But the most interesting case is the filtering of Aftab magazine. [The hard copy edition of] Aftab is being published based on a permit issued by the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance. Source: Nasim-e Saba web site, Tehran, in Persian 20 May 03, p3 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** IRAQ. SWEDISH IRAQI BECOMES NEW HEAD OF IRAQI TELEVISION | Text of report by Swedish radio Ekot web site on 20 May Swedish Iraqi Ahmad al-Rikabi is to become the new head of Iraqi state television. Al-Rikabi has worked in Radio Sweden's Arabic service, part of Sveriges Radio [national public-service broadcaster]. He has also been presenter of the SVT [Swedish television] programme 'Mosaik'. Al-Rikabi succeeds former dictator Saddam Husayn's son Uday as head of Iraqi television [as published]. State-owned Iraqi propaganda TV is to be turned into a free medium serving democracy. Source: Sveriges Radio Ekot web site, Stockholm, in Swedish 20 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** IRAQ [non]. New unidentified service from LIBYA, q.v.!! ** ISRAEL. YONNI BEN-MENACHEM ELECTED AS NEW DIRECTOR OF ISRAEL RADIO http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/spages/295193.html By Anat Balint, Haaretz Correspondent Yonni Ben-Menachem, Israel Radio's diplomatic correspondent for the past six years, was elected as the new director of Israel Radio Tuesday night by a 7-2 majority of the Israel Broadcasting Authority's tenders committee. The stormy committee meeting was interrupted early on when members realized the two representatives sent by the Journalists' Associations in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem were Israel Radio workers, a clear conflict of interest. The IBA legal adviser, Hannah Metzkovich, insisted on their replacement before the vote. Before the meeting, committee member Dr. Ilan Asia sent a vehement letter to Industry Minister Ehud Olmert, the minister with the IBA portfolio, charging IBA Chairman Avraham Natan was not qualified to chair the tenders committee. Asia claimed that Natan announced at the last session of the tenders committee that he'd "make sure no observers attend to this affair, so the tender can be conducted in an orderly fashion." He was referring to an observer from the Attorney General's Office at the last appointments tender, which selected the director of Channel One TV. After the vote, the attorney general's envoy sent a letter to the state attorney charging that some of the votes for Ben-Menachem were not cast for professional reasons. Asia wrote to Olmert that "it seems Natan wants to hold the tenders committee sessions in the dark, out of the public eye, and that raises suspicions about his motives." Ben-Menachem's close ties with Prime Minister Ariel Sharon have raised fears among many journalists in Israel Radio that he will serve as the prime minister's proxy at the news station. (via Doni Rosenzweig, May 20, DXLD) ** JAPAN. 3373.5, 1018-, NHK Mihara, May 18. Fair reception of this 300w back up USB transmitter of NHK Osaka 2, with Japanese talk by mostly YL, with occasional interjection by OM. Lots of splatter. This one usually heard better in the depths of winter. 3373.5, 1137-, NHK, Mihara, May 19. USB back up 300 watt transmitter for Osaka 2. English lesson about whales. Good with a fair amount of atmospheric static. ID for NHK at 1140. No SW parallels noted. 3607.5, 1027-, NHK, Shobu-Kuki, Tokyo, May 18. Good reception with lively talk between a man and a woman. Lots of laughter, and music. 900 w USB back up transmitter for NHK Tokyo 1. Good reception. 3970, 1141-, NHK Sapporo 1, May 19. Good reception of this 600 w back up USB transmitter carrying NHK 1. Parallels include 3259 (600 w NHK Kasuga), 3607.5 (900 w NHK, Shobu-Kuki, Tokyo). Latter is best with good/very good reception. At 1255 recheck, 3607.5 and 3970 are no longer in parallel. At top of hour, back in parallel. Also parallel to 6005 (600 w Sapporo 1). At 1300 all transmitters are off except 3970 which continues despite scheduled sign-off. 6005, 1212-, NHK Sapporo May 17 Good reception, best in LSB with Japanese talk by male. Not a bad signal for a 600w transmitter, in a crowded band! 6005, 1223-1230, NHK, May 19. No ID on sign-off after Japanese female vocal. 600w Sapporo 1 transmitter (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** KOREA NORTH. Nuevo esquema en español de la Voz de Corea Pyongyang: 00 UT [¿y?] 0200 UT 11735 13760 1700 9975 11735 1800 4405 11710 15760 15245 2200 4405 13760 15245 Muchos 73 y buen DX... (Adán González, Venezuela, May 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** LIBYA. On 18/5/03 around 2130 UT I was trying to pick up Bahrain on 9745 kHz but I heard a station mentioning Iraq a lot and most of the time talking to the Iraqi people and telling them about how great it's to have the rule of the people not the rule of a party or one leader. then there was a program called ``To our brothers in Iraq`` identifying the Party meanings etc... By the end of the transmission I heard them announcing a phone # and a fax #, also an address at (Libya)... I was really amazed by that but that ruling by the people thing brought Libya to my mind as they say it's the first country to be ruled by the people. They gave the times in Baghdad time; also I think they have 2 transmissions. The frequencies mentioned were 9745 kHz, 11660 kHz and 7245 tentative. I wanted to get the full details with the address in Libya and the phone # and the fax # but they were not on 19/5/03; maybe tonight they will be on (primary Report). (Tarek Zeidan, Cairo, Egypt, May 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) [9745??:] I noticed that it's not only Iran targeting Iraq with a special radio station. Around 2130 UT yesterday I managed to pick up a station targeting the Iraqi people will revert tomorrow with the whole story and the name of the station with the fax/tel number as I was very tired yesterday to grab a pen and a piece of paper to write the frequencies and times down as they announce it in Iraq Time :( Anyway, just bear with me and I'll keep you posted. All the best guys (from Cairo, Tarek Zeidan, May 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) As I'm writing this they are on both 7245 and 11660 but the QRM on 7245 from Radio Svoboda RFE/RL is driving me crazy!! Hopefully I'll be able to get the contact details by the end of the transmission. On 11660 they are really so weak I could hear a word or two. And then heavy QRM from another station. On 9745 they are not on. I could hear only an Arabic station (tentatively Bahrain) playing only Arabic music. Couldn`t get any ID. Same gossip about "how important is the rule of the people, not the rule of a party ... Don`t be fooled by any group of people that may get into power through you" They are using the same terms they use on the Libyan stations, exactly like people's committees. Mauno, if you are awake, can you record like the last five minutes of that transmission, 2155 just in case I couldn't get a clear catch of the contact details. Hopefully by the end of this hour you'll have the full picture :) (Tarek Zeidan, Cairo, Egypt, May 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hi again guys, hope I ain`t boring you with all these e Mails. First of all I have to thank Mr. Mauno Ritola for his help by sending me the last 4 minutes of that station which really helped me to clarify the times of that transmission. here we go with the final/corrected contact details: Address: The General Center for Overseas Stations, P. O. Box 4677, Tripoli, The Great Jamahirya (that's Libya in common words) Fax: ++ 218 21 44 46 875 (corrected). They have 2 phone numbers: ++ 218 21 44 49 106, ++ 218 21 44 49 872. Times of the broadcast: twice a day, the first one at 10.00 - 11.00 P.M Baghdad time (1800-1900 UT), second transmission 01.00 - 02.00 A.M Baghdad time (2100-2200 UT); a repeat the transmission again at 04.00 - 05.00 P.M Baghdad time (1200-1300 UT). I think that's about it, guys. Hopefully I'll be able to get an ID of that station soon. All the best (Tarek Zeidan, Cairo, Egypt, May 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) This seems to be the station that is about 50/50% here with Radio Bahrain [9745], signing on at sign-on [sic] at 2100z. Thanks Tarek! (Paul Ormandy, Oamaru, New Zealand, May 21, dxing.info via DXLD) Has anyone checked their Web site to see if there's some info in Arabic there? I suggest clicking on http://www.ljbc.net/fpage_2.htm which bypasses the Flash intro screen. There's nothing on the English site http://en.ljbc.net/ but unfortunately I don't read Arabic so it could be staring me in the face and I wouldn't know :-( 73, (Andy Sennitt, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Please note that the unknown station Libya to Iraq in Arabic was not on air between 1200 and 1300 gmt. Source: BBC Monitoring research in Arabic 21 May 03 (via DXLD) ** LITHUANIA. Sitkunai SW: the relays of Radio Barabari, Avaye Ashena and FBN have been cancelled. Apart from daily transmissions of Radio Vilnius, there is still Radio Santec in German on 9710 Sun 1200-1300 (to Europe). Please note that the name of this station is Radio Santec, while the alternative name "Universelles Leben" / "Universal Life" is the name of the radio ministry in Germany (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, May 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Cancelled by Sitkunai or by the clients? Have they each moved to some other site, or off the air? (gh, DXLD) ** MEXICO. Radio UNAM onda corta Estimados amigos: el día de hoy (20/05/03) por la tarde se escuchó muy mejorado el audio de Radio UNAM onda corta. La portadora sigue escuchándose con buena intensidad, existe desvanecimiento, y el audio como lo anotamos arriba ha mejorado. Si tienes informes al respecto hazlo llegar, para comunicarnos con el Ing. Mejía quien agradece esta ayuda. 73's (Julián Santiago, clubdiexistamexico yahoogroup via Héctor García Bojorge, DF, Conexión Digital via DXLD) {en 9600 variable!} ** MOROCCO. Local programming from Tangier was observed on May 17 at 0500 on 11920, see original message below. Of course not so much a surprise but I think nowhere reported previously. This raises the question how IBB Briech receives the RTM audio, perhaps simply by Ballempfang (FM pick-up)? Anyway the audio quality of the source in use is quite poor (crackling, at times severe non-linear distortion) (Kai Ludwig, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Marokkanisches Lokalprogramm auf KW? Hallo! Heute morgen vor dem s/off um 0500 UT auf 11920 identifizierte sich der marokkanische Rundfunk "Idha´at mamlaka t´ill maghribiya min Tanger". Gerade eben war auf 15340 kHz wieder die bekannte ID "...min Ribat" zu hören. Könnte es sich bei der Morgensendung um die Übertragung eines Lokalprogrammes aus Tanger gehandelt haben? 73, (Patrick Robich, Austria, A-DX via Kai Ludwig, DXLD) ** MYANMAR. 5985.81, 1423-, Radio Myanmar, May 18. After some time on exactly 5985, and also 5986, I'm again hearing Myanmar on their long- standing old frequency. Fair to almost good reception with Burmese music (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NETHERLANDS. AUTOMATIC AMBIENT RADIO Radio DOM was an automatic radio-station located on the Dom tower in Utrecht, broadcasting a dynamic auditory soundscape based on the sounds of the city of Utrecht. Radio DOM got its inputs from six computer-controlled surveillance microphones installed on the Dom tower, which constantly scanned the inner city area. The sound signals picked up by these microphones were algorithmically combined into a continuously varying soundscape which was broadcast 24 hours a day by an FM radio transmitter installed on the Dom tower. The transmissions of Radio DOM could be received in the city of Utrecht from June 4 until October 3, 1999, at 102.3 MHz FM. Radio DOM was part of the exhibition Panorama 2000, organised by the Centraal Museum in Utrecht . . . http://iaaa.nl/radio/domE.html (via Benn Kobb, DXLD) ** NIGERIA. 7255, 0454-, Voice of Nigeria, May 19. Excellent reception with very drawn out Interval signal and occasional, 'You are listening to the Voice of Nigeria'. Into National Anthem at 0456. Into French language programming. At same time 15120 comes on with English at fair level (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Voice of Nigeria heard on 19 May with nice reception on clear 7255 kHz from 2100 UT (after CRI sign-off) until 2115 (blocked by RAI). Opening announcements, ID, talk, etc, in presumed Fulfulde. Seemed to make a big thing out of the 'new' website with an emphatic mention of it early on! Listening over past couple of days seems to indicate that Yoruba 2000-2100, Fulfulde 2100-2200 and Hausa 2200-2300 are on 7255. English heard, as expected, on 15120 kHz when checked at 2115 on 19 May (Tony Rogers, Birmingham - UK, BDXC-UK via DXLD) VON LAUNCHES WEBSITE This Day (Lagos), May 20, 2003, Posted to the web May 20, 2003 Chikas Ohadoma, Abuja Voice of Nigeria (VON) yesterday broke new grounds when it launched its official website. At the official launch of the website, http://www.voiceofnigeria.org which was planned by NigeraNet [sic], VON's technical partners, Minister of Information and National Orientation, Prof. Jerry Gana commended the Director-General of VON Mr. Taiwo Allimi for the numerous achievements recorded by the management team and staff of the organisation in the last four years. Gana said before now, "almost all international broadcasters are accessible through the internet. That posed a clear challenge for Nigeria's only international radio station, a challenge that I am glad that the management of Voice of Nigeria, under the very able leadership of the Director-General, Mr. Taiwo Allimi, has successfully tackled. We are proud of your zeal, determination and commitment to excellence." Gana also commended the inclusion in the website of a provision for opinion poll. "This is a wonderful decision because opinion polls can be employed effectively by Voice of Nigeria in enriching its programming. "I have no doubt that it will also be a useful tool in our policy- making process as a nation," the Minister said. Earlier, the Director General of VON, Allimi noted that the launch of the website had taken the Corporation fully into the world of Information Technology. Explaining the nature of the website, Allimi said "Voice of Nigeria website will inform on VON, its history, its radio frequencies and programmes guide" adding "Visitors will also find information about Nigeria such as investment tips, tourism destinations and weather profile for the tourists, peoples and languages of Nigeria, music and theatre, arts and culture, etc." Allimi disclosed that the VON website would have similar pages on Africa. (http://allafrica.com/stories/200305200652.html via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) VOICE OF NIGERIA WEB SITE OFFICIALLY LAUNCHED The Voice of Nigeria (VON) yesterday officially launched its Web site, http://www.voiceofnigeria.org which has been in operation already for well over a year. At the launch ceremony, Prof. Jerry Gana, Minister of Information and National Orientation, commended VON Director- General Taiwo Allimi for the achievements of the organisation in the last four years. Gana commended the inclusion in the site of technology to hold opinion polls. "This is a wonderful decision because opinion polls can be employed effectively by Voice of Nigeria in enriching its programming. I have no doubt that it will also be a useful tool in our policy-making process as a nation," he said (© Radio Netherlands Media Network 20 May 2003 via DXLD) ** PAPUA NEW GUINEA. 1725 kHz, 1226-, GA, Goroka, May 17. Fair reception of 50w aero beacon from Goroka in AM [MCW / A2?] mode. 1737 kHz, 1229-, KUT, Kutubu, May 17, poor to fair reception of this 50 w aero beacon. Not as strong as 1725 (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PAPUA NEW GUINEA. 4890, 1034-, NBC Port Moresby, May 18, PNG bandscan. Good to very reception with prayer in English. Splatter from RTM Malaysia. Then an American religious song 'Celebrate Jesus' Name'. 3905, 1038-, Radio New Ireland, May 18. Strong signals with Pidgin religious programming. 3850, 1039-, Radio Independent Makumui, May 18. Not heard today. 3395, 1041-, Radio Eastern Highlands, May 18. Not on air. 3385, 1042-, Radio Eastern New Britain, Rabaul, May 18. Not on air. 3375, 1043-, Radio Western Highlands, Mount Hagen, May 18. Not on air. 3365, 1044-, Radio Milne Bay, Alotau, May 18. Not on air. 3355, 1045-, Radio Simbu, Kundiawa, May 18-19. A messy frequency, but they don't appear to be on the air. Lots of splatter from Indo just above this frequency. 19 May: 0916 At fair to good levels with Port Moresby relay of National news in English. 3345, 1046-, Radio Northern, Popondetta, May 18. Nothing here except RRI, Ternate on 3344.85 with strong signal. 3335, 1049-, Radio East Sepik, Wewak, May 18. Excellent reception with a radio play in Pidgin. 3325, 1051-, Radio Bougainville, Kubu, May 18. Relatively strong signal with many mentions of Bougainville under music, which I thought might be RRI Palangkaraya, but then they played a Christian hymn. Still there does appear to be two stations co-channel. 3315, 1055-, Radio Manus, Lorengau, May 18-19. Not on air. May 19: Good reception with National news via Port Moresby in English. 3305, 1115-, Radio Western, Daru, May 18. Very weak het only, so I presume not on air? Needs more investigation to confirm. Anyone in Australia/NZ able to confirm? When rechecked at 1138, they were on the air, with a fair signal with local music, then Pidgin announcement. Did hear 'Voice of ?'. Will have to listen to the MD recording. Lots of ute QRM on this freq. Rapidly faded way down to poor levels within a minute, concurrent to QRM going way up! Still could make out 'Sunday evening'. Sounded like sign-off announcements at 1155, then dead air for about a minute, then back in Pidgin, with mentions of 5:00. Broadcasting to the people of the Western province from our studios in Daru. Radio Western ID. This was in English. Followed by National Anthem at good level, now over the pesky ute. Off at 1200:45. 3290, 1118-, Radio Central, Boroko, May 18. Good signal with islands music, and Pidgin talk. 3275, 1119-, Radio Southern Highlands, Mendi, May 18. Good reception with EZL music. They must have paid their electrical bills, as I have them as previously off air for non-payment of the bill. Fair amount of static, and lower modulation when announcer came on. Did hear 'good night'. In Pidgin. Only at fair level due to the static and low modulation. 3260, 1121-, Radio Madang, May 18. Not on air. Only slop from NHK, Kasuga, 600w relaying JOLK, Fukuoka 1 in USB at good levels. 3245, 1126-, Radio Gulf, Kerama, May 18. Not on air. 3235, 1127-, Radio West New Britain, Kimbe, May 18. Excellent levels with local choral hymn. 3220, 1129-, Radio Morobe, Lae, May 18. Weak het, then Russian fishermen came on with excellent levels in USB. Presumed not on the air. 19 May: Same Russian fishermen. On LSB there is something very weakly heard, but I doubt PNG. 3204.97, 1131-, Radio West Sepik, Vanimo, May 18. Good levels with Pidgin talk and local music. 2410, 1037-, Radio Enga, May 18. Not on the air (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. 4975, Radio del Pacífico clear ID at 0130 May 17, ``Pacífico Radio``, religious program, good audibility till 0300 UT. Nowadays, it is the most powerful Peruvian station on the dial. No trace of Radio Unión on 6115 these weekends (Artyom Prokhorov, in a countryside just 70 km South of Moscow using Sony 7600G and its telescopic antenna, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** PORTUGAL. ONDA CURTA EM NOTÍCIA Cortesia do jornalista Célio Romais. Não perca em "RADIONOTICIAS" as notícias desta onda. Visite http://www.aminharadio.com (António Silva, radioescutas via DXLD) ** PUERTO RICO. WI2XSO, 1260, Mayagüez, new synchro for WISO Ponce is on (AM Switch, NRC DX News May 19 via DXLD) Will it keep the experimental calls? Sob! Now how are we to tell whether we are hearing Ponce or Mayagüez? There otta bea law (gh, DXLD) ** RUSSIA. 180 kHz, 1214-, Radio Rossii May 19 Petropavlovsk at weak strength with Russian talk. 279 kHz, 1221-, Radio Rossii, May 19. Also noted Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk in parallel to 180 but slightly out of sync with Russian programming. Poor, but better than 180 (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** RUSSIA. VOICE OF RUSSIA TO START INTERNET BROADCASTING The Voice of Russia state radio company broadcasting in 32 languages begins internet broadcasting, reads the company's press release. . . http://newsfromrussia.com/main/2003/05/20/47202.html (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** RUSSIA. VOICE OF RUSSIA TO LAUNCH ON-LINE VIDEO BROADCASTING | Text of report by Russian news agency RIA Moscow, 20 May: The Russian state broadcasting company Voice of Russia, which broadcasts in 32 languages on the airwaves, is launching video broadcasting on the Internet, says a press release from the company received by RIA-Novosti on Tuesday [20 May]. "On-line video broadcasting is to become one of the main areas of the company's operation in the future," the company notes. A special section is to be opened on the Voice of Russia website shortly, in which the most significant and interesting programmes and interviews will be posted in a video format. "In those conditions when the electronic mass media are developing fast" it is necessary to provide listeners, through the Internet and the worldwide web, with "the most up-to-date news product, a balanced combination of audio and video components, as well as textual and graphic information", says Voice of Russia broadcasting company chairman Armen Oganesyan. Source: RIA news agency, Moscow, in Russian 1213 gmt 20 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** SAHARA WESTERN [non]. Hoy se cumplen 30 años de existencia del Frente Polisario, que lucha por obtener la liberación de su país ocupado desde hace 27 años por Marruecos en contra de los mandatos de la ONU. Hay conmemoraciones en los campamentos de Tinduf, ubicados en Argelia. La RNRASD se encuentra ubicada en Bir Lehlu, capital de los territorios liberados del Sahara Occidental y comenzó sus emisiones el 28 Diciembre 1975. Además de su onda corta, emite en 1550 khz. A estar atentos entonces a las frecuencias cercanas a 7470, en donde se la escuchaba tiempo atrás a Radio Nacional de la República Árabe Saharaui Democrática. 73's GIB (Gabriel Iván Barrera, Argentina, May 20, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Gracias, Gabriel por el dato. Y vale agregar para quienes no lo saben que esta emisora entraba con excelente recepción por estas latitudes, hasta hace no más de un par de años atrás, hacia las 2230+ UT, en la frecuencia que Gabriel nos indica. 73's (Arnaldo Slaen, ibid.) ** SAIPAN. ANATAHAN CONTINUES TO BELCH ASHES The volcanic eruption on Anatahan continued for the fifth day yesterday, with the Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center reporting of ashes being spewed out to an altitude of 10,000 feet from the volcano's crater. "I have not seen any change in it over the last 24 hours," said Nancy Merckle, a meteorologist at the center's Satellite Analysis Branch. Merckle said clouds of ashes extending up to 15 nautical miles wide were suspended up to an altitude of 13,000 feet above Pacific waters. The ashes were moving 5-10 knots westward toward the northern portion of the Philippines. The ashes have reached over 1,000 miles from Anatahan. . . http://www.saipantribune.com/archives/newsstorysearch.aspx?cat=1&newsID=28350&issID=1245 (Saipan Tribune May 16 via DXLD) So does this have any effect on radio stations such as KFBS? (gh, DXLD) ** SINGAPORE. 6150, 1052-, Radio One, May 19. Strong reception, best in LSB with English financial news. A 'Slice of Life' at 1056 about unemployment. Then ad for Channel news radio, then traffic watch... 'a broken lorry on Mount Batton way'. [Mountbatten? gh] Weather forecast, hazy and warm (low 27, high 32). News from Radio Singapore International at TOH (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 6150, 1030, Radio Singapore, English - local news broadcast with traffic report, news on SARS, ID's by man and woman as "News Radio 938" good signal on LSB (Brett Saylor, Pennsylvania, May 20, Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** SOUTH AFRICA. 3320, 0435-, South African Broadcasting Corporation, May 19. Despite my listings stating that this is Radio Sonder Grense in Afrikaans, what I am hearing at weak level is English (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SPAIN. Uma dica para quem quer encontrar amigos pelo mundo inteiro é a sintonia do programa Con Respuesta, da Rádio Exterior de Espanha. Vai ao ar, nos sábados, às 1100, em 21570 kHz. De acordo com Leônidas dos Santos Nascimento, de São João Evangelista (MG), o programa recebe cartas, sempre no idioma espanhol, de países como Benin, Ucrânia e Austrália. Destaque para cartas de ouvintes de Cuba, maioria absoluta no programa! (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX via DXLD) ** SYRIA. Hi all, heard Radio Damascus last night at 2110 on 13610 in English with "you are tuned to Radio Damascus" ID, then straight into Arab music. Strong carrier but fairly low modulation. Also noted 300 Hz tone on the carrier, which sounds very similar to a CTCSS tone. Nice to see that Damascus is still alive and broadcasting. 73, (Sean G4UCJ RECEIVER: ICOM IC756; GRUNDIG SATELLIT 600, 3000 ANTENNA: Low Band vertical with 32 x 10m ground radials Indoor dipoles for 14-30 MHz and 50 MHz/Band I TV 1.3m diameter MW loop + FET Preamp., May 21, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** TAIWAN [and non]. A Equipe que faz a programação em espanhol da Rádio Taipei Internacional está indignada com os correios da Argentina e Espanha. Conforme Bonnie Cheng, apresentadora do Buzon Aereo, todas as cartas clássicas enviadas aos ouvintes destes países foram devolvidas, sob o pretexto de que poderiam espalhar o SARS. Nas duas últimas edições do programa, Bonnie explicou, de forma detalhada, que o vírus se espalha "en contacto cercano entre personas". (Célio Romais, Panorama, @tividade DX via DXLD) ** U K. BABY BROADCAST BAFFLES PILOTS LONDON, May 19 (Reuters) --- Instead of landing instructions, aircraft approaching Britain's Luton airport heard the squealing of tiny infant Freya Spratley broadcast over their radios. Authorities worked 12 hours to track the frequency and determined that a baby monitor at mother Lisa Spratley's house, located near the airport, was broadcasting her baby's cries to the cockpits of approaching planes, the BBC reported on Monday. "It was like something out of the Ghostbusters. They came down the path and stopped me and said we'd like to check something inside the house," Lisa Spratley told the station. "They said they were working on behalf of Luton airport traffic control. They'd been asked to sort out interference they'd been receiving on the airwaves and had tracked it down to our address." The BBC said there was no threat to safety: pilots who heard the infant Freya instead of air traffic control were able to switch to a different frequency. The company that made the baby monitor supplied the Spratleys with a new one. And little Freya seemed to have little idea of the commotion she had caused. REUTERS (via Andy Sennitt, DXLD) WTFK???!!! (gh) It`s a third harmonic (Tim Bucknall, UK, harmonics yahoogroup via DXLD) Of what, falling where? (gh) ** U K [and non]. Glenn, FYI/FWIW/etc.: http://www.biased-bbc.blogspot.com/ 73, (Harry Helms, NV, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Currently discusses the Jessica Lynch story, Texans in Ardmore, etc. (gh) ** U S A/HAWAII/LATIN AMERICA. 10000, 1417-, May 18. WWVH and WWV fighting it out with Spanish speakers (?drug traffickers) on USB. At least equal in strength. Unwelcome pests! (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [non]. GERMANY, 13810, 0412-, Radio Africa International (United Methodist Church), May 19. Excellent reception with French language African programming. Lovely strong, clean modulation with perfect easy to follow French (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. 1610 kHz, 1403-, TIS, May 18. Weather forecast loop, then information about the Columbia River bridge. Fair at times, but mostly poor amongst the cacophony of other stations. 1611 stations from Australia still causing a het. Computer generated voice as well 'double U double U...' (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. 1610.03, 1414-, talking house, May 17. Weakly heard tape loop, mentioning the 'Hi...This is the nice three bedroom...well placed. All new windows. Well cared for. For those...come have a look at it', and a phone number 360- 580-111?6 or 7. Again, ...?$69,500... Take a look, and thank you very much.' Best in LSB. Increased in strength during the day. I sent out John Bryant to locate the transmitter and he confirmed the location as being approximately 2.6 km from this location! Not bad for 100 mw. Coastal effect? Location was an empty trailer with a small sign in the window mentioning 1610 for more information (I have a jpeg of this). Could not see any transmitter anywhere through any of the windows, so I'm assuming it was plugged into an electrical outlet in the bathroom. Not bad, as the trailer was enveloped in aluminum siding. A new method of DXing for me --- going TO the transmitter location! Now for a QSL ;) (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Rumor is that KEZZ-1470 in Estes Park CO may get one of the country`s first ultra-short Kinstar AM antennas. If the FCC gives their approval, KEZZ may install the 40-foot Kinstar this summer to help resolve a long on-going battle between the station and local politicians over the relocation of the KEZZ antenna (Patrick Griffith, CO, NRC Domestic DX Digest May 19 via DXLD) Visitors to Rocky Mountain National Park this summer, please check this out! (gh) ** U S A. CHEVRON-TEXACO TO DROP SPONSORSHIP OF METROPOLITAN OPERA BROADCASTS http://www.nytimes.com/2003/05/21/arts/21CHEV.html ChevronTexaco announced yesterday that it would withdraw its support from the Metropolitan Opera's Saturday afternoon live radio broadcasts after the 2003-4 season, ending the longest continuous commercial sponsorship in broadcast history. Joseph Volpe, general manager of the Met, said that he was determined to continue the broadcasts without ChevronTexaco and that he would look for a new sponsor. Started on Christmas Day in 1931 with Humperdinck's "Hansel and Gretel," the Met matinee broadcasts have introduced opera to millions of people around the world. Mr. Volpe said the broadcasts had been "the single most powerful audience development program in introducing opera to families" and had inspired opera stars. "Many of the singers today first discovered opera on the radio broadcasts," he said. Patricia E. Yarrington, ChevronTexaco's vice president for public and government affairs, said in a statement, "As our business has evolved, we believe it is important to focus more of our resources directly with the countries and markets where we do business." Beginning in 1940 Texaco was the sole sponsor of the broadcasts, which are now heard live from the Met stage at Lincoln Center 20 times a year on 360 stations at an annual cost of about $7 million. Broadcast December through April, the broadcasts reach an estimated 10 million listeners in 42 countries (via Joel Rubin, NY, DXLD) Of course, the Saturday Met broadcasts are one of the oldest broadcasts in the world. They are on a syndicated network in the U.S. and on CBC and on many other stations (Joel Rubin, NY, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I knew an ill wind was blowing when Chevron took over Texaco. Will we detect a little less enthusiasm about C-T in the announcer`s voice next season? More in next issue (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. NEW JERSEY TV TOWER PROPOSAL IN QUESTION http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/ny-bc-ny-attacks-antennas0521may21,0,3139058.story?coll=ny-ap-regional-wire May 21, 2003, 6:59 AM EDT BAYONNE, N.J. (AP) A plan to build a 2,000-foot television tower is on hold after a group of broadcasters asked the Federal Aviation Administration to temporarily suspend its review of the project, The Star-Ledger of Newark, N.J., reported. The Metropolitan Television Alliance made its decision after plans for the Bayonne tower received a negative review from FAA officials who address takeoffs and landings from airports in the New York metropolitan area, said Pat Smith, a spokesman for the alliance. He did not elaborate. Building the tower in Bayonne would mean rerouting planes at three area airports, according to an FAA review released last year. A new tower would improve TV reception in the metropolitan area, which has been spotty for some households without cable since the old tower at the World Trade Center was destroyed in the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. The MTVA had asked for permission to build a temporary tower on Governor's Island in New York while the trade center site is being rebuilt, but Mayor Michael Bloomberg has said he would be unlikely to support such a plan. Since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the MTVA has been transmitting from a backup system atop the Empire State Building. Though that system is being upgraded, it is outdated. The tower in Bayonne would cost $200 million and would be the world's largest free-standing structure, surpassing the 1,815-foot CN Tower in Toronto. It would serve 11 area television stations and some FM radio stations and emergency communications systems. Copyright © 2003, The Associated Press (via Andy Sennitt, DXLD) ** U S A. IBOC: You might want to check out today's NorthEast Radio Watch, http://www.fybush.com, wherein I recount my ride in the Ibiquity Magic Van a couple of weeks ago... Note, particularly in a WTFDA context, that the suspension of standards-setting applies only to the AM system; the FM system is essentially ready to be unleashed commercially upon the world, whether we DXers are ready for it or not. s (Scott Fybush, May 19, WTFDA via DXLD) ** U S A. FRIENDS, LOYALTY BIND HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES TO THE AREA By ANTHONY VIOLANTI, News Staff Reporter, 5/18/2003 Buffalo broadcasting is the one degree of separation that binds us all. Somehow, we are all connected: from Harry Webb to Carol Jasen; from Clint Buehlman to Sandy Beach. Generations come and go but Buffalonians remain united by the memories of the broadcast personalities who left an imprint on their lives. In our town, broadcasters are family. They mirror the way we were and are - blue collar, ethnic and hard-working. Should we move on to bigger and better things, those familiar radio voices and television faces remind us of media roots that not only shaped a sense of community, but also personal history. So it is for Tim Russert. . . http://www.buffalonews.com/editorial/20030518/1012581.asp (via Fred Waterer, Ont., DXLD) ** U S A. Interesting story about the 30,000 translator apps the FCC recently received at [registration required] http://www.bizjournals.com/ct/c/419216 (Patrick Griffith Westminster, CO, USA, NRC FMTV via DXLD) ** U S A. PIRATE RADIO STATION BLOCKING WXEL SIGNAL By Joseph Mann, Business Writer http://www.sun-sentinel.com/business/local/sfl-zwxel20may20,0,1184414.story?coll=sfla%2Dbusiness%2Dheadlines Posted May 20 2003 An unlicensed radio station broadcasting from downtown Fort Lauderdale is blocking the signal of Palm Beach County-based WXEL, FM 90.7, in parts of Broward and Miami-Dade counties. The pirate station, which broadcasts Caribbean and rap music at 90.9 FM, "is obstructing our signal to thousands of listeners" in the two counties, said Jerry Carr, WXEL's station manager. The pirate's owners are unknown, but Carr said WXEL engineers tracked the broadcast signal to a building in downtown Fort Lauderdale. WXEL, a National Public Radio affiliate, has its studios in Boynton Beach and its transmitter and antenna at Lantana Road and U.S. 441. It broadcasts from Fort Pierce to northern Miami-Dade County. The pirate began broadcasting at 90.9 FM around October of last year, Carr said, and the Federal Communications Commission was immediately notified. Up until now, however, the pirate station has remained on the air. When WXEL made additional calls to the FCC, the public radio station was told that they're "working on it," Carr added. Neither the FCC nor the pirate station could be reached for comment. WXEL, as well as other local stations, have had trouble with unlicensed stations in the past. In some cases, confiscating a pirate's transmitter, antenna and other equipment only takes them off the air for a few days. "A pirate can get on the air for less than $1,000," Carr said. WXEL last month completed a $600,000 upgrade, which raised its antenna height to 1,100 feet and boosted transmission power to over 40,000 watts. "We thought this would eliminate the [pirate's] interference, but it didn't," Carr said. Typically, when the FCC receives word that someone is operating an unauthorized radio station, a federal offense, the agency sends a team to locate the source of the signal, takes this information to a federal prosecutor, seeks a warrant from a federal judge and federal marshals can then shut down the station and seize its equipment. A Florida man was recently prosecuted for operating an FM radio station in the Orlando area without FCC authorization. The man was sentenced to 9 months in prison, to be followed by a year of supervised release and community service. Aside from filing a complaint with the FCC, WXEL also has engaged an attorney in West Palm Beach and is considering a civil lawsuit against the pirate station. "WXEL believes the station is being wronged civilly because the pirate has, in essence, usurped a large pool of listeners and users of WXEL in areas where his signal is causing theirs to be compromised," said Richard Zaretsky, WXEL's lawyer. WXEL and the South Florida Sun-Sentinel are news partners (via Brock Whaley, Artie Bigley, Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. THE HURRICANE WATCH NET NEWSLETTER Welcome to the Hurricane Watch Net News Letter Page. All items presented here are intended for our audience at large. Any questions or comments may be directed to Mike Pilgrim, manager of the Hurricane Watch Net at k5mp@hwn.org. 05/12/2003 Given the broad readership of this web site, it seems prudent that we should explain for those who are not associated with Amateur Radio just who we are and what our role is during hurricane season. We are a group of licensed Amateur Radio Operators trained and organized to provide essential communications support to the National Hurricane Center during times of Hurricane emergencies. Our primary mission is to disseminate tropical storm advisory information to island communities in the Caribbean, Central America, along the Atlantic seaboard of the U.S., and throughout the Gulf of Mexico coastal areas. We also collect observed or measured weather data from amateur radio operators in the storm affected area, and convey that information to the Hurricane Forecasters in the National Hurricane Center via the amateur radio station in the center (WX4NHC). Founded in 1965 by Gerry Murphy, (Amateur radio call sign K8YUW), the Hurricane Watch Net activates 14.325 MHz whenever a hurricane is within 300 miles of projected landfall or becomes a serious threat to a populated area. For those of you who may not possess an amateur radio license, we invite you to monitor net activities on 14.325 MHz which is available on many popular general coverage receivers. Amateur Radio operators who desire to participate are encouraged to visit our membership discussion elsewhere in this web site and note the requirements particular to becoming a member of our organization. As a point of interest, let me emphasize that the Hurricane Watch Net is a group of 35 amateur radio operators strategically disbursed from Toronto, out to Bermuda, through the Caribbean Sea, Central America, Mexico and across the continental USA. We are not housed in a single location as some of our followers believe, rather, we are located such that we can provide a continuous path of communications from storm affected areas to the forecasters in the National Hurricane Center in Miami. Whether or not you have the interest or capability to listen in as we conduct our net operations, we hope that you will discover the plethora of weather related information made available on our web site. Particularly, we invite you to sign in on our ``guest book``, be sure to leave a comment or two to let us know how you think we might better serve you. We have made a link available for you to e-mail directly to Net Management for those kinds of interactions requiring direct comment. Speaking of our web site, through the diligence of our Web Master, Mr. Bobby Graves, you will continue to see enhancements both in content and functionality. We welcome your comments and/or suggestions for additional enhancements. During the off season, members of the Hurricane Watch Net are busy getting ready for the next season. While many take advantage of the slack period to tune up, overhaul, and otherwise fine tune their communications equipment (amateur radios and PC equipment), many of us behind the scenes are paying attention to such things as Web Page management and enhancement, administration of our organizational strategies, plans, recruiting process, and otherwise taking advantage of training opportunities. Many of our members attended the 8th annual mini-conference at the National Hurricane Center on February 1st, which was a full day of orientation and idea sharing as regards our work as communicators of vital weather data. Among the highlights was a personal presentation from Capt. Dave Tenneson, amateur radio operator NL7MT who pilots one of the many NOAA Hurricane Hunter Aircraft during the hurricane season. Perhaps last season many of you tuned in as Capt. Dave checked in to the Hurricane Watch Net with first hand reports from within the eye of Hurricanes Lili and Isidore as each were in the area of the Yucatán Peninsula... During the week of April 14-19 several of us attended the National Hurricane Conference in New Orleans in which we learned of the latest technologies, strategies, and preparations for the upcoming Hurricane season. Additionally, we heard the year 2003 predictions from Dr. Bill Gray (12 named storms, 8 Hurricanes of which 3 will be of Major intensity). Be sure to refer to the link to Dr. Gray`s web site (on our home page) where you will see updates as they are made available. Of all topics discussed in New Orleans, I suppose the one of greatest interest was the decision to begin this year issuing forecast information out to 4 and 5 days ahead of the storm. Given these requirements are established primarily for the Navy`s benefit when ships must be moved out of harms way, or for NASA who requires plenty of lead time to properly secure a shuttle, and for off shore drillers to have time to safely evacuate their crews to safety, it is the decision here in the Hurricane Watch Net to basically ignore the 4/5- day forecast information as it is estimated the margin for error can be as much as 275 to 375 miles when attempting to project point positions that far in advance. You will also note that the Media will treat this new data merely as ``zones of influence`` rather than to attempt any ``point tracking`` in days 4 and 5. Now as we approach the 2003 Hurricane Season, we at the Hurricane Watch Net are hopeful for another season of minimal affects on human life and property. On the other hand, we stand ready to provide all the support as needed during these times of anticipated hurricane emergencies. In closing, let me thank you for your interest in our activities at the Hurricane Watch Net, and invite your comments and suggestions to make our service and this web site more beneficial for your personal needs. Please let us know of topics and ideas you would like to see discussed here in our web page. Your comments may be directed directly to myself, k5mp@hwn.org. Sincerely, Mike Pilgrim, Amateur Radio Station K5MP, Manager, Hurricane Watch Net The following reprint is provided in response to popular demand For those who don`t understand this ``ham radio talk`` but wish to participate in future activities, please refer to the ``FAQ`` selection on the main menu of this web site for guidance as to how you too may participate. Regarding membership in the Hurricane Watch Net and a question frequently asked, let me first of all remind you that you must be an individual (no group memberships available) with a valid amateur radio license authorized for operations on the 20 meter phone band. Secondly you must read in it`s entirety the ``Membership Information`` section here on the web site main menu, and if you feel you qualify, then please feel free to submit the provided application. Please understand that we are not attempting to swell our numbers, rather we are interested primarily in filling certain voids in our coverage in the areas west of the Mississippi. We will entertain applications from anyplace, and will certainly consider any outstanding candidate irregardless of location. Please review carefully our requirements in the above mentioned section of this web site, and if you feel you have something to offer, then by all means, please submit the application. Keep in mind that we are looking for those with the best communications skills (both personal and technical), availability and propagation to the affected areas and the NHC as needed, net control experience, knowledge of our net operations and personal awareness of what we do and how we operate, and a respectable _expression of how you feel you can serve our needs. For those who have short-wave receivers capable of reception on the 14 MHz short-wave band, we hope you will tune in when our net is active. Be advised that we will activate the net on 14.325 MHz when a hurricane is within 300 miles of projected land fall. You may subscribe to current weather advisories (see ``Subscribe`` button on the homepage). For those of you who are licensed amateur radio operators, you may learn from various sources when our net will be active. Please be advised that as a normal course of business we handle all net communications within our own membership. On occasion however, it becomes necessary for us to request assistance for the relay of essential information; at that time we will solicit the assistance of non member stations on frequency. You can be most helpful if you will await our request for that relay assistance rather than to volunteer in an unsolicited form. In order to reduce double transmissions and confusion, do not transmit to the station you hear and wish to relay until permission to do so is given by the Net Control Station. Copyright © 1999 - 2003 The Hurricane Watch Net All rights reserved Last updated: Monday, May 12, 2003 Webmaster: Bobby Graves (KB5HAV) (http://www.hwn.org via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) See also RECEIVER NEWS below ** UZBEKISTAN. 7285, 1330-, Radio Tashkent, May 18. Radio Tashkent comes up with the short straw here. IS is just audible before their English broadcast (I could hear no other parallels [such as 17775, 15295] --- a sign of declining sunspots and MUFs, unfortunately). Then totally overpowered by Voice of Vietnam sign-on with listed Cambodian at good level (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VENEZUELA [non]. Hola Glenn, Saludos desde Catia La Mar, VENEZUELA. El pasado domingo 18 pude anotar otra frecuencia para Aló Presidente: 13750 kHz, aparte de las ya activas de 17750, 13680 y 11670 kHz. Esta vez la peor señal era la de 13680. Excelentes: 13750 y 11670 [vía Cuba] (Adán González, May 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VIETNAM. 5034.77, 1247-, Voice of Vietnam, 3rd program, May 17. Hmong Service with fair reception, classical music. Parallel to much stronger 6165. A question re the latter. If I recall, Saigon used to have a transmitter on this (or was it 6160?). Is this the same transmitter? Brief talk by YL at 1250 and into local vocal. 6378.57, 1126-, Lai Chau, May 17. Presumed logging with weak Vietnamese style music with much atmospheric noise. Poor overall. Much stronger carrier at 1255 recheck, and drifted to 6378.39. Modulation is still very low! (Walter Salmaniw, MD, Grayland WA DXpedition, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ZIMBABWE [non]. They updated their web: More tests on new SW Radio Africa frequency 4880 kHz: Further broadcast times will be Wednesday and Thursday 07.05pm - 07.25pm [sic --- if it`s p.m. you don`t put a zero before it! --gh] (Zimbabwe Time) Listeners in Zimbabwe will be able to receive our signal on 4880 kHz as well as on the usual 6145. We need to know whether the new test signal is an improvement and would urge listeners to contact us with views. 023 275 030 : 00 44 20 8387 1441 : views@swradioafrica.com (Roberto Scaglione http://www.bclnews.it hard-core-dx via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. Re 3-086: the station on 4335.34 and 5728.39 --- perhaps it be significant that the difference between the two frequencies is 1393.05 --- so is there a MW outlet there, which could be mixing with one of the SW frequencies to produce the other? (gh, DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED [non]. Re DXLD 3-086 UNIDENTIFIED 6315: V. of Tigray Revolution has been on 6350 for a year (?) now. The soccer game in question was probably Africa Cup Winners Cup game Etoile Sahel (Tunisia) vs. Club Olympique (Mali) ending 4-0, which took place 17 May. I don't know what kind of receiver was used, possibly one with IF of 455 kHz. Tunisia is listed on 7225 1600-2300. Again old formula 2 x 455 is 910. 7225-910 is 6315. I assume (even if it's dangerous) that it was RTT Tunis program heard on 6315 due to receiver "mirror". Well, the language doesn't match, I believe Tunis has only Arabic programs on SW (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, May 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. Re 3-086 on 6585+ -- see BOLIVIA in same issue! (gh) UNIDENTIFIED [non]. This is my last comment about this unID 9270 (at least for a while) :)). On 19 May at 1830 on 9270, the station with vibrating carrier and Middle-East/Central Asian sounding music was again audible. And it is Tajik Radio, second harmonic of 4635. Not a Turkish harmonic, but harmonic anyway :) 73 (Jari Savolainen, Finland, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Strong signal here in south Italy on 9270; it's Voice of Greece, // 9420 - 9375 - 15650. No more signal on 9270 at 2256 when 9420 go off, and 9375 and 15650 are still on. This is an harmonic from Kavala, but his formula? (Roberto Scaglione, ibid.) Take your pick; or both?? UNIDENTIFIED. International Amateur Radio Union Region 2 -- April 2003 MONITORING SYSTEM NEWSLETTER http://www.echelon.ca/iarumsr2 INTRODUCTION This Newsletter contains news about interference from non-Amateur stations heard in the Amateur bands in IARU Region 2 during the month of March, as well as selected news about interference heard recently in IARU Regions 1 and 3. Notes about interference in bands which are not allocated exclusively to the Amateur Service are for information only. If you have any comments or questions about these news items, please contact your national Amateur Radio society or the IARU Region 2 MS Coordinator. NOTABLE INTRUDERS HEARD IN REGION 2 The following intruders were notable in Region 2 during March : 7006 kHz J3E Encrypted speech, also on 7018, 7021, and 7102 7100 A3E Unidentified SWBC. 14280 A3E Unidentified SWBC, drifting frequency. 24, 28 MHz A3E,J3E Pirates and "CB" types galore! Mysterious speech signals are again being reported in the 40 m band. So far they have been heard in the southern USA on 7006, 7018, 7020, 7021, and 7102 kHz, transmitting encrypted speech in a single-sideband (SSB) mode. According to reports these signals are very similar to ones heard on about the same frequencies between late 1999 and mid- 2001, although they seem to be a little weaker now. More observations of these signals are required. As reported last month, the shortwave broadcasts continue on 7100 kHz by at least two different broadcasters, one on 7099.98 and the other on 7100.00 kHz. They are sometimes on the air at the same time. Three broadcasters known to use this frequency are Voice of the Broad Masses (VoBM) from Eritrea (in scattered one-hour periods from 0330 to 1830 UT), Voice of the Islamic Revolution of Iraq (actually a clandestine broadcast from Iran, 0330-0530 UT) and Voice of the Islamic Republic of Iran or Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB, 1930-2000 UT). It does seem confusing. An unidentified shortwave broadcast is being heard regularly in Argentina on 14280 kHz around 1100 UT, apparently from Asia. In Region 3 broadcasts on this frequency are being variously reported as Iran (after 0130 UT) and Beijing (0800-0900 UT). This signal on 14280 kHz is not to be confused with Radio Pyongyang, reported in both Argentina and Canada on 14250 kHz. The unidentified code groups at 0210 UT on 3523 kHz and the "310" broadcast from France at 1700 UT on 14320 kHz reported in previous months are no longer heard and we hope they have gone elsewhere. This seems typical of the clandestine "numbers" broadcasts, many of which change their skeds (frequency and/or time) every few months, some even monthly. An unidentified data signal occupied 3797 kHz for at least 2 nights in early March and was heard with good strength in eastern North America. Although this signal was not a major source of interference, except for those two nights, it is of some technical interest. The signal was an F7D emission with 4 frequencies within a 400 Hz bandwidth. The data rate was 100 or 200 baud and the data was contained within frames of 280 millisecond duration. There seemed to be considerable redundancy in the data, possibly due to one or more data channels being "strapped" together. It was not possible to read out the traffic. A display of the data stream, produced by the Analyzer2000 analysis software shows the structure of the signal. The top panel shows the last received frame of data bits (the vertical axis is frequency); the center panel is a "raster" display of successive frames of data (each horizontal line is 280 msec long); and the bottom panel shows the autocorrelation function for the 280 msec frame (the strong peak at 280 is just beyond the right-hand edge of the display). In the raster display, vertical bars are formed by bits having the same position within the frame. If the bit always has the same value, then the bar is always the same colour. This signal is similar to another unidentified signal that appears sometimes in the 30 m band, with center frequency of 10105.2 kHz. (The 30 m band is a shared band, where the Amateur Service has only Secondary status.) (An image of the described display will appear in the Newsletter published on the website at http://www.echelon.ca/iarumsr2/newsletter.html ) Our monthly report would not be complete without mentioning the persistent and too-numerous radio pirates and "CB" type operators who occupy our 24 and 28 MHz bands, using AM (A3E) and SSB (J3E upper and lower) modes, some with beeps, some with echoes, and none of them with any right or privilege to be there. HIGHLIGHTS FROM REGION 1 The March Newsletter from Region 1 is not available yet. Please stay tuned! HIGHLIGHTS FROM REGION 3 In his Newsletter for February, B. L. Manohar (Arasu), VU2UR, offers the following comments : "A number of data transmitting stations using A7D, F1B, F7D, H2D, M7B modes are regularly reported. The famous "Havana Gurgle" on 18090 kHz is several years old and it is celebrating Birthdays without any hindrance from any authority. "... NZART [New Zealand] and WIA [Australia] are quite regular in reporting Radio Pyongyang, DPR Korea, on 3560 kHz and other harmonics as well. Second harmonics of BBC, All India Radio and Radio Beijing were also heard on 14320, 14290 and 14280 kHz respectively "WIA [Australia] is keeping a tab on 14044 kHz and ARSI [India] are regularly reporting these SE Asian stations, conversing in the slot 2300-0200 UT. Several channels in 40 and 20 mb are used by the Indonesian pirates, as usual, as if these were their International Frequency Registration Bureau [IFRB] registered frequencies. "Unless many of the Member Societies of our Region organize effectively and report, with follow-up of their monitoring systems, it would not be easy to get these pirates/intruders out of our bands." In his report to Arasu for WIA (Australia), Henry, VK8HA, comments that the "mob" of radio pirates on 14144 kHz USB are of ethnic Chinese origin, speaking a southern Chinese dialect akin to Hokkia [Hakka?] but mixed with Indonesian words. Further, by a process of elimination, the other mob on 14044 USB seem to be from either Thailand or Cambodia. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Newsletter was produced from information provided by the following organizations and individuals. Their contributions and encouragement are hereby acknowledged. Any errors or omissions are entirely the responsibility of the Region 2 MS Coordinator. ARRL (USA) and Coordinator KØBOG KH6B (IARU) LU5DG (IARU) RAC (Canada) and Coordinator VE6JY IARU MS International Coordinator, ZL1BAD IARU MS Region 1 Coordinator, OD5TE IARU MS Region 3 Coordinator, VU2UR DARC (Germany) MS Coordinator, DJ9KR - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - This Newsletter is published for and distributed to the IARU Region 2 Executive Committee, Region 2 member societies and associated individuals by the IARU Region 2 Monitoring System Coordinator, for their use and information. Permission to use information from this Newsletter in other Amateur Radio publications is hereby granted, provided that proper credit is given. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Prepared by : Martin H. Potter, VE3OAT Co-ordinator of the IARU Region 2 Monitoring System P. O. Box 84, Greely, Ontario K4P 1N4, Canada (via Horacio Nigro, Uruguay, May 21, DXLD) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ BOEHLERT, HALL TOUT WEATHER RADIO AS A HOMELAND SECURITY ESSENTIAL Committee on Science, SHERWOOD BOEHLERT, CHAIRMAN Ralph M. Hall, Texas, Ranking Democrat http://www.house.gov/science May 20, 2003 Press Contacts: Heidi Mohlman Tringe Heidi.Tringe@mail.house.gov Jeff Donald Jeffrey.Donald@mail.house.gov (202) 225-4275 WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, Science Committee Chairman Sherwood Boehlert (R-NY) and Ranking Democrat Ralph M. Hall (D-TX) sent a letter to Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge, touting the homeland security benefits of "NOAA Weather Radio" and requesting that the early warning technology be added as an emergency preparedness kit item. "We were recently briefed on the NOAA [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration] Weather Radio system and its capability to get warnings to the public for all hazards, including terrorist attacks. We think NOAA's system should be expanded to deal with homeland security," wrote Boehlert and Hall. The Members urged Secretary Ridge to add NOAA Weather Radio (NWR) receivers as an emergency preparedness kit item and consider promoting the system on the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) website. In addition, they expressed their support for the President's fiscal year 2004 budget request to upgrade the current NWR system to provide local emergency management officials an authenticated, secure, electronic method to send non-weather emergency messages on NWR. They stated, "The Committee on Science recognizes that science and technology are keystones of national security and improving technology is critical. While local emergency managers can use NOAA Weather Radio to broadcast non-weather emergency messages for hazards such as chemical spills and civil emergencies, the process requires manual intervention and can be time consuming." A copy of the letter is available upon request. NOAA Weather Radio is a nationwide radio network, run by NOAA's National Weather Service. Operated directly from government facilities, NWR transmits into the homes of the American public through commercially available receivers and can be programmed to self-activate, so they can alert the public to impending threats anytime day or night. NWR has been successfully alerting communities to natural disasters for the past three decades, and has recently developed into an all-hazards warning system, which can broadcast a wide range of vital updates, including AMBER Alerts and terrorist attacks. Boehlert and Hall also held a press conference today, with other members of the Science Committee, NOAA Administrator Ret. Navy Vice Adm. Conrad C. Lautenbacher, and industry representatives, to increase public awareness of the technology. "Up to the minute warnings on NOAA Weather Radio helped many families seek shelter from the record breaking tornado systems that recently plagued the nation's mid-section," said Lautenbacher. "Coordination between the network of NOAA forecasters, quick acting emergency managers and the broadcast media provided extremely timely warnings." Environment, Technology and Standards (ETS) Subcommittee Chairman Vern Ehlers (R-MI) noted, "Weather emergencies can strike any part of the country at any time. Just last week NOAA Weather Radios were crucial in alerting residents of Marquette, Michigan to a mandatory evacuation of the town due to a severe flood. This was very early in the morning, at 6:00 am, when many people were still asleep and only learned of the flood through their Weather Radio." "NOAA Weather Radio is yet another way in which NOAA can contribute to our homeland security. From NOAA's Space Environment Center, which works closely with the Air Force to ensure accurate GPS readings, to NOAA's Profiler Network, which provides wind data for the prediction of the probable path of harmful substances that may be released into the atmosphere, NOAA is already working on many homeland security fronts. It makes sense for NOAA to expand its weather radio system to get non-weather emergency messages to local emergency managers and the public," said ETS Ranking Democrat Mark Udall (D-CO) Representative Frank Lucas (R-OK) stated, "My congressional district is in the middle of 'Tornado Alley,' so I've seen firsthand the injuries and loss of life that can occur when residents aren't aware that a storm is coming. This month alone, more than 100 Oklahomans have been injured in tornadoes and windstorms. I'd like to see these radios become as prevalent in Oklahoma homes as smoke detectors. When severe storms hit our state, they could be the difference between life and death." "As the Representative of communities who have been devastated by hurricanes in the past, I know how important the 24-hour radio network can be. I wanted to come out today and show my support for this system and encourage the public to use it, it could save their life," said Rep. Nick Lampson (D-TX). "The radio is vital to those living in Southeast Texas due to the hurricane threat but it is also an important part of the Amber Plan. Amber Alerts are sent out over this system and the more people that have it, the better for our children." ### 108-065 Heidi Mohlman Tringe, Communications Director, Committee on Science 2320 RHOB, Washington, DC 20515 202-225-6371 (Voice) 202-226-3875 (Fax) 202-225-1981 (Cell) (via Dan Robinson, DXLD) TELEGRAMS, NOT TELEPHONES, PROVIDED MOST LONG-DISTANCE COMMUNICATIONS Sat, May 17, 2003, By DAN NERHAUGEN For the Journal Good telegraph operators were hot commodities 100 years ago this week, leading to big rewards from one employer. . . http://www.wisinfo.com/journal/spjlocal/278634249201000.shtml (Stevens Point Journal via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) PROPAGATION +++++++++++ The following is a Real Audio file (37-kb) than runs for approximately 19 seconds. (This is an excerpt from a third-generation copy.) Many thanks for the assistance of N5JEH in creating it. The original recording was made by Glenn Hauser when he was with the USAF at Korat AFB (Nakhon Ratchasima) in Thailand and is of diurnal equatorial sporadic-E on 94.2 MHz from Singapore (at apx 1000 miles) at 0545 Z on 28 September 1970. This is near noon local time and has a midpoint almost on the geomagnetic dip-equator. Note the extreme choppiness to the signal (very similar sounding to the nocturnal F2- related TE flutter). The broadcast is in the Malay language. See the October 1997 issue of QST (pp 39-41) for an excellent description of the phenomenon in the article by Dr. Whitehead. http://www.qsl.net/wa5iyx/ra/94eqes01.ra (From WA5IYX, Pat Dyer, http://home.swbell.net/pjdyer/aud-fil3.htm via DXLD) And now amigos before going QRT , here is Arnie Coro's HF propagation update and forecast.... YET ANOTHER CORONAL HOLE.... we had only a two day break from coronal hole activity, and here we are again seeing the A index, the planetary geomagnetic disturbance indicator moving UP, as a consequence of the solar wind coming from the coronal hole !!! Solar activity is low, and the sunspot number count is near 75. Solar flux is expected to increase slowly during the next several days... it was around 130 units when I was writing the script of the show around 18 hours UTC Tuesday, that's around 2 pm local time here in Havana. There are very good chances of Sporadic E skip events, so be on the lookout for TV DX on channels two to six during the next three to five days (Arnie Coro A., CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited May 20 via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via DXLD) FORECAST OF SOLAR AND GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY 21 MAY - 16 JUNE 2003 Solar activity is expected to range from very low to moderate levels during the period. Low to moderate levels are expected early in the period with the return of a zone of active longitude that contained old Regions 345, 349, and 348. These regions are expected to have C- class and possibly M-class potential. Very low to low level activity is expected when these regions depart around 03 June. No greater than 10 MeV proton events are expected during the forecast period. The greater than 2 MeV electron flux is expected to reach high levels everyday of the period. The geomagnetic field is expected to range from quiet to major storm levels during the period. A relatively weak coronal hole high speed flow is expected to rotate into a geo-effective position on 21 – 22 May and could produce active to minor storm levels. A large negative polarity coronal hole high speed flow is expected on 27 – 30 May with major storm levels possible. A very large southern hemisphere coronal hole is due to return on 02 – 12 June with major storm levels possible. :Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt :Issued: 2003 May 20 2211 UTC # Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Environment Center # Product description and SEC contact on the Web # http://www.sec.noaa.gov/wwire.html # # 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table # Issued 2003 May 20 # # UTC Radio Flux Planetary Largest # Date 10.7 cm A Index Kp Index 2003 May 21 130 15 3 2003 May 22 135 15 3 2003 May 23 140 20 4 2003 May 24 145 20 4 2003 May 25 150 20 4 2003 May 26 150 20 4 2003 May 27 150 25 5 2003 May 28 150 35 6 2003 May 29 145 20 4 2003 May 30 145 12 3 2003 May 31 140 8 3 2003 Jun 01 130 15 3 2003 Jun 02 120 20 4 2003 Jun 03 110 35 6 2003 Jun 04 100 30 5 2003 Jun 05 100 30 5 2003 Jun 06 95 35 6 2003 Jun 07 90 30 5 2003 Jun 08 95 20 4 2003 Jun 09 95 20 4 2003 Jun 10 95 30 5 2003 Jun 11 100 20 4 2003 Jun 12 100 20 4 2003 Jun 13 105 15 3 2003 Jun 14 105 15 3 2003 Jun 15 110 15 3 2003 Jun 16 120 15 3 (http://www.sec.noaa.gov/radio May 20 via WORLD OF RADIO 1182, DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-086, May 19, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3e.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1182: RFPI: Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0700/0830, 1300/1430 on 7445 and/or 15039 WWCR: Wed 0930 9475 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1182.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1182.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1182h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1182h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1182.html WORLD OF RADIO on WJIE: At 1630 UT check Sun May 18 on 13595, WOR was again already in progress, and it was still 1179 as played last week, rather than 1180, 1181, or preferably the latest, 1182. Has anyone heard the scheduled Sat 0930 or Sun 1030 airings on 7490 or 13595? (gh) UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIAL Thanks for the good job you do; it is always a pleasure to read your bulletins. It must take you hours every time to edit them? 73's (Tore Larsson, Sweden, ARC) {Yes} ** AFGHANISTAN. AFGHANISTAN: ATTEMPTS TO SMUGGLE SATELLITE DISHES FOILED | Text of report by Iranian radio from Mashhad on 19 May An attempt to smuggle equipment for satellite dishes to Herat has been foiled. A report from the Central News Unit in Kabul quoted the head of Herat customs saying that hundreds of satellite dishes had been confiscated on the verbal order of the governor of Herat, Esmail Khan, at Torghondi customs checkpoint on the Afghan-Turkmen border. He said that this order was aimed at preventing the development of corruption in various areas of Afghanistan. By a similar instruction earlier, the governor of Herat, Esmail Khan, placed a ban on cable TV, the setting up of entertainment centres and women singing. Source: Voice of the Islamic Republic of Iran, Mashhad, in Dari 0330 gmt 19 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) Backsliders ** AFGHANISTAN. CABLE TV BACK ON IN AFGHAN CAPITAL DESPITE HIGH COURT BAN | Text of report by Afghan news agency Hindokosh Kabul, Hindokosh News Agency, 29 Sowr 1382 [19 May]: Cable television programmes have started in Kabul after a four months gap. Once again the cable television network has commenced its programmes four months after the head of the Supreme Court Mowlawi Fazl Hadi Shinwari banned it. The chief researcher of the Academy of Sciences, Abdol Jabar Abid, commenting on this issue, said: The BBC, CNN and Al-Jazeera television networks broadcast these programmes, and they are beneficial for people, especially for those who need education. Four months ago Minister of Information and Culture Mr Sayd Makhdum Rahin had said that cable television programmes would resume in a legal framework, and would also pay tax to the Ministry of Finance. The deputy justice minister for administrative affairs Mr [Mohammad Ashraf] Rasuli has said that they have not yet succeeded in forming an appropriate framework for cable television programmes. Source: Hindokosh news agency, Kabul, in Dari 1300 gmt 19 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** AFGHANISTAN/UK. SOLAR POWER BRINGS BBC WORLD SERVICE TO BAMIAN | Text of report by press release from BBC on 19 May Two years after the Taleban destroyed two huge Buddha statues in Bamian in central Afghanistan amid international furore, BBC World Service has erected a solar powered FM transmitter to bring BBC World Service to the predominantly Hazara population of the region. Apart from a few private generators, Bamian has no electrical power which is why BBC World Service chose solar energy to power the new 89.0 MHz frequency. This is the fourth FM frequency BBC World Service has launched in Afghanistan since the Taleban regime fell in November 2001. FM frequencies already transmit BBC World Service in high quality sound to millions of Afghans in the capital, Kabul, Mazar-e-Sharif and Jalalabad in eastern Afghanistan. [WTFK???] "Throughout more than two decades of conflict, Bamian became one of the most neglected regions of Afghanistan. Almost the entire population fled under the Taleban. There was little investment in the area. It has never had a power station or any radio facilities," said Behrouz Afagh, head of Eurasia region at BBC World Service. "Now the population are returning to Bamian. For the first time people in the region can listen to the World Service on FM," he said. The new solar powered FM transmitter will broadcast 24 hours a day with programmes predominantly in Pashto and Persian. BBC World Service has an unparalleled reach in Afghanistan. A recent survey in Kabul found that 82 per cent of Afghans in the capital listen to BBC World Service broadcasts every week. The survey - the first since the Taleban left power - found BBC World Service is the leading broadcaster in Kabul with 88 per cent of Afghans perceiving BBC World Service as a trusted source of information. BBC World Service plans to expand its FM presence in Afghanistan with further FM frequencies in other provincial cities over the coming year. Source: BBC press release, London, in English 19 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** ARGENTINA. Recuerden que la página web mantenida por el colega santafesino Luciano Gentile, con abundantísima información sobre la radio argentina, puede disfrutarse haciendo "click" en http://www.geocities.com/radioestaciones (Arnaldo Slaen, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. X Band: Heart n Soul Productions Ltd, 5 Phoenix Street, Castle Hill 2154. Trading name is also a BCB callsign, 2ME. They currently own 57 licences in the extended AM band, and as such, are the largest single owner of such licences in Australia. Recently granted an Australia-wide content licence by the ABA to be used in conjunction with the expanded AM band transmitters. 2ME Sydney 1638 broadcasts in Arabic and English, as a bilingual station targeting Arabic people in NSW. The program is networked to 3ME Melbourne 1647. In 1999 there were plans to extend this to Adelaide. 2ME Address: Suite 6, 5 Macquarie Street, Parramatta 2150. T: 02 9635 1638 Owner Sid Mehri is also the owner of Hygrade Properties Pty Ltd (see #40) whose frequencies are actually used to carry the 2ME and 3ME program. Heart n Soul Productions is also the operator of a second format brand, known as Radio 16 NTC, the Country Music Network. The ID is `The best mix in the country on Radio 16 NTC`. Radio 16 NTC is currently broadcasting on 1611 Tamworth, 1620 Armidale and New England, 1629 Bathurst and 1701 Sydney. Address: 5 Macquarie Street, Parramatta 2150. T: 02 9899 9633 (Tim Gaynor MWOZ via May NZ DX Times via DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. NEW SW/NUEVA OC/NOVA OC --- 18/Mayo/2003 1205 UT 6.586.1v Radio Nueva Esperanza, El Alto, Depto. La Paz, Bolivia Av. Rául Salmón, 92 entre Calle 4 y 5, Zona 12 de Octubre, El Alto - La Paz - Bolivia Tel. (02) 282-5269 ID OM "Desde la República de Bolivia, transmite Radio Nueva Esperanza en 6.585 MHz de onda corta, banda de 49 metros. Anunciando la pronta venida de nuestro Señor Jesus Cristo" Esta rádio já transmite por onda média em 1520 kHz conforme anúncio da rádio e está no WRTH2003. Anúncio na rádio também da Libreria Nueva Esperanza no mesmo endereço. 73's e QRV (Rogildo Fontenelle Aragão, Cochabamba - Bolivia, a.k.a. Quillacollo-Bolivia, Lowe HF-225E - Sony ICF-2001D - LW 50m, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOLIVIA. 4796.88, Radio Mallku, Uyuni, 1010+, May 15. Local ads in Aymara & Spanish. ID by female: "Radio Mallku". Other ID and ann.: "Radio Mallku, labrando y construyendo....transmitiendo programas de.....Radio Mallku, emitiendo espacios radiofonicos para la cultura popular...."; Andean music. 24432 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentina, hard- core-dx via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. 12575, Radio Globo, Río de Janeiro, 1200+, reportada por Adan Mur, en esta frecuencia alimentadora, en modo A3H. Identificación de la emisora, mencionando la frecuencia de los 1220 KHZ. SINPO 45544 (Adán Mur, Paraguay, Conexión Digital via DXLD) maritime band ** CANADA. RCI frequency change starting May 21 for 2200-0000 (World at Six, As It Happens) 6140 starting Wednesday, replacing 13670, to benefit New England, NY, NJ --- 9590, which was expected to do well, was skipping over that region (Bill Westenhaver, RCI, CKUT International Radio Report May 18, notes by Ricky Leong, via DXLD) As requested by John Figliozzi ** CANADA. MANY CANADIANS HAPPY WITH CBC The Gazette, Saturday, May 10, 2003 Your May 3 editorial "State media no solution" was not very complimentary to the CBC. My radio listening time is divided up between the CBC, 40 per cent, Radio-Canada, 15 per cent, the classic station, 15 per cent. Vermont Public Radio, 15 per cent and no radio at all the rest of the time. The noise that is classed as music on the other FM and AM stations is nothing but irritating. This racket coupled with the very invasive advertising makes for a speedy turn-off. I had no idea that cost of running the CBC, as you say in the editorial, was only $33 per person per year. This is really a bargain. You say that there is a very small percentage of Canadians who listen to CBC regularly. I doubt this. I'm sure that many Canadians are happy with the service of the CBC but do not come up on any supposedly accurate popularity polls. I guess these polls make many people like me irrelevant and ready for the dustbin of history (Frank Moller, Westmount, [Letter to the Editor] (c) Copyright 2003 Montreal Gazette via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** CHINA. The Beijing 50 kW transmitter on 17625 is active again with CNR2 on a reduced schedule, using 17615 (as RFA jammer) 0300-0700 and 17625 0700-1100. The switch from 17615 to 17625 takes from 30 to 60 seconds, typical of older transmitters. On the other hand, CNR2 on 7230 seems not to be a move from 7200 but a programme change at Xi`an, while 7200 Beijing 50 kW also seems to be gone (Olle Alm, Sweden, May 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CHINA. CHINESE COMMUNIST PARTY PROPAGANDA NEEDS RETHINK, OFFICIAL SAYS The Chinese Communist Party's head of propaganda has called for a radical overhaul and strategy rethink in propaganda units. Writing in the party journal Qiushi, Li Changchun said propaganda units, including party media organs, must become more market-oriented, and produce newsworthy reports which have more relevance to people's lives. Li said all party propaganda organs, including publishing houses, the media and cultural troupes, must be run like commercial enterprises and should even seek new markets overseas. Li predicted that as China's economy opened up to the world, "hostile Western forces" would keep trying to Westernize and divide China, people's ideas and moral values would become more diversified and could even become distorted. Li warned that China was already suffering from a decline in morality and a lack of faith and trust. He said propaganda units must therefore raise public morale by highlighting the party's achievements in market economic reforms and social prosperity, while exposing and criticizing any problems that had provoked public anger and complaints. The party should also tighten controls over the Internet and prohibit any harmful information, Li added. The following is the text of the article by Li Changchun, member of the standing committee of the Politburo under the CCP Central Committee, entitled: "Use important thinking of 'three representations' to guide propaganda and ideological work", published by Chinese magazine Qiushi (Seeking Truth) web site on 1 May . . . [extremely long article skipped as it would take up almost half of this issue; maybe someone can find the website, and it is in English as noted below --- gh] . . .The significance of succeeding in the party's propaganda and ideological work is enormous and the task is most arduous. Under the leadership of the CCP Central Committee with Comrade Hu Jintao as its general secretary and the guidance of Deng Xiaoping Theory and the important thinking of the "three representations", we must study and implement in depth the spirit of the 16th CCP National Congress, unite as one, rouse ourselves to make the country prosperous, serve as a link between the past and the future, advance with the times, accomplish the important and glorious mission entrusted to us by the CCP Central Committee, and duly contribute to the building of a well- off society in an all-round way and the creation of a new look in the building of socialism with Chinese characteristics. Source: Qiushi, Beijing, in English 1 May 03 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. 5958.18, La Voz de los Centauros, Villavicencio. May 2003 - 1140 UT. This station is off air during long periods but now activated with good signal. Belongs to CARACOL and drift of some 10- parts up/down. Also heard during the evenings. Enclosed recording of "La Voz de los Centauros" http://homepage.sverige.net/~a-0901/ (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin May 18, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** COSTA RICA. Radio América, San José, is now at: http://www.radioamerica780am.com and there has been no change in description of Radio America 850 since January (Tetsuya Hirahara/RNM, May 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CROATIA. A foreign service of Hrvatski Radio, besides SW frequencies also broadcasts on 1134 (not // 1125). Heard programmes in Croatian, Spanish: 0230-0300, English: 1800-1803, 0200-0230 (May). Programmes at 1800 is only 3 min duration (Robert Petraitis, Lithuania in an email (9/5-2003), Medium Wave Circle email list) Croatia on 1134 is in English at 1500 (Stefano Valianti, Italy, May 17th ibid) I hear Voice of Croatia in English at 2200-2203 on 1134 with news (Steve Whitt, Yorkshire, UK, May 17th, ibid., all via Mike Barraclough, DXLD) The programme in English at 1500 gmt on 1134 kHz continues until 1530. (Stefano Valianti, Italy, May 18th, Medium Wave Circle email list via Barralclough, DXLD)) Following the change in the schedule of Vof Croatia on 28th April (see email news posting 16 May), I haven't heard any English news so emailed the station to find out if they still carried English. Their reply mentions 1134 kHz mediumwave only, with English at 0600, 1000, 1500, 1800 and 2200 UT:- Dear Mr. Pennington, Thank you for listening to our program. We are a small, but determined team and are hoping to make the time spent with us as fun as possible. You can tune into the English portion of our program every day at 8, noon, 17, 20 and 24 hours CE[S]T on medium waves 1134. Hope you enjoy the program and let us know what you think about it. Yours sincerely, Sandra Kalogjera, editor [English at 2200-2225 UT on 1134 easily heard here in the UK with "Croatia Today" programme. Shortwave 6165 and 13830 didn't carry this English programme at 2200 although these frequencies were in parallel with 1134 in Croatian earlier in the evening, 18 May] (Alan Pennington, BDXC-UK, Caversham UK, via DXLD) ** CUBA. This is Radio Havana Cuba amigos, and let me provide you with a news item related to our station engineering department. The 15120 kiloHertz frequency broadcast to Europe will be off the air for several weeks, as the old antenna system is taken down and the new array is installed... So, for those of you in Europe and also in North America that picked up the 15120 kiloHertz frequency, please receive our apologies, we will try to have the new antenna up as soon as possible amigos !!! (Arnie Coro, CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited May 17 via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via DXLD) {Better not! Nigeria on 15120, and RHC subsequently heard on 11760} ?? News to me they had been on 15120 lately, if he is talking about 2030-2130 UT? Last reported on 11760 ex-9505 ex-11760 ex-11670 ex-13 MHz frequencies, tho they did use 15120 in the dim distant past (gh, DXLD) Glenn, Caught the CAm release of RHC again today, May 18. It is still running 2300 to midnight and still on 9550. Looks like it's set in for awhile (John H. Carver Jr., Mid-North Indiana, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CYPRUS TURKISH. 6150,7 11.5 0018 Radio Bayrak International played pop from the 60-ies but very sparse with calls. 2-3. RÅM (Rolf Ahman, Sweden, SW Bulletin May 18, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ECUADOR. Finally after many years in Quito I have fitted a decent earth connection. A thick 1.90 meter long copper pole down into the earth irrigated with water containing 2 kg salt plus 5 meter long copper cable to my receiver. Really improved reception. [in this issue see also COLOMBIA, PERU, UNIDENTIFIED] 5966.63, La Voz del Upano, Tena. May 14 2003 - 1232 UT. Quite sure this station for some reason relaying "Radio María Ecuador" March 12 0235 UT on 5966.59 kHz (see SWB 1507). Listen to the recording from this occasion (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin May 18, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) Where? ** ECUADOR [and non]. As previewed, this week`s Viva Miami on WRMI is a conversation between Jeff White and Allen Graham, of HCJB and DX Party Line. They went over the process leading to the decision to cut English to Europe and North America; altho he took part in discussions, the decision was made by the management, not Allen Graham. Just this past week, received confirmation from HCJB Australia, on Tuesday after recording this week`s DXPL early, in order to attend a conference in Miami, that they will continue carrying the program DX Partyline; Allen Graham will need some help to keep producing it in Quito, tho, due to his additional duties. He will be allowed to keep producing the program, to air in Australia, on that weekend block, early Sunday morning in the Americas. Another station is offering to air the program if they continue to produce it, for listeners in North America. Doesn`t want to mention station`s name yet. Bottom line is DXPL will continue after May 31, but a few things need to be firmed up with his superiors. Confirmed that Morning in the Mountains will also continue, primarily for missionaries who have no other access to English language programming. Haven`t had a chance yet to let Greg Schatzman, Bob Padula, Luigi Cobisi and other contributors know (notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) Finally some good news. Perhaps ODXA Perspectives lives again. Thank you Glenn for passing this along. Appreciate it (Brian Smith - ODXA Chairman, via DXLD) OK, here is item seven of the weekend edition of Dxers Unlimited... sad news amigos, DX Party Line, the HCJB short wave hobby program is going to go QRT. Yes, this nice program will no longer be broadcast by the Quito, Ecuador based station, and they are also stopping most of their English language programming to North America... At present I haven't heard if the other radio hobby show from Quito, Ham Radio Today is also going off the air, but it seems like it will be following the same sequence, as it is part of their English language service. But don't worry amigos, DXers Unlimited will stay with you as much as possible, and as always we do try hard to make it better every day... My point of view is that there is certainly a world wide audience for good quality radio hobby programs, and that there are lots of listeners ready to enjoy them !!!! (Arnie Coro, CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited May 17 via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via DXLD) ** GUYANA. 3291.2, Voice of Guyana (presumed), 0825-0915+ May 18, non- stop choir vocals until a man spoke at 0839. Mix of talks and different types of music including English lyric pop tunes. Fair signal but very noisy conditions made speech almost impossible to make out. Reactivation? (Rich D`Angelo, PA, NASWA Flashsheet via DXLD) ** HAWAII. In response to the Article `The KAHU-KHBC 1060 kHz Saga` on page 34 in the April 2003 NZ DX Times, Glen Zeigler, a contract engineer on the Island of Hawaii makes a few corrections to the article (Mark Nicholls -Chief Editor) Glen responds: I am a contract engineer on the Island of Hawaii. At one point or another I have worked with all of the stations here and have a fair knowledge of the ups and downs of most stations. Incidently, I knew Alan [Roycroft] since about 1980 when he started to go into retirement. Actually I am probably one of a few engineers that didn`t get the four letter words (so I have been told). For what Alan was or was not he was respected and therefore won his respect. I have made some notations below based mostly on fact. If you have any questions concerning KHBC thru KPUA today, I probably have the answers. Aloha Glen Zeigler || The original CP in 1936 was for KWFB on 1210 kHz in Hilo. It actually signed on, after modification, as KHBC on 1370 kHz with 100 watts on May 1, 1936. Down through the years it changed ownership and frequencies and finally became KPUA on 970 kHz which is now on 670 kHz and is owned by New West Broadcasting. Not really the original station any more. || Glen responds: Not quite correct, according to the Hilo Tribune Herald and the FCC Notice == Hilo Tribune Herald and FCC documents from the era (I have copies in front of me for both) KHBC signed on May 1, 1936 on 1400 kHz at 250w. Also the original licensee was Hawaiian Broadcasting System, Limited later changed to Honolulu Broadcasting Company, Ltd. While the KWFB may be fact there is nothing in the FCC Data Base showing that early assignment. *************************************************************** || And, Buddy Gordon calls himself the Hilo Broadcasting Company. He doesn't exactly claim to be the original station but claims they act like the original one what with all the different format structures and music and being strictly live and local which they certainly are. It is one neat and unique station! Really pulling in the listeners with its new 5 kW transmitter.|| *************************************************************** Glen responds: It is very true Buddy`s station sounds good considering the past performance of KAHU. But in retrospect, while the programming provides more options for the older listener what it really embraces and sounds like the KIPA Rainbow Radio of the early 80's. Does anyone really remember the programming on KHBC? As for the heritage of KHBC, New West is justified in its remarks as the application data and ownership including KWXX-FM (KPUA-FM), KGMD-TV (KPUA-TV) were part of the history starting with KHBC on 1400. I am sure New West could [not??] care who uses the KHBC call sign. But to say they are the original station (that is what the sign says in front of their studio) is misleading (May NZ DX Times via DXLD) ** HAWAII. NEW LAW REQUIRES MOST BOATERS TO HAVE EMERGENCY RADIOS By EDWIN TANJI , City Editor HONOLULU --- Gov. Linda Lingle has signed into law a bill that will require boaters who venture more than a mile from the shoreline to carry emergency radio equipment — including kayak tours that are likely to wander beyond the mile limit. . . http://www.maui.net/~mauinews/lnews0e.htm (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** ICELAND. 13855/U 4.5 1700 AFRTS among others with info about CIA. Very strong on my K9AY indicating the signal coming from the West, in such case probably Keflavik, Island. Disturbed at 1830 from "Salama Radio International", whatever that now is on the same frequency with music from Africa in a religious programme. SND (Stefan Bjorn, Sweden, SW Bulletin May 18, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) 13855U ICELAND. AFN: E-mail from Trish Huizinga confirms the site as Grindavik. "The xmtr site for both b/cs hrd by you [13855, plus 3903 in Feb 2002, verified in Dec 2002--JB] is located in Grindavik. There is a site there, attached to the base in Keflavik, that sent out our signal by mistake (before properly allowed to do so) last year. That was the 3903 kHz xmsn. We receive the signal from California and place it on our cable stns which can only be picked up in homes on the base. We also send 'the voice line' to the Grindavik location where the sailors here send it out on SW 13855 kHz." In a separate E-mail she says they have no plans for additional fqys right now (Jerry Berg, MA, NASWA Flashsheet via DXLD) ** INDIA. 11620, All India Radio - Patna, *0010-0103 May 18, open carrier followed by flue music IS from 0014 until brief opening announcement by a man at 0015. Group singing followed by more talk in Hindi at 0021. Thought I heard Patna mentioned as part of ID at 0030 just before a woman gave the news. Programming was mainly talk with some music selection in second half-hour. Fair signal but broadcast subject to many program breaks presumably studio to transmitter feed problem while was very poor amidst QRM (Rich D`Angelo, PA, NASWA Flashsheet via DXLD) Per dx_india rpt? Usual AIR startup at 0013 May 18, then program of various talk and Indian music, a few brief silent periods. Signal went off at 0055, back a little weaker at 0058, through ToH when there was what could have been an ad, then more mx. Was a pretty good signal at opening, but I could not pick out a Patna ID. Nothing heard on 9595. Anyone else listening at this hour? (Jerry Berg, MA, NASWA Flashsheet via DXLD) ** INDIA. Christian program of Joyce Meyer Ministries called "Life in the World" program is heard on Sundays on AIR Hyderabad A 738 kHz in Telegu at 0215-0228 UT. (Their SW channel is off air then for frequency change). Their site jmmindia.org also lists programs on Vividh Bharathi & Doordarshan TV along with several other cable TV channels. It is a major development as one could not imagine hearing/viewing such Christian programs on AIR & Doordarshan. 73 (Jose Jacob, VU2JOS/AT0J, National Institute of Amateur Radio, Box 1555, Somajiguda, Hyderabad 500082, India, dx_india via DXLD) His truth is marching on (gh) ** INDONESIA. 4604.96, RRI Serui, 1155-1210 May 19. Pop vocal music; 1159 M announcer with ID, followed by SCI to 1200:25, then Jak program beginning with time check "Pukul sembilan belas Waktu Indonesia Barat". Good signal on this new frequency. 4869.96, RRI Wamena, 1205-1240 May 19. Instrumental version of BeeGee's "I Started a Joke"; M announcer at 1207 with ID, then more music. Not // to other RRI's which were running Jak news. Nice signal. (John Wilkins, Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Drake R-8, 100-foot RW, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. SATELLITE RADIO SYSTEMS STAY WORLDS APART FIRMS HAVE NO DEADLINE TO BECOME COMPATIBLE By Earle Eldridge, USA TODAY With no deadline to worry about, the nation's two satellite radio companies say it could be years before they meet a federal requirement to design radios that can receive broadcasts from both. That's years during which any consumer who wants to switch from one company to the other will have to spend hundreds of dollars for a new radio to receive the new service. As part of a 1997 rule allowing XM Satellite Radio and Sirius Satellite Radio to operate, the Federal Communications Commission required that they work toward compatible radios. But it set no deadline or penalties for non-compliance. Steve Mather, analyst with Sander Morris Harris, says that without deadlines or fines, the companies don't have much incentive. ''A radio that gets both signals makes it easier to turn to the company that has the deal of the month.'' Consumers pay a monthly fee of $12.95 for Sirius or $9.99 for XM Satellite Radio. They also must buy the radio, which can cost from $100 to over $2,000 depending on features. The nationwide services offer about 100 channels, many commercial-free. XM has more than 500,000 subscribers, Sirius 68,000. The goal of the FCC requirement was twofold: to prevent a repeat of the Beta vs. VHS videotape nightmare, and to give consumers a choice. FCC spokesman David Fiske says the agency didn't set a deadline for compatibility because it wanted the companies to ''take the most cost-effective approach.'' XM and Sirius say their engineers have jointly developed an antenna that can receive both signals. And they say they are working toward meeting the federal requirement, but success is at least three years away. The engineers don't meet on a scheduled basis, and the FCC doesn't require progress reports. XM Chairman Gary Parsons says the companies could offer a radio today that receives both broadcasts, but it would be too costly. ''We want to provide choice at a reasonable price,'' Parsons says. Automakers, the biggest drivers behind satellite radio's growth, are unlikely to push the compatibility issue because they have aligned with one service or the other. General Motors, for example, has an agreement that requires XM to pay a fee until 2009 for the exclusive right to put XM in GM cars. GM also gets a percentage of the monthly fee XM subscribers pay. About 250,000 GM owners have satellite radio. Ford Motor has an exclusive deal with Sirius. Rick Lee, GM's executive director for satellite radio services, says surveys show GM customers are happy with XM. ''I've never gotten one call from a consumer who was upset because we don't offer Sirius,'' he says. Lee says if GM customers begin demanding Sirius, the automaker will consider offering it. (c) Copyright 2003 USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Co. Inc. (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM [non]. WORLD RADIO NETWORK BECOMES A DRM MEMBER Geneva --- World Radio Network (WRN), the London-based international broadcaster and transmission service provider, has joined the Digital Radio Mondiale( (DRM() Consortium. DRM comprises broadcasters, network operators, manufacturers and researchers who have created a digital system (also called DRM). DRM is the world`s only non-proprietary, digital system for short-wave, medium-wave and long-wave with the ability to use existing frequencies and bandwidth across the globe. WRN`s participation brings DRM`s membership to a record high of 81 members from 30 countries. Placing his full support behind DRM, Karl Miosga, WRN`s Managing Director said: ``World Radio Network is delighted to be playing an active part in DRM which represents a combination of digital innovation and close cooperation between broadcasters around the world – two of the founding principles behind WRN. We have been a long-time proponents of the distribution of international, cross-border radio by innovative and sustainable digital platforms, be that the Internet, digital satellite, digital cable or mobile cellphone services in order to reach new listeners around the world. To this list we add DRM because we believe it is going to offer listeners increased choice in radio listening combined with digital audio quality.`` ``Several of DRM`s broadcaster members are also associated with WRN,`` said DRM Chairman Peter Senger. ``The addition of WRN as a member of DRM is a great fit, and we look forward to working together in the future.`` The world`s first [sic] DRM broadcasts will be transmitted across the globe on June 16th, 2003. The precise moment of DRM`s inaugural broadcasts will occur during the International Telecommunications Union`s (ITU) World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC 2003) in Geneva, marked by a reception at the Château de Penthes. . . (DRM Press Release, May 19 via DXLD) But, but --- WRN does not operate any SW transmitters, which is what DRM is all about, so what is the point?? I suppose any organization can join DRM, whether it has any direct interest in the technology or not. More on DRM at bottom (gh, DXLD) ** IRAQ. MORE NEW RADIO STATIONS REPORTED Press reports from Iraq reveal that more and more new radio stations are coming on the air. An Associated Press report says that "Radio of the Iraqi Republic, run by former Information Ministry officials, urges listeners to forget the past and work together for a better future." Another update from Salam Pax Salam Pax, the Baghdad Blogger, has been to Basra and has now returned to Baghdad. Internet access is still expensive, as he explains: "The people at Electronic Iraq and al-Muajaha kindly agreed to host the images for this post and we will put up the post on their site too. I have warned them that I have a lot of images and as the Arabic saying goes: wa qad u'thira man anthar - don't blame someone who has already given you a warning. I really didn't have any other choice: the guys at the internet place wanted to charge 66,000 dinars for uploading 1.2 megs of images. That`s around $50 by today's rate. You should see how people react when they tell them how much they charge. Because of the rise in the value of the dinar even richrich people from foreign find them expensive and start bartering. We buy internet time like we buy tomatoes now: "look if I spend an extra half hour, will the rate go down 3000 dinars?" NB: The pictures and mirror sites were not there yet when checked at 1545 UT (RN Media Network May 19 via DXLD) ** IRAQ [non]. TRANS WORLD RADIO AIRS SPECIAL PROGRAMS TO LISTENERS IN IRAQ As military activity shifts from combat to restoring order in war- ravaged Iraq, Trans World Radio recently aired a series of special Arab-language programs designed to offer spiritual encouragement and biblical perspective to listeners in Iraq and the surrounding region. The daily 15-minute broadcasts began in March just before the commencement of the war in Iraq. The programs aired from TWR- affiliated outlets in Monte Carlo and Cyprus, and were produced in partnership with Christian broadcasters Words of HOPE and the Back to God Hour. The series, called "Kingdom of Jesus–A Kingdom of Truth, Peace, Justice and Self-Giving Love," received exciting responses from Muslim listeners in the region. To read more about these programs and TWR's ministry in the Middle East, visit the following link: http://www.gospelcom.net/twr/news/nr.php?nr=59 (TWR E-Snapshots May 2003 via Alokesh Gupta, DXLD) ** IRELAND. Glenn, With reference to item in DXLD 3-078, May 6, 2003: "...TIPPERARY MID WEST RADIO", homepage at http://www.tipperarymidwestradio.com/ the missing program schedules for weekend-listening can be found at http://www.tipperarymidwestradio.com/schedule2.html and http://www.tipperarymidwestradio.com/schedule3.html i.e. Saturday and Sunday respectively. Assuming that a listener finds the Saturday schedule per above, be warned that the current link for Sunday given therein leads to "Bad Gateway" message. Use the second link supplied above instead. And with reference to the Live Stream Audio that can be had by clicking on the "Listening Room" logo on the station's homepage, or sans logo "Tune in Live - CLICK HERE": the source URL for that is not immediately obvious and should the logo-link or other not work, the following will get the audio-stream going. The /screaming/ portion is no typo! http://www.tippnet.ie/screaming/tmw.asx (Finbarr O'Driscoll....Ireland, May 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ISRAEL. English is heard again from IBA at 0400 on 17600, May 18 (Chris Hambly, Victoria, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Despite the continuation of the strike, Kol Israel foreign language broadcasts have been back on the air since at least noon Israel Time Friday (according to Joel Rubin). [Later:] The general strike was called off: http://bet.iba.org.il/bet.htm?item=betlanguage23 The Histadrut called off the general strike at 6 a.m., Sunday. Histadrut leaders made the announcement after an agreement was reached in talks Saturday night between Finance Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and Histadrut chairman Amir Peretz. The strike was launched in protest of the government's economic austerity plan which called for cuts of 11 billion shekels. The sides agreed to a four billion shekel cut in wages in the public sector. The 4 billion shekels represent about 80 percent of the treasury's original demand. In return the Histadrut agreed to freeze new wage demands and cost of living increments for two years. The sides have not yet agreed on the plans for cuts in penison funds. Business leaders estimate 3 billion shekels in losses from the strike. 18.05.03 14:38 (via Doni Rosenzweig, May 18, DXLD) 1900 UT May 18, 17545: Kol Israel in English, news of latest bombing, signal s7~9 333 some QSB on the signal, 1905 talk about the terrorists, talks with Palestinian authorities, by David (Colonel Jon Standingbear, Army Radio Station ADN3U, P. O. Box 44, Beaumont, Calif, 92223-0044, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ITALY. I finally got around to listening to the recording I made of R. Tre Network [6275] from 10 April and was able to copy a number of canned jingle IDs, including this one at 0018 "Radio Tre Network, your station for the 21st century". One other ID that I noted at 0118 mentioned "?, FM, shortwave, satellite, ? radio station, (different male announcer) Radio Tre Network". I found that rather interesting. At least they are 'aware' of shortwave. Now, why would they mention shortwave in an ID announcement?? (Dave Valko, PA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** JAPAN. JAPAN and MALAYSIA: Made a curious observation on 5 May: Japanese broadcast of Radio Japan at 1700-1800 uses two frequencies for Europe (6175 and 9750 kHz), and both of them are interfered by the same station in Indonesian or Malay. A schedule search revealed that both frequencies are simultaneously used by the Voice of Malaysia, but schedule taken from http://www.bclnews.it gives different languages at 1700-1900: Indonesian on 6175, Malay on 9750. Probably the latter source is not correct, as WRTH does not show any Indonesian broadcast from Malaysia at this time (Dmitry Mezin, Kazan, Russia, Signal via DXLD) Malaysia has been on those two frequencies forever; how could R. Japan miss them?? (gh) ** KASHMIR [non]. Voice of Jammu & Kashmir Freedom Movement: 5100 (Pakistan - ?). Sent 1 IRC. In 97 days got a pack of 6 "SOS from Indian occupied Kashmir" magazines, 2 grand leaflets, Kashmiri viewcards and letter from Islam ud Din But, where he/she appreciates listening interest and quotes broadcasting schedules in Kashmiri and English. Address: Islam ud Din But, V.O. Jammu & Kashmir Freedom Movement, P.O. Box 102, Muzaffarabad, Azad Kashmir, via Pakistan (Shukrat Rakhmatullayev, Tashkent, Uzbekistan, Signal May 17 via DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH [non]. UPI's Capital Comment for May 13, 2003 From the Washington Politics & Policy Desk Published 5/13/2003 2:22 PM http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=20030513-113817-6558r WASHINGTON, May 13 (UPI) -- Capital Comment -- Daily news notes, political rumors and important events that shape politics and public policy in Washington and the world from United Press International. Broadcast news... The House International Relations Committee has approved a proposal authored by California Republican Rep. Ed Royce to increase U.S. broadcasts into North Korea. Royce's amendment expresses the sense of Congress that Radio Free Asia's broadcasts to the Communist stronghold should be increased to 24 hours each day "This amendment developed as a result of our recent visit to RFA studios in Seoul. Those broadcasts are having a positive impact, countering the North Korean government's stream of lies and propaganda," Royce, chairman of the U.S.-Republic of Korea Interparliamentary Exchange since 1999, said. Radio Free Asia is a surrogate news service, created to overcome the North Korean government suppression of free speech and its use of indigenous media as a propaganda tool. Royce's amendment also addresses the crucial problem of inserting radios into North Korea, requesting a report detailing U.S. government efforts to maximize the ability of North Koreans access to foreign broadcasts like RFA. "We are reaching a critical period on the Korean peninsula. In order to ensure his survival, North Korean leader Kim Jong Il keeps a tight reign on information and people -- systemically abuses their human rights," Royce said. "But, things are starting to change because RFA is playing a vital role in countering his lies." Royce represents a sizable portion of the Southern California Korean-American community and is a longtime advocate of increasing U.S. international broadcasting efforts (via Jilly Dybka, DXLD) ** MACEDONIA. 810, Radio Macedonia has started a Foreign Service on MW. The schedule is as follows: 1800 Bulgarian, 1830 Greek, 1900 Albanian, 1930 Serbian, 2000 Radio Dvadesetidva (R. 22) starts with relay of the news from program 1, 2030 Voice of Homeland in Macedonian. The transmission ends at 2400. Deutsche Welle's eveningtransmission starts at 1430 until 1700. Languages are Albanian, Macedonian and Serbian. During 2004 DW and MR will start DRM-tests on 810 kHz acc. to Mr. Ljupco Mancevski, technical director (Bengt Ericson, ARC Info Desk via Olle Alm, DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. END OF AN ERA --- Possibly the best known New Zealand street address in SWL/DX circles has lost that link after more than 55 years. On 17 April, RALDA CUSHEN moved from 212 Earn Street, Invercargill to a retirement village. Ralda grew up in Earn Street, and married ARTHUR CUSHEN who lived at the other end of Earn Street in 1946, at the Methodist Church in Earn Street. Soon after, Arthur and Ralda moved into their new home at 212 Earn Street, Invercargill, next door to Arthur`s parents. When Arthur died in 1997, Ralda stayed on in the house but it has now been sold to a young family. We visited Ralda at Easter as she was settling into her new warm and cosy unit. She sends greetings to everyone in the DX League. For those readers wishing to contact Ralda, her new address is Unit 10, Rose Lodge Village, 129 Tweed Street, Invercargill (May NZ DX Times via DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. POWER ACROSS THE PACIFIC --- This is the headline of a feature on the Internet website of the Auckland Radio Trust and World Service NZ, encouraging feedback from overseas listeners to their signal on 1476 AM --- carrying BBC World Service programmes 24 hours a day. The website states that ``the transmitter at Puketutu Island in the Manukau Harbour was built by Blythe Radio Systems of New Brighton, Christchurch. It is licenced for 48.0 Max dbw which covers much of New Zealand, and North and East into the Pacific Ocean, with the primary coverage area being the North Island from Taupo northwards. The aerial system consists of two masts built at sea level which give directional properties to the signal and were originally used for Radio Hauraki when the offshore station was licensed for operating on land. Amongst the many listeners overseas to World Service NZ on 1476 AM are the crew of the cargo vessel `Baltimar Boreas` which runs from Auckland to Noumea in New Caledonia and the Fiji Islands. The station also has listeners in Rarotonga in the Southern Cook Islands group, and has had reports of the station being heard in Japan.`` The website also says that correspondence from listeners outside of New Zealand is welcomed. Recently agreement was reached for links between the site http://www.worldservice.co.nz/ and the DX League`s website http://www.radiodx.com (May NZ DX Times via DXLD) ** NIGERIA. Federal Radio Cooperation Of Nigeria, Kaduna (per 2003 WRTH); 5-18-03; 4770 kHz; 0523-0534 UT; English; pop music and announcements; lots of noise, barely caught ID "Radio Nigeria" at 0532; SINPO 33131; Icom R71A with 110-foot random wire (John Sandin, Merriam, KS, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NIGERIA. Today, the day the http://www.voiceofnigeria.org website should be launched officially, nothing was different there compared to last Friday. The wrong Arabic schedule has been removed, now only the Arabic version available, correctly giving 1600-1800. On Sunday, I listened to VON as follows: 15120 English until 1100* unepected closedown. Not heard at 1300, but at 1540 till after 1600, not heard at 1900 (QRM) but very strong after 2000. 11770 signing on at 1557 with very strong signal and news in Arabic. French ID at 1755 announcing 7255 and 11770. Off at 1957 after announcing morning transmission in French being only on 7255. So if this is correct and English is at 15120 all the time, there must be three transmitters. 7255 not heard. 9690 is occupied by Romania. No chance. Thorsten Hallmann, [Tyskland] as usual, May 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** OKLAHOMA. One of the last holdouts against NSP 24 hour telecasting, may be about to concede. This week`s print TV Guide shows OETA running all-night, mostly repeats of the previous evening`s prime-time PBS lineup, but not exactly. For instance, POV, which OETA is reluctant to run in primetime, except for one or two cherry-picks per season, is supposed to be on at 1 am (CDT) early Tuesday. Online TV Guide listings agree. I was already counting my chickens --- more chances to tape PBS stuff overnight when it doesn`t conflict with the occasional logjam of good stuff on commercial TV. However, zap2it listings still show a sign-off period, and so do OETA`s own online listings via http://www.oeta.onenet.net/ for the rest of May! Due to its leadtime for print, TV Guide sometimes gets caught by incomplete or changed plans on the part of stations. But it would appear this is at least being considered, if delayed beyond this fortnight. I just noticed this and haven`t had a chance to confirm it myself. But when it happens, that will be the end of Enid Cox Cable off-air pickup of various other channel 13 stations in KS, TX, AR, after signoff when a bit of tropo is enhanced (they still get KETA-13 offair rather than satellite like some other OKC stations --- is OETA still not on Dish or DirecTV?). But that will also give DXers more time to DX OETA`s full power outlets on 13, 12, 11 and 3, plus its statewide UHF translator network, while those channels will become NSP blocked for us. BTW, OETA has a page about DTV, which says KETA-DT starts in May on channel 32 --- not to be seen around Enid, with KXOK on 32! Or will that blow off the blowhard? Analogically speaking, Enid has always been considered part of the OKC market, albewe on the fringe. Hmmm, when tropo is up, as early UT Mon May 19, local KXOK-32 signal gets snowy; at first I thought they were having power problems, but now I suspect it is QRM from KETA-DT! BTW2, even under dead conditions I am getting DTV snow on 28, but nothing listed around here; KFOR-DT OKC is supposed to be on 27, but if there, it`s weaker. Meanwhile KETA-13 was getting torn up by KERA-13 et al., and KWTV-9 had heavy DTV snow from WFAA-DT-9. A few minutes after local midnight early Monday, KETA-13 did sign off as usual, and after a few more minutes of color bars was replaced by a local-quality signal both on antenna and on Cox Cable Enid, from KERA-13 Dallas (Glenn Hauser, Enid, May 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Ah...the old "We'll go overnight on cable but not via antenna" trick! TV Guide lists WKAR-23 as going overnight...but actually, it's only on their cable service (and probably only the local tiers, not in extreme outlying areas). WTVS-56 does go overnight via antenna and cable both...and since they're showing big-time movies as long as "Ben-Hur" on Friday & Saturday nights, that just might make more sense! (Kind of a trade-off for us not getting AMC??????) Oftentimes WTVS will put some obscure specials or reruns during 4-6AM. I did remember WKAR's cable service signing off for maintenance about a week or so ago... Q: Are PBS outlets doing the 24-hour thing to be more competitive with DSC, TLC, and the History Channel, which also repeat their prime-time lineup into the wee hours? (Keith K Smith[tm] Lansing, MI, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Good theory, but even in the current local OKC listings for Cox via http://www.newsok.com – actually ``powered`` by zap2it, KETA-C14 still shows a signed-off period between 12 and 5:30 am (gh, DXLD) I believe what you're seeing in the TV Guide, Glenn, is what we see on OETA's cable channel here in the metro OKC area. After OETA's sign- off, Cox Cable picks up PBS off satellite and runs whatever they're running. KETA is still off the air overnight. The Oklahoman's TV guide also shows them off overnight (John Zondlo, Yukon, OK, fmdxweb.com, WTFDA via DXLD) I don't know about the full-power VHFs, but at least some of the LPTV UHFs (15, 28, 36, 46) have been running "OETA" ID bars overnight for a while. I would rather have the bars (Danny Oglethorpe, Shreveport, LA, WTFDA via DXLD) {See 3-090 for OETA`s explanations and more} ** PERU. 4415.67v, Radio Cielo, Chiclayo, la provincia de Chiclayo, el departamento de Lambayeque. May 15 2003 - 1120 UT. This Peruvian pirate has been on air a couple of times the last week with quite poor signal. When "Cielo" is heard with much better quality I will attach a short recording. Info from "Ventanaperú": Provincia de Chiclayo, cuya capital es Chiclayo. Sus distritos son: Chiclayo, Chongoyape, Eten, Puerto de Eten, José LeonarOrtíz, Lagunas, La Victoria, Monsefú, Nueva Arica, Oyotún, Picsi, Pimentel, Reque, Santa Rosa, Saña; con una población total de 625,183 hab. 5009.65, Radio Altura, Cerro de Pasco, la provincia de Pasco, el departamento de Pasco. 1110 UT. Occasionally reactivated due to the decease of a well-known person, "Sr. Pacheco"? Talk about the deceased and some ads. I have not heard this station for a long time. Nice signal. Listen to the recording from this occasion. http://homepage.sverige.net/~a-0901/ Info from "Ventanaperú": Provincia de Pasco, cuya capital es Cerro de Pasco. Sus distritos son: Chaupimarca, Huachón, Huariaca, Huayllay, Ninacaca, Pallanchacra, Paucartambo, San Francisco de Asis de Yarusi, Simón Bolívar, Ticlayán, Tinyahuarco, Vicco, Yanacancha; con una población total de 132,954 hab. 6520.31, Ondas del Rio Marañón, Aramango, la provincia de Bagua, el departamento de Amazonas. May 2003 - 2300 UT. Has been active for some weeks with decent signal. It is a pity to write "reactivated" when the normal state is irregular for "Ondas del Rio Marañón". Listen to the recording from this occasion. Info from "Ventanaperú": Provincia de Bagua, cuya capital es Bagua y cuenta con los distritos Aramango, el Parco, Bagua; con una población total de 69,334 hab. (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin May 18, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. Radio Panamericana has resumed their website with 50th anniversary logo. Good site to listen to Salsa oldies. Good DXing, (Tetsuya Hirahara/RNM, May 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PHILIPPINES. The following monitoring information was supplied by Geir Stokkeland from listening on location. Comments have been added by Alan Davies. Here are the differences I can find compared to WRTH-03. I've also added some notes from a partly illegible letter sent to WRTH editor from a reader Leo Catajoy in PHL. 567: Naga City, PBS with callsign DWRB (I suspect WRTH is right to list DWRP), agrees with my obs. this is ex-549, freq already updated in WRTH-03 603: Naga City, new callsign DZLL ex-DWLV 621: Virac City, new PBS station DZBC or DZBZ (Catajoy says callsign is DZVC in Virac, ex-DZBU Legaspi C., Albay; PBS website agrees with DZVC Virac and does not list any station in Legaspi City, see http://www.pbs.gov.ph/profile.htm for list of PBS callsigns and addresses but no frequencies) 765: Cebu City, new callsign DYAR ex-DYCB (this agrees with my observation from March '01 so WRTH-04 needs to be updated) 882: Calbayog City, new callsign DYOG ex-DYJR (PBS website agrees with DYOG) 981: He tentatively suggests callsign DYBJ rather than DYBQ 1008: DXXX heard on 1010 kHz 1071: Talisay, Camarines Nte Prov, new station DZSL 1179: Tentative new station in Koronadal, no other details 1242: DXSY heard on 1247 kHz 1260: Lucena City DZEL ex-1053 kHz 1296: Roxas City, Capiz Prov: DYJJ ex-1287 1323: DXAD heard on 1321 kHz 1431: DYKS heard on 1427 kHz 1548: Dagupan City DZST new callsign ex-DWDP; other observers and myself agree that the callsign has changed, but to DZSD, so WRTH-04 needs to be updated) 1584: Talavera DWBR, new callsign ex-DZDF (change has been confirmed in report from Roland Schulze) 1593: Marawi City, new station DXSM (WRTH lists DXSM for Jolo 774 kHz, and PBS website also lists DXSM Jolo; Catajoy says it should be DXFM on 1539 kHz operated by Lanao Radio / TV Broadcasting Corporation) (Geir Stokkeland, Alan Davies, May Artic Radio Club Info Desk via Olle Alm, DXLD) ** RUSSIA. Voice of Russia tells me on May 15: "I guess that you are missing MOSCOW MAILBAG. Joe Adamov, the host of his program, has just returned home from the hospital, and we do not know when he`ll be able to resume work." (Erik Køie, Copenhagen, May 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SWEDEN [non]. IBRA Radio is a Christian radio ministry supported by local Pentecostal churches in Scandinavia and ministering to 110 countries. IBRA Radio is part of the Dagen Group which, besides radio ministry, also publishes a Christian daily newspaper (Nya Dagen) and operates a television ministry (TV-Inter). Other divisions in the Dagen Group include Samspar (insurance) and Mösseberg (rehabilitation). IBRA's 1000 coworkers produce radio programs in 60 languages targeted at 110 different countries, IBRA broadcast 200 hours of programming daily. Mailing address: IBRA Radio, SE-141 99 STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN. E-mail: ibra@ibra.se Web Site: http://www.ibra.org IBRA also has offices in the following countries: Bangladesh, Burundi, Denmark, Cyprus, Estonia, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, Malta, Russia, Norway, Pakistan, Rwanda, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey and Congo (Dr. Juergen Kubiak, May WWDXC DX Magazine via DXLD) ** TURKMENISTAN. 4930, 16.5 2055, Radio Ashkabad with news in English. Long time ago I last heard something in English from this station. Now it seems they are up running again. I will try a new report. 3-4 CB 4930, 17.5 2030, Radio Ashkabad with English at this time. I guess English is transmitted sometime between 2030 and 2100. 3-4 CB (Christer Brunstrom, Sweden, SW Bulletin May 18, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) A small fragment heard: 2038-2045, 4930 kHz in English. Then language changed to presumed Turkmen (open_dx - Thomas Baier, Germany . . .) Russian edition of Signal (No. 97) reproduced the following message from EDXP E-NET. (This is back translation from Russian, so it may be different from the original. - Signal Ed.) 4930, meteo forecast in English (!) at 2049 on 23 April. (EDXP E-NET - Zacharias Liangas, Thessaloniki, Greece) So it may be a regular broadcast, with varying time. Now English is more preferred language in Ashgabat than Russian. Russian inserts present only when some CIS officials visit Ashgabat. (Ed.) A possible simple explanation: news bulletin at 2030-2045 is split to Turkmen (2030-2038) and English (2038-2045). Weather forecast, as I guess, goes out in Turkmen at 2045-2048, then in English at 2048-2050. A similar policy occurs at Kyrgyz Radio (4010, 4795 kHz). (open_dx - Igor Yaremenko, Novosibirsk, Russia; all in Signal via DXLD) ** U K. Apparently the BFBS shortwave relays have left the air from Sunday morning 18 May. The last thing I heard from them was an open carrier on 15795 at 0340-0400- on Sunday. No sign of life on Sunday afternoon or Monday morning. Presumably they now have enough coverage from local FM transmitters (Olle Alm, Sweden, May 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [non]. Re Gospel for Asia, 15170: What is the broadcast schedule for this station? (Bob Combs, New Mexico, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Hi Bob and friends! You can "download" the schedule from http://www.gfaradio.org Best wishes (Arnaldo Slaen, ibid.) No sites, but precisely: http://www.gfaradio.org/docs/schedule.html (gh) ** U S A. FCC CHAIRMAN REJECTS CALL FOR DELAY OF MEDIA OWNERSHIP VOTE By David Ho, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) FCC Chairman Michael Powell rejected a request from two of his commissioners to delay a decision on overhauling rules governing ownership of newspapers and TV and radio stations. The Democrats on the five-member Federal Communications Commission had asked Powell Tuesday to push back a June 2 vote by a month to give them more time to study an internal agency proposal that recommends easing ownership restrictions. ''I must respectfully decline to postpone,'' Powell said Thursday in a statement. ''There is precedent for granting such a request, but it is not customary to do so over the strong objections of a majority of commissioners.'' Powell said he also needs to meet a timetable set by Congress. The proposed plan would allow companies to own more TV stations in local markets, reaching more U.S. homes. It also would eliminate many restrictions on one company owning combinations of newspapers and TV and radio stations in the same city. Powell and the two other Republicans on the commission favor loosening regulations, an outcome sought by many large media companies that say the rules are outdated and hurt business. Michael Copps, one of the Democratic commissioners, said Powell is rushing to vote on proposals that could change the media landscape in ways not fully understood. ''The chairman's decision not to make these proposals public, nor even to grant a short delay in voting, runs roughshod over the requests of the American people,'' Copps said. ''This is no way to do business when critical issues affecting every American are at stake.'' The FCC is considering whether decades-old ownership restrictions still reflect a market altered by satellite broadcasts, cable television and the Internet. Critics say relaxed rules will lead to more mergers, leaving a few huge companies in control of what people see, hear and read. Powell said he would extend until May 30 the period the agency would accept public comment on its media ownership review. The comment period usually ends a week before a vote. On Wednesday, nearly 100 House Democrats sent a letter to Powell, asking him to publicly justify his agency's plans for overhauling media ownership rules. Consumer groups, musicians, writers, academics and the National Rifle Association have written the agency opposing eased ownership rules or asking that the vote be delayed. Other lawmakers, mainly Republicans, and Commerce Secretary Donald Evans have urged Powell to stay on schedule. On the Net: FCC: http://www.fcc.gov (via Fred Vobbe, NRC FMTV via DXLD) ** U S A. 1680 kHz: Saturday May 10 May TN and I mailed a recording of a unID Spanish station on 1680 kHz. I hoped you wanted to have something to work on at the SWB/ARC convention in Halmstad. Quickly as a lightning a reply came from our member Tore Larsson/TL, who said it probably was WTIR. I have heard that this stationhas changed format to Spanish. This station is as well located in "Orlando" which could be heard on the recording. I relistened to the recording and it seems that Tore is correct; it sounds like "WTIR" and not the prefix "WCUL(??)" which was my guess. Thanks Tore for your fast reaction! Also Henrik Klemetz reacted quickly. Already on Sunday afternoon/ evening SWB got this information from Henrik but unfortunately TN had no time to mail the members until Monday evening. Thank you for this info Henrik! (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin May 18, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Re KFHX-1620 AZ: Kevin Redding wrote: || Well, I dunno if its a real pirate. The Catholic Church runs it and Sheriff Joe Arpaio has a show on the station. || You just cited two very good pieces of evidence that it's a REAL pirate!!! ;-) No doubt it's supposed to be a Part 15 station, but --- like my local "Phat Rock" on 1650 -- there's no way it's running 100 milliwatts and the "five foot antenna (including ground)" limit if you can hear it five miles away. Betcha anything it's running one of those Ramsey 5 or 10 watt AM transmitters --- maybe they aren't even aware they're operating illegally (Harry Helms, W7HLH, Las Vegas, NV DM26, May 17, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. KSDO-1130 San Diego has been sold and is now running a Spanish format. I haven't listened to the format much yet, but an article in the SD Union this morning says it's a "nueva vida" kind of (Protestant?) religious format, which is basically what XEXX-1420 has been running recently. KSDO had been managed into oblivion by Sneer Channel, who moved all the high rated local and syndicated programming to KOGO-600 some time ago in their usual fashion. Hey, if Sneer Channel sells (or stops managing) just one more station in this market, they won't be breaking the law anymore (at least in San Diego!). 73, (Tim Hall, Chula Vista, CA, May 17, amfmtvdx via DXLD) This is the first time I've heard of Clear Channel selling one of their AMers since they bought all those hundreds of stations! Have they sold any others? (Steve Francis, Alcoa, Tennessee, ibid.) I understand that they're selling KIIS-AM (1150), Los Angeles. These moves could signal that they're making new purchases (better properties to replace those being sold) or that they need cash (Brian Goodrich, ibid.) They were owning and/or managing a total of 12 stations in San Diego. KSDO was one of the ones they were managing. Basically all they did was loot all of the high-rated programs on KSDO and move them down to KOGO-600. No wonder some people refer to management as "damagement" :) 73, (Tim Hall, Chula Vista, CA, ibid.) ** U S A. STARBOARD BACKING OUT OF WJOB HAMMOND BUY Minneapolis-St Paul, May 13 (CRU) --- According to a report published in the Chicago Sun-Times today, Starboard has decided not to pursue the purchase of historic WJOB 1230 AM in Hammond, Indiana (Chicago) because it is getting adequate coverage from its leased stations WJJG 1530 AM and WCSN 820 AM. The report says that Starboard will forfeit $243,000 for not following through in its purchase of the bankrupt station. The purchase has been controversial from day one; the local newspaper the Northwest Indiana Times reported that the mayor of Hammond and a good many citizens were angry about losing the sole local voice to a religious network operation, and the paper reported the mayor had tried to talk to the FCC about it when he was in Washington on business (Catholic Radio Update #213, February 10, 2003). According to an article written by Christine Harvey in the Northwest Indiana Times, the station dismissed most of what was left of its staff, and the owners, St George Broadcasting, have renewed talks with the previous owner, M&M Broadcasting. Another group, Vazquez Development, LLC, owned by James E. Dedlow and his wife, first cousin of Mayor Duane Dedlow, Jr., is also said to be interested in the station. According to Ms. Harvey`s report, ``It is unclear whether money troubles, local opposition or both caused the WJOB sale to fall through. However, Starboard President Brownrigg told InsideRadio.com last month that after spending $11 million to build its base, the company planned to stop buying stations for now and concentrate on syndication.`` Starboard`s plan to buy WWCA 1270 AM in Gary, Indiana, is not affected by the present matter. The Northwest Indiana Times article can be read at http://www.thetimesonline.com/articles/2003/05/09/news/lake_county/74c4e9131bba109786256d200083a366.txt Database --- Hammond: WJOB 1230 AM (1,000 watts fulltime). 6405 Olcott St., Hammond, IN 46320. Tel.: (219) 844-1230. Being purchased by Starboard Broadcasting, Inc., from St George Broadcasting, Inc. Founded 1928 by the Hammond-Calumet Broadcasting Co. as WWAE 1200 AM, share time with WSBT 1200 AM South Bend, Indiana (Mike Dorner, Catholic Radio Update May 19 via DXLD) ** U S A. WHYY'S TERRY GROSS, HOST OF FRESH AIR, HONORED WITH PRESTIGIOUS MURROW AWARD, FOR `OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTIONS TO PUBLIC RADIO' PHILADELPHIA, May 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Terry Gross, host of Fresh Air, WHYY's national weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, was awarded today the celebrated 2003 Edward R. Murrow Award at the Public Radio Conference in New Orleans. . . http://www.whyy.org/about/pressroom/terrygross.html/ (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U S A. Re DXLD 3-084: This setback for AM IBOC comes just as regular DRM transmissions launch. What will it mean for the eventual launch of AM IBOC? Is it too early to know and too late to do anything about it? The receiver makers must really be confused. How does this square with the earlier glowing reports from the WOR New York chief engineer? Somebody is blowing smoke. What will this mean for possible acceptance of DRM for domestic USA broadcasting? The plot thickens. (Joe Buch, swprograms via DXLD) From: Radio Currents Online http://beradio.com/ar/radio_currents_28/index.htm#nrsc NRSC SUSPENDS IBOC STANDARD-SETTING Washington - May 15, 2003 - The National Radio Systems Committee, a co-sponsored effort of the National Association of Broadcasters and the Consumer Electronics Association, created a DAB subcommittee that has been responsible for evaluating systems for use in the United States. The subcommittee has been focused on Ibiquity Digital's IBOC for some time. The NRSC DAB subcommittee released a letter to its members stating that the groups efforts in setting a standard have been temporarily suspended. The following is excerpted from the memo: As a result of growing concerns over the audio quality of iBiquity's low bit-rate codec, the NRSC DAB Subcommittee is temporarily suspending its IBOC DAB standards-setting process. This action is being taken, by unanimous approval of the DAB Subcommittee's Steering Committee, in accordance with the Subcommittee's long-standing goal of supporting the development of a digital radio system offering significant improvements over existing AM and FM analog services. These concerns have arisen recently, as a result of both information submitted to the NRSC by iBiquity as well as by demonstrations of the Ibiquity AM IBOC system at the 2003 CES, at NAB2003, and at the studios of National Public Radio (NPR) in Washington, D.C. The NPR event was a private audio demonstration organized by Ibiquity; at that time Ibiquity stated the audio being demonstrated was based on the latest version of Ibiquity's proprietary audio coding algorithm, PAC, and was the version to be implemented in first generation IBOC receivers. DAB Subcommittee members who attended the NPR demonstration do not consider the audio quality demonstrated by the Ibiquity 36kb/s PAC technology to be suitable for broadcast. This demonstration confirms subjective test data produced by iBiquity and reviewed by the NRSC early in 2003 (Ibiquity ultimately withdrew this subjective test data submission from consideration by the NRSC, indicating that improvements to PAC were currently being made). In order to allow time for Ibiquity to resolve any matters relating to its audio coding technology prior to continuation of NRSC standardization, the DAB Subcommittee is temporarily suspending its IBOC DAB standard-setting process. The NRSC will consider resuming standard-setting immediately when Ibiquity has demonstrated to the NRSC that the audio coding problems of concern have been resolved. Ibiquity released the following statement: Due to some specific concerns about the current state of the AM audio quality, the NRSC has temporarily suspended standard setting efforts for IBOC digital broadcasting. At this time, we concur with their decision to temporarily delay these efforts until the issue is resolved. The NRSC has not expressed any concerns about the core system architecture or implementation of IBOC. There are no issues with coverage, reception or functionality. The issue is in the audio coder and has to do specifically with AM audio quality. The resolution will be a software upgrade, and no other changes to the system will be necessary. As such, we have an on-going improvement plan and anticipate resolution of the AM audio quality issue as soon as possible. Ibiquity and its partners continue to support radio's transition to digital broadcasting and look forward to capitalizing on the potential for HD Radio. At issue is the quality of the encoding algorithm currently being used by Ibiquity. The PAC algorithm, while designed for low bit-rate transmission, has apparently been judged to provide insufficient quality by the NRSC subcommittee. At the NAB2003 convention, similar comments were the topic of discussion among convention attendees, particularly for the AM service. Ibiquity previously had used AAC coding in many tests. The PAC algorithm, developed by Lucent, was implemented more recently. Ibiquity is the result of USA Digital Radio and Lucent Digital Radio merging. Several receiver manufacturers had planned to introduce commercially available IBOC receivers this summer. There is no word yet on whether this announcement will affect that rollout (via Joe Buch, swprograms via DXLD) ** ZIMBABWE [non]. Re ``4880 was used many years ago by the SABC, for their internal service in Afrikaans, so maybe a South African-based transmitter?`` Technically, that's plausible. Politically, no way! Mugabe himself was in South Africa yesterday at the funeral of Walter Sisulu. I know DXing is not supposed to be political, but an awareness of the political background should help DXers to discount some possibilities, or point to others. [Later:] Re my earlier comment re 4880: Seems you were right and I was wrong. My apologies. It still seems bizarre to me that a clandestine broadcasting to Zimbabwe is using South African facilities, but since the deal is with Merlin and not with the station itself I guess there are no South African laws being broken (Andy Sennitt, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Some strange bedfellows have resulted from the various reciprocal relays and transmitter leasing deals over the years. Nothing would surprise me anymore. Besides, money often wins out over ideological purity (Craig Seager, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Hi Jari, I had a chat today with my colleague Rocus de Joode of our Programme Distribution Department, and he assures me 100% that the tests on 4880 are *not* from our Madagascar relay. All audio that goes out via our relay stations has to go via the transmission centre in Hilversum, and Rocus would be responsible for arranging the feed. But no such arrangement has been requested or activated :-) I guess it probably is via a Sentech facility. Merlin or Sentech should be able to confirm. 73, (Andy Sennitt, RN, May 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. Re 4870: Lobo's real name is Kent Lavoie (b. 1943, Tallahassee Fl). He scored 16 Hot 100 entries in the USA during the 1970s, and also produced material for others such as Jim Stafford (including "Spiders and Snakes"). After his brush with pop culture, he went on to compose and record jingles for TV and radio. I have a couple of early vinyl recordings; I think only the "greatest hits" type compilations ever made it onto CD (Craig Seager, Bathurst, Australia (60s/70s music aficionado, and occasional DXer, DX LISTENING DIGEST) In case anyone has lost track in this sidebar thread, the station was actually pretty definitely RRI Wamena a shade below 4870 (gh) UNIDENTIFIED. 4335.34, UNID LA SS, unknown QTH. May 14 2003 - 0110 UT. See comments at 5728.39 kHz. 5728.39, UNID LA SS, unknown QTH. May 13 2003 - 0100 UT. Most of the time a quiet female DJ and simultaneously in the background an instrumental version of a well known tune by Simon/Garfunkel. Also check the logging of the same station at 4335.34 kHz. Radio Naylamp, Lambayeque is a station which can be heard both here and there on the scale but the programme format does not match with what I have heard earlier. UT -5 and close down 0140 UT. Listen to the recording from this occasion -- at http://homepage.sverige.net/~a-0901/ (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin May 18, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) [No, these do not both work out to be harmonics of a common fundamental --- gh] UNIDENTIFIED. Dear Glenn, A question on the African station on 6315 that I received on Saturday 17 May 1816-1833 UT, with a weak signal and considerable transmitter hum. I know that the Voice of Tigray Revolution and the Voice of Peace and Democracy of Eritrea have been reported on this frequency. However, I am not sure if the format of the program I heard matches any of these stations. The language sounded similar to Arabic but was certainly NOT Arabic (Tigrigna?? But see next). It was a transmission of a football match with the team `Olympic Bamaco` from Mali playing (`Olympic Bamako`, `Al Mali` mentioned many times). Many mentions of `Brahima Kone` and `Konate`; I searched the web, and these appear to be football players from Côte d`Ivoire (could this be the other team?). Also many mentions of `Al Mubarrak`. At 1824 UT the football transmission was interrupted by a female announcer. Next, the Kor`an reading followed (first singing, then brief translation). At 1827 – a music pause and a short comment by the same female announcer, mentioning Mali. Then the football transmission continued. Would the Tigray station interrupt for the Koran reading? I doubt it, as 80 percent of the Tigray population is Christian. I guess the Eritrean clandestine would not do this either (and would they transmit football at all?). Thanks for any help! (Robertas Pogorelis, [Lithuania?], May 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hmmm, did you rule out an image from 7225 or 7215? Could also be a mixing product between two inband 49m stations (gh) UNIDENTIFIED. 6585.41, probably Perú or Bolivia. May 2003 – 0100 UT. Religious station with Indian language. Fast talking gentlemen, religious songs and "banda del pieblo", that is brass-band. I have heard one definitive geographic name: "Santa Cruz". Several times also mentioning of "La Esperanza" and it might be the name of a location. In "Provincia de Santa Cruz, dpto de Cajamarca" there is a "La Esperanza". Or maybe it is Bolivia? I have heard a very uncertain ID sounding "fonetically" as "Radio Lider Frank". In any case very exciting and maybe something new? Very stable in frequency and close down 0200 UT (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin May 18, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED [non]. On 18 May at 2100 on 9270 I can hear Voice of Greece in Greek. Distorted audio and vibrating carrier but parallel can be heard on 9420. 73 (Jari Savolainen, Finland, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Well, this is an interesting frequency. First I thought that VOG on 9270 could be my receiver mix-up. But when talking with Alf Aardal of Norway, he also heard it. After 2100 I made some random checks and at times I think there was another station under VOG. Just after 2300 I noted that VOG on 9420 was off and had also disappeared from 9270. But the vibrating carrier was still there and now another station audible with some music and female talk on 9270. So, it seems they were there all the time under the VOG. As I had to use SSB (my receiver couldn't handle in the AM mode the nearby ute traffic), it is difficult to say what language was spoken. Needs further checking. 73 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, ibid.) [Later:] Once more about this unID 9270, don't get bored :). Just came to my mind the Turkish harmonic on 5562. It's origin must be 927. So this 9270 could well be 10 x 927. Harmonic, just like Mauno suggested. Have to check 9270 tonite against 5562. 73 (Jari, ibid.) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ RECEIVER NEWS +++++++++++++ THE NEW ``ULTIMATE AM RECEIVER`` IC-7800 Granted, it's actually a full featured transceiver, but when you read the specs of the receiver section for this baby, it's hard to believe that it won't also be the ultimate tool for AM BCB DXing! It even has AM Sync Detection! It's the new Icom IC-7800 and it's soon to be available. More details here: http://qtc-japan.net/2001/03_news&topics/ic-7800new.pdf P.S. In A/B tests between my Icom 746 and my Drake R8B, it was even money. So imagine, this bad boy. I'd say we may have a new king! 73, (Les Rayburn, N1LF, IRCA via DXLD) A "DUAL RECEIVE" EXPERIMENT, SSB + AM Hello all. I've been trying out a new (??) mode of listening to fading stations and so far it's been producing some interesting results. Not sure yet if it's an "improvement or not, but "seems" a little better. I know that everyone on this list has heard the results of fading on a shortwave station, it goes with the territory. I'm sure that 'most' of us have used either ECSS or a Synchronous detector when we listen to a station that is either fading badly or has an adjacent channel causing a lot of QRM. It can make a big difference. HOWEVER, I've been toying with something a little different. This Yaesu VR-5000 has two separate internal receivers (not just two VFO's). The main receiver can be used in any mode/bandwidth. The "sub" receiver can only be used in either the AM (fixed bandwidth) or narrow FM modes. The two receivers can either be tuned separately or locked to tune together. Each receiver has it's own volume control. Now, what I've been toying with on fading signals is locking the two receiver VFO's together, putting the main set on either LSB or USB (whichever is best) and the sub on AM. This produces some interesting results. 1. By carefully tuning the set (in SSB the main tunes in 20 Hz steps, the sub (AM mode) in larger increments) I can obtain either zero beat or very close to it. By juggling the two volume controls I can get a satisfactory "mix" of sound with the overall reduction of fading (SSB receiver) and wider audio bandwidth (AM receiver). 2. If not perfectly "Zero Beat", music gets a kind of "Chorus" or "Phasing" sound (guitarists are familiar with this) while voice gets a definite "whuff-whuff-whuff" sound. This is primarily due to the 20 Hz tuning steps. A SSB receiver that tunes in 1 Hz steps would for all practical purposes eliminate that. 3. I'll bet that those with premium transceivers having a "Sub receiver" (such as a 756 Pro, Yaesu 1000D etc) that tuned in 1 Hz steps could carry this experiment further and obtain better results. Anyone else want to experiment with this and see what results they get? If you don't have a receiver with "dual watch" two receivers fed into one audio channel would also work, though it'd be a bigger headache tuning them. 73 de (Phil KO6BB Atrchley, swl via DXLD) MAGIX MUSIC CLEANING LAB "MAGIX music cleaning lab is the most powerful audio software for compiling, cleaning and mastering audio recordings of all kinds". Yes, this is the words from the manufacturer about his product. Persons good at identifying radio stations probably use this type of product. I bought "MAGIX music cleaning lab" for about 40 dollars and have tested the programme. There are a lot of possibilities to digitally manipulate and improve a recording. I believe a DX-er has an enormous use of what is called "Time Stretching/Resampling/Pitch Shifting editor". This means that you can at the same time digitally lower the speed without changing the pitch and change a male bassy voice to a more female version. The address to MAGIX is: http://www.magix.com (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin May 18, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DX LISTENING DIGEST) DRM +++ MY EXPERIENCES WITH DRM[tm] RECEPTION IN NEW ZEALAND Compiled by Chris Mackerell, Wellington With the start of ``live`` broadcasts from Radio Netherlands and Deutsche Welle next month, the Editor has twisted my arm into writing a few words about my experimenting with DRM reception over the last few months. For those new to the technology, Digital Radio Mondiale, DRM for short, is a method of broadcasting on AM (longwave, medium and shortwave) radio using digital signals rather than analogue - it`s like listening to an audio stream on the Internet, but broadcast on medium or shortwave radio rather than via the net. DRM offers the potential for totally noise and fading free shortwave reception. In addition it has the ability to carry stereo signals, and multimedia broadcasts, including extra information such as pictures and subtitles. Screen capture of multi-media DRM broadcast (Courtesy Michael Dressen, Germany) [original article illustrated] For the last few years I`ve found that I`ve spent less time on DXing and shortwave listening and more time tinkering around with computers, the internet, and internet radio. When I became aware of the development of DRM I thought it would be a good way to combine my long standing interest in DXing and shortwave listening with my interest in computers and the net. At the moment there are no commercially available consumer-grade receivers for DRM reception. To receive DRM broadcasts at the moment you need a modified receiver together with a computer to decode the signal. The modifications required to receive DRM involve the installation of an additional IF module to provide an IF output signal suitable to be fed into a PC soundcard, together with modifications to the receiver`s IF bandwidth to allow for the 12 kHz bandwidth of a DRM signal. I had originally thought about modifying my AOR AR-7030 for DRM reception, but in the end I decided to purchase a DRM-ready Yaesu FRG- 100 from SAT-Service Schneider in Germany. They also sell a very small DRM IF module for installation into other receivers. FRG-100/DRM is fitted with a 12 kHz IF output and has bandwidth filter changes to receive DRM broadcasts. In my receiver I`ve had the wide AM filter bank used for DRM --- this results in AM Wide being *really* wide when used for normal AM transmissions. This has turned out of making it a really nice little receiver for general shortwave listening. In addition to a modified receiver, a suitable program is required on your PC to decode and listen to DRM broadcasts. I purchased the ``DRM Software Radio`` program from Merlin Communications, which I run on a dual processor 733 MHz Pentium III computer running Windows XP/Pro. There are freeware packages available for decoding DRM signals, but due to licencing of the coding algorithms used you need to compile them yourself on a Windows PC. I don`t have the required compiler so I have been unable to try the freeware software. Having taken the plunge I eagerly awaited the arrival of my new receiver. It duly arrived, and has been installed in my DX shack. I am listening from Tawa, a suburb of Wellington, the capital city of New Zealand. It`s a residential area with houses filled with TVs, computers and other noise-generating electronics. My house is no exception! My antenna is a 30 metre wire in the garden. This feeds my receiver through a JPS ANC-4 noise reduction unit to help cut down some of the local noise from my PC and the rest of the house. The very first day I got the receiver home and set it up I was able to get some of the best DRM reception I`ve heard. Radio Netherlands were running some test transmissions from Bonaire for RNZI and I got home about 10 minutes before the start of the broadcast! I frantically connected everything up, tuned the receiver, fired-up the software on my PC, and much to my amazment superb quality audio came out of my PC speakers! Since then I`ve been able to receive DRM tranmissions from Deutsche Welle via Sines, Portugal, Radio Netherlands via Bonaire, and the BBC via Rampisham in the UK and Sackville in Canada. These have all been test broadcasts, and the results have been variable. SAT-Service Schneider DRM IF Module Yaesu FRG-100/DRM [caption] This is new technology and it has a long way to go yet. True, there is no static or fading, but instead you get dropouts and distortion at times, very similar to listening to an internet radio station via a dialup connection a year or so ago. Having said that, I think how much that technology has improved dramatically over a very short time, and I can`t help thinking the same will happen with DRM. I`ve had the chance to listen to some DRM samples from RTL test tranmissions to Europe on 6095 kHz. These are really superb and show how good the DRM signal can be. Samples from these can be found on my website, together with my own recordings. Is DRM going to be ``DX-able``? Well, the DRM software can decode a station ID from a DRM signal that is totally drowned out by a normal AM broadcast, but, no, I don`t consider it will be a DX medium for a long while yet, if ever. It doesn`t have that challenge of picking an ID out of the noise after hours of frustrating listening! It`s an ``all or nothing`` medium. I do think it will be very good for those people who like shortwave listening. Some of the audio can be xcellent. A lot of DXers are very concerned about digital broadcasting and its impact on other signals. My experience so far is that existing AM shortwave broadcasts have caused far more disruption to the DRM test signals I`ve been trying to listen to than vice-versa! What happens when DRM becomes more common, and spreads to the medium-wave band, remains to be seen. I can`t help thinking that if the BBC went back and used a frequency like its old 15070 kHz for a world-wide DRM broadcast they would be on to a winner all round. FM quality stereo shortwave with pictures could be just around the corner... If you want to know more about DRM you can email me at chris@radiodx.com, or visit some of the web links listed below. My DX Shack FRG-100/DRM on the left [caption] Screen shot of DRM test Transmission by Radio Netherlands from Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles on 15400 kHz 0430 13th April 2003 by Chris Mackerell in Wellington, NZ. [caption] Internet Links about DRM: My own DRM page, including audio samples: http://www.owdjim.gen.nz/chris/radio/DRM/DRM.html Latest DRM broadcast information from Radio Netherlands: http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/html/drm_latest.html The DRM Software Radio site (includes excellent forums about DRM): http://www.drmrx.org/ SAT-Service Schneider --- DRM equipment suppliers: http://home.t-online.de/home/sat-service/sat/DRM/DRM.htm The official DRM Consortium site: http://www.drm.org/ The DRM logo is a trade mark of Digital Radio Mondiale Association and is used with permission. DRM logo © DRM Association 1998. (NEW ZEALAND DX TIMES MAY 2003 via DXLD) DRM UPGRADED STANDARDS From: Radio Currents Online - May 05 - May 18, 2003 --- Geneva - May 7, 2003 - As the June 16 date of Digital Radio Mondiale's (DRM) first broadcasts draws near, the on-air system has received another universal standardization plaudit. The European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) has elevated its September 2001 Technical Specification (TS) of the DRM system to a higher level, ETSI Standard (ES). The new document is published as ETSI ES 201 980 V1.2.2 (2003- 4), Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM); System Specification. Simultaneously, ETSI has published the datacasting standard for DRM as ETSI TS 101 968 V1.1.1 (2003-04), Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM); Data applications directory (via Joe Buch, DXLD) [see also INTERNATIONAL VACUUM] PROPAGATION +++++++++++ UNBELIEVABLE SKIP PHENOMENON, BUT IT HAPPENED In my 50 years of fascination with e-skip I have never experienced what happened yesterday 5/14. You might want to get a map to check out this event. At 0925 I checked for e-skip. My antenna was pointing just south of west, approximately 260 degrees, where I had received Mexico up into the mid FM range on the previous day. I started flipping channels and got classic e-skip on channel 3. I mean classic, with variations from perfect to minimal reception within seconds. At 0930 the station was identified as WLBT, Jackson, MS which is approx. 170 miles to the south of my location in Oxford. During good tropo WLBT will override my local channel 3 in Memphis, but not that morning. When I aligned my antenna with the WLBT transmitter, Memphis was received. When I returned my antenna to west, I got classic e-skip from WLBT. The other VHF from Jackson, channel 12 was not received at all. At the time of this phenomenon we were experiencing rain, with occasional lightning in Oxford, but to the west Arkansas was essentially covered in a blanket of rain and thunderstorms. Later after the weather over Arkansas had passed things were back to normal and I was receiving Memphis on Channel 3 with the antenna in the exact position that I had received the skip from WLBT. Without a doubt this was a skip, but a rain cloud phenomenon rather than e-skip. Again the reception was classic and I was shocked that it was from WLBT. Have I had my head in the sand for fifty years or is this unusual? If it is unusual and with this information can any one question the effect of rain clouds on propagation? Lets talkk about it! (Conway Dabney, Oxford, MS, WTFDA via DXLD) I got WCBI 4 Columbus once this way, I never get it by tropo. I had some heavy lightning here, and it only stayed on for a few seconds after a close strike. BTW, it's also about 170 miles from here. (Chris, ibid.) This short reception of WCBI-4 is like the lightening scatter I've seen. However, Conway's several minutes of WLBT-3 is odd. Airplane flutter can also do some strange things, but not for five minutes (unless maybe the plane is circling over and over). I had KBEJ-2 Fredericksberg (250+ miles) by airplane scatter one morning an hour or so after a tropo signal from KBEJ had faded out. It behaved a lot like Es. I think the KBEJ signal was still nearby, but my equipment just wasn't able to pull it in without the help of the airplane. Conway's reception is different from anything I've seen. BTW, when I see lightening scatter, I disconnect my antennas (Danny Oglethorpe, Shreveport, LA, ibid.) My hunch: a nice bit of tropo scatter. I've had FM's come in for a minute or two, strong one second, faint the next. Then gone completely. Often during dead conditions. Signals from 200+ miles... (Saul Chernos, Ont., ibid.) This reflected reception of WLBT lasted for an extended period of time. The reception was just as good and erratic when I had to leave as when I first noticed it and I was watching and trying to figure out what was happening for at least 45 minutes (Conway, ibid.) Reference the Conway Dabney report of WLBT at 170 miles with what appeared to be Es type fading. This is already shaping up to be a most unusual year (more tornados reported in USA during first 14 days of May than any COMPLETE month of May on record) and perhaps by coincidence (although I doubt it) an unusual amount of early-season Es including some pretty short stuff which of course indicates abnormally high density in the E layer. On that subject, if you have been of the habit of checking only channels 2-6 for Es, I strongly urge you to continue through high band as a matter of NEW habit this year! ... The ideal graphic representation of Es assumes the abnormally dense area capable of refracting/reflecting VHF signals is in a straight line - such as: XXXXXXXXX which when combined with an incoming skippable (new word) signal results in XXXXXXXXXXXXXX O O O O O O O O O (you) (distant transmitter) However, if there is a significant WIND SHEAR about, creating turbulence in the E layer beyond whatever it takes to create Es, then the ideal and illustrative E layer can look like this X X X X The turbulence creates a "dimple" in the E layer XX over at least a small region. As the ANGLE which the signal approaches the abnormally dense layer is almost always the ANGLE at which the signal leaves the layer (they are RECIPROCAL), then we can have X X YX XY Y X Y Y Y Y Y Y Y (you) (not distant) Of course there can be dozens, hundreds of variations of this - the important point being that straight, flat line, Es "clouds" can assume a number of physical dimensions which are NOT - flat, straight lines. That there might be a connection, in the physics sense, between the abnormally high number of (turbulent) tornados in the upper south and Midwest and the type of reception Conway reports is fodder for discussion. Conway's description of "fading from perfect to minimal in seconds" does NOT suggest lightening scatter to me; any I have noted is more like MS reception with significant periods of NO SIGNAL in between "perfect" and "perfect." On a hunch I checked the amateur 50 MHz (6 meter) "reflector" reports for the same date and period of time. I note that around one hour earlier a station to his north was reporting "Very strong signals for a few minutes, then nothing" from another who was around 200 miles away. There is nothing that exactly fits his time frame (nothing at 9:25 AM on the 14th of May) but then I would expect hams who might have observed this happening at 50 MHz to pretty much ignore the effect given that 200 mile is hardly an earth shattering "routine distance" for any reasonably well equipped six meter station. Bottom line? Doug said it in this month's VUD - "Hang on, this could be an exciting ride" (or something to that effect - I paraphrase). (Bob Cooper in New Zealand, WTFDA via DXLD) My take on this reception is that it is either not ionospheric in nature, or less likely, backscatter. The ionization density would have to be extreme for this to be direct reflection from the E region, given that Conway was pointing in a different direction from the station. This would indicate that the ionization was so strong that signals could be reflected back, which would have indicated blanket Es up to 80 MHz, and likely widespread reports of 144 and 220+ MHz Es in the southern part of the US. Openings of this magnitude are long lasting and widespread. The other important thing to keep in mind is that windshear theorized to cause Es at 100 km altitude is completely separate and generated by different events than "turbulance" and shear that occurs in the troposphere (0-18 km). I really don't have a solid theory, but I'd lean towards a tropospheric reception for several reasons: 1) The ionsopheric possibility seems far fetched given the relative lack of other reports and distances involved 2) There are many unknown variables here: - How pure is the pattern of Conway's antenna? - Was the bearing coincident with a null of that semi-local? - Did the received station's altitude vary from other stations nearby the reception area? - etc 3) The fact that there were storms and showers in the area. This could add another dynamic of breaking up enhancement or ducting formation. One thing is for sure - it's fun to theorize about this. :) (Mike Hawk, ibid.) Hi amigos radioaficionados! This is the weekend edition of your favorite radio hobby program. I am Arnie Coro in Havana, now ready to share with you about seventeen minutes of on the air and on the web time. Item one: AT LAST --- yes AT LAST the solar coronal holes activity has subsided, and the associated geomagnetic field disturbances and geomagnetic storming are now over. The daily planetary A index is now near 10 units, and that should produce much better HF propagation conditions during the next three to five days IF, and again, I say IF no more coronal hole generated solar wind comes into the picture !!! The solar flux is now near 100, and the actual sunspot number is hovering also around 100. And now amigos just before the end of the show, here is Arnie Coro's Dxers Unlimited HF and 6 meters propagation update and forecast. Solar flux near 100 units and holding steady for the next two to three days. The sunspot number count is also near 100, and fortunately, as I was typing the script of the show at around 17 hours UTC, the last A index recorded was around 10 units. Let's hope that the continuos solar coronal hole activity comes to a halt, as those coronal holes have disrupted short wave radios for a very long period of time now. We may see some nice Sporadic E openings, so keep your TV sets with external antennas tuned to channels 2, 3 or 4, whichever one is not in use at your location to detect possible signs of E skip (Arnie Coro, CO2KK, RHC DXers Unlimited May 17 via Bob Chandler, VE3SRE, ODXA via DXLD) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 3-085, May 17, 2003 edited by Glenn Hauser, ghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted later at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd3e.html For restrixions and searchable 2003 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn NEXT AIRINGS OF WORLD OF RADIO 1182: RFPI: Sun 0530, 1130 [maybe; see CR], 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230, Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0700/0830, 1300/1430 on 7445 and/or 15039 WWCR: Sun 0230 5070, 0630 3210, Wed 0930 9475 WJIE: [maybe] Sun 1030, 1630 7490 and/or 13595 WBCQ: Mon 0445 7415 WRN ONDEMAND: http://new.wrn.org/listeners/stations/station.php?StationID=24 OUR ONDEMAND AUDIO: Check http://www.worldofradio.com/audiomid.html [Low] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1182.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1182.ram [High] (Download) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1182h.rm (Stream) http://www.k4cc.net/wor1182h.ram (Summary) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1182.html ** AUSTRALIA. On two occasions this coming week, RA will not be emanating from Shepparton. Aerials are in two groups in 1.5 sq km area. J group is a collexion of curtains and two rhombics, favoring SE Asia, Japan, NW Pacific, etc. J had work on transmission lines a few years ago, a bit of a disaster; since then working on handicap with reduced power, some frequencies not accessible. Lines are now being replaced or modified to enable them to work over full frequency range and full power. Aerials out of service while working on transmission lines. For a period of hours on Tue and Wed, will be off the air. Tue, whole station will be quiet, 0500-0900 UT; Wed, local time, P = Pacific transmissions on but J aerials for English, Indonesian, Tok Pisin will be off air. Need to switch off all the antennas when using sensitive measuring equipment. Wed, will also have staff members working inside transmission lines with 100 kW, so must be off for safety, OSH issue. As we go into solar minimum, J6 and J9 = 6 and 9 MHz curtains are constrained only to use certain frequencies; afterwards, J6 for example will be usable all the way from 5.9 to 6.2 MHz, to access clear channels more readily. Plan subject to change: Tue 20 May silent 0500-0900 UT; Later UT Tue from 2100, frequencies reduced for a 12 hour period. Brandon, Cox Peninsula, and offshore relays, webstream unaffected (Nigel Holmes with Roger Broadbent, RA Feedback May 16, notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOLIVIA. 5580.21, R. San José, San José de Chiquitos noted 2312- 2350 YL and OM, deep fades, no music, 16 May. Anyone else hearing this? (Bob Wilkner, FL, R-75 and NRD535D noise reducing antenna, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BURUNDI. Re 6140 reactivated: Hi Glenn, absolutely no sign of it here. Could someone in Africa check this? 73, (Mauno Ritola, Finland, May 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. CRTC AWARDS FOUR NEW RADIO LICENCES By KEITH DAMSELL, MEDIA REPORTER, Thursday, May 15, 2003 - Page B4 The federal broadcasting regulator has awarded four new radio licences to serve the Southern Ontario twin cities of Kitchener and Waterloo, including an FM dance station to CanWest Global Communications Corp. The Beat, to be broadcast by CanWest at 91.5 FM, is expected to begin operations "sooner than later," said a company spokesman. To win the licence, CanWest has committed to broadcasting 40 per cent Canadian content -- 5 per cent above the minimum 35 per cent -- and will spend $2.1-million on local artist development over the seven-year licence term. The hip-hop dance station targeting young adults is the TV and newspaper giant's second radio service in Canada. In February, CanWest began operating a jazz radio station in its hometown of Winnipeg. The company has radio applications pending in Montreal and Edmonton. In its addition to the Beat, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission awarded three additional FM licences: A country music station to small private broadcaster Larche Communications Inc. A Christian music station to non-profit charity Sound of Faith Broadcasting. A native radio station to Toronto broadcaster Aboriginal Voices Radio Inc. The four services were chosen from among 10 applicants, a group that included a proposed mainstream hit music station from Rogers Broadcasting Ltd., a unit of Toronto holding company Rogers Communications Inc. In its decision, the CRTC said approval of the Rogers application "would not contribute to the diversity" of voices serving the market, noting the company already owns two radio stations and a cable TV service in the region. At present, three major broadcasters operate five commercial radio stations serving Kitchener-Waterloo: Rogers' AM news station and an FM pop music station; CHUM Ltd.'s AM talk radio station and an FM rock service; and a single FM music station in nearby Cambridge owned by Corus Entertainment Inc. (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) Haven`t seen the CRTC info about this yet (Westenhaver) The following is a digest of decisions released today (May 14) by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission for four new radio stations to serve Kitchener-Waterloo, twin cities located about 60 miles west of Toronto. The estimated population of Kitchener- Waterloo in 2002 was 437,542, making it the eleventh-largest radio market in Canada (From Harry van Vugt, Windsor, Ontario, Canada) 1/ The Commission approves the application by Global Communications Limited for a licence to operate a new Rhythmic Contemporary Hit Radio FM station serving Kitchener-Waterloo. The station will operate at 91.5 MHz (channel 218B) with an effective radiated power of 3,600 watts. Global`s proposed station is one of four new FM radio stations authorized in decisions issued today to provide service to the Kitchener-Waterloo area. In total, these decisions deal with ten applications for new FM radio stations that were considered at the 28 October 2002 Public Hearing in Kitchener. 2/ The Commission approves the application by Larche for a licence to operate a new English-language FM radio programming undertaking serving Kitchener-Waterloo. The station will operate at 99.5 MHz (channel 258A) with an effective radiated power of 1,600 watts. It will be a new Country FM station 3/ The Commission approves the application by Sound of Faith for a licence to operate a low-power English-language specialty FM radio programming undertaking at Kitchener-Waterloo. The station will operate on frequency 94.3 MHz (channel 232LP), with an effective radiated power of 50 watts. 4/ The Commission approves the application by Aboriginal Voices Radio Inc. for a broadcasting licence to operate an English-, French-, and Aboriginal-language Native Type B FM radio station in Kitchener- Waterloo at 102.5 MHz (Channel 273A) with an effective radiated power of 460 watts (via Harry & Brenda van Vugt, DXLD) ** CHINA. A couple of strong Chinese transmitters (serving to jamm Radio Free Asia transmissions?) with CNR 1 can be heard here in the middle of Europe between 0400-0600 UT (and also before and after...) on 17525, 17615 (very strong - a Hi-Fi reception), 17880 kHz. They are much stronger than regular CNR 1 transmitters from Beijing on 17550, 17580, 17605 and 17890 kHz listed with 100 kW. GOOD DX, (Karel Honzik the Czech Republic (Czechia), AOR AR-7030 30 m Long Wire, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** CEUTA. 1584, RadiOlé, MAY 14, 2327 - man in Spanish, then musical interlude; way over SER [mainland Spain]. This was one of the first TA's fading in: imagine if it ran big power! + MAY 15 0011 - Spanish pop vocal, then woman mentioned Melilla; HUGE signal! (Mark Connelly, Rockport, MA (GC= 70.622 W / 42.667 N) (Granite Pier) Receiver: Drake R8A Antenna system: 2 m per side square broadband loop, 1.8 m active whip, 46 m wire, Superphaser-2 phasing unit, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** COSTA RICA. RFPI`s program schedule must be regarded as highly variable, even before 0600 UT. On UT Sat May 17, the scheduled 0130 airing of WORLD OF RADIO did not start until 0207, tho it was the new edition 1182. The scheduled 2330 Sat airing must not have happened, as at 2357 check something else was on 7445 and 15039; upon recheck at 0030 after DX Partyline on HCJB, the RFPI Mailbag was in progress and that ended at 0037. From the last 7 minutes of that show, I learnt that it was produced on May 13, and apparently they now intend to do a new Mailbag on Tuesdays rather than Friday or Saturday. Still working on live streaming; that was tested for 4 or 5 days, but has problems with congestion, choppiness; listeners invited to try [no URL given; it used to be http://195.210.0.134:8004/listen.pls but this would not work when checked at 0219 UT May 18]. On SW, 15040 is back, at 90% power; reception reports wanted, observing when it peaks, compared to 7445, to help decide what hours to run it; for now and a few days it is continuous like 7445, which has also been tweaked (James and Naomi, RFPI Mailbag, notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CZECHOSLOVAKIA. 80 YEARS OF RADIO BROADCASTING IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA 50 YEARS OF TELEVISION IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA In May there are two important anniversaries on the territory of Czechoslovakia (which now includes the Czech Republic and Slovak Republic): 80 years of radio and 50 years of television. Czechoslovakia was the second country in Europe to start regular radio broadcasts in May 1923. The first country was the United Kingdom in 1921. Regular television broadcasts started in Czechoslovakia in May 1953 (Karel Honzik, Czechoslovak DX Club (CSDXC) http://www.dx.cz hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** ECUADOR [and non]. This appears to be based entirely on the HCJB press release published here weeks ago, but anyway --- HCJB SHARPENS FOCUS ON LATIN AMERICA -- May 16, 2003 QUITO, ECUADOR - HCJB World Radio is refocusing its radio ministries in Latin America for greater impact in the region and as part of a strategic global media mix. . . http://www.jesusjournal.com/articles/publish/article_398.html (via Mike Terry, DXLD) If you read this in time, a reminder to check VIVA MIAMI, UT Sun May 18 at 0330 on WRMI 7385, for Allen Graham with new news about HCJB. That show normally repeats: Sun 0930 on 9955, 1200-1300 and 2200-2230 on 15725, but some of those might be the Spanish version. There was nothing new about the situation on this week`s DXPL (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY [non]. Radio RASANT from IRRS-Shortwave on 13,840 and 5,780 Radio Rasant the students' radio of the Realschule in Sundern (Germany) will be airing via IRRS-Shortwave on Sat & Sun May 17 and May 18, 2003 at the following times: May 17, 2003 at 0830-0930 UT on 13,840 kHz May 17, 2003 at 1930-2030 UT on 5,780 kHz repeated at the same time & freqs on Sunday May 18. IRRS-Shortwave is on 13,840 kHz Sat & Sun from 0800-1200 UT, and daily every evening on 5,780 kHz from 1900-2030 UT. We will be glad to receive reports to: reports@nexus.org Check also http://www.nexus.org/NEXUS-IBA/Schedules and http://www.radiorasant.org, email: info@radiorasant.org Best 73, (Ron Norton, NEXUS-IBA support, PO Box 11028, 20110 Milano, Italy ph: +39 02 70606603 - fax: +39 02 70638151 e-mail : ron@nexus.org http://www.nexus.org Cumbredx mailing list via DXLD) ** INDIA. AIR Patna of Bihar State is noted today on 11620 & 9595 sign on at 0015 UT. They are noted announcing the SW frequency. Usually these are External Service frequencies (Urdu, English etc.) AIR Patna usually operates on 621 kHz. [Later:] About AIR Patna heard on 9595 & 11620, my investigations have revealed that, the 100 kW MW Transmitter of AIR Patna on 621 kHz is having some problems. So for the last two days their programs are relayed via Delhi on 11620 kHz! This will continue for a couple more days only. The monitored schedule on 11620 is: Transmission I 0015 to around 0400 UT Transmission II 0630 to around 0930 Transmission III 1130 to around 1741 There will be extended broadcasts on Sunday. Most of the programs are in Hindi and some programs in Urdu were also monitored. The External & other Home Services on 11620 are cancelled for this. AIR Patna is already announcing 11620 in their broadcasts. 9595 was also noted in parallel today for the first transmission only. Patna is the capital of Bihar State in Northern India. It is a rare occasion. So keep watching this interesting transmission on 11620. The address of AIR Patna is: Superintending Engineer All India Radio Frazer Road Chhaju Bagh Patna 800001 Bihar Their following email ID seems to be working: cbspatna@sancharnet.in The other email ID I have is not accepting my messages. 73 (Jose Jacob, VU2JOS/AT0J, May 17, dx_india via DXLD) Having such a SW backup for an ailing MW transmitter is fine, but at the expense of numerous external services? Shows where AIR`s priorities lie! (gh, DXLD) ** INDIA [and non]. AIR, BBC TALK SWAP If all goes according to plan, Indians in Britain will soon be able to hear desi numbers from All India Radio (AIR) on BBC's domestic FM channels while people here will be able to listen to entertainment and lifestyle programmes from the Beeb courtesy AIR. An hour-long meeting between senior executives of Prasar Bharati and BBC here on Monday explored the possibility of swapping airtime on each other's home turf. If the agreement both sides discussed actually gets signed, the programme swapping will begin on August 15, Independence Day. The BBC will be given an equal one-hour slot on AIR's medium wave. While there is a restriction on BBC dishing out news and current affairs, no such conditions inhibit AIR programmes in the UK. "If we can raise money on the BBC programme, we can have it," said a senior Prasar Bharati official. However, the BBC sounds a little cautious by pointing out that no agreement has yet been clinched. "A meeting was held on Monday which dealt with a wide range of issues; no agreement was reached on any of these," a BBC World Service spokesperson said on Wednesday. - The Times of India (From : Indiantelevision.com) Regds, (via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, DXLD) {what are desi numbers??} ** INDIA. On the subject of dangers in broadcasting. Picked up a few years ago. /Olle HOW A COBRA BROUGHT AIR TO EARTH All India Radio's Gulbarga (in Karnataka) station announcer was up on air when a cobra decided to bring him to earth. It crawled up the station steps, sneaked into his studio and made its presence known by a couple of majestic hisses. The next thing anybody knew, the programme was off air. For, the snake -- an inquisitive fellow -- undertook an exploratory journey of the studio. He crawled under tables, over wires and cables, unmindful of the people around -- he wasn't afraid of them; if they were afraid of him, well, tough luck! He crawled on, heading straight for the anchor's chair. Which was more than what either the announcer or his cameramen could take. They air- navigated the room and, in 5 seconds flat, was out of the doors. Once outside, it was a mad rush towards the nearest telephone. Soon, police and forest officials, armed with sticks and nets, rushed to the station. The next hour, they moved chairs, looked under tables and even rolled up the carpet (while the scheduled programme remained off air, and the station relayed Dharwad AIR). But no luck! The slithery villain was nowhere to be found. The brave officials looked some more, but the cobra remained unfound. Till, finally, it got tired of the game, crawled out from inside the toilet it was hiding and went its way! The station resumed broadcast immediately. http://www.indiaserver.com/thehindu/2000/01/10/stories/0410227j.htm UNI (via Olle Alm, Sweden, DXLD) Only gets to indiaserver recipes ** INTERNATIONAL WATERS [non]. Exciting offshore radio news From http://www.mvcommunicator.com/4693.html On 27 March 2003, The Super Station acquired the radio ship MV Communicator for use as a radio station. Unfortunately, any thoughts of broadcasting have been severely delayed due to vandals entering the ship and smashing up much of the equipment, leaving us with massive repair bills. Our main priority at the moment is to bring the MV Communicator back from Pampushaven in the Netherlands to Essex, UK so we can carry out repairs and restore her to her former glory as a working radio ship. We will be launching "The Communicator Club" very soon. Membership of the club will provide you with an exclusive newsletter, trips to see the ship once she returns to the UK, and progress reports as we continue work on her. Discounts on merchandise will also become available. Funds from the membership will help to finance the extensive repairs we need to carry out. Once repairs to the ship are complete, our aim is to launch a live twenty four hour radio station, broadcasting a mixture of hot A.C. and soft rock. Very soon we will be publishing recently taken photographs of the ship. This will enable you to witness the scale of the damage, and give you an idea of the extent of repairs needed in order to make the dream of bringing this ship back to life a reality. In May 2002, Dave Miller called Janie Ash, the former Managing Director of a radio station in Belfast where they both worked, for a chat about a mad idea of saving a radio ship from the scrap yard. To his amazement she thought the idea of preserving a piece of radio history, while at the same time creating a brand new vibrant radio station was a thrilling prospect. Through the lengthy process of purchasing the ship, both Dave and Janie remained committed and hopeful that Clear Channel Communications (the previous owner of The Communicator) would finally sell to them for an affordable price and not scrap her. On 27 March 2003, Dave and Janie flew to Amsterdam to meet Rob Van Der Vegt from Clear Channel to take another look at the vessel and take ownership of her. It was a huge achievement after months of complex negotiations. As they both stepped on board the smiles disappeared as they looked around to see that vandals had been on board and wrecked the ship. A deal was struck and the ship was transferred over so that work could commence with immediate effect. In May 1984 Laser 558 appeared from the radio ship MV Communicator anchored in the North Sea. Its All American DJ's soon attracted a cult audience of 10 million loyal listeners. Independent Local radio stations were not only losing listeners but advertising revenue as well. Laser 558 always disputed the "pirate" tag and in a press release from the New York Office Roy Lindau President of MMI, the Worldwide Sales Group for the station stated "that unlike other pirate stations of the past Laser 558 is a legal station, since the ship is registered outside of Europe, transmits from International Waters, is owned by a Panamanian company and staffed and supplied by citizens of The United States Of America. Big American Personalities became household names all over Europe. Jessie Brandon, Rick Harris, David Lee Stone, Steve Masters, Holly Michaels, Craig Novak, Chris Carson, Tommy Rivers and of course Charlie Wolf. Contact details: The Super Station, Suite 449, 305 Madison Avenue, New York NY 10165 USA Or email: info@mvcommunicator.com (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** ISRAEL. There was a three hour programme on the "Time Tunnel" oldies show between 1200-1500 today (14/05/03) on Radius 100FM here in Israel, to the Voice of Peace. This being on a day that a tribute is going to be paid to Abie Nathan, the founder of the VOP at the Tzavta theatre in Tel-Aviv. Lots of Israeli artists will be performing and the proceeds will go to the costs of Abie's treatment. To remind your readers, Abie has suffered two strokes, leaving him in a wheelchair, and barely able to talk. The programme consisted of VOP Jingles, excerts from Kenny Page, Tim Sheperd, commercials, Twilight Time, and other famous moments from the VOP's 20 year history. It was broadcast on the station Radius, which broadcasts on 100 FM; the station that took over the old VOP frequency. The VOP closed down in October of 1993, and Radius started in September of 1995. The programme was also broadcast through their website http://www.100FM.co.il which also has a camera showing live pictures from the studio. The Israeli radio station is paying tribute to the VOP now (1200-1500 Israel local time) on 100 FM or through the Internet at the above web address. There will be a special benefit tonight a 8 pm in Tel-Aviv to help the recovery of Abie Nathan, who has suffered two strokes in the past few years (Mike Brand, Earthradio via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** ITALY. IRRS: See GERMANY non ** NETHERLANDS. Radio 10 FM will leave 675 by the end of September: -- Subject: [A-DX] Radio Tien FM: AM nur noch bis September Hallo Liste! Vor allem für Nordrhein- Westfalen und Emsländer interessant: Radio 10 (Tien) FM sendet nur noch bis September 2003 auf 675 khz. Von Juni- September kommen in den Niederlanden 19 Füllsender zu den beiden Hauptfrequenzen (103,0/103,3 MHz) hinzu. Dann werden statt 22% 60 % der NL- Landesfläche erreicht werden. Quelle: Radio 10 FM (war da Donnerstag nach Ostern). (Demnächst mehr im RADIO KURIER) Gruß in die Runde (aus Franken Hendrik Leuker, Germany, A-DX via Kai Ludwig, DXLD) ** NIGERIA. VON`s English program schedule grid now updated, for April-September 2003, with no breaks from 0450 to 2300, all on 15120? --- and ??: http://www.voiceofnigeria.org/english.html Drop-down menu for other languages available (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** RUSSIA [and non]. FEBC Announces New Station in Russia FEBC St. Petersburg, 1089 AM --------------------------------- Far East Broadcasting Company's Russian Ministries http://www.febc.org/russia http://www.radiotserkov.ru have purchased the long established AM station Teos St. Petersburg, enabling FEBC to establish a full time local radio ministry in the second-largest city of Russia. FEBC St. Petersburg, 1089 AM, will broadcast to some five million people in the Greater St. Petersburg area on a 20 kW medium wave transmitter. Since 1 May 2003, 1089 AM has been on the air with FEBC organised programmes from 7.00 to 24.00 h local time daily. The main emphasis of the station is on Christian evangelism and building a bridge between the community and Christian congregations, modelled after FEBC Moscow's ministry in connecting radio listeners with local churches in the area. Types of programmes on the station will include Bible teaching, counselling, talk-shows and music. Far East Broadcasting Company originally started out as a missionary radio station on short wave but since the 90s has moved to a more diversified approach establishing more and more local FM and AM stations. In the case of Russia, FEBC short wave broadcasting started in the late 40s from the Philippines, while local ministries started in 1992 with programmes in Khabarovsk. Today, there are several regional ministries while nationwide coverage is still provided by some ten hours via short wave station KGEI [sic] Saipan. In the 90s activities mainly concentrated on Siberia and Ukraine, but more recently FEBC's Russian Ministries also moved to European Russia. "Radiotserkov" first broadcast radio programmes in St. Petersburg in June 2002 from another local station (three hours on Olguno 684 kHz, 10 kW). It should be noted that beside Russian FEBC also maintains many other programmes in national and regional languages of the former USSR. While many of the programmes are produced within the Russian federation, FEBC still actively seeks overseas funding especially among US donors (Dr. Hansjoerg Biener, May 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SWEDEN. Regarding PLC in Sweden it has suffered a lot of setbacks during the last years. Sydkraft, Sweden's second large power company, has in practice halted all its grand plans on PLC for most of southern Sweden. It is cheaper and more effective to use ADSL on common phone lines. My guess is that the state controlled Vattenfall, Sweden's dominant power company, eventually will come up with the same conclusion. Song Networks, the Vattenfall partner, a broadband company, has been balancing on the fine edge of bankruptcy for the last few years and will not have that much money to drown in PLC. Vattenfall is also running huge losses on its broadband operations, with adventures into wireless broadband for urban as well as rural areas (Hermod Pedersen, Web Editor <http://www.hard-core-dx.com/> DX LISTENING DIGEST) See also PLC section at bottom [If this issue seem a bit bottom-heavy, it`s because we held over a lot of UK and USA stuff from last issue ---- gh] ** U K. CORPORATION CHIEF REJECTS 'MYTHS' ABOUT BROADCASTER By Tim Burt Published: May 12 2003 5:00 | Last Updated: May 12 2003 5:00 Gavyn Davies wants to nail "a few myths" about the BBC. The chairman of the world's largest publicly-funded broadcaster denies the BBC is too rich, too commercial and wary of outside regulation. . . http://news.ft.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=FT.com/StoryFT/FullStory&c=StoryFT&cid=1051389928557 (via Jill Dybka, Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** U K. BBC Management Training --- The big question is if this will really result in better programs (From the London Telegraph, May 15, 2003 via Roger Chambers, Utica, New York) BBC TO SPEND MILLIONS ON LEADERSHIP TRAINING COURSES By Tom Leonard, Media Editor (Filed: 15/05/2003) The BBC is to send more than 5,000 staff on an eight-day residential management training course in a multi-million pound campaign to improve leadership, Greg Dyke, the director-general, is to announce today. Greg Dyke Mr Dyke, who joined the corporation pledging to cut costs and management bureaucracy, is expected to tell staff that the BBC can make better programmes if it is better led. It will be compulsory for every member of staff in any sort of managerial role to attend the course at the Ashridge business management school in Hertfordshire. The school, a country house set in 150 acres near Berkhamsted, offers training in jargon-wrapped subjects such as "action learning", "appreciative inquiry" and improvisation workshops. The BBC's leadership training programme, which will partly be conducted by some of its managers, will include advice on motivating and