DX LISTENING DIGEST 2002 ARCHIVE

Glenn Hauser's World of Radio

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DX LISTENING DIGEST 2002 ARCHIVE

NOTE: Since this file is getting almost too big to manage, we are closing it at this point, containing all DXLDs for the first three months of 2002, now renamed dxldta02.html Its original name, dxldtd02.html now applies to the current to-date file, starting with 2-052, April 1, 2002. |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| ALSO NOTE: INDIVIDUAL DXLDS, JANUARY-JUNE 2002: On our own website we no longer have individual issues before July 1, 2002, just these massive quarterly archives. Individual issues are, however, still available at DXing.com, indexed here: http://www.dxing.com/dxrold.htm -- and 2001 archive is also there ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 2-051, March 31, 2002 edited by Glenn Hauser, wghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted afterwards at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd02.html For restrixions and searchable 2002 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn WORLD OF RADIO #1124: (STREAM) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1124.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1124.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1124.html NEXT AIRINGS ON WWCR: Mon 0100, 0600 on 3210; Wed 1030 on 9475 NEXT AIRINGS ON RFPI: Sun 1830, Mon 0030, 0630, 1230 on some of: 7445-USB, 15039, 21815-USB CONTINENT OF MEDIA 02-02 is now available: (STREAM) http://www.DXing.com/com/com0202.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.DXing.com/com/com0202.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/com0202.html ON RFPI: Fri 1900, Sat 0100, 0700, 1300, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, Tue 2000, Wed 0200, 0800, 1400 on some of: 7445-USB, 15039, 21815-USB ** AFGHANISTAN [non]. 8700 (USB). Information R Feeder to Command Solo was still audible until about Mar 15 in the early morning and late afternoon with the usual programmes in Pashto and Dari (Groppazzi, Italy, and Petersen, Denmark, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) 8700 USB. Unidentified station after Commando Solo is reported to have arrived back in the States. Mar 24, 1530 (fade in)- past 2310. Playing typical Afghani music. I didn`t listen continuously, but no announcements were heard. Signal strength less than previously (Noel Green, England, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) The Command Solo aircraft reportedly have left Afghanistan, but the feeder which I believe is at a U.S. Base in Saudi Arabia may still be in use (Ed. Anker Petersen, Denmark, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** ALASKA. ALASCA. HAARP -Escutei os sinais em 5800 kHz dias 26 (0740 UT), dia 27 (0845 h), dia 28 (0840 às 0900 e 0930 às 1000). Uai (mineiro tem que falar assim), estou escutando-os também hoje dia 29 de março em 3200 kHz e em 5800 khz às 0700 h. Pude perceber que os sinais em 5800 iniciam-se aos 30 minutos de cada hora e se extendem até aos 60 min da hora. De 30 aos 45 min os sinais são por 1'30" consecutivos com uma pausa de 30 seg. De 45 aos 60 min da hora, os sinais são continuos. Obs: Em 3200 kHz as transmissões comecam aos 0 min da hora e vão até aos 30 min (Nilson Couto, Betim - MG, Radioescutas via @tividade DX via DXLD) ** ANTARCTICA. March 29, 15425.55, LRA-36, 2105-2215, Latin American romantic type ballad music, with only occasional announcements in Spanish. I did hear announcements at 2123 and 2135. CD recording skipped at 2137. Signal was weak to begin with, but increased to fair level around 2144. Audio started dropping out at 2153. Definite ID announcement at 2200. I don't speak SS, but these are some of the words from my ID recording that I understand: "Transmite LRA ?? (pres 36)... Radio ? Arcángel?..." Then freq in kHz. was given "para todo ? " Played clip for Glenn Hauser who was fairly sure about station ID and 100% sure about ending slogan "para todo el mundo." This is a difficult one for us in N America to hear due to the frequency being too low for efficient mid-day propagation from Antarctica; however, the station was on later then usual, and I think there was a slight geomagnetic disturbance at the time, which pushed the MUF down. Signal was of fair strength and quite listenable at peak, but with rapid flutter, which would also suggest a degree of geo-magnetic disturbance (David Hodgson, TN, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Interesting observations, David. I have yet to hear them in Victoria between the usual 1800 and 2100 time frame. They were relatively well heard, however, during that test transmission a few years back for North America. Again that was a later transmission. Seems to be the same propagation characteristic as Radio St Helena. Consistently, the signal would be poor to non-existent, for the first hour, and then gradually increase, often to good to very good levels before starting to gradually fade during the last hour. Maybe they'll be on late again this Monday? (Walt Volodya Salmaniw, BC, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** ANTARCTICA. 15475.5. LRA36, R Nacional, Base Esperanza, Mar 14 and 20, 2100, Spanish. Heard also on 14402.5 in USB. This may have been a switching error as the latter frequency is assigned to Base Esperanza, Base General Belgrano II and Base General San Martín for radiotelephone traffic (Maarten van Delft, Netherlands, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** ARGENTINA. A nice QSL letter was received Mar 14 from Army station LTA. Address: Batallón de Comunicaciones 602, Ejército Argentino, Azopardo 250, piso 18, 1328 Buenos Aires. They are responsible for the relays of various broadcasting stations on 15820 (Maarten van Delft, Netherlands, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** ARGENTINA. 11423.15 LSB, R Bosques (presumed), 0237, Mar 30, Signal was weaker then usual, I suppose related to the elevated solar wind speed (600 kM/s). L Am pop and ballads, with announcements on the quarter hour, which is what I've observed in the past. I couldn't get enough signal to pick out individual words, so no ID this time. Switch to AM on 11423.95 at 0330. This operator is known to switch modes of modulation in the same transmission period. I caught only a few traces of AM audio on the peaks. Will try again over the next few weeks if solar/geo-magnetic conditions quiet down (David Hodgson, TN, March 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) See also SOUTH AMERICA ** AUSTRALIA. New frequency for R. Australia, 2330 UT Mar 30 in English, is 15230, no longer on 15240. Remember when 15230 was a frequency of VLH/VLR Melbourne? (Chris Hambly, Victoria, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Yes. But no surprise, RA website still shows 15240, undated and apparently not updated, and always totally inadequate in not showing exact times, just morning/daytime/evening! http://www.abc.net.au/ra/hear/swguide.htm (Glenn Hauser, March 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. Voice International, Darwin now running Australia- produced programming, with English 1000-1100 on 13685 to China, and Indonesian heard on 15365 at 1026 with "Suara Internasional" ID in between DJ banter and pops. Also heard Mandarin on 13775 at good level at 1030, so now seem to be running at full steam (Matt Francis, Canberra, 31 March, ARDXC via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. The schedule of R Gaúcha, Porto Alegre differs from publication to publication, so your DBS-editor asked Samuel for help. He phoned Claudia Landell at Rádio Gaúcha who said that it now is on the air as follows: ZYE 850, 6020, 0900-0400 ZYE 851, 11915, 0900-0300 More information about Rádio Gaúcha: http://www.clicRBS.com.br (Samuel Cássio, Brazil, Mar 18, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** BURKINA FASO. 5030, R TV Burkina, Mar 15, 16, 23, 24, 26, 1846- 0002*, French, songs, a communiqué regarding an EC foreign language interpreters request, a 2 minute newscast 1900, then Vernacular and French 1931 for an obituary; also heard later, 2250 radioplay in French. 2315, upbeat musical programme, talk by man, occasional mentions of Ouagadougou, sounded very professional. Very strong, like Mauritania, but with better audio. However, ended programme at 2359 and followed with a couple of minutes of their very interesting IS (with what sounds like birds in the background), same IS as on the Dave Kernick IS website, then off with no ID or NA. 55444 (Berg, D'Angelo, Gonçalves, Green and Petersen, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) 7230 R TV Burkina, Mar 11 and 14, 0824-1040 fade out, (signed off 0902 on Monday Mar 11), French/ Vernacular, traditional tunes and tribal songs. 25332 (Carlos Gonçalves, Portugal, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** CANADA. CBC Radio 1 went into special (prepared in advance) programming at 1805 UT on the death of Britain's Queen Mother (Mike Cooper, GA, March 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) See also UK! You mean Canada`s Queen Mother? ** CANADA. CBC Radio One previews for Monday, April 1: TOO FOOLISH FOR WORDS: Easter Monday on CBC Radio One, join host Russell Bowers for Too Foolish for Words, a salute to five centuries of spoken English. From the lyrical to the downright ludicrous, there are about two million words in the English language (don't you wonder who counted?), and the average adult uses only about a thousand. Learn a few more on Too Foolish for Words, Monday at noon (12:30 NT) on CBC Radio One. RICHARDSON'S ROUNDUP: Today on the Roundup....happy Poetry Month! Hear the poetry winners of the 2002 Canadian Literary Awards. As well, can we build an entire person out of Canadian place names? You've been calling and writing with your anatomical nominations. Join guest host Sheryl McKay on the Roundup at 2:06 (2:36 NT) on CBC Radio One. YOUR HOME AWAY FROM HOME: It's never too early to start thinking about summer getaways. Easter Monday, join host Theresa Blackburn for Your Home Away From Home, a two hour foretaste of your summer escape - from the little orange pup tent to the cottage by the lake and everything in between. Great stories and even greater music: Your Home Away From Home, Easter Monday at 4 p.m. (4:30 NT) on CBC Radio One. IDEAS: Tonight on Ideas...Regarding the Mexican Pet. You know the story about the Mexican Pet? How about the choking Doberman? You've surely heard The Hook. Even savvy urban folk fall prey to urban folktales. A panel hosted by Paul Kennedy, tonight on Ideas at 9:05 (9:35 NT) on CBC Radio One. (CBC Hotsheet via DXLD) ** CHECHNYA [non]. MOSCOW TO KEEP AN EYE ON RADIO LIBERTY'S CHECHEN SERVICE | Text of report in English by Russian news agency Interfax Moscow, 30 March: Moscow is so far making no pessimistic forecasts towards the launch by Radio Liberty of broadcasts in Chechen, but pledges to closely monitor the subject matter of the radio station's programmes. Presidential aide Sergey Yastrzhembskiy told Interfax on Saturday [30 March]: "We won't hold any position on the issue in advance but will be judging by deeds." Yastrzhembskiy emphasized that the decision to unveil Radio Liberty broadcasting in Chechen "carries a certain risk". "The North Caucasus is a very sensitive region for Russia and Chechnya is a painful point," the presidential aide said. In this connection, he said: "We will be closely monitoring the subject matter of programmes and the newsmakers' composition, and only then draw conclusions." Source: Interfax news agency, Moscow, in English 1643 gmt 30 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ???? Did we miss something? Last we heard, the RL Chechen service had been postponed indefinitely; are they now going ahead with it?? Or is the above story mere posturing (gh, DXLD) ** CHINA. Wavelength on CRI: The April 5th edition will feature an interview with Radio Pekin's first English announcer Wei Lin. She worked at CRI for more than 50 years. Wavelength airs at 0040 UT [Fridays] on CRI's domestic service and can be heard by listening to the live feed on our web site at http://www.cri.com.cn/english (Wave- Length, China Radio International, Beijing, China; Attention: Lu Feng and Keith Perron, e-mail: wavelengthcri@yahoo.com DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CHINA. Ouvida a Voice of Strait nos 6115 kHz em 23 de Março às 0937 com noticiário em inglês, boa recepção (Samuel Cássio, São Carlos SP, @tividade DX via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. 5957.6, Caracol, Mar 15, strong just after 1000 with extensive international and Colombian news, advertisements, mentions of Caracol, signal slowly drifting downward. Not there on Mar 17 (Jerry Berg, MA, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. 6233/6260v: The main transmitter of La Voz de la Resistencia which was located in the rural zone of Vista Hermosa in the Meta department, Amazon Basin, 200 km southeast of Bogotá, was destroyed with several charges of dynamite by the Colombian antidrugs police on Mar 19. It was the main radiostation of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). It was powered by solar energy and had a 23 metres antenna. The FARC will, however, be able to broadcast from similar transmitters in other regions dominated by this guerilla organization (Héctor Arboleda via Monferini, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) This could be a retaliation for the closure by FARC guerillas on Feb 28 of Government controlled radiostation Onda Zero in the southern Colombian town of Acevedo, Huila Department, when some 10 fighters from FARC threatened to blow up the station and then made off with a transmitter, antennas, and other equipment (Ed. Anker Petersen, ibid.) There was nothing in previous press reports we had about this being the SW transmitter, but mentioned only MW 660. Is it unwarranted to assume they were at same site? (gh, DXLD) ** C I S. NDXC`s Foreign relays on SW through facilities in the CIS is partially updated; I think only the entries in blue refer to A-02: http://www2.starcat.ne.jp/~ndxc/relay.htm (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CONGO, DEM. REP. 9550.0, R Okapi, Kinshasa; In South Africa nice and strong signal. Is coming through with a fair signal at 0900, so possibly on 24 hours/day? Was off the air Mar 20 and 21 (Vashek Korinek, RSA, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** CROATIA [non]. A-02 Schedule for Croatian Radio Starting March 31st 2002 you can listen Croatian Radio on these frequencies: (NB - mostly in Croatian) Europe 6165 0400-2300 Europe 7365 0400-0900 Europe 9830 0400-1700 Europe 13830 0900-2300 South America 9925 2300-0100 North America (East) 9925 0100-0300 North America (West) 9925 0300-0500 New Zealand 9470 0500-0700 Australia 13820 0700-0900 Copied from the Croatian Radio website. (via Alan Roe, Teddington, UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CZECH REPUBLIC [and non]. PRAGUE: 31 March 2002 - 26 October 2002 Re-worked from R. Prague website today. CZECH 0830-0857 11600 S.W.Europe 21745 E.Africa/Mi.East 0930-0957 21745 S.Asia/W.Africa 1100-1127 11615 N.Europe 21745 S.Asia 1230-1257 6055 C.Europe 7345 W.Europe 1330-1357 13580 N.Europe 21745 S.Asia 1530-1557 5930 W.Europe 21745 E.Africa 1730-1757 5930 E.Europe/Asia/Australia 21745 C.Africa 1930-1957 5930 W.Europe 11600 S.E.Asia/Australia 2100-2127 11600 S.E.Asia/Australia 15545 W.Africa 2330-2357 11615 N.America 13580 S.America 0130-0157 6200 N.America 7345 S.America 0230-0257 7345 N.America 9870 FRENCH 0600-0627 5930 W.Europe 7345 S.W.Europe 0800-0827 9880 W.Europe 11600 S.W.Europe 1630-1657 5930 W.Europe 21745 C.Africa 1830-1857 5930 W.Europe 13580 W.Africa/S.W.Europe 2200-2227 11600 N.America 15545 GERMAN 0630-0657 5930 W.Europe 7345 Europe 1000-1027 6055 C.Europe 9880 W.Europe 1200-1229 6055 C.Europe 7345 W.Europe 1500-1527 5930 W.Europe 1630-1657 *5990 W.Europe ENGLISH 0700-0727 9880 N.W.Europe 11600 0900-0929 21745 S.Asia/W.Africa 1030-1057 9880 N.Europe 11615 N.W.Europe 1300-1329 13580 N.Europe 21745 S.Asia 1600-1627 5930 N.W.Europe 21745 E.Africa 1700-1727 5930 N.W.Europe 21745 C.Africa 2000-2027 5930 N.W.Europe 11600 S.E.Asia/Australia 2130-2157 11600 S.andE.Asia/Australia 15545 W.Africa 2230-2257 11600 N.America 15545 0000-0027 7345 N.America 11615 0100-0127 6200 N.America 7345 0300-0327 7345 N.America **7385 9870 0330-0357 11600 Mi.East/S.W.Asia 15620 SPANISH 0730-0757 9880 S.W.Europe 11600 1400-1427 11990 S.W.Europe 13580 1800-1827 5930 S.W.Europe 13580 1900-1927 5930 S.W.Europe 13580 2030-2057 5930 S.W.Europe 11600 2300-2327 11615 S.America 13580 0030-0057 7345 C.America 11615 S.America 0200-0227 6200 C.America 7345 S.America **7385 N.W. of SouthAmerica RUSSIAN 0400-0427 684 St.Peterburg 9865 E.Europe 11600 E.Europe/S.W.Asia 1130-1157 6055 E.Europe *15675 21745 E.Europe/S.W.Asia 1430-1457 *9430 E.Europe 11625 13580 E.Europe/S.W.Asia 1530-1557 *7235 E.Europe Transmitters at Litomysl l16E10 49N48 *Relayed via Rimavská Sobota, Slovakia 20E00 48N23 **Relayed via WRMI Miami, Florida 80W22 25N54 (Alan Roe, UK, March 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) English and Spanish portions also via (Ramón Vázquez Dourado, Spain) ** DENMARK [non]. 7490, R Denmark via Sveio, Norway, Mar 22, 1830- 1855*. The last programme produced by the Shortwave Section at Radio Denmark, edited by Karl Erik Jeppesen and with closing remarks by technicial adviser Erik Køie. 55555 (Anker Petersen, Denmark, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) By this ended 53½ years of own editorial production especially for Danes abroad. From Mar 23 nearly all items will be repeats from the main newscasts in the Domestic Service of Danmarks Radio. The next ``Stil ind`` (Tune in) with Erik Køie will be broadcast Saturday Mar 30 in each Danish broadcast from 1230 to 1730 after the news. Tune in and send him a report! (Cf. DX-Window no. 190) (Ed. Anker Petersen, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. 5009.8, R Cristal, March 23, 1050 Spanish talk about the Conference on Financing for Development held in Monterrey, Mexico, ID "Radio Cristal ...Santo Domingo", good (Ron Howard, CA, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) Also heard in Denmark Mar 24, 0130-0246* with surprisingly good signal like a local station! ID as ``Esta es Rádio Cristal`` and a lot of fiery bachata dancerhythms. Artist Francisco Vez had problems in singing ``Polititica – Polititaca``, because the tempo was so fast that he nearly stumbled over the words! The closing announcement mentioned that it was a program from R Pueblo broadcast over HIMI R Cristal in Santo Domingo, followed by the National Hymn of the Dominican Republic. 44444 ! (Anker Petersen, Denmark, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** ECUADOR. IMPORTANT NOTICE REGARDING HCJB WORLD RADIO LIVE STREAMING On March 31, 2002, HCJB World Radio will terminate its multi-lingual Live Internet Audio Stream. We will be concentrating our efforts to provide on-demand archived audio of our programs which will better serve listeners who tune in via the Internet. We thank all of you who participated in our survey and who listened to our Live Stream at one time or other. Live Streaming may return at a later date in a different format, including special events. We welcome your comments. (HCJB Website March 31 via DXLD) Live stream still running at 0100 UT Sun March 31, but it was not DXPL; instead, some religious drama in Spanish, tho English was still appearing on the schedule. So I was forced to turn on a SW radio and confirmed new 11960, the hummy frequency for DXPL. Then at 0212 we checked 21470, the new service to India, and found it audible, tho poorly, with the mailbag show. In fact, HCJB website shows 0200-0330 as the new block to India, but times along the side are still 2330-0100!! (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I'm wondering if anyone in India can hear HCJB's new retimed broadcast to India, 02-0330 on 21470? I've heard that the beam through Europe to India could make for interesting reception possibilities... so if you're able to hear it, share your thoughts with the group. DX Party Line should be heard on UT-Saturdays at 0200 on the above frequency, that's Friday night in North America (Joe Hanlon in Philadelphia, USA, dx_india via DXLD) ** FALKLAND ISLANDS [and non]. Hola! Te invito a leer (y también a escuchar y ver) el especial que hemos realizado sobre los 20 años de la guerra de las Malvinas o Falklands. Puedes ingresar a través de http://www.bbcmundo.com o directamente pulsando en http://www.bbc.co.uk/spanish/especiales/0203malvinas/ Si te gusta, recomiéndalo! Cordiales saludos, (Roberto Belo | BBC WS New Media, 701NE Bush House, The Strand, London, WC2B 4PH, UK Tel: +44 (0) 20 755 72864 | Fax: +44 (0) 20 7836 4332 E-mail: roberto.belo@b... [truncated by yahoogroups] Web: http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice | http://www.bbcmundo.com (via Horacio Nigro, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Lots of stuff to read, but here is the page with audio links, including the ``Marcha de las Malvinas``: http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/spanish/specials/newsid_1881000/1881019.stm (gh, DXLD) ** GERMANY. ``142nd DW Radio World DX Meeting`` with Uwe and Wolfram was heard as scheduled via webcast at 2335+ UT Sat March 30. They are still plumping for a weekly 10-minute show and have had lots of positive response from listeners. Had some DX tips from Roland Schulze, Philippines, including a Laos/Vietnam/Thailand broadcast pileup on 7145. But it will be another month until the next one. Closing with ``76 = Lord Bless You`` (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTNEING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. 7265, SWR3, Rohrdorf and // 6030, Mühlacker, Mar 19, until 1100 heard with the usual good reception 45555, but at retune 1205- 1250 both transmitters were at low power (QSA2) and some adjustment tuning took place on 7265. Both stations were back to normal at 1315. I wondered what the reason was and wrote Wolfgang an e-mail (Anker Petersen, Denmark, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) I phoned the transmitter site at Rohrdorf at Tel 49 7575 916-0. The guy was not willing to tell me much of the service. BUT they had as always put the regular SWR-3 program on air, using the RESERVE unit [Made by RIZ Zagreb Croatia] this day, not the regular SIEMENS Austria unit (ex R Bremen 50 kW unit, moved to SWR Rohrdorf in 1996/1997). Both transmitters handle 10 kW of power in an effective corner dipole antenna. But an old Rhode and Schwarz vertical 'creel' type antenna is still available for maintenance purpose, of broad band type, not very effective these days (Wolfgang Bueschel, Germany, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** GREECE. ERA-5 Athens really OOB 17905 kHz in the UTE band. \\ 15630 at 0830 UT (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, March 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) It`s All Greek to Me (music announced in English) timeshift confirmed, in progress at 1818 UT Sunday March 31 on 17705 via Delano (gh, DXLD) ** HONG KONG. I have been listening two early mornings now and have not heard a thing here from Hong Kong on 3940 at 0945 (Steve Lare, Holland, MI, March 29, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HUNGARY. I'm very happy to inform you that on Mar 18 Mr Béla Szomraky phoned me from Budapest reporting about the new schedule of Radio Budapest. It's a remarkable success of our EDXC Conference in Budapest to notice that Italian, French and Spanish newscast are included in the new schedule with all existing languages. The Italian programme on Mar 31, 2002 will include a greeting from the EDXC Secretary General and Assistant Secretary General to all listeners. The EDXC portal at http://edxc.multimania.com will report about all frequencies. Someone told me the EDXC was unuseful. Hungary showed the contrary! (Luigi Cobisi, Firenze, EDXC Secretary General, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** ICELAND. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA [non]. 3903 USB. AFN off, possibly due to the unexpected DXers' enquiries, but, then, may be not so, as a very similar clean, strong QSA is being noted on USB, though airing a mere tone signal instead of relaying AFN. I tried it Mar 15 around 2300, and that's what I could hear (Carlos Gonçalves, Portugal, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) Also noted here (Anker Petersen, Denmark, ibid.) Dear friends, I just received a highly appreciated black and white QSL-card directly from AFRTS in Keflavik poststamped by Icelandic Mail on 27 MAR 2002. As far as I know, no one else has received it so far ! It verifies my report of 3903 kHz on 2nd March 2002 heard at 0525- 0605. With the report, I attached an IRC and my businesscard, and the reply arrived after 26 days in a handwritten envelope from Sig Jonsson, Naval Media Center, 235 Keflavíkurflugvöllur, Iceland - nearly the same address which is in WRTH2002 page 232 which I used for the report. The card is signed by the same person, probably with the full first name Sigdur which is Icelandic. In Danish it would have been Sigurd. On the rear side of the card is printed: Official Business. Department of the Navy Officer in Charge U. S. Navy Broadcasting Service Detachment EIGHT Box 25, Naval Station FPO New York 09571 Best 73, (Anker Petersen, Denmark, March 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDIA. The following changes of AIR SW schedule has been monitored from today 31 March 2002 up to 1400 UT. HOME SERVICE 9575 replaces 9565 at 1330-1740 EXTERNAL SERVICE Add 5990 0100-0200 Sindhi to Pakistan. Add 7250 Panaji (?) Nepali 0130-0230 to Nepal. 9575 replaces 9565 1215-1330 Tibetan Add 11715 Nepali 0130-0230 to Nepal. 11775 Panaji replaces 11695 1215-1330 Tibetan, 1330-1430 Nepali. Add 11835 Panaji (?) Hindi 0315-0415 E.Africa 13685 replaces 13700 1000-1100 English to Australia (Jose Jacob, dx_india March 31 via DXLD) ** INDIA [non]. IBC-TAMIL -- LONDAN A02-SCHDULE WITH EFFECT FROM 31-3- 02 EVENING UTC 0000-0100 17495 KHZ; MORNING UTC 1230-1330 11570 KHZ (D. PRABAKARAN, LECTUERER, N.L. POLYTECHNIC, METTUPALAYAM-641301, TAMILNADU, INDIA dx_india via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. The French-language WRN feed is now available on Telstar 5 digital, next to WRN1 and WRN2. No reference to this on WRN Web site (Mike Cooper, Mar 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Sunday March 31, WRN1 to NAm was still running on standard time (as it should, but not made clear), so at 1400 UT had Prague, not WORLD OF RADIO. However, at 1500, fill music and ``technical difficulties`` for half an hour, when WOR could have been inserted, but it already ran this weekend on Sat at 1500. Next week, it is supposed to be on Sundays at 1400 (Glenn Hauser, DXLD) ** IRAN. TEHRAN CUTS INTERNET ACCESS. Just days before the two-week Norouz (New Year) holiday, the Telecommunications Company of Iran (which is part of the Ministry of Post, Telegraph, and Telephone) cut the phone lines of scores of Internet service providers. Mohammad-Amir Forughi, a Tehran-based expert on the Internet, told RFE/RL's Persian Service that the ISPs would not be able to question the legality of this action because the courts will not be in session during the holiday period. When a number of Internet cafes were closed in May 2001 there was speculation that it was because young Iranians were using Internet cafes (also known as "coffee-nets") to make cheap international telephone calls, which deprives PTT of revenues. In August 2001, Iran's Supreme Cultural Revolution Council decided that the government would control Internet access and it made the Telecommunications Company and Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting the main Internet distribution centers. A December article in "Aftab-i Yazd" expressed regret that President Mohammad Khatami had signed the act restricting Internet usage by people under the age of 18. The act also restricts public access to some political websites, according to the article. The article asked if the next step would be the banning of radios, since Khatami was silent on the banning of satellite reception equipment. In addition to using the Internet for international calls, some people in Iran use Internet chat rooms to communicate in real time with their counterparts in other countries. Contributors to a Persian-language "weblog" (http://www.hoder.com/i/) agreed that the major newspapers -- "Iran" and "Kayhan" -- had published reports about the interruption of telephone service for ISPs. They offered conflicting views on the impact of this. "Ehsan," for example, said he would not be able to send his message if the reports were true, and "Sina" said that he had used several ISPs successfully. "Alireza" and others confirmed the report about the phone cuts but said it was being unevenly enforced. "Omid" said that so far there is no problem, but "God forbid if this happens." ("RFE/RL Iran Report," 25 March, via RFE/RL Media Matters March 29 via DXLD) ** IRAN. Glenn, Today terrible jamming noted against clandestine Voice of Iran station, in Persian. Scheduled 1630-1730 Daily on 15690 via Issoudun, France, \\ 17525. (reported to be via France on 3rd winter channel 12065, on 8-Jan-2002). On 15690 strong super-wide Bubble jamming, unbelievable 116 kHz wide, from 15631 to 15747 kHz affected. Seldom wide appearance in international broadcasting bands. On 17525 kHz channel only a small two-time motocycle type noise jamming observed. 73 (Wolfgang df5sx Büschel, March 30, Germany, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRAN [non]. 7480: On this frequency at *1759-1830* of March 17th and 18th I only heard Radio Payam-e-Doost with strong signal, clear identifications, web site address http://www.bahairadio.org and mail address with a Box in Virginia, USA. So, it's quite different from what I read on DX-Window 189 and 190. Unfortunately I wasn't able to turn on the radio before 1750 (Alessandro Groppazzi, Trieste, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) I checked up on this and I hear daily R. Barabari at *1659-1730* and R Payam-e Doost daily at *1800-1830*, both in Farsi, so the information that R. Barabari had prolonged its broadcasts until 1830 obviously was wrong. To me, it sounded like the same, powerful transmitter is used for both broadcasts, but is it located in Grigoropol` (Moldavia), Jerusalem (Israel) or Sitkunai (Lithuania)? All three have been mentioned recently (Anker Petersen, Denmark, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** IRAQ [non]. 11660, Voice of Islamic Revolution of Iraq (from VOIRI, Iran), Mar 26, 0355-0526*, Arabic political talks about Iraq, Arab songs, ID's at 0400 and 0525, closed with a patriotic song about Iraq. 45344. Heard in parallel on 7100 with 32332. 9790 was covered by RFI QRM (Anker Petersen, Denmark, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** ISRAEL. Kol Israel until 1 July. Moshe phoned and stated that it will be necessary for new funds to be found in July in order for them to continue the broadcasts. Cheers (George Poppin, San Francisco, March 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ITALY. RAI, Italy March 31-Oct. 27, 2002 English schedule: 0055- 0115 N. America 9675, 11800; 0445-0500 Africa 7235, 9875; 1935-1955 Europe 5970, 9745; 2025-2045 Africa 9670, 11880; 2205-2230 Japan 11900, 15625. (from a RAI pamphlet e-mailed from Roberto Scaglione via Daniel Sampson, Prime Time Shortwave, http://www.triwest.net/~dsampson/shortwave/ DXLD) ** ITALY. A list of Italian broadcasting on short and mediumwave is on http://www.bclnews.it -- it is today updated every hour. I need to know about Italian broadcasting on MW in USA. Many thanks (Roberto Scaglione http://www.bclnews.it Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** LAOS. 4658.57, Lao National Radio (LNR), Houa Phan, Mar 04, 1157- 1230* in Laotian, at 1200-1229 relay of // 6130 from Vientiane. Local ID at s-off. Suffers co-channel QRM by a Chinese speaking station on 4658.8, also // 6130 suffers by co-channel Xizang PBS, Lhasa, Tibet. LNR had some transmitter power problems, and also covered sometime by the Chinese signal. Chinese station // on nearby weak 6110 signal too. On Feb 19, China was on 4660 and 6130, and LNR Houa Phan was on 4660.8. At 1232* both 60 mb stations signed off (Roland Schulze, Philippines, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** LATVIA. UPDATE ON LATVIAN RADIO CHANGES Excerpt from report by Voice of Russia "DX Club" web site on 12 March Off to Latvia now. In front of me is a letter from Roland Straumal from Cesis district of this Baltic capital [Riga] (I quote):"... [ellipsis as published] Significant changes have recently taken place in local broadcasting. The first programme of Latvian radio in Lielauce in Dobele District is broadcast on 99.6 MHz and reception is good. Unfortunately, as of 4 January Latvian radio no longer broadcasts on mediumwave. It stopped broadcasting on 945 kHz despite the fact that the director-general of Latvian radio promised back in 2001 to continue mediumwave broadcasting for another four years at least. Incidentally, since the start of this year the first programme of Latvian radio is called Latvijas Radio Viens (which means Latvian radio -1). Since the beginning of January, Latvijas Radio-2 has been broadcasting from a new studio. What's more, its programmes are broadcast round the clock via transmitters in Cesvaine, Daugavpils and Rezekne. The second programme of Latvian radio - the Doma Square channel - is called Latvijas Radio Cetri Doma Laukums (Latvian radio-4 Doma Square) since 1 January. It broadcasts 24 hours a day but only via transmitters in Riga, Daugavpils and Rezekne, for the time being. The third programme of Latvian radio, Kfasika, since 1 January is called Latvijas Radio Tris Kfasika. It also operates 24 hours a day, but only in Riga, on 103.7 MHz. A new Riga transmitter has started to operate to relay plenary sittings of the Latvian parliament on 96.2 MHz. These programmes used to be broadcast on 945 kHz MW. [Passage omitted: in November last year Amadeus classical music radio stopped broadcasting]. A new radio station has appeared in Riga on 103.2 MHz, Radio Nova. It replaced Radio KNZ, a student radio station, which was warned by the national council for television and radio broadcasting after the replacement of its owner that its programmes did not correspond to its broadcasting plans - there were no news or information programmes. Source: Voice of Russia web site, Moscow, in Russian 12 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** LIBERIA. 6100, "Voice of Liberia" (so announced), 0630 Mar 19 with African music, mention of "Ambassadors of Music," upbeat anmts, greetings to lstnrs, ID 0641, TC, 0645 speech by female Reverend of United Methodist Church, African music again 0650, seemingly more brief religious speeches. TC 0656, music, ads 0657, TC 0700, more music, 0702 "Good morning from Monrovia, the news read by . . ." Signal a little fluttery, but not too bad overall (Jerry Berg, MA, NASWA Flashsheet via DXLD) ** MADAGASCAR. PRO-RAVALOMANANA RADIO STATION RAIDED | Excerpt from report by Malagasy independent newspaper L'Express de Madagascar on 25 March It was a very eventful weekend in Andapa [northern Madagascar], one of the districts of Sava, Antsiranana Province, where 10 individuals wearing military fatigues arrived in a Land-Rover on Friday [22 March] evening from Sambava [a port town in northeastern Madagascar that supports President Ratsiraka]. Early on Saturday morning, members of this commando unit raided a tiny pro-Ravalomanana [who has also declared himself to be president] private radio station where they took three people hostage before thoroughly thrashing them, according to witnesses on the ground. The group is then said to have left with its "prisoners" for Sambava at about 1000 [local time]. Faced with this situation, several high-ranking leaders of the local KMMR [Marc Ravalomanana's Support Committee] took precautions and hid themselves in the surrounding countryside. Fear amongst local residents must surely have climbed up a few notches when death threats were pasted, to be seen by all during the night of Saturday-Sunday, on doors of homes belonging to some Arema [ruling Association for the Rebirth of Madagascar party] leaders, including Senator Julien Rakoto, in what seemed to be a retaliatory action. In fact, for several weeks now, no effort towards any rapprochement or dialogue between the two warring camps [pro-Ravalomanana and pro- Ratsiraka camps] has taken place. Faced with this escalation of violence, which looked like it was headed for the worst, Senator Jean- Max Rakotomamonjy, representing Antsiranana Province (on a Leader Fanilo [Malagasy for "Torch"] party ticket), and a former Andapa mayor - under the same Leader Fanilo banner - yesterday morning took the initiative to invite local leaders and representatives of both camps to a meeting at his home. The meeting, which took place in the evening, at last saw the attendance of the Andapa deputy prefect, accompanied by his two deputies, the commandant of the local gendarmerie branch, the town police station's commandant, as well as prominent political leaders representing the two camps. Following a heated debate earlier on - the authorities present saying they had not been informed of the arrival of any commando unit - Senator Jean-Max Rakotomamonjy managed to make the participants see sense and a "non-aggression pact" was signed. According to the agreement, Arema leaders, who include Senator Julien Rakoto and the provincial council deputy chairman, Norbert Randroso, personally pledged, if necessary, to meet the Antsiranana provincial governor, as representatives of Sambava, and negotiate the release of the three "prisoners" who are KMMR members... Source: L'Express de Madagascar, Antananarivo, in French 25 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** MALI. ORTM Bamako appeared around 0805 UT on odd v9633.98 ... 9633.96, Vernacular news, also on \\ 11960.00 even (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, March 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NAMIBIA. The only night frequency at the moment is 3270 (presumed 1700-0500) and the day one 6060 (presumed 0500-1700). Both frequencies (the same transmitter, I suppose) are quite undermodulated and the signals are much weaker than I would normally expect here. Could be that the last SW transmitter is on its way out? (Vashek Korinek, RSA, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. Hi Glenn, Please note that the English transmission to Europe and North America starting at 1030 UT ends at 1225, not 1125. Mea culpa. I will correct it ASAP (Andy Sennitt, RN, March 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NIGER. 45,650 MHz VHF, La Voix du Sahel, Niamey, Mar 20, 0900-1400, regularly heard in FM-modulation on this unusual frequency. This is a so-called STL (Studio-Transmitter Link), i.e. carrying the signal from the studios in Niamey to the transmitting centre outside the city. Worldwide low-band VHF reception is possible as a result of the present sunspot maximum (Maarten van Delft, Netherlands, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) Other Europeans frequently receiving it are equally convinced it is a semi-harmonic unintentionally radiated of 91.3 MHz (gh, DXLD) ** OKLAHOMA. Change in Okla. City frequencies: Greetings Glenn, WWLS 104.9 moves to 105.3 --- why, I don`t know; I can`t see the power is going to change any unless they like the Kingfisher transmitter being away from the OKC area to reach into the northern part of Oklahoma. I see on 1000000watts.com that the mile radius is 27.5 miles; I would appreciate your input on this. they have started announcing of the change today Saturday; I have not heard if 105.3 staff is moving to any place new (Bill Eckart, Mustang, March 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** OKLAHOMA. Can you tell me on what dates and times you will be broadcasting last year`s OK MOZART festival this spring?? Regards, (Glenn Hauser, Enid, to KCSC) Mr. Hauser: We'll be airing OK Mozart on Saturdays at 9:00 p.m. this year [0200-0400 UT Sundays]. The first broadcast will be April 13, and there are seven programs in the series this year. Thanks for listening, (Kent Anderson, KCSC-FM, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Still don`t know about other usual outlets, KWGS Tulsa, and KOSU Stillwater; last year KCCU Lawton waited until May-June and then ran them consecutive days at 9 am. KCSC scheduling fits nicely into a gap between NY Philharmonic [non] Live broadcasts (gh, DXLD) ** PAKISTAN. Terrible audio of R Pakistan Islamabad observed on 21465.00 EVEN !! at 0800 UT onwards, \\ EVEN 17520.00, lower strength, but better audio, what ever that mean... (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, March 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PALESTINIAN MEDIA: GAZA TV CARRIES REPEATS, RAMALLAH RADIO OFF THE AIR Palestinian Satellite Channel Television in Arabic (Gaza), official television station of the Palestinian National Authority, has been observed since 2230 gmt on 29 March 2002 to carry a repeat of the programmes broadcast the previous night, focusing on the military situation in the Palestinian territories. Broadcast programmes consisted of newscasts, patriotic songs, phone calls from Palestinians praising the leadership of President Yasir Arafat, and demonstrations staged in Gaza in support of Arafat. Newscasts were carried at 0100 gmt in Arabic and O300 gmt on 30 March in English. An announcement urging Ramallah and Al-Birah citizens to donate blood for the wounded was repeated at 0242 gmt on 30 March. Palestinian radio Voice of Palestine in Arabic (Ramallah), official radio station of the Palestinian [National] Authority led by Yasir Arafat, is still off the air on its only FM frequency of 90.7 MHz. Wafa in Arabic, official news agency of the Palestinian National Authority, continues to carry reports on its web site, updating the situation in the PNA territories. Source: Voice of Palestine, Ramallah, in Arabic 29 and 30 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** PERU. 3375, R San Antonio de Padua de Callalli verified with a no data e-mail reply to 18 DX'ers from v/s Hno Rolando del Carpio Montalvo, Director. The reply took 23 days in response to a postal report with US$1.00 return postage. The v/s mentions the station is on the air 1000-1330 and 2200-0130. Rolando indicated a postal reply would be coming soon. His e-mail address is: san_antinio14@hotmail.com He gave the station's postal address as: Hno Rolando del Carpio Montalvo, Director, Radio San Antonio de Padua de Callalli, Apartado Postal 1817, Arequipa, Perú. I'm quite pleased with this one (Rich D'Angelo, PA, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** PERU. 6956.73, R LV del Campesino, 0215, Mar 30, Andean folk music. As always, nice to hear this one. "Happy Birthday" theme music and station ID given @ 0215, through the static crashes. Then I guess Birthday greetings were made over the air by announcer (David Hodgson, TN, March 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. Sign on and sign off times is a variable affair with some of the smaller Peruvians. If nonstop music is heard beyond "regular" schedule, it's probably that someone has paid for a couple of hours of "background music" for a private event, a birthday party, a wedding anniversary, or whatever. The next morning, such a station will typically sign on much later than usual, if at all (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, via Dxplorer, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** PORTUGAL. Por sua vez, Isabel Saraiva (isabelsaraiva@r...), do Departamento de Intercâmbio e Contacto, informa que a RDP transmite, todas as segundas-feiras, o programa "DX Internet", dentro do Correio do Ouvinte. Vai ao ar por volta de 0025 UTC, em 13660 e 15295 kHz, freqüências especialmente destinadas ao Brasil (Célio Romais, @tividade DX Mar 28 via DXLD) ** PORTUGAL. A RDP INTERNACIONAL E AS ONDAS CURTAS No dia 22 de março passado tivemos a oportunidade de estar presente ao evento promovido em S.Paulo, pela RDP Internacional, com a finalidade de informar o público brasileiro, sobre a entrada em junho de seu novo transmissor de 300 kW dirigido ao Brasil e a Europa, que melhorará signficamente o serviço em OC dessa emissora. Tivemos a oportunidade de entrevistar para o Encontro Dx o sr. Jaime Marques diretor da emissora, que gentilmente nos recebeu na Casa de Portugal. O sr Jaime informou que a emissora aposta muito ainda nas ondas curtas e por isso a RDP fez um grande investimento em transmissores e na modernização das antenas. No evento ele informou que o Brasil tem uma grande participação nas emissões da RDP e por isso a emissora fez esse evento em S.P e no RJ, as duas maiores cidades do Brasil. Informou ainda que a RDP Int. pode voltar a emitir em outros idiomas num futuro próximo. Lamentavelmente os únicos dexistas/radioescutas conhecidos no evento eramos nós, apesar da RDP Internacional ter enviado a convites para os que escrevem a emissora. Além do sr Jaime Marques esteve presente outras vozes da RDP como a locutora Elisa Portugal o presidente do Instituto Camões e diretores da Casa de Portugal. O show foi muito bonito, com a presença de 3 cantores e 3 cantoras que vieram especialmente para o evento que na verdade foi uma amostra do show que a RDP apresenta anualmente em uma grande cidade portuguesa que leva o nome de Festa das Comunidades Portuguesas. Estamos remetendo para o site do SRDXC uma hora desse show , e acreditamos que nossos amigos da Paraíba possam disponibiliza-los para os interessados. O Encontro DX apesar de já gravado para até o mês de abril, irá fazer o possível para colocar ainda em abril a entrevista do sr Jaime Marques no AR e um trecho do evento (que inclui as palavras das autoridades e parte musical). Acreditamos que os colegas que ouvem emissoras internacionais deveriam ter uma maior presença no evento da RDP Internacional, pois seu diretor falou muito bem dos ouvintes que escrevem para os programas e da importância das ondas curtas. Sabemos que ouvir a RDP Internacional não é dexismo, mas o apoio as grandes broadcasting é importante, pois ajuda a formar adeptos para o nosso hobby. Afinal a maioria dos "cobras" começam ouvindo as grandes broadcasting (Cassiano A. Macedo e José Moura, Mar 30, radioescutas via DXLD) ** ROMANIA. RRI English March 31 - October 26, 2002 North America 0200-0300 9 510 11 940 Japan 0200-0300 11 810 15 105 New Zealand 0200-0300 15 180 17 815 North America 0400-0500 9 510 11 940 India 0400-0500 17 735 21 480 North America 0600-0700 9 635 11 940 Western Europe 0637-0656 7 105 9 625 9 550 11 775 North-East Africa 0700-0800 21 530 Western Europe 1400-1500 15 250 17 735 Western Europe 1700-1800 15 380 17 805 Northern Europe 1700-1800 11 740 15 365 Western Europe 2100-2200 9 510 11 940 Northern Europe 2100-2200 9 725 11 740 Western Europe 2300-2400 9 570 11 775 North America 2300-2400 11 740 15 105 (RRI website March 31 via gh, DXLD) ** ROMANIA. A bad co-channel clash on 15270 kHz at 0800-0827 UT, two stations performing on same level, Romania is there 8-9 UT, and the other ... Romania in Romanian 0800-0900 on 15270 15370 17790 17860, and maybe also on a 5th channel too. Same Sunday special only program at 0900- 1000 on 15180 15250 17745 17790 17840 21490 (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, March 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** RUSSIA. Estimados amigos: Les comunicamos que al entrar en el horario de verano por estas latitudes, a partir del 31 de marzo y hasta el 26 de octubre de este año, "La Voz de Rusia" tendrá el siguiente esquema para sus emisiones en español: Hacia España: 2030-2100 UT 11630 y 7440 kcs. Nota: Desde el 01.09.02 se agrega la frecuencia de 9480 kcs. Hacia Centroamérica: 0000-0100 UT 11750, 9830 y 9665 (hasta 01.09.02) kcs. Nota: Desde 01.09.02 en este primer horario se agrega la frecuencia de 7180 kcs. 0100-0200 UT 9830 kcs. Hacia Sudamérica: 0000-0100 UT 12060, 12010 (hasta 01.09.02), 11510, 9965, 9860, 9830, 9480, 9450 (hasta 01.09.02) y 7330 kcs. 0100-0200 UT 12010, 11510, 9965, 9945, 9860, 9830, 9450 y 7330 kcs. Nota: desde 01.09.02, se agregan 9890 y 9470 kcs. en ambos bloques horarios. Agradeciendo su atención, les saluda muy cordialmente (Francisco Rodríguez "Frecuencia RM" LA VOZ DE RUSIA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** RUSSIA. PUNISHMENTS FOR SPEAKING BAD RUSSIAN ON THE WAY? A special government council on the Russian language is preparing a draft law that may include fines for incorrect use of the mother tongue, gazeta.ru reported on 27 March. Education Minister Vladimir Filippov said the bill will be modeled on similar legislation in France. He said the council has asked a group of academics to contact media executives and editors to inform them about correct Russian usage. ("RFE/RL Newsline," 27 March via RFE/RL Media Matters March 29 via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. 11840-USB, R Sakhalin: From continued monitoring it now appears that their own program is 0900-1000 daily except Sunday; they break away from R Rossii (// 13705) at 0900 and pick it up again at 1000. Program is usually music and telephone talk. Finally got positive ID on Mar 22 (Jerry Berg, MA, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) Now shift all that one UT hour earlier for DST, right? (gh, DXLD) ** SIKKIM. INDIA. 3390, AIR Gangtok, Mar 12, 1430-1500, English program with pops. Today the theme was "Old is Gold" with songs from Elvis, etc. English ID at 1430 announcing MW and SW (G. Victor A. Goonetilleke, Sri Lanka, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** SOUTH AMERICA. PIRATE Radio Cochiguaz 11440 KHz USB March 31 0010 UTC relay of German pirate Radio Metropolis. SINPO 24332.Had transmitter problems, will try to return at 0400 (e-mail from operator) (Wade Smith, New Brunswick) Hi Glen, Radio Metropolis (Pirate??) copied here in NF... 31/03/02 - 0049 UT - 11440 KHz USB - Location given as somewhere in the Andes - music and then man gave station ID and reception report address (Europe) in phonetic alphabet. Signal was low but very clear with no IF. SIO 344 Regards, (Vernon Matheson - VO1VM RX - Kenwood TS450 ANT - Gap Vertical and 500' longwire, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Dear friends of Cochiguaz, Our signal was put on 11440U kHz as usual. But, between 0028-0041 and also after 0114 the transmission was interrupted for a technical problem with our transmitter, but, fortunately now, after 0200 the problem was resolved. We will return as usual at 0400 31/3 with our programme relaying to Radio Metropolis with our usual power. Meantime, we inform you that our signal was heard in USA and Canada by recent reports received. FFFR, (Cachito, Radio Cochiguaz ,11440U khz http://www.geocities.com/rcochiguaz hard- core-dx via DXLD) ** UKRAINE. We gave up trying to second-guess what RUI will do as DST starts; English at 0100 should have moved to 0000 UT March 31, but instead we heard German at 0000; but English was not at 0100 either; instead, Ukrainian on the webcast, and also on 12040 ex-7375, which at least we were able to confirm at 0116; no big signal here for a megawatt, with adjacent 12045 stronger. So English apparently got elbowed out. What would happen at 0400/0300 UT? By 0300 the shift had been made and English was airing (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. Expect major programming changes to BBCWS in the coming days following the death of the Queen Mother. BBC1 television has suspended normal programmes. 73, (Andy Sennitt, RN, March 30, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Well, at the risk of having a few tomatoes tossed my way, this appears to be a little "over the top". I mean it's nearly a six hour radio vigil at this point. Before anyone jumps on me, I realize fully the respect and love this woman commands--and deservedly so. But she was 101 years old and had been in declining health for some time. It's hardly a shock and not a "tragedy" in the hardest sense of the word. The WS has gone out of its way NOT to cover the UK in any signficant way over the recent past, and now it suspends regular programming to "analyze" the death of a 101 year old woman. I agree that some special programming is warranted, but this seems out of all proportion. One man's opinion...your mileage may vary (John Figliozzi, swprograms Mar 30 via DXLD) I remember getting a tour of Bush House (from a friend of mine that worked there about 10 years ago) and we were talking to the continuity announcer who was on duty that day. He was showing me the huge black binders underneath the control desk which were bio and background info on the major members of the Royal Family (including the Queen Mother.) He said that the informal mantra amongst the on-air folks in regards to a Royal death was "please, dear god, not on MY shift!" 73 (Maryanne Kehoe, GA, swprograms via DXLD) Yes, there was a long debate at the 100th (and before) of how much the BBC should do about this royal death and for how long. Many would just like to take notice and throw her in the bin, but the powers are of that era and class so it goes on, at Easter too. We may see a proper backlash by Monday. The Anti-royal Guardian news paper has some good articles about the prospects for coverage of Queen Mother's death and reactions. Try, for example, http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4234038,00.html Crown imperious As the professional royal mourners prepare, is anybody paying attention any more? by Nick Cohen The Observer (London) Sunday August 5, 2001 (Daniel Say, BRITISH Columbia, swprograms via DXLD) I flicked through the channels last night - BBC2, BBC4, BBC5, BBC6, BBC WS and BBCWS Extra were all carrying the same programme. Why? BBCTV and BBC5 didn't feel able to cover the Lottery draw. Why? With all the years that they have been planning this the coverage was pathetic. There was nothing to suggest why she should be regarded as significant - her achievements seem to be that she pioneered the supposedly touchy feely Royal Family that we have now (and isn't that where their problems started?), and she was a big supporter of National Hunt racing. And this being the BBC we only got half the story. No mention of the King and Queen's wholehearted support for the disastrous policy of appeasement. And as for the wartime walkabouts and the remark that she could "look the East End in the eye" - well that would only be true if the whole East End had also decamped to Windsor and safety every night. The domestic coverage (I only listened to WS for about 20 minutes) also featured the usual suspects wheeled out on every Royal occasion - Dickie Arbiter, Ronald Allison (who ARE they?) and Stevas (less visible since his job as cheerleader for Charles's marriage become redundant). The impression given, rightly or wrongly, is that only a very few elderly people actually care about the Windsors. Perhaps that is true. Now it may well be the case that the Queen Mum was a wonderful person fully deserving of being mourned, but from the BBC's partial and fawning coverage, who can tell? (Nicholas Mead, UK, ibid.) ** U K. Re "I kept hearing this headline on BBC news. ``Placed in administration`` means nothing to me as a North American. Is that an euphemism? Going bust is the cause or effect? I guess like we would say, being in the hands of a receiver running it (gh, DXLD)" Glenn-- It's the Brit version of "in bankruptcy," but I don't know enough about their system to know if it's the equivalent of Chapter 7 (liquidation) or Chapter 11 (continuing to operate under the control of the court). Regards, (Chuck Albertson, WA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. COMEDIAN BARRY TOOK DIES Sunday, 31 March, 2002, 11:07 GMT 12:07 UK Took helped write radio comedy Round the Horne Comedian and scriptwriter Barry Took has died aged 73. Took, who helped create classic radio comedy Round the Horne, had been suffering from cancer and died in his sleep at a nursing home in London. Took was behind a number of TV and radio shows He was a successful TV and radio presenter, hosting Points of View and panel games including The News Quiz. He died in the early hours of Easter Sunday, according to his youngest daughter, Elinor Holbrook. Took, also responsible for bringing the Monty Python team to the BBC, recently said: "There are people worse off than me. I've had a very long run. I'm fine really. I'm just old." He will be remembered with fondness for his sense of humour, Mrs Holbrook, 33, said. He was always funny, he had a great sense of humour "He was taken ill in December last year. I was with him yesterday and he wasn't too good at all," she said. He died at 0550 BST, she said, remembering her father by saying: "He was always funny, he had a great sense of humour." Took started his career as a stand-up comedian, but soon formed a writing partnership with Marty Feldman, who he had met while performing at a variety show at the old York Empire. The pair were the main writers on Round the Horne, the 1960s radio show that continued the comedy tradition started by The Goons. It starred Kenneth Horne and Kenneth Williams. Took also wrote a number of other radio shows, later moving to television with comedies including Bootsie and Snudge, which starred Alfie Bass and Clive Dunn. He became the voice of viewers when presenting TV's Points of View, and chaired BBC Radio 4's The News Quiz. In it, he kept the panel in order and the show proved such a success that it provided the basis for TV's Have I Got News For You? Took is survived by three other children - Mrs Holbrook's half-brothers Barry, 50, and David, 40, and her half-sister Susan, 46. ©2002 BBC News Online http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/entertainment/tv_and_radio/newsid_1903000/1903696.stm Glenn, I recall listening to "Round The Horne" on BBC WS back in the late '60s. 73, (Ivan Grishin, Ont., DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. VOA will use 19000 kHz for an Uzbek program at 1230-1300 beginning 3/31. First VOA use of the band. df k4voa (Dan Ferguson, DC, via Wolfgang Büschel, DXLD) Site??? ** U S A. WEBCASTS' INNOCENT AGE COULD COME TO A QUICK END From: http://www.cleveland.com/ 03/29/02 Fed up and feeling himself getting old in a young industry, Chuck Benjamin left the computer business at age 50 to devote full time to his longtime avocation of music. He wound up with a foot in both fields. These days, it gives him an unusual understanding of how ruthless both can be. Tuesday nights at 7:30, Benjamin broadcasts "The Innocent Age" on WELW AM/1330 in Willoughby. Drawing from his collection of every record on the Billboard Hot 100 since 1955, he specializes in music that listeners missed, or haven't heard in decades. He interviews artists, giving special attention to those the business forgot, and he takes requests. "I don't want to let the memories die," he said. "I think, as a society, we lost romanticism in the 1980s. I think it has survived in music, but you have to look hard to find it. All I want to do is help people go back to another time, when they didn't have a care in the world." By night, "The Innocent Age" reaches a comparative handful of eastern suburban communities. But because WELW simulcasts on the Internet, at welw.com, Benjamin has heard from listeners as far away as Australia. That's not unusual. Growing numbers of listeners find that "Internet radio" offers more than 10,000 outlets, from Net-only operations to simulcasts of over-the-air stations, and that it delivers an astounding variety of choices filling every conceivable niche - including those abandoned by corporate-controlled conventional radio. Benjamin, who also is the host of a weekly computer show on WELW, saw his future in radio on the Internet. But the future could end in a few weeks. Unless Congress gets involved and acts quickly, Internet radio will be killed in its infancy. The public interest - already reeling from a merger frenzy that has left control of entertainment and news in a very few corporate hands - will take another kick in the teeth. Here's why: In 1998, Congress passed the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, or DMCA, supposedly to update copyright law for e-commerce. A goal was to protect recording artists from the threat of "perfect digital copies" of their work trading for free on the Net. To make up for their lost income, the DMCA required Webcasters to pay royalties to record companies, in addition to royalties they pay songwriters. (Broadcast stations, in contrast, only pay royalties to songwriters. Congress decided about 75 years ago that performers and labels weren't entitled to royalties because of the promotional value of radio airplay.) A basic problem is that Internet radio - unlike Napster or various file-swapping operations - doesn't provide "perfect digital copies." Webcasts, like radio broadcasts, tend to serve more as a promotional spur for CD sales - often helped by direct links on Internet radio sites. "It's not close to good, let alone perfect," Benjamin said. "Most of them sound a little on the tinny side. You're limited by bandwidth." A bigger problem is that fee negotiations broke down between big record companies and loose-knit Webcasters. So a panel convened by the U.S. Copyright Office came up with a recommendation that Internet-only Webcasters pay labels 14 cents per song per listener for what they play. Simulcasting broadcasters would pay 7 cents per song per listener. Noncommercial simulcasters, like public or college stations, would pay 2 cents per song per listener. Over a year, a Webcaster averaging 100 listeners a day would owe $500,000. But the panel also recommended making the fees retroactive to 1998, and added record-keeping requirements that are a burden in themselves. It will be a real killing for record labels if the recommendations take effect as scheduled on May 20. Internet radio will die before even turning a profit. Webcasters, working through sites such as SaveInternetRadio.com, radiocrow.com and wcsb.org are urging listeners to write Congress. "I don't mind paying a fee, as long as it's realistic," Benjamin said. "But it's not like the artists would see a nickel of this anyway. It's just the big record companies. It's just plain blatant greed." © 2002 The Plain Dealer. Used with permission (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. DUELING ANNIVERSARY SPECIALS ON CBS, NBC Continuing TV's current nostalgia craze --- and apparently hoping to take a little air out of similar festivities on NBC--CBS has scheduled the two-hour special "CBS ... 50 Years From Television City" for April 27, the first Saturday during the next ratings sweeps. NBC's three- hour 75th anniversary special, which will range from the network's beginnings in radio to the present day, is scheduled for May 5. The CBS program will be hosted by Carol Burnett, whose special during November drew blockbuster ratings. Among the other blasts from the past scheduled for sweeps, which begin April 25, NBC has an "L.A. Law" reunion movie, a Bob Hope special, a 10th anniversary special for "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno" and a reunion of cast members from "The Cosby Show." NBC also will support its programming with a book, "Brought to You in Living Color: 75 Years of Great Moments in Television and Radio from NBC," to be issued in mid-April. ABC, meanwhile, will trot out a "Laverne and Shirley" special and an "American Bandstand" 50th anniversary show. ABC has canceled the critically acclaimed drama "Once and Again," announcing that the final episode will air April 15. Now in its third season, the low-rated program has bounced around the network schedule and been the subject of an Internet lobbying campaign (LA Times via Brock Whaley, March 30, DXLD) ** U S A [non]. RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY'S REGIONAL ANALYSIS GOES ONLINE. Regional Analysis proudly presents our new website: http://www.regionalanalysis.org Log on for an in-depth look at all of RFE/RL's broadcast regions, read "RFE/RL Newsline" and 15 weekly analytical reports, and follow our briefings and roundtable discussions with policymakers and scholars (RFE/RL Media Matters March 29 via DXLD) ** VANUATU. At the end of November 2001 I visited the headquarters of Radio Vanuatu while on holiday in Port Vila. The transmitter site is on Emten Lagoon about 5 kilometres south east of Port Vila. The site houses a transmitter building containing two short wave and one medium wave transmitter and their associated antennas. The programmes are broadcast on short wave from a 10kW two channel Energy Onix Broadcast Transmitter Model HF-10K-2 tuned to 4960 and 7260. The signal is fed via coaxial cable to dipole antennas directed north and south to the islands in the group. 7260 is principally used from 1900 until 0600 hours, switching to 4960 at 0600 until the end of the transmission at 1115 (Sundays 1000). If one of the channels develops a fault, as happened while I was there, the other frequency acts as the standby. There is a standby transmitter tuned to 3945 kilohertz, but this is currently out of service because of shortage of spare parts to make it operational, and the date for its return to service is unknown (George Brown, Scotland, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) ** ZIMBABWE. 5975, ZBC, Mar 13 and 15, 2030-2300, booming in with African Music, 2055 ID and news in Shona or Ndebele by man at 2100 (Korinek, RSA and Vaghjee, Mauritius, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) 6045, ZBC, Mar 15, 2200-2300, Shona and Ndebele (Korinek, ibid.) 6175, ZBC, Mar 15, 2200-2300, heard only that day. IDs as ``National Radio``. (Korinek) New frequency ? (Ed Anker Petersen, ibid.) ** ZIMBABWE [non]. 7120, Voice of the People, via Talata, Madagascar, Mar 23, *0330-0430. Brief instrumental music and English ID. Signal surprisingly about even with co-channel RFE-RL in Armenian, but audio a little low. Following the results of the presidential election, station intends to continue this extra transmission which started early March., but with difficulty. As hoped, RFE-RL went off at 0357, but Voice of the People was much weakened by then and at 0400 got lost in the spillover between VOA 7115 and Voice of Russia 7125, both strong. I did hear a quick VoP ID (:33) and mention of Zimbabwe (:36) in the 0330 mix. Heard again Mar 24 when RFE-RL was much weaker due to poor propagation, but this time Voice of the People went right into introduction music and "Good morning and welcome to the program 'Let's Talk' . . ," without any real ID. Weakened quickly this night. (Jerry Berg, MA, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. 6715 USB, mystery station (cf. DX-Window no. 189, 190). The Korean speaking religious station was operating Wednesday Mar 13 at 2112 and Sunday Mar 17 at 1940 (on air already) until sudden off 2018. This is a strange one (Green, UK and Groppazzi, Italy, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) On Friday Mar 15 I checked this frequency at about 2130 and there was nothing at all. At recheck at 2205 it was booming in. Perhaps it signs on around 2200 on Fridays? (Vashek Korinek, RSA, DSWCI DX Window Mar 27 via DXLD) 6715, UNID Korean Religious Station, 2302-2336* Mar 29, first time hearing what others have been reporting. Generally poor signal with talks and religious vocals with broadcast terminated during a piano instrumental (Rich D'Angelo, PA, NASWA Flashsheet via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. Some A-02 observations. Hi Everyone, just came across an UNID Persian language station on 7300 kHz at 0930 UT. Not DW sce 9- 930. Will check it further. Music and freq selection looks like Bulgaria, but latest schedule sent out by Ivo doesn't fit such a Persian service from Sofia (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, March 31, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 2-050, March 29, 2002 edited by Glenn Hauser, wghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted afterwards at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd02.html For restrixions and searchable 2002 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn WORLD OF RADIO #1124: (STREAM) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1124.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1124.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1124.html NEXT AIRINGS ON WWCR: Sat 0600, Sun 0330 on 5070; Sun 0730, Mon 0100, 0600 on 3210; Wed 1030 on 9475 FIRST AIRINGS ON RFPI: Fri 1930, Sat 0130, 0730, 1330, 1800, 2400 on some of: 7445-USB, 15039, 21815-USB AIRINGS ON WORLD RADIO NETWORK: Sat 0900 to rest of world; 1500 to NAm CONTINENT OF MEDIA 02-02 is now available: (STREAM) http://www.DXing.com/com/com0202.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.DXing.com/com/com0202.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/com0202.html ON RFPI: Fri 1900, Sat 0100, 0700, 1300, 1730, 2330, Sun 0530, 1130, Tue 2000, Wed 0200, 0800, 1400 on some of: 7445-USB, 15039, 21815-USB WORLD OF RADIO SCHEDULE ANTICIPATED FROM APRIL 7, 2002 Those who need this info in advance may now find it along with the current schedule at http://www.worldofradio.com/radioskd.html ** AFGHANISTAN [non]. 8700 Information Radio, Diego García [sic], March 23 1535, 24222, Unidentified Male talk and local music, very weak signal rather than before. It seemed same program style as a month ago (Kazunori Watanabe, Tokyo, Japan Premium via DXLD) Here in Japan, there is nothing on 8700 today at 1355 now. But I heard it on 23 March 1535-1715. It seemed same program syle as a month ago (Kazunori Watanabe, Tokyo, Japan, March 28, hard-core-dx via DXLD) I listened to 8700 for some time early this morning (Thursday) around 0100. The programme consisted of the usual fare, modern Afghan pops and the occasional message in a local language. The only difference from the previous activity on this frequency was that the signal now consisted of USB plus CARRIER. This transmission actually was listenable in the AM mode. Reception was weak, in part due to a racket maker on the lower side (8702 silent at that time). At 1715 today (Thursday) there is a weak carrier on 8700, but the digital ute on 8702 is obliterating any possible audio. Today it's almost spring-like in Härnösand with 15 degrees above, but much of the winter snow remains, and can be expected to stay for another two or three weeks. The hours of daylight now are from 5 am to 7 pm, local time. Best 73's for now (Olle Alm, Sweden, March 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ALBANIA. I just found a picture which apparently shows the transmitter hall at Cërrik: http://www.transmitter.be/chi-gd5056.html (Kai Ludwig, Germany, March 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ANGOLA. 7217, New frequency? National Radio, Luanda, Good Reception at 2100 March 27 with program in English (Mahendra Vaghjee, Mauritius, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Yes, first heard here on 15/3 with French at 2000, measured at 7216.8 on that day. Seems to replace 7245 (Craig Seager, Bathurst, Australia, ibid.) ** ANTARCTICA. Friday, March 29, on 15475.55, station with LA ballads, announcements at 2120, 2140, and ID at 2200, LRA36? On later than usual; went off around 2215 (David Hodgson, TN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Listening to his ID tape over the phone, I was almost convinced I heard ``LRA36, Radio Nacional Arcángel Gabriel....`` and definitely concluding as the music faded up, ``...para todo el mundo.`` (Glenn Hauser, DXLD) ** ANTIGUA. DEUTSCHE WELLE 3RD HARMONIC ON 10 METER AMATEUR BAND Glen[n], I was casually tuning the 10 Meter amateur band at approximately 7 PM CST 3/27/2002 (0100 3/28/2002 UT) on 29 MHz looking for amateur AM activity and was surprised to hear the musical tones of Deutsche Welle on 29.100 MHz. I monitored the programming until 7:45 PM. This apparent 3rd harmonic of 9.7 MHz (Antigua) mirrored the programming thereon. Signal levels were s9+. The receiving equipment here is a Yaesu FT1000MP and a Collins 51J-4. Antennas are a Cushcraft R7 amateur vertical (base at 15') and a 60' wire (at 15') with an antenna tuner. Signal levels were comparable on both setups on both frequencies. As a reality check, I contacted John Kaufmann by land line, K9KEU who lives about 20 miles to the south of me (Willowbrook, IL) and he verified reception of the 29.1 MHz DW signal (Frank J. Mercurio, Schaumburg, IL, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Yes, 3rd harmonics from 9 MHz broadcast stations fall all over the 10m hamband; if more hams tuned in AM, they might be encountered more often (gh, DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. DST ends in SE Australia this weekend, and some program changes affect R. Australia. Grandstand, sporting coverage, will run at 0200-0800 on Sat and Sun [certain frequencies only, I believe --- gh]; Australia All Over gets reduced by an hour local Sunday mornings, UT Sat 2000-2145. There is an additional half-hour version of Bush Telegraph, M-F at 1130. And in the local mornings and evenings, news on the half hour is being added at many times (John Westland, RA Feedback March 30, notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BENIN. R. Benin, 7210.27, March 23 2230-2303* French talk, YL announcer, phone talk, variety of Afro-pops, French and US pops. S/off with NA, Fair. And March 24 *0556-0615+, s/on with local drums. NA at 0557 and vernacular talk followed. 0600 French ID, talk. Variety of local pops, US and French pops. Good. This on UT Sunday. I believe s/on is around 0500 on weekdays (Brian Alexander, PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOTSWANA. 4820, R. Botswana, 3/24 0255 Cowbell and mooing IS for 5 minutes followed by man in language. Haven't checked for this one in a while. One of my favorite IS (Dave Tomasko, Downers Grove, IL, MARE Tipsheet via DXLD) ** CAMEROON [non]. See MADAGASCAR ** CANADA. Thanks for the heads-up re the strike at CBC's French network. It's giving me the chance to hear some nice French vocal music without interruption via CJBC on 860. They even skipped the ID at 0400 UT, but they're doing quite well on a naked CC Radio here in Minneapolis. At about 0413, March 28, (i.e. Thursday evening local), they played an ID which began simply: Ici Radio Canada. The twist is that "Canada" was pronounced as in English, as if to make a point. Then, in good French, they continued, "La premiere chaîne vous propose une selection de musique..." etc., etc. (Max G. Swanson, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. Glenn, This from today's Toronto Sun: http://www.canoe.ca/Columnists/dunford_mar28.html March 28, 2002 IT JUST AIN'T JAZZ --- WHY RADIO VET TED O'REILLY QUIT By GARY DUNFORD -- Toronto Sun T.O's EXIT: "Who do you listen to for jazz in Toronto if not Ted O'Reilly" asks musicman Rob McConnell. An odd and public question, since he asked it on-air yesterday of O'Reilly himself. The radio vet wrapped his amazing, 37-year-run at CJRT -- re-branded as JAZZFM91 -- with yesterday's show. The station says O'Reilly retired. Ted says he quit. What's the difference? "The difference is, I don't want to work there any more," he says. "It's 37 years next Monday, and for about 35 of those years I loved working there. There was a community of purpose, a place that was dedicated to really good stuff -- and now it's another commercial radio station. It sounds like CHFI; it sounds like EZ-Rock." That's not a harsh judgment. To a listener, the broader sweep of JAZZFM91's increasingly formatted playlist is jazz without edge. Hummable. Upbeat. All-day audio wallpaper. Call letters out of music. Call letters into music. Cups. Contests. Promotions. "It's mainly the music," O'Reilly says of his exit. "The new program director accused me of playing music with too much improvising in it. That's bad when you're at a jazz station. They want music that people will turn on and leave on, in the background. They don't want anybody getting excited or angry." No surprises. ' Manipulation In short, JAZZFM91 aims to do for jazz what Classical96 does for the classics. Manipulate a music genre to offer a safe, attractive, one- stop for people in full flight from charted pop, rap and crap du jour. Offer melodies you know. Guitars. Standards. Diva vocalists. Keyboards. Lifestyle earfood. As the station actually calls it, Dinner Jazz. "Jazz is supposed to be a personal music and they're de-personalizing it," O'Reilly says. "They'll say this is what jazz is today. I don't think that's true. There's no reason why you can't play Louis Armstrong or Jellyroll Morton beside John Coltrane." Unless you're afraid they'll put distinctive thumbprints on the clean, portion-controlled plates of carefully selected dinner music entrees. "I'm tired of the uphill flight to keep what I think is good jazz on the air," O'Reilly says. "When you go to the absolute softest side of jazz music and take only that, then toss in other artists who aspire to be jazz artists, is it truly jazz?" Does Sting get airplay because he once hired Branford Marsalis? Does Frank Sinatra make the cut because he's kinda like jazz? As a teen O'Reilly was hooked by Miles Davis and big band swing. After graduating from Ryerson, he had radio gigs in Kitchener and Brampton, then joined CJRT in 1965. The station had 150 jazz LPs. Today it has 15,000, plus 12,000 CDs. It's the music library he says he'll miss most. In 37 years, Ted produced and recorded 250 concerts for broadcast, interviewed Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Charlie Mingus. He's produced albums for jazz labels, written for magazines, been the go-to guy for local musicians seeking promotion and support. He admits jazz is his religion, his calling. "They play jazz by the pound," says O'Reilly, whose concerts-for- broadcast and pointed interviews with players defined his run. "Put that piece in the computer, let the computer check the repetition factor ... the aim is daytime listening at the office." Bigger slice Indeed, JAZZFM91's determination to cut itself a bigger slice of Toronto's radio pie is raising eyebrows in broadcast circles. The "membership-supported" station runs pledge drives but also sells commercial advertising. Increases in listenership come at the ratings and ad expense of commercial rivals. Licensed to serve a minority taste, it aims at the majority. "I'm surprised Ted Rogers hasn't asked why he can't issue charitable tax receipts too," one wag jokes. Oddly, during JAZZ91 pledge drives, the titles most often requested by listeners are distinctive jazz classics, often by "dead guys" and farthest in spirit from the tuneful wash of the "soft jazz" that fills new release schedules. "I have resigned, but not retired," O'Reilly told listeners last night after spinning his favourite, 12-minute version of Jeepers Creepers, unlikely to be playlisted again. "'Til I speak with you again sometime, somewhere ... think nice thoughts." If you say so, Ted. But as one of those listeners with a JAZZFM91 charitable receipt in hand, I ain't thinkin' them this morning. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- (© 2002 Gary Dunford, Toronto Sun, via Ivan Grishin, DXLD) Glenn, I recall listening to Ted's nightly "Jazz Scene" program from 10PM-1AM on CJRT-FM, back in the '70s & '80s. His voice was just perfect for that time of night! 73, Ivan http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1017270068308&call_page=TS_Letters&call_pageid=968332189003&call_pagepath=News/Letters (Ivan Grishin, DXLD) Mention of Ted O'Reilly in the middle of this jazz column. It sounds similar to what happened to Rukeyser, but not as extreme. http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1017183667944&call_page=TS_News&call_pageid=968332188492&call_pagepath=News/News (Ivan Grishin, DXLD) ** CHINA. Voice of Strait. According to the reply from the station, the transmitting schedule is as follows: News and Politics Channel: 6115 kHz 2225-1700 UT (Wed 1000-1700) Literary and Life Channel: 7280 kHz 2225-1700 UT (Wed 1000-1700) Amoy Language Channel: 4940 kHz 2225-1700 UT (Wed 1000-1700) (via Ogino, Cumbre DX March 28 via DXLD) See recent report of 6115 with some English ** CHINA [non]. CLANDESTINE? from TAIWAN to CHINA. 15388 and 13750: New Star Broadcasting Station Channels 2 and 5 respectively. Heard at 1010 and 1110 March 29. Numbers transmission at TOH. After the transmission, there is a short pause before music start up and message in plain Mandarin by YL announcer, "We thank you for listening to our program. To enable the latest news to be delivered to you, the sponsoring organisation has requested us to solicit entries on the manufacturing of mpeg systems. Fees will be given for articles used. Submit your articles to w2798@hotmail.com or by post to P. O. Box 12587, Taipei. Thank you for listening." Some popular theme music follows. There is of course, no mention of what the sponsoring organisation is (Richard Lam, Singapore, Cumbre DX via DXLD) First time I have ever seen any kind of contact information for this one. (Cumbre Ed.) ** COSTA RICA. RFPI missing from 7445 around 0730 (Chris Hambly, March 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Also missing earlier UT March 29 but 21815- USB audible past 0200. Hope it is just down for the long delayed antenna hoisting; 7445-USB back at 0307 UT check March 30 (gh, DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. Glenn: concerning Fidel Castro's prodigal daughter's radio broadcasts from Miami. Ms. Alina Fernández is hosting a show titled Simplemente, Alina! on WQBA 1140 AM, 11.00 pm to 1.00 am EST [what days, local M-F?? currently 0400-0600 UT, soon 0300-0500]. Actually, she is not mentioned in a station's on-line schedule yet. - Her show is only 6 weeks old. So I had to call WQBA to find out her time slot. WQBA has both RealAudio and a webcam. But getting a live audio feed takes some extra clicks and a short registration. To listen, go to http://www.netmio.com/radio/wqba/listen/ and then push "power" button on a radio receiver image. To watch, go to http://www.netmio.com/radio/wqba/webcams/webcam43_en.html (Sergei Sosedkin, IL, March 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) TALK RADIO IN MIAMI HAS A NEW VOICE: CASTRO'S DAUGHTER Marina Jiménez, National Post, March 27 Miami's hottest new radio talk show host is a perfect match for the city's large and vociferous Cuban community, routinely criticizing the Communist regime and the ageing dictator at its helm. But Alina Fernández isn't just another embittered Cuban exile. She is the daughter of Fidel Castro, a relationship that has brought her neither power nor fortune, and one she never mentions on air. Listeners just know. Simplemente, Alina!, broadcast Monday through Friday on WQBA-AM, is run on a shoe-string and though it can be heard in Cuba she doubts her father has ever listened to it. "I don't think so. He doesn't have so much time to waste," she laughs in a throaty voice during an interview from her home in Miami's Little Havana. Ms. Fernández, 46, escaped from Cuba eight years ago disguised as a Spanish tourist and later wrote a book about being the daughter of Mr. Castro. She sees her six-week-old show as an effort to re-establish the institutional memory of her generation. Full article at: http://www.nationalpost.com/home/story.html?f=/stories/20020327/462641.html (via Sergei Sosedkin, IL, DXLD) ** DUCIE ISLAND. Ducie Island DXpedition is a wrap: The inaugural VP6DI DXpedition to the newest DXCC entity has come to an end. A 2.5- square-mile atoll, Ducie was approved for DXCC credit last November, but it took three trips, many months of planning and a big budget to make this operation a reality. The DXpedition was sponsored by the Pitcairn Island Amateur Radio Association. The VP9DI team was on the air for just over nine days, logging something on the order of 40,000 contacts. The crew was reported heading for Henderson Island (OC-056), anticipating arrival March 27. Team members will operate for approximately 24 hours using their individual call signs. Look for VP6BK/JA1BK, VP6XX/JF1IST, VP6AJ/K9AJ, VP6VT/K5VT, VP6TC, VP6DB, and VP6MW. According to the pilot stations, QSLs for Henderson Island and /mm QSOs go to the individual operators. VP6DI HF QSLs go via VE3HO, and 6-meter QSLs go to JA1BK. On-line log is available at http://www.big.or.jp/~ham/VP6DI but not all contacts have been posted. More information is available on PIARA`s DXpedition to Ducie March 2002 Web site (The Daily DX via ARRL March 27 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** FRANCE. Radio France Int'l schedule from March 30 to Africa. 0400-0430 M-F 11910, 11995; 0500-0530 M-F 11685, 15155, 17800; 0600-0630 M-F 11710, 17800, 21620; 0700-0800 M-F 15605; 1200-1230 15540ga, 25820; 1400-1500 11610, 17620; 1600-1700 11995ga, 12015ga, 17605; 1600-1730 11615, 15605 (RFI website via Daniel Sampson, WI, Prime Time Shortwave, http://www.triwest.net/~dsampson/shortwave/) ** HAWAII. My NZDXT item referring to the transmitter actually being atop Mt Haleakala was a misreading of the original item. The same storm which produced snow atop Mt Haleakala also brought high winds which resulted in an outage which knocked KNUI-AM off air for a week. Reception in the Pacific NW since clearly indicates KNUI is now back to full power, and indeed, is putting out an enhanced signal (David Ricquish, Wellington, New Zealand, March 28, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** HONG KONG. Don't forget about the special broadcasts for the yacht race. 3940 at 0945 and 2345 (Hans Johnson, Mar 28, Cumbre DX via DXLD) How could we forget? It`s on the WOR MONITORING REMINDERS calendar... ** HUNGARY: Updated A-02 Schedule for Radio Budapest eff. March 31: Croatian to Eu 0400-0413 Daily 6025 2000-2013 Daily 6025 English to Eu 1900-1928 Daily 6025 7130 2100-2128 Daily 3975 6025 English to NoAm 0100-0128 Daily 9560 0230-0258 Daily 9570 German to Eu 1200-1258 Sun 6025 7220 1400-1458 Sun 6025 9850 1700-1758 Sun 5970 6025 1730-1758 Mon-Sat 3975 6025 1930-1958 Mon-Sat 3975 6025 French to Eu 0430-0443 Daily 6025 7165 2015-2028 Daily 6025 7235* (*) ex 9755 Hungarian to Eu 0500-1058 Sun 6025 (relay HS-1 Kossuth R) 0500-1558 Mon-Sat 6025 (relay HS-1 Kossuth R) 1100-1158 Sun 6025 1300-1358 Sun 6025 1800-1858 Daily 3975 6025 2200-2258 Daily 6025 Hungarian to NoAm 0000-0058 Daily 9800 0130-0228 Daily 9570 2000-2058 Daily 17690 Hungarian to SoAm 2200-2258 Daily 11755* 15455 (*) ex 9730 2300-2358 Sun 11755* 15455 (*) ex 9730 Hungarian to AUS 1100-1158 Sun 21560 2100-2158 Daily 15195 Italian to Eu 0445-0458 Daily 6025 7165 2030-2043 Daily 6025 11755* (*) ex 6170 2130-2143 Daily 6025 11885 Russian to Eu 0300-0328 Daily 3975 6025 1530-1558 Sun 6025 9575 1700-1728 Mon-Sat 6025 9575 1930-1958 Sun 6025 9575 Romanian to Eu 0345-0358 Daily 6025 1500-1513 Sun 6025 1615-1628 Daily 6025 Serbian to Eu 1645-1658 Daily 6025 Slovak to Eu 0415-0428 Daily 6025 1630-1643 Daily 6025 Spanish to Eu/SoAm 2045-2058 Daily 6025 6145 2145-2158 Daily 6025 11885 Ukrainian to Eu 0330-0343 Daily 3975 6025 1600-1613 Daily 6025 9575 (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 29, via DXLD) ** INDIA [and non]. AIR band scan 17OO-1725 UT in Finland Hi Glenn. I checked this evening ALL INDIA RADIO frequencies (+others) audible here in Turku, former capital of Finland. Here´s the list of the frequencies I heard: -5040 kHz JEYPORE -5010 No trace of THIRU... or Garoua, it was MADAGASCAR. -5005 R NEPAL -4980 UNID (Chinese?) -4965 CHRISTIAN VOICE with ID in EE 1715 UT -4950 SRINAGAR (?) -4940 GUWAHATI formerly known as GAUHATI -4920 + 4910 + 4895 + 4860 + 4840 + 4800 + 4790 (really UNID) 4775 kHz AIR IMPHAL. I checked my QSL-list. In the seventies I used to listen to Asian MW-stations while living in eastern Finland. I listened to AIR IMPHAL on 920 kHz on Sept. 30th 1973, they replied in a month with letter. -4760 kHz very poor. Best of 73´s and a HAPPY EASTER! (Jouko Huuskonen, Turku, FINLAND, March 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. World Radio Network posted new schedules today for WRN1 and WRN2, available digitally on Telstar 5 Ku satellite. On the English-language WRN1, World Of Radio shifts from Saturday at 10 am Eastern to Sunday at the same time, in the slot formerly held by VOA's Communications World. Wales Radio International takes over the Saturday morning slot formerly held by WOR. In other changes, Radio Netherlands becomes available for 3 hours a day -- for an hour each at midnight, 8am and 6pm Eastern -- replacing RTE in the first two slots and Russia/RTE in the third slot. Radio Polonia at 1 pm is cut from one hour to 30 minutes, with Channel Africa (M-F), Network Africa (Sat) and Wales Radio International (Sun) airing at 1:30 pm. On the multi-language WRN2, RTE's hourlong broadcast in Irish at 8 am disappears from the schedule, and there are minor time changes for YLE Radio Finland. By the way, WRN Web site indicates the "WRN Boutique" has been closed for renovation since last August (Mike Cooper, Mar 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. WRN AVAILABLE IN SOUTH AMERICA VIA TELSTAR 12 From 1st April 2002, WRN begins broadcasting a trial service to South America from the Telstar 12 satellite. This developments means WRN is now a truly global broadcast network covering most of the Earth's surface twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. The footprint for Telstar 12 (see right) covers all of Central and South America with receive dish sizes between 60 to 100cm. The service will not be marketed to the partial footprint that covers the US and Canada - the service is not intended for this region. [eastern half of NAm] During the trial period from April 1st to December 31st 2002, we will initially be broadcasting a relay of our English and multi-lingual Africa Asia network as there is no customised feed as yet available to the satellite uplink site. Satellite Coordinates: Telstar 12 at 15.0 W, Transponder 35 (BVN TV) 11.974 Ghz Vertical Polarisation, Symbol Rate 3,400 Msym/s FEC 3/4, DVB MPEG2 NEW DESIGN, NEW NAVIGATION, NEW WRN WEBSITE! WRN is redesigning and relaunching its website and has commissioned Tornado Productions http://www.tornado.tv to undertake this work. Watch out for future announcements! (WRN press release via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. MARS --- NASA officials on March 27 released the first of what could be a daily flow of images of the Red Planet, snapped by a camera aboard the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The USD 300 million Odyssey was launched in April and arrived in orbit in October. It will eventually serve as a communications relay satellite for missions slated to land on Mars beginning in 2003. (AP) See: http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/odyssey (SCDX/MediaScan March 28 via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL WATERS [non]. Titanic special event reminder: Special event station GB90MGY will be on the air April 13-15 to commemorate the 90th anniversary of the Titanic disaster. The call sign suffix recalls the ``MGY`` call sign the Titanic used on her fateful maiden voyage in 1912. The station will be active on all HF bands 80 through 10 meters--CW only--from 1030 UTC April 13 until 0647 UTC April 15-- the precise time in the UK that the Titanic sank after striking an iceberg in the North Atlantic with a loss of more than 1500 lives. Members of the sponsoring Titanic Wireless Commemorative Group will operate GB90MGY from a replica of the Titanic`s wireless room. For more information, contact the Michael Shortland, G0EFO, Titanic Wireless Commemorative Group, msa-consult@dial.pipex.com or visit The Titanic Wireless Commemorative Group Web site http://www.gdrs.net/titanic The station will be set up in Godalming, Surrey, the birthplace of Titanic radio operator Jack Phillips, who stayed at his post sending out distress calls to alert other ships and saving more than 700 lives before he went down with the ship (The Daily DX via ARRL March 27 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** IRELAND. 9389.95, Laser Hot Hits, 0630 3/28, Several "Laser" IDs, by male DJ in passing. // 6220, but as expected, much clearer. Postal address, phone # and e-mail address given around 0635. Fair copy. I've read recently that they are using new transmitters, but not 100% sure this is not someone else relaying them. This is the first time I've heard them on this frequency. Fade out around 0700-0800 (David Hodgson, TN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ITALY. MARCONI BLOCKED JEWS FROM IL DUCE'S ACADEMY Inventor of the radio helped in Italy's anti-Semitic campaign Rory Carroll in Rome, Guardian, Tuesday March 19, 2002 Guglielmo Marconi, the father of radio and Italy's scientific hero of the 20th century, has been outed as a fascist hatchetman for Benito Mussolini's anti-Semitic policies. Documents unearthed in Rome have exposed Marconi as a clandestine but willing enforcer of the dictator's campaign against Jews years before the persecution came into the open... http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4376828,00.html (via Bill Westenhaver, QE, DXLD) ** KURDISTAN [non]. UZBEKISTAN: Summer A-02 Schedule for Voice of Mesopotamiya in Kurdish: 0500-1100 NF 15675 TAC 100 kW / 256 deg, ex 15415 1100-1300 on 11530 TAC 100 kW / 256 deg, ex 1100-1700 73 from (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 29, via DXLD) ** MADAGASCAR. Glenn, The station on 5010.0 closing just after 1900 is Madagascar, heard tonight (28 March) very clearly in parallel with much weaker 3287.6. After the national anthem they play the usual and distinctive Madagascar interval signal which has been around for years and years. Here in Nairobi, 5010 is COMPLETELY CLEAR once Madagascar has signed off. I am very sceptical of these reports of Cameroon on that frequency. I think Cameroon has now left shortwave for good (Chris Greenway, Nairobi, Kenya, March 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NETHERLANDS [and non]. A-02 Schedule for R. Netherlands R. Netherlands sked 31 March to 27 October 2002 Retyped from website Dutch 0130-0225 AM 6010sa 11730fl 15315bo 0330-0425 NAM/AF 6165bo 9590bo 9845ma 15560ma 0500-0557 EU 1512wo 7125fl 0500-0757 EU 9895fl 0500-1700 EU 5955fl 9895fl 0559-0757 EU 11935fl 0700-0800 NZ/AU 9820bo 11655bo 0759-1700 EU 13700fl 13700fl 0930-1015 Surinam (mo-sa) 6020bo 1030-1125 AS/AU 13820ma 17575ma 21480ma 1228-1325 17495 1330-1425 AS/AU 9890pe 12065ta 13695kh 17580ma 21480ma 1630-1725 AF 6020ma 11655ma 1730-1825 EU/ME 9895fl 13700fl 15560fl 2030-2125 AF/EU15835ka 6015ma 6020fl 7120ma 9895fl 9895fl 11655fl 15315bo 17605bo 21590bo 2130-2225 AM 6020bo 9895fl 13700fl 15155bo 15315fl 2330-0025 AS 7280ma 9590si 17590kh Dutch (DRM tests) [more below...] 0530-0625 EU 11655bo 0630-0800 EU 15245bo 2030-2125 EU 15565bo English 0430-0530 NAM 6165bo 9590bo 0930-1130 AS/AU 9790bo 12065pe 13710ir 1030-1125 EU/NAM 5965sa 6045ju 9860we 1430-1625 AS/NAM 9890ma 11835ma 12075ta 15220sa 1730-2025 AF 6020ma 7120ma 11655fl 1830-2025 AF 9895fl 13700fl 2030-2230 EU 1512wo 2330-0125 NAM 6165bo 9845bo Indonesian 1130-1325 Indonesia 11690si 17580ma 21480ma 2130-2325 Indonesia 6120si 7285ma 9590ma Spanish 0130-0325 CAM 6165bo 9845bo 1100-1125 SAM 15450bo 1130-1157 SAM 6165bo 9715bo 1200-1225 CAM 6165bo 9715bo 2230-0125 SAM 9895fl 11720bo 15315bo Transmitters: bo = Bonaire fl = Flevo ir = Irkutsk ju = Juelich ka = Kaliningrad kh = Khabrovsk ma = Madagascar pe = Petropavlovsk Kamchatski sa = Sackville si = Singapore ta = Tashkent we = Wertachtal wo = Wolvertem (Alan Roe, Teddington, UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Special DRM Demonstration for NAB During the Convention of the National Association of Broadcasters, our Bonaire relay station will be broadcasting a demonstration of the Digital Radio Mondiale system, beamed towards Las Vegas. The broadcasts start on Friday 5 April 2002 and end on Friday 12 April 2002. Bonaire will operate at 2330-0255 UTC on 15525 kHz with a DRM power of 10 kW. Content will be: 2330-0125 RNW English, and 0125-0255 RNW Spanish (Media Network newsletter March 29 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND: RNZI Frequency Schedule from March 31 to May 5, 2002: 1650-1750 Mon-Fri 6095 / 035 deg to NE Pacific, Fiji, Samoa, Cook Is 1751-1850 Mon-Fri 11725 / 035 deg to NE Pacific, Fiji, Samoa, Cook Is 1851-2050 Daily 15160 / 000 deg to All Pacific, also audible in Eur 2051-0458 Daily 17675 / 000 deg to All Pacific, also audible in WNAm 0459-0758 Daily 15340 / 000 deg to All Pacific, also audible in Eur 0759-1105 Daily 11675 / 000 deg to All Pacific 1106-1310 Daily 11675 / 325 deg to NW Pacific, Bougainville, E Timor, Asia 1311-1650 Occ`l 6095 / 000 deg to All Pacific (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 29, via DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. Re Defence Forces Broadcasts: The Armed Forces Canteen Council is a non-profit organization which operates facilities at military bases, the profits from which are used for a wide variety of activities. In this case, they include funding SW broadcasts via RNZI. It's similar to the Australian Army Amenities Service which funded a network of 22 radio stations in Australia, the Pacific, SE Asia and Japan during WWII. They had more mothers knitting and holding raffles so could afford more stations than NZers <grin> (David Ricquish, Wellington, NZ, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. NEW ZEALAND MUSIC QUOTA FOR RADIO 26.03.2002 4.00pm Regulating for New Zealand music quotas on radio is still an option if a voluntary code falters, Broadcasting Minister Marian Hobbs says. The code, launched today, will see radio stations playing on average 20 per cent New Zealand music by 2006. New Zealand music is applied to all music performed by artists normally registered as New Zealanders, including people performing in Australia and other countries... http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay.cfm?storyID=1291784&msg=emaillink (via Bill Westenhaver, QC, DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. Hi Glenn, Stumbled upon something which might be of interest to utility monitors: As of 1 May, the Meteorological Service of New Zealand is making changes to its weather radio facsimile services. They've been transmitting heretofore simultaneously on four frequencies, but due to needed transmitter maintenance, they'll be using only one frequency at a time from 1 May. Info, including links to PDF versions of the old/new skeds, may be found at: http://www.metservice.co.nz/forecasts/radiofax_changes.asp 73- (Bill Westenhaver, QB, March 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** OKLAHOMA. Progress(?) report on KXOK-TV 32, Enid`s ownly local TV station: some 10 pm newscasts have been missing without explanation, so the auction just keeps going. Good Morning Enid, however, at 7 am Friday had some news: we thought it looked different, and the reason is that they are currently originating from temporary studios next to the transmitter atop the Broadway Tower, as they still aren`t ready to move into Oakwood Mall. And Scott revealed that KXOK-FM started March 28 at 5:30 pm, on 104.7. Indeed it was on when we checked around 7:15 pm (all times CST) March 29, playing a cut from ``Tommy``. They plan to broadcast an Oklahoma Crude stupid ballgame live this weekend, but format if any is not yet clear. Close-in, it seems to have no trouble overriding KIXR Ponca City on same frequency, but I haven`t yet determined whether it is still officially LP, ex-KUAL. One of the few other locally produced TV shows so far is Doctor Fear, hosting monster movies at midnight early Saturday. He made a guest appearance on the morning show, reading a statement in (pig?) Latin (Glenn Hauser, Enid, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** OMAN. R. Sultanate of Oman, 15355, March 16 0300-0358* in English. Kor`an in Arabic with English translations and commentary on the recited verses. US pop music by Lionel Richie and others. Ad for contest to win a Toyota Corolla. Chimes and news at 0330-0342. Phone talk. Abruptly off at 0358. Fair-good. Barely audible one week later on March 24 (Brian Alexander, PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PARAGUAY. Re R. América on SW 7300: But not all is ready. According to Tony Jones, obtaining a license in Paraguay is very bureaucratic and takes very long time (Nicolás Éramo, Argentina, Cumbre DX March 28 via DXLD) ** SAMOA AMERICAN. WDJD near Pago Pago, American Samoa is now conducting tests on 585 with 5kW power. Official sign-on date is April 13. I've asked the acting station manager, Vickie Haleck for precise dates and times for tests as well as an address for DX reports. The station is DX friendly, wants reports. Programs are 70% English/30% Samoan, ID slogan is 'for you and your family, 585 AM WDJD'. Check the April 2002 New Zealand DX Times for an exclusive front page article on WDJD, only the third MW station in 50 years in American Samoa (David Ricquish, Talkback, NZ DX Times / http://www.radiodx.com hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** SAUDI ARABIA. The shortwave parallel frequencies for the 1521 Saudi Arabian are 9555 and 9870 kHz. I hear both the medium wave and shortwave stations best around local sunset. It is often the first TA signal to fade in because of its huge (2 megawatt) power and a transmitter site next to the Red Sea with a straight overwater trajectory towards us. At seashore sites in New England and eastern Canada, 1521 can come in 2 to 3 hours before sunset. 1 p.m. EST is my earliest reception (from Cape Cod) and 2:30 p.m. EST is about as early as I've noted them here in Billerica (about 15-20 miles inland from Ipswich, Marblehead, etc.) Sign-off is at 2300 UT (6 p.m. EST). Spain is usually what you hear on 1521 in Saudi Arabia's absence. Sometimes Czech, British, and even Chinese stations have been heard on this channel. When Saudi-1521 signs on again at 0300 UT (10 p.m. EST), there's more slop from WWKB-1520 than during the sunset receptions. If you're lucky (translate: super propagation + Beverage + beach), you can get some medium wave parallels to 1521, among these: 594, 648, 900, 1440. The 1512 Saudi station is not parallel to 1521. This one's usually good around 0200 UT (9 p.m. EST) if you aren't next to a 1510 pest like WWZN (Mark Connelly, WA1ION - Billerica, MA, USA, NRC-AM March 27 via DXLD) ** SOMALIA. There's some new Somali activity on 6750.25. It's in the Rahanwein language, so I need to check it out further. Regards, (Chris Greenway, Nairobi, Kenya, March 28, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SOUTH CAROLINA. Here`s another website with lots of testimonials about the alleged sins, to put it mildly, of Brother R. G. Stair: http://prophecy.sinfree.net/stair/stair.html If all of this is true, or for that matter, any of it, why hasn`t he been arrested and prosecuted? (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SWEDEN. RADIO SWEDEN -- Coming up on Radio Sweden: Thursday: "The S-Files" celebrates Stockholm's 750 years Friday: Good Friday special -- Stockholmers and THEIR Stockholm Saturday: Fringe and mainstream forms of expression -- graffiti and circus Sunday: In "Sounds Nordic", the top 100 ABBA songs and celebrity wannabe Emma Robinson Monday: Easter Monday special "The Ice Brothel" Contrary to our reports on the air and on the web, our new shortwave frequency schedule actually goes into effect on Sunday March 31 (and not April Fool's Day), along with everyone else, when Western Europe switches to Daylight Saving/Summer time (George Wood, SCDX/MediaScan March 28 via DXLD) Who says SCDX has to be on Tuesdays? (gh) ** THAILAND. 8742.98, Thai Meteo Station 1220 playing interval signal. Very weak, best in USB. Still in at 1618 Mar 28 same level (Joe Talbot, Alberta, Cumbre DX via DXLD) I believe the last log of this was back in 1999 (- Cumbre Ed.) I think we had some last year if someone want to search DXLD (gh, DXLD) ** TUNISIA. Amateur station 3V8BB, Mike. 28494 USB 1540 - 1615 UT March 28, Good signal in Oregon. Working West Coast/Stateside/world. Said to QSL via YT1AD (Bill Flynn, Cave Junxion, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** UKRAINE. I keep checking, and checking; UT Sun Mar 24 at 0100, there it was back on 7375, RUI in English to NAm! S 4/5. It was also there on 7375 at 0400 (Bob Thomas, CT, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** UKRAINE. Glenn, I noticed a new "Real Audio Shedule" [sic] tag on the left side of the RUI web page. I thought that it would provide times of programs and languages used, but all they had was a general list of programs available in Ukrainian, English, German and Romanian. Perhaps it's still under construxion. [Later that same day:] I noticed that left-side tag on the RUI website now reads New Broadcasting Shedule [sic], and it brings up the new A-02 schedule (Ivan Grishin, Ont., March 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. ITV Digital goes bust * A High Court judge agrees that ITV Digital, the crisis-hit UK broadcaster, can be placed in administration. Full story: http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/em/-/hi/english/business/newsid_1896000/1896732.stm (via Ricky Leong, Canada, DXLD) I kept hearing this headline on BBC news. ``Placed in administration`` means nothing to me as a North American. Is that an euphemism? Going bust is the cause or effect? I guess like we would say, being in the hands of a receiver running it (gh, DXLD) ** U K. 'THE SILENT KEY' RADIO PRODUCER WANTS FEEDBACK From RSGB: David Ellis, the writer and producer of the BBC radio feature 'The Silent Key' http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio3/speech/silentkey/sk18.shtml that featured amateur radio, is keen to receive feedback on the programme. It was broadcast on BBC Radio 3 on the 23rd of February and is now accessible on BBC on-line with both sound (realplay) and visuals. David Ellis, producer, Silent Key, writes about the programme: 'Erik Davis, cultural commentator, freelance writer for 'Wired' and 'The Village Voice' contextualised the more spectral, invisible dimensions of radio/cyber spaces whilst chipping away at the utilitarian shell of technology (or in the case of radio, the 'furniture', the knobs, dials, and accumulated junk) and it was this aspect of his book 'Techgnosis' that inspired many of the ideas within The Silent Key. Davis's 'electromagnetic imaginary' becomes a 'sonic imaginary'. During our early recorded conversations (extracts of which are used) we speculated on what Davis described as 'an archaeology of signals' and the 'collecting mentality' as represented by the 66 postcards that initiated the search for Arthur Trigell a.k.a. A Silent Key or dead radio ham. The cards became the pointers to a life lived, perhaps lost, though not unrecorded. Behind these cards existed a shadow story, as yet undetermined, of radio itself and of experiments conducted in wooden huts, spare rooms beyond geo-political and class borders. (At one point during my search I consulted a graphologist in an attempt to identify the 'hobbyist's underloop'). Composer and previous collaborator on various performance-based work Richard Kilgour ('The Titanic Signals', 'K.2 The Mountain', `Ezekiels Tounge', Iain Sinclairs 'London Essay') introduced me in 1999 to electronic engineer David Donnard who "knew someone, in the know", someone who might consider acting as my guide into the Ham fraternity, into what has been called 'the true art of radio'. The someone was Prem Holdaway, a North London-based radio enthusiast, formerly a teacher of electronics and badminton coach, and currently an active ham. Inducted into the esoterica/techno-jargon of the 'knob culture' Holdaway led me to Doreen Barnes an Essex-based morse operator who is one of the key voices heard throughout the 45 minute piece. The poignancy of Doreen and her husband Dennis's life (Dennis is now a Silent Key) led me to what radio aficionados recognise as the "pivotal year of 1957", and specifically October 1957, as this was the year when the first orbital satellite 'Sputnik' began transmitting signals from space. (According to Doreen they were "akin to the sound of a baby hedgehog"). Of equal importance, though more terrestrial in its impact, was what became known as 'TOMMOROW'S MUSIC', or the sound of Joe Meek, the maverick early 60's record producer and innovator of 'tape-splicing, cranked-up echo effects and sound montaged British pop. Filtering his 'homebrew' habits (as a radio experimentalist in the 50's he constructed a T.V in the woods) into his recordings, he revved up the post-war pop charts with 'Telstar' and 'Jonny Remember me'. Some of these homebrew habits (or simulation of them) were consciously used whilst in the studio with sound engineer/producer Neale Gardner during the editing/mixing of SK. SK was always about detour, digression and delay. It took as its model a previous semi-improvised performed lecture called 'K.2-the mountain' which was my attempt to trace the origins of the Y.M.C.A which I had discovered had been founded by my great, great grandfather George Williams, a pig farmer turned haberdasherer who worked in London. Of George Williams I learnt next to nothing. Of K2 and the outdoor movement? Lots. The search for Arthur Trigell, the Silent Key of the title, or G3JAF, became the point of departure in this investigation into the lesser known history of radio and, with it, the murky spiritualism of 19th century table rappers, the analog circuitry g'd upped to receive disembodied voices from the past, Lithuania nationalism, Slavic hymns, rogue frequencies, thrummings, spheric utteraces, whistlers. The Silent Key is an assemblage (sound montage) of broadcast clichés, composed music, clicks, dictaphonics, and interviews etc. It's also about making radio without a handbook.' (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ?? (gh, DXLD) ** U K [non]. RUSSIA: Effective April 6 Radio Ezra in English will be on air at new time: new 2330-2400 Sat NF 17665 P.K 100 kW / 060 deg to NAm, ex 0900-0930 Sun on 12110 VLD 100 kW / 140 deg to Pacific [but the old broadcast ended some months ago, not just now --gh] (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 29, via DXLD) ** U S A. Stories about VOA: The Committee to Protect Journalists annual report, "Attacks on the Press in 2001," mentions VOA's reassignment of Spozhmai Maiwandi, chief of the VOA Pashto Service. http://www.cpj.org/ The CPJ report and its mention of VOA was reported by RFE/RL: http://www.rferl.org/nca/features/2002/03/26032002091809.asp Freelance journalist Frank Smyth comments on the Spozhmai Maiwandi matter: Not many Americans have heard of Spozhmai Maiwandi, but many Afghanis have. A native of the Central Asian nation, she ran the Pashto service of the Voice of America for over a decade. VOA is the paid broadcast arm of the U.S. government, but Ms. Maiwandi is a journalist, and she aired more than just American propaganda. She reported the news, and, in a broadcast shortly after September 11, included the remarks of the Taliban leader, Mullah Omar. That raised hackles in the Bush administration, and she quickly became a target. Soon, under Bush-appointed director Robert Reilly, VOA turned on Ms. Maiwandi. First she found insulting notes slipped under her door by anonymous coworkers, she said, producing a note that simply read: "This is no longer your office. Move your big [expletive removed] out of here." Then she was fired from the Pashto service, although in an Orwellian twist Reilly claims he gave her a promotion. "You are being given a temporary promotion," VOA's department of human resources wrote to Ms. Maiwandi. "This action is not a reassignment from your current position. Your position of record remains Chief of the Pashto Service," the note added, even though she would no longer run the service. Unfortunately the VOA case is only one of many examples in which Bush officials have manipulated the press... http://www.tompaine.com/feature.cfm/ID/5294 (via Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [and non]. VOA Pronunciation Guide: The Voice of America now has a searchable index on-line --- complete with audio. (It beats scouring the Beeb site, and listening to a whole story...) http://www.voa.gov/pronunciations/ (Tom Popyk, CAJ List via Ricky Leong, QU, DXLD) ** U S A. Another story of great men with feet of clay, like the recent reports of Marconi's anti-semitism [see ITALY] KEN RUSSELL FILM CASTS EDISON IN A POOR LIGHT by Chris Hastings (Filed: 24/03/2002) THE family of Thomas Edison, the inventor of the light bulb, has attacked a new film by Ken Russell that portrays him as a ruthless sadist intent on destroying his closest rival. Mr Russell's new film biography of Nikola Tesla, who was one of Edison's greatest adversaries, will also undermine the scientist's claim to be the father of electricity and provide a very different picture of one of America's revered heroes... http://news.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2002/03/24/wedis24.xml 73- (Bill Westenhaver, QB, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. I heard that you had an 80th anniversary documentary about WLW. Wonder if and when this will be in your audio vault? Or rebroadcast with advance notice. Regards, Glenn Hauser, WORLD OF RADIO to WVXU via DXLD) Dear Glenn, Thanks for your e-mail. The documentary will be publicly released as a 2-CD set with a 70 page booklet in early summer. I'd suggest that you keep checking out the web site for specific information about its availability. If we do another rebroadcast, we'll also put that on the web plus there will be a fair amount of on- air promotion. Thanks again for writing (Dr. Jim King, WVXU, March 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. VETERAN RADIO STARS TO DISCUSS ALABAMA`S OLDEST STATION From: http://www.bizjournals.com/birmingham/stories/2002/03/25/daily19.html 19:03 EST Tuesday The two familiar names noted mostly for their local television careers will participate in the 80th birthday celebration of Alabama's first radio station, WSY, which later became WAPI. The station is still going strong as NewsTalk 1070-AM, owned now by Citadel Broadcasting. The celebration will be held April 1, sponsored by the Birmingham- based Alabama Historical Radio Society (http://www.bham.net/ahrs) and Alabama Power Co., which started WSY to communicate with linemen repairing power lines. The discussion will be held in the main auditorium of the Alabama Power building on Sixth Avenue North downtown. The festivities include a 6 p.m. panel discussion with longtime radio industry personnel, including Lucas, known in the 1960's as "Weathergirl Rosemary" on WAPI-TV (now NBC13 WVTM). Lucas paired with longtime talk show host Dave Campbell on WAPI for the Saturday Football Cavalcade pre-game show in the fall during the 1960s and 70s. Another former WAPI announcer, Sterling Brewer, went on to fame as the host of "Live Studio Wrestling" on WBMG-TV (now CBS42 WIAT). Former station manager and announcer Everett Holley also will sit on the panel. "We're proud Alabama Power launched the first radio station in Alabama," says company president and CEO Charles McCrary. A museum exhibit of radio history, with antique radios owned by private collectors, will be on display April 1 through May 31 in the Alabama Power archives department (via Mike Terry, UK, DXLD) ** U S A. I found a link to LDS Radio Network, run by the Mormons. The network has two "streams". "LDS Radio" features religious talk and music, while "LDS Instrumental" provides non-interrupted, non- religious (AFAICT) music. I enjoyed LDS Instrumental the morning of March 27, but it went silent around 1700 (Perhaps the soothing music put the operator to sleep!) It's still not heard past 2230. LDS Instrumental http://www.ldsradio.com/instrumental.asx LDS Radio http://www.ldsradio.com/ldsradio.asx (Ivan Grishin, Ont., March 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Glenn, The links to LDS Instrumental and Radio are down right now, so I assume they are now working to correct the problem with LDS Instrumental. (Grishin, 1516 UT March 27) LDS Instrumental is back as of 1700 today. But now that I listen again, I notice that it is playing mostly instrumental and choral religious music, something they didn't do yesterday. Maybe it's because today is Maundy Thursday? 73, (Ivan Grishin, Ont., March 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. 11490, WHRI Noblesville IN; 2119-2127+, 24-Mar; World Harvest Radio toe-tappin' Gospel music and religious program. 2x harmonic audible at noise level //5745 fundamental at S50!. (Harold Frodge, MI, MARE Tipsheet via DXLD) ** U S A. When Elephants Dance: Here's an excellent article about the state of the war on copyrights in the US, and how it may impact internet radio. Quite amusing in places, and well worth the read even though it is lengthy. http://www.farces.com/stories/storyReader$414 (Ray Robinson in L.A., Radio Caroline Mailing List via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. SAVING INTERNET RADIO From Dan Gillmor, San Jose Mercury News Tech columnist: "Media conglomerates are in a merger frenzy. Telecommunications monopolies are creating a cozy cartel, dividing up access to the online world. The entertainment industry is pushing for Draconian controls on the use and dissemination of digital information... "The offenses against the public interest have been piling up, one after the other...The most recent outrage...is the music companies' scheme to control Internet radio or murder it if they can't. Net radio provides the variety and value that broadcast radio, so dominated today by a few behemoths, has almost utterly lost. Now it's going to disappear, if the greedy souls who dominate commercial music have their way -- just one more whack at the public interest to preserve the untenable business models of well-connected corporations. "I'd been hoping that Congress would come to its senses one of these days, and mitigate the damage it has done with laws like the Digital Millennium Copyright Act [in .pdf form]. As prescient critics warned, the law has been abused by the entertainment crowd and its craven allies in the technology business to threaten scholars, curb free speech and even incite outrageous prosecutions. "I'd been hoping that lawmakers would see the danger of market concentration in telecommunications and media. No luck there, either. I'd been hoping that the courts might intervene. But courts are more political than we learn in our third-grade civics classes. Federal judges are nominated and confirmed by politicians who only occasionally peek out of the pockets of the special interests. Again and again, with few exceptions, judges are upholding laws that trample on tradition and rights. "There's no simple, all-encompassing solution to this dismal situation. Fighting for the public interest will involve work on a variety of fronts. It's essential, for example, that we put pressure on Congress and keep it there... "Here's my message to the record industry and its allies: I'm not a thief. I'm a customer. When you treat me like a thief, I won't be your customer." Read Gillmor's entire editorial in the San Jose Mercury News http://www.siliconvalley.com/mld/siliconvalley/2922052.htm (via RAIN via Mike Terry, UK, DXLD) ** U S A. Here's yet another Salon.com piece on Clear Channel Communications. 73- Bill Westenhaver WASHINGTON TUNES IN, By Eric Boehlert Critics accuse Clear Channel of shady radio deals and nasty concert business. Now the government is starting to pay attention... http://www.salon.com/ent/feature/2002/03/27/beltway/index.html (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** U S A. A NEWSLINE FOLLOW-UP: A POLITICALLY DISORGANIZED 11 METER CLASS D SERVICE A few weeks ago we reported that the FCC has refused to hear an appeal by an Illinois CB operator convicted of Disorderly Conduct for interfering with a neighbors home entertainment electronics. In the days since that report first aired, it caused quite a stir on several Internet discussion groups. Everyone wants to know how a service that once boasted 3 out of every 5 Americans with radios in their cars could wind up where the local sheriff or policeman could take an operator off the air. After a bit of research, the answer seemed pretty clear. In one word: Politics. Here is Amateur Radio Newsline`s South East Bureau Chief David Black, KB4KCH, with part 1 of a multi part look at the strange political side of 11 meter CB. When it comes to having political representation, most communication groups are in good shape. Hams have the American Radio Relay League looking after their political well being. Broadcasters have the powerful National Association of Broadcasters. Cellular telephone companies have the CTIA. Even the General Mobile Radio Service, which shares frequencies with the Family Radio Service, has representation amid the Personal Radio Steering Group. So, what form of communications lacks representation? That would be 11 meter, Class D Citizens Band radio. What does CB have? This: (Sound from 11 meter CB) Give CB a listen, and you hear lots of people using a service without any structure or formalized representation. Some might even call it anarchy. (More sound from 11 meters) Ironically, CB`s lack of political power--as well as its inability to defend against bureaucratic attack--is not due to shortage of people using the airwaves. Many believe that next to cellular telephones, the second largest selling piece of 2-way radio equipment in the 20th century has been the CB radio. During the gas crisis in the 1970s, many cars sported some sort of 11 meter whip and a cheap CB radio under the dash. Low cost 11 meter radios by the millions were manufactured, imported and sold. The industry had hobby magazines and several newspaper style newsletters devoted to CB radio. CB operators outnumbered hams by at least 20 to one. And they outnumber GMRS users by 1000 to one. But CB was not able to defend itself from outside pressures either back then or today. Why? Part of the reason goes back to CB`ers themselves in the 1970s and early 1980s. Most of them were not really interested in the service. It was just a utility. A way to help learn where to find the cheapest gasoline or avoid speed traps. The CB radio service lacked any real monetary commitment. Without that, there was no political commitment. And when fuel prices began to ease, many but not all 11 meter operators pulled their radios out of their cars--and put them in the attic. Then there were the few others, the die hard CB hobbyists. They treated CB channels 1 through 40 as a sort of ham radio-like hobby. Some operated illegally, but would take the chance just to make a DX contact. But they never organized. Why? Different CB groups formed over the years. Many called themselves political messiahs of 11 meters. But many turned out to be bogus. During the late 1970`s and early 1980`s, CB radio scam artists were busy, trying to separate the 11 meter radio operator from his hard earned cash. As group after group appeared and then vanished, it became apparent to most using CB that trusting anyone was too expensive. Now, more than 25 years later, trust in any CB political organization seems little more than a remote possibility. And what about the legal CB operators? Those dedicated to public service? That part of the story, next week. For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I`m David Black, KB4KCH. Next week David tells us about the only successful CB organization and the reason that it survived when the rest went away. (ARNewsline(tm)) THAT FINAL ITEM: AN APRIL 1ST CB DXPEDITION TO THE ISLE DU CONEY Earlier in this week`s newscast we reported that 11 meter CB has no political clout. What it does have is a bunch of people who just want to have fun. Now, a group of them is planning what they call a People`s Radio DXpedition from an exotic island location. Roving reporter Pierre Pullinmyleg is here with the details: AUDIO ONLY, NO TEXT. Download MP3 audio at http://www.arnewsline.org Hopefully, Pierre will be back a year from now to pull your leg once again. (The April Fools Day File) (Amateur Radio Newsline March 29 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. SHORTWAVE: ARNEWSLINE VISITS AN SWL-FEST From CB to shortwave listening. Ham radio operators are not the only radio hobbyists who hold conventions. So do Short Wave Listeners and one of the most successful gatherings is Winterfest. Amateur Radio Newsline`s Steve Coletti took his tape recorder and visited this years gathering. He has this report: AUDIO ONLY - NO TEXT. Download MP3 audio at http://www.arnewsline.org by clicking on the newscast number. It may not be the size of the Dayton Hamvention or Huntsville Hamfest, but to Short Wave Listeners, Winterfest is truly the best (ARNewsline(tm) via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. Chatter from I, Liz, the Teletype Blonde: I finally gave in and bought a utility decoder-a Universal M-7000. I bought it used (all 7000s are used) just in case I didn't like it. As it turned out, I love this gadget. I have spent hours decoding Morse Code, teletype, and fax. I have yet to learn many other things. 6994: WC2XPF, an experimental RTTY station in Auburn, WA. Listed as NEWSMAX in Klingenfuss guide but that didn't appear in my printout. 50Bd/170Hz shift, reversed polarity. My prize logging possession. Will QSL (Liz Cameron, MI, 25 Mar, MARE Tipsheet via DXLD) Time? ** U S A. March 28, 2002 SENATOR: $39M NEEDED FOR PLANE RADIOS WASHINGTON (AP) - F-15 fighter jets flying combat air patrols over the United States as part of homeland defense must have radios that can communicate directly with any commercial airliner deemed suspicious, Sen. Charles Grassley says. Because of different frequencies used by F-15s and commercial airlines' radios, communication now is accomplished by relay through ground controllers, he said in a letter to the leaders of the Senate Appropriations Committee's defense panel. "A few short seconds and a miscommunication could lead to a tragic situation," Grassley, R-Iowa, wrote the subcommittee chairman, Sen. Daniel Inouye, D-Hawaii, and the top Republican, Sen. Ted Stevens of Alaska. His office released the March 20 letter on Thursday. Grassley asked that $39 million - the cost estimated by the Air Force - be included in an upcoming spending bill to equip 583 of the F-15s with such radios. Airlines communicate on the Very High Frequency, or VHF, band, while the F-15s communicate on the Ultra High Frequency, or UHF, band, and do not carry the VHF radios needed to talk to the civilian aircraft, Grassley wrote. "We need to find a way to ensure that these two planes can talk to one another," Grassley said in a statement Thursday. "Funding to make certain that no commercial airliners are diverted, or tragically, terminated, should be of utmost importance for homeland security." The F-15s have been assigned to intercept commercial airliners that are identified or suspected of being under terrorist control. "If hostile intent is determined, the interceptor acting through its chain of command, may be ordered to direct the airliner to an available airfield or, in the extreme case, to terminate the airliner's flight," Grassley noted. Lacking the ability to contact the airliner directly, "communications are accomplished in an indirect way, by relay through ground controllers," Grassley wrote. "This can be cumbersome, time consuming, and subject to error." There was no immediate reaction to the letter from Inouye or Stevens. (from lasvegassun.com via Sergei Sosedkin, March 29, DXLD) About time ** U S A [non]. Hi! Believe me, there is no AFRTS USB transmissions from Sigonella nor Diego García on those often mentioned frequencies. Not since last summer or so, least at the moment. That´s the sad truth. Frequencies for Florida, Puerto Rico, Guam and Hawaii transmitters seem right to the spot and active. Puerto Rico and Guam are heard best here in Southern Finland. Happy Easter from Helo (Kari Helpaltio, Finland, hard-core-dx via DXLD) re AFRTS, a strange QSL came by mail, obviously to my report of them last month of the Guam transmitter on 13362U. Guam was the only one I had not reported earlier by ordinary mail, but here was a mail QSL from them that I had heard Diego García on 4319 which I had not. Not this time. That was a year ago, and I received their QSL. Let's face it, the AFRTS QSL dept. has computorized QSL-ing, and you can't blame them for not answering reports, but this time it got screwed up. I just wonder when all naval units will have their satellite receivers fixed up and this episode of AFRTS on SW ends. But so far it has been real fun. Anybody with a QSL from erratic Iceland on 3903U ? That would indeed be a good one for the history buffs in 50 years or so. 73 and enjoy the holiday ! (Johan Berglund, Trollhättan, Sweden, ibid.) What holiday? ** U S A [non]. AWR Combined schedule for 30 March 2002 to 27 October 2002 Retyped from the AWR website. Afar 1700-1730 AF 17665ab Amharic 0300-0330 AF 11975ab 1700-1730 AF 15520ab Arabic 0400-0500 ME 15470mo 0500-0600 AF 15470mo 0600-0700 AF 11610ju 15470mo 1700-1800 ME 15460mo 1800-1900 AF/ME 17555mo 1900-2000 AF 15175mo 15485ju Bangla 1300-1330 AS 15320ab 1330-1400 AS 15385ag Bulgarian 0400-0500 EU 9570ju 1700-1800 EU 15235ju Burmese 1400-1500 AS 11930ag Chin 0000-0030 AS 11770ag 1400-1430 AS 15380ag Dyula 0730-0800 AF 17780mo 2000-2030 AF 15355mo English 0030-0100 AS 6035ab 6055ab 0200-0230 ME 9820mo 0330-0400 AS 11775ab 0400-0430 AF 7235me 0430-0500 AF 11975me 0500-0530 AF 5960me 6015me 0530-0630 AF 15105me 0700-0730 EU/AF 7230mo 0830-0930 AF 17780mo 1000-1030 AS 11930ag 1000-1100 AS 11560ag 1300-1330 AS 15385ag 17740ab 1330-1400 AS 11705ag 11980ag 15320ab 1630-1700 ME 9385ag 9600ab 11850ag 15450ag 1800-1830 AF 5970me 6095me 1800-1900 AF 7170me 1930-2000 EU 7130ri 2000-2100 AF 9745me 2100-2200 AF 15355mo 2130-2200 AS 11850ag 11980ag Farsi 0230-0300 ME 6145ab 0330-0400 ME 11665mo 1630-1700 ME 15410mo French 0430-0500 AF 9845me 0700-0730 AF 11610ju 0800-0830 AF 17780mo 2000-2030 AF 7170me 9780me 15485ju 2030-2100 AF 15355mo Fulfulde 1900-1930 AF 11640me German 0730-0800 EU 7230mo 1500-1530 EU 7165mo Hausa 0600-0630 AF 15345me 1930-2000 AF 9745me Hindi 0000-0030 AS 6035ab 6055ab 1530-1600 AS 11890ag 13705ab 15195ag Igbo 0530-0600 AF 15345me 1930-2000 AF 11640me Indonesian 1100-1130 AS 15205ag 2200-2230 AS 11850ag 15320ag Italian 0900-1000 EU sa-su 11880ju Japanese 1300-1330 AS 11705ag 11980ag 2100-2130 AS 11850ag 11980ag Javanese 1130-1200 AS 15205ag 2230-2300 AS 11850ag 15320ag Kannada 1430-1500 AS 17860AB 1530-1600 AS 15575ag Karen 0030-0100 AS 11770ag 1430-1500 AS 15380ag Korean 1200-1300 AS 9720ag 2000-2100 AS 9740ag 11960ag Malagasy 0230-0330 AF 3215ta 1530-1630 AF 3215ta Malayalam 1530-1600 AS 11850ag 17630ab Mandarin 0000-0200 AS 12120ag 15370ag 17635ag 1000-1100 AS 15510ag 1000-1500 AS 15615ag 1100-1200 AS 11560ag 11975ag 1100-1300 AS 17835ab 1200-1300 AS 11775ag 15150ag 1400-1500 AS 11880ag 2100-2200 AS 15265ag 2200-2400 AS 12120ag 17635ag 2300-2400 AS 12010ag Marathi 1600-1630 AS 9600ab Masaai 1730-1800 AF 12130me Nepali 1500-1530 AS 11890ag 17630ab Oromifa 0300-0330 AF 11710mo 1730-1800 AF 17665ab Punjabi 1500-1530 AS 13705ab 15195ag Romanian 1600-1700 EU 13720ju Russian 0300-0330 AS 11775ab 1330-1400 AS 17740ab Sinhala 1430-1500 AS 17630ab Somali 0330-0400 AF 11955ab 1630-1700 AF 17665ab Swahili 0400-0430 AF 11975me 1700-1730 AF 12130me Tagalog 1030-1100 AS 11930ag 1600-1630 ME 9385ag 15450ag Tamil 1330-1400 AS 17860ab 1500-1530 AS 11850ag Telugu 1400-1430 AS 17860ab 1500-1530 AS 15575ag Tigrinya 0300-0330 AF 11945ab 1730-1800 AF 15520ab Urdu 0230-0300 AS 9820mo 1400-1500 AS 15320ab 1600-1630 AS 11850ag Vietnamese 0100-0200 AS 15445tn 1400-1500 AS 15490tn 2300-2400 AS 15320ag Yoruba 0500-0530 AF 15105me 2030-2100 AF 7170me Transmitters: ab = Abu Dhabi, UAE ag = Agat, Guam ju = Juelich, Germany me = Meyerton, South Africa mo = Moosbrunn, Austria ri = Rimavska Sobota, Slovakia ta = Talata, Madagascar tn = Taiwan (Alan Roe, Teddington, UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** YUGOSLAVIA [non]. YUG(SER)/BIH: The Radio Yugoslavia website includes at http://www.radioyu.org/schedule.htm a programme schedule valid from April 8, 2002 at 1430 UT. Is this a target date for a revival of transmissions from Bijeljina? (Kai Ludwig, Germany, March 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Looks about the same as before, including English to NAm both on 9580, 0000-0030 East except Sunday, 0430-0500 West daily. The date suspiciously coincides with DST start in NAm, maybe automatic imaginary schedule? (gh, DXLD) R. Yugoslavia English schedule 1430 UT April 8 to 1330 UT October 27, 2002. 0000-0030 except Sunday, N America ce 9580; 0430-0500 N America w 9580; 1830-1900 Europe w 6100; 2100-2130 Europe w 6100; 2200-2230 Australia 7230. Something I just noticed about the Radio Yugoslavia schedule is that the broadcasts to Australia moved from 1330 to 2200 UT (R. Yugoslavia website via Daniel Sampson, Prime Time Shortwave, http://www.triwest.net/~dsampson/shortwave/ ) ** ZIMBABWE. Your readers may recall this Reuters quote from DXLD 2- 034 ``The only way that Robert Mugabe can win this election is if he steals it." So now here's one from the well-whaddya-know file, Glenn. Those ZBC webcasts that went away just a week before the country's (insert your own adjective here) presidential election? Hey guess what, a week after the election they came back. How about that. New addresses however. ZBC 2, a.k.a. Radio Zimbabwe, w/ African and South African pop and announcers speaking Shona and Ndebele is now at http://66.8.38.108/zbc2-fm.asx Radio Three, a.k.a 3FM, mixing Zimbabwean pop with US rap and soul in English "catering to the youths" according to the website, is now at http://66.8.38.108/zbc3-fm.asx 3FM continues to do a 5 minute hourly newscast 24/7 that always has a Mugabe story as the lead. Still, both webcasts are a solid source for new African releases if that is your cup of tea. Lively music and stooge journalists: your best entertainment value. Please pardon my non-objective, dripping sarcasm. It is only temporary; DXLD deserves better! (Tom Roche, Atlanta, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. 6715: I tried Friday night Mar 22 from around 1700 past 2000 but it was not on air. However, when I retuned again around 2310 it WAS on air. At least, I think it was this - all I was hearing was a general hub-bub of noise similar to what you hear from a concert hall before the conductor appears. The signal was USB only and pushing the S meter up to 7. It would seem, therefore, that transmission is late on Fridays and earlier on Sundays??? I suspect this is something similar to the Irish CBers (Noel Green, England, Cumbre DX via DXLD) 6715 U, active again at 2245 tune in Fri Mar 29, but prohibitive amount of lightning static (David Hodgson, Nashville TN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ PROPAGATION NOTES When the next solar minimum will be? According to a recent NOAA Preliminary Report and Forecast of Geophysical Data, their prediction shows it to be some time between September 2006 and April 2007. Still a ways off, and right now we are enjoying the peak of the current cycle. You can read these NOAA reports at: http://www.sec.noaa.gov/weekly/ and the one showing the latest solar cycle projection is the March 5 issue. You can also see historic charts of this and previous solar cycles on WM7D's web site at: http://www.wm7d.net/hamradio/solar/index.epl (Bill Smith, TX, Cumbre DX March 28 via DXLD) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 2-049, March 27, 2002 edited by Glenn Hauser, wghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted afterwards at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd02.html For restrixions and searchable 2002 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn WORLD OF RADIO #1124 available early UT March 28: (STREAM) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1124.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1124.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1124.html FIRST AIRINGS ON WBCQ: UT Thu 0030 and 0600 on 7415 FIRST AIRINGS ON WWCR: Thu 2130 on 15685, Sat 0600 on 5070 FIRST AIRINGS ON RFPI: Fri 1930, Sat 0130, 0730, 1330, 1800, 2400 on some of: 7445-USB, 15039, 21815-USB CONTINENT OF MEDIA 02-02 is now available: (STREAM) http://www.worldofradio.com/com0202.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.worldofradio.com/com0202.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/com0202.html [available soon] ALSO FROM DXing.com: http://www.dxing.com FIRST AIRINGS ON RFPI: Fri 1900, Sat 0100, 0700, 1300, 1730, 2330 on some of: 7445-USB, 15039, 21815-USB DX PROGRAMS new revision by John Norfolk: http://www.worldofradio.com/dxpgms.html UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIAL Glenn: I appreciate the posting. Thanks for the link to the latest issue. I have just returned to the hobby and am amazed at the resources that have come into play. I plan on checking-out your website later today. Thanks again, (Dave Lines, Spring City, PA) ** AFGHANISTAN [non]. Glenn: Gordon Adam, former head of BBC Pasto Service, writes about international broadcasting to Afghanistan in the Sunday Herald of Scotland.... http://www.sundayherald.com/23148 (via Kim Elliott, DC, DXLD) ** ALASKA. Amigos, convido-os a visitarem a página http://www.grimm.med.br/radioescuta.htm onde logo na abertura colocamos a imagem (frente e verso) do QSL da emissora HAARP (High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program - Gakona) que o nosso grande amigo Marcelo Toníolo dos Anjos captou em 5800 KHz e ao reportar esta freqüência obteve este QSL raro, diga-se de passagem. Também convidamo-los a visitarem os demais segmentos da referida página (Rudolf Grimm, São Bernardo, SP, @tividade DX via DXLD) ** ALBANIA. Tirana at 0245 doesn`t seem to show up on UT Sundays already. Been that way for a few weeks. Continues to be late by 5+ minutes on both 6115 and 7160 at 0245. Or may show up on time on one and not the other, weekdays. March 21 0330, no show 6110 [sic] but OK on 7160, ditto at 0245 (Bob Thomas, CT, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BULGARIA. OBSERVER #173 / 26-03-2002 ---------------------------------------------------------------------- OBSERVER is an edition of RADIO BULGARIA compiled by Ivo Ivanov & Angel Datzinov Items here may be reproduced if it is mentioned "OBSERVER-BUL". All times in UTC ---------------------------------------------------------------------- BULGARIA: Summer A-02 schedule of RADIO BULGARIA - March 31 to October 27, 2002: ADDR: 4, Dragan Tsankov Blvd., 1040 Sofia and P. O. Box 900, 1000 Sofia. Tel.:+359 2 9336 733; fax.:+359 2 650 560 Website: http://www.nationalradio.bg Programme Director: Angel Nedyalkov e-mail: nedyalkov@nationalradio.bg Frequency Manager: Ivo Ivanov e-mail: rbul1@nationalradio.bg MW: Petrich (G.C: 23.18E/41.42N): 747 kHz 500 kW/non-dir Vidin (G.C: 22.40E/43.49N): 1224 kHz 500 kW/205 deg SW: P=Plovdiv/Padarsko (G.C: 24.42E/42.10N): 2 x 500 kW, 3 x 250 kW S=Sofia/Kostinbrod (G.C: 23.13E/42.49N): 2 x 100 kW, 2 x 050 kW ====================================================================== ALBANIAN / e-mail: albanian@nationalradio.bg 0530-0530 Mon-Fri Balkans 7300 P250/248, 1224 0600-0700 Sat/Sun Balkans 7300 P250/248, 1224 1545-1630 -daily- Balkans 7300 P250/248, 1224 1900-1945 -daily- Balkans 5900 P250/248, 1224, 747 ====================================================================== BULGARIAN / e-mail: bulgarian@nationalradio.bg 0000-0100 -daily- North America 9400 P500/306, 11700*P500/306 0000-0100 -daily- South America 9500 P250/245, 11600 P250/258 0430-0500 Mon-Fri Balkans 7300 P250/248, 1224 0430-0500 Mon-Fri East Europe 7500 S100/030, 9500 S100/030 0430-0500 Mon-Fri West Europe 9400 P500/306, 12000*P500/306 0400-0500 Sat/Sun Balkans 7300 P250/248, 1224 0400-0500 Sat/Sun East Europe 7500 S100/030, 9500 S100/030 0400-0500 Sat/Sun West Europe 9400 P500/306, 12000*P500/306 1000-1030 -daily- East Europe 11700 S100/030, 15200 S100/030 1000-1030 -daily- West Europe 12000 P500/295, 13600 P250/306 1200-1400 -daily- Balkans 1224 1200-1400 -daily- West Europe 12000 P500/295, 15700*P500/306 1500-1600 -daily- Middle East 13600*P500/126 1500-1600 -daily- South Africa 17500 P500/185 1500-1700 -daily- East Europe 7500 S100/030, 9900 S100/030 1800-1900 -daily- Balkans 5900 P250/248, 1224, 747 1800-2000 -daily- Middle East 7400 P250/140 1800-2000 -daily- West Europe 7500 P250/306 ====================================================================== ENGLISH / e-mail: english@nationalradio.bg 0200-0300 -daily- North America 9400 P500/306, 11700*P500/306 1100-1200 -daily- West Europe 15700*P500/306, 17500 P250/292 1900-2000 -daily- West Europe 9400 P500/306, 11900*P500/306 2100-2200 -daily- West Europe 9400 P500/306, 11900*P500/306 2300-2400 -daily- North America 9400 P500/306, 11700*P500/306 ====================================================================== FRENCH / e-mail: french@nationalradio.bg 0100-0200 -daily- North America 9400 P500/306, 11700*P500/306 0600-0700 -daily- West Europe 12000 P500/295, 13600*P500/306 1700-1800 -daily- West Europe 9400 P500/306, 11800*P500/306 2000-2100 -daily- West Europe 9400 P500/306, 11900*P500/306 ====================================================================== GERMAN / e-mail: german@nationalradio.bg 0500-0545 -daily- West Europe 9400 P500/306, 12000*P500/306 1000-1100 -daily- West Europe 15700*P500/306, 17500 P250/292 1615-1700 -daily- West Europe 9400 P500/306, 11800*P500/306 1800-1845 -daily- West Europe 9400 P500/306, 11800*P500/306 ====================================================================== GREEK / e-mail: greek@nationalradio.bg 0400-0430 Mon-Fri Balkans 7300 P250/248, 1224 0500-0600 Sat/Sin Balkans 7300 P250/248, 1224 1630-1715 -daily- Balkans 7300 P250/248, 1224, 747 1945-2030 -daily- Balkans 5900 P250/248, 1224, 747 ====================================================================== RUSSIAN / e-mail: russian@nationalradio.bg 0300-0400 -daily- East Europe 7500 S100/030, 9500 S100/030 0300-0400 -daily- East Europe 11900 P250/045, 1224 1400-1500 -daily- East Europe 7500 S100/030, 9900 S100/030 1224 1400-1500 -daily- Central Asia 13800 P250/045 1700-1800 -daily- East Europe 7500 S100/030, 9900 S100/030 2300-2400 -daily- Central Asia 12100 P250/045 ====================================================================== SERBIAN / e-mail: serbian@nationalradio.bg 0530-0600 Mon-Fri Balkans 7300 P250/248, 1224 0700-0800 Sat/Sun Balkans 7300 P250/248, 1224 1500-1545 -daily- Balkans 7300 P250/248, 1224 2030-2115 -daily- Balkans 5900 P250/248, 1224, 747 ====================================================================== SPANISH / e-mail: spanish@nationalradio.bg 0100-0200 -daily- South America 9500 P250/245, 11600 P250/258 0100-0200 -daily- Central America 9700 P250/295 1600-1700 -daily- South Europe 15700 P250/260, 17500 P250/258 2100-2200 -daily- South Europe 11800 P250/258, 13800 P250/260 2300-2400 -daily- South America 9500 P250/245, 11600 P250/258 ====================================================================== TURKISH / e-mail: turkish@nationalradio.bg 0430-0500 Mon-Fri Middle East 6000 P250/115, 7400 P250/140 0500-0600 Sat/Sun Middle East 6000 P250/115, 7400 P250/140 1715-1800 -daily- Middle East 7400 P250/140, 1224, 747 ====================================================================== (*) effective July 1, 2002 DX-MIX program in Russian will be on air: 1445-1500 Saturday on 13800, 9900, 7500, 1224 1745-1800 Saturday on 9900, 7500 2345-2400 Saturday on 12100 0345-0400 Sunday on 11900, 9500, 7500, 1224 Radio Varna with program "Hello Sea"/"Zdravey more" in Bulgarian will be on air 2100-2400 Sun and 0000-0300 Mon on 9800 Varna 100 kW / non- dir. 73 from (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 26 via DXLD) ** CAMEROON. Some days in January/February I heard football reports on 5010 kHz. Cameroon team participated in all of them. It was Africa Cup, hosted by Mali. Last broadcast I heard was on 10 February, final game: Cameroon vs. Senegal. Judging from this, I can conclude that broadcasts came from Cameroon, rather than Madagaskar (Vladimir Rozhkov, Kansk, Russia, via Kvadrat, via Signal March 27 via DXLD) Indeed, Africans regularly transmit reports from large football events. Let's check stations from that continent during the World Cup 2002, maybe we will hear come reactivated frequencies then. I recall that in 1996, the fantastic final Nigeria-Brazil was broadcast live by Nigerian transmitter on 4990 kHz, which was silent long before (Vladimir Kovalenko, Tomsk, Russia, Signal via DXLD) ** CANADA. Further to the discussion earlier, here's what happened on the afternoon show, the tail end of which I caught coming out of school. It was called (wait for it...) The Afternoon Edition, hosted by Kenny King. The news was read by Patricia Pleszczynska, whose voice I recognized from the weather forecasts this past weekend (Ricky Leong, March 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Kenny King is Senior Sales Manager (Québec and Ottawa) for English TV, with offices both in Montréal and Ottawa. The idea of playing music he (presumably) liked reminded me of what I've done occasionally on CKUT, when I've been called in on short notice to host the morning show. Pleszczynska, as I mentioned in the last message, is head of English Radio in Québec. One person here told me that he heard Jean Larin reading news on French radio yesterday morning, and that he and another of the RCI bosses were on air on the weekend. 73- (Bill Westenhaver, QU, DX LISTENING DIGEST) "UNION SUPPORT STRONG AT CBC" http://www.canada.com/montreal/montrealgazette/story.asp?id=897A75FB-7044-41AC-8A98-03F622B96697 More on the strike here. It will be interesting to see what the Labour Relations Board has to say. 73- (Bill Westenhaver, March 27, DXLD) You might be interested in this special issue on the SCRC strike. Particularly, you should check out the link for the "Blog-Out," the weblog on the strike by one of the striking journalists. 73- (Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) TSF NUMERIQUE N 1162 [1] CONFLIT DE TRAVAIL À RADIO-CANADA, ET «BLOGUE-OUT», PORTRAITS D'UN CONFLIT DE TRAVAIL Un conflit de travail opposant les 1 200 membres du Syndicat des Communications de Radio-Canada (SCRC - journalistes, recherchistes, assistants de réalisation et de production, animateurs et lecteurs de nouvelles) à leur employeur perturbe sérieusement la programmation de la chaîne d'État, tant à la radio qu'à la télévision. Situation confuse : les syndiqués avaient déclenché une grève de 24 heures, mais se sont vus refuser l'entrée des locaux de la société d'État au terme de leur arrêt de travail; le SCRC a porté plainte devant le Conseil canadien des relations industrielles (CCRI); la direction affirme qu'il ne s'agit pas d'un lock-out, mais bien d'une grève générale illimitée. Assemblée générale du syndicat, ce mardi 26 mars, et audience devant le CCRI. La chroniqueure médias du quotidien La Presse brosse un triste portrait de l'information qui «reste à voir» à la télé : «Il n'y a plus de téléjournaux avec présentateurs et météo et analyses à Radio- Canada depuis vendredi. Mais après avoir annoncé un congé de nouvelles pour le week-end à la Première Chaîne, Radio-Canada s'est ravisée et a diffusé simultanément sur ses deux chaînes un bulletin où des voix généralement inconnues - sauf celle du patron des nouvelles Jean Pelletier - nous racontent l'actualité. Le style n'y est pas, mais la plupart des nouvelles y sont.» Pour ce qui est des informations à la radio... Répercussions sur le Web : le SCRC nous propose une revue de presse quotidienne sur le conflit tel que traité par les médias, et publie également son journal syndical, «Le Petit canard», qui d'éditions spéciales «négo» est passé aux éditions spéciales «grève» puis aux éditions «lock-out». Mais la perspective originale est celle de «Blogue-Out : portraits d'un conflit», un blogue mis en ligne par Jean-Hugues Roy, l'ex- animateur de l'émission sur les nouvelles technologies «Branché» qui a joint les rangs de la salle des nouvelles depuis le retrait de l'émission de la grille horaire. L'avis est de mise : «Ce blogue est une initiative personnelle de Jean-Hugues Roy et ne représente ni l'avis de Radio-Canada, ni l'avis du Syndicat des communications de R.-C.» Et pourquoi un blogue sur le conflit? On sait que la précarité des emplois des contractuels, surnuméraires, temporaires et autres est un des points en litige. Roy explique : «J'ai eu une idée la nuit dernière, celle qui porte conseil. Chaque jour que le lock-out se poursuivra, je ferai le portrait d'un-e collègue qui travaille dans la précarité. Ça mettra un visage sur une abstraction.» Mais le techno-branché et adepte de la photo numérique ne se limite pas aux images et y va également de commentaires bien sentis de l'intérieur, comme celui-ci : «Les cellulaires fournis par RC ne fonctionnent plus depuis vendredi avant-midi. Un moindre mal si on travaille à Montréal. Mais les copains de Sans Frontières qui sont en Israël et dans les Territoires sont soudain incomunicado... En zone de guerre, un cellulaire peut vous sauver la vie.» On aime les blogues de journalistes, on déplore qu'il y en ait si peu en français, mais souhaitons à Blogue-Out une courte vie. On se souvient trop, pour l'avoir vécue, de la grève de huit mois des journalistes, du 30 octobre 1980 au 30 juin 1981. Syndicat des Communications de Radio-Canada http://www.scrc.qc.ca/ Cyberpresse : Radio-Canada en conflit : ce qu'il reste à voir http://www.cyberpresse.ca/reseau/chroniqueurs/lcousineau/lcou_102030080862.html SCRC : Le Petit Canard http://www.scrc.qc.ca/sections.php?submit=sections§ion=5 Blogue-Out : portraits d'un conflit http://radcan.blogspot.com/ Radio-Canada : Sans frontières http://radio-canada.ca/actualite/sansfrontieres/ UNION DES ECOUTEURS FRANCAIS Radiodiffusions, utilitaires, radio-écouteurs, radioamateurs, techniques... Courriel: uef@nerim.fr uef@u-e-f.net Web: http://www.u-e-f.net La radio des radios : http://www.radio-uef.org U.E.F.: B.P.31, 92242 MALAKOFF Cedex, FRANCE. (via Bill Westenhaver, QU, March 27, DXLD) ** CANADA. CBC PLANS TO CHOP THIS MORNING http://www.nationalpost.com/home/story.html?f=/stories/20020326/452419.html A disappointing story, especially the disappearance of "The House!" 73- (Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) March 26, 2002 Also facing axe: The House: 'They told us CBC Radio doesn't create enough buzz' --- by Chris Cobb, Ottawa Citizen The CBC is set to scrap high-profile programs This Morning and The House as part of an overhaul of its national Radio One service. This Morning, a radio institution that reaches 1.43 million listeners daily, began in the early 1970s as Peter Gzowski's This Country in the Morning and is currently hosted by Shelagh Rogers. The House, a weekly Parliamentary digest now in its 25th year, is a favourite with hundreds of thousands of political junkies across the country, 600,000 of whom tune in each week. Both shows are among the highest-rated programs on CBC Radio. Axing The House is sure to cause a stir among federal politicians. Jim Abbott, the British Columbia MP who is Canadian Alliance heritage critic, argued that The House offers an important service to Canadians. "It's an hour-long program that no private broadcaster could afford to do," he said yesterday. "It makes politicians more accountable and exposes to Canadians more of the detail of what's going on in Ottawa. And it has great listenership. So why are they playing with it? "It's exactly the sort of programming the publicly funded broadcaster should be doing." Anthony Germain, who recently replaced veteran broadcaster Jason Moscovitz as host of The House, confirmed the show is coming to an end, but refused to discuss the decision. "I'm just very disappointed that a show with such a loyal audience is being taken off the air," he said. The Radio One makeover, scheduled for September, is the first major overhaul of CBC radio in 30 years. It will affect local and national programming in the weekday-morning prime-time hours from 6 a.m. to noon, and it will mean major changes throughout the day on Saturday. Network management figures the makeover is necessary if the CBC is to better reflect Canada, attract younger listeners and widen its appeal among minority groups. Alex Frame, CBC vice-president of radio, yesterday refused to discuss specific programs until the changes are announced in late April. "This country has gone through significant changes," he said. "If you look at Vancouver, it would be hard to call it a northern European city now -- or Toronto, the same thing. "When you listen to CBC Radio in Vancouver or Toronto, does it sound like the city in which you are living? Ottawa is a very different city than it was 15 years ago. Are we reflecting those changes?" Whatever happens to The House, added Mr. Frame, CBC Radio will not reduce its political coverage. And he denied CBC Radio will deliberately target a younger audience, but said if the make-over is successful, the number of listeners in the 35 to 49 age group is likely to increase. During the past 10 years, the percentage of CBC Radio's audience older than 50 has increased to 69% from 53%. "We don't intend to pander to any demographic," he said. "We don't have to worry about our share of audience. We have a hell of a share." It also appears the popular science show Quirks & Quarks will shift from its current noontime slot to fill the morning hour left by The House -- 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. -- and Saturday afternoon will be all live programming. Other shows, such as The Sunday Edition and the venerable weekday evening As It Happens, are likely to stay in their current spots. Changes to the Saturday schedule have been partly forced upon CBC management because Arthur Black is retiring from his long-running morning show Basic Black, and Nora Young, host of the afternoon pop culture show Definitely Not the Opera, wants to work on other projects. Replacement shows are being developed but so far, CBC management has given no details to staff. One CBC employee, who asked not to be named, said management wants more "buzz" around its radio service. "They told us CBC Radio doesn't create enough buzz," said the employee. "They want a radio service that has people talking around the water cooler." CBC management believes national political coverage on CBC Radio has become too Ottawa-centred and more stories should emanate from elsewhere in the country. In a little-noticed shift last week, Tony Burman, the CBC-TV news chief, was appointed editor-in-chief for news and current affairs of both TV and radio. This is the first time one person has held both jobs and is a signal that some joining of radio and TV news resources is imminent. Senior CBC executives have taken the unusual step of producing briefing notes for middle managers so they could be consistent in answering employee questions about Mr. Burman's new job. "The announcement is likely to cause a stir internally, particularly among the radio news and current affairs staff," the briefing document says. The document gives managers a series of questions that staff might possibly ask, along with the answers to each question. (National Post March 26 via Bill Westenhaver, Ivan Grishin, DXLD) ** CANADA. Here's a piece about the funeral for Johnny Lombardi in Toronto. http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1017097420579&call_page=TS_GTA&call_pageid=968350130169&call_pagepath=GTA/News 73- (Bill Westenhaver, QB, DXLD) Lombardi 'made people happy' http://www.nationalpost.com/news/national/toronto/story.html?f=/stories/20020326/452654.html Here more on Johnny Lombardi's funeral [CHIN-1540]. 73- (Bill Westenhaver, QC; Sergei Sosedkin, IL, DXLD) ** CANADA. Received the following press release in my e-mail box from Star Ray TV --- the pirate/community (depending on your point of view) TV station that's been broadcasting in the east end of Toronto on UHF Channel 15 for the last number of years. 73 de Bob VE3SRE Star Ray TV, 186 Main Street, Toronto, ON M4E 1W2 Tel: (416) 693-7400 Email: srtv@s... [truncated] Website: http://www.srtv.on.ca March 26, 2002 Press Release For immediate release, Toronto: STAR RAY TV GOES TO PARLIAMENT Jan Pachul, has been fighting the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission for years over a licence to operate a low power community television station in the east end of Toronto. Earlier this month, Pachul, general manager and owner of Star Ray TV was invited to appear before Parliament's Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage. The Committee is studying the state of the Canadian broadcasting system, as a pioneer of community television Pachul was pleased to have the opportunity to speak publicly about his frustrations with the CRTC - to the people who can recommend the changes needed to grant his community, and others like it, the right to broadcast the kind of local programming that is not available from any other source. Pachul called for the disbanding of CRTC, referring to it as a "corrupt, wasteful, useless bureaucratic" organization. He makes the argument that a broadcasting system where five corporations own a majority of broadcasting properties nationwide is the result of the CRTC's biased policies in favour of a handful of industry élites. The CRTC denied Pachul's licence application for a new, innovative, community television station when five major broadcast organizations objected, even though the public was in total support of the station. Pachul maintains that the majority of commissioners fabricated reasons to turn down his application. "Yes, they came up with reasons right out of thin air that had absolutely no validity, " he says. Pachul believes that freedom of speech should include equal access to broadcasting frequencies for everyone, not just for a few wealthy corporate insiders. Pachul takes issue with the majority of CRTC commissioners being lawyers or consultants and questions their qualifications to judge what stations and programming Canadians can watch. He says, "A couch potato that watches 40 hours of TV a week would be more qualified and preferable as a CRTC commissioner than a lawyer." He proposes a broadcasting system that is competitive and responsive to new players in broadcasting. "Why is the CRTC dictating programming formats and protecting existing formats from any competition?" he asks. "The tasks needed to regulate broadcasting such as spectrum management and competition law are already done by Industry Canada. So what is the CRTC accomplishing?" It would appear that their agenda is to maintain the same kind of bureaucratic control that has made sure that only a select few players will continue to rule the airwaves, which do after all belong to all of us. The Heritage Committee meeting will be broadcast on CPAC this Thursday, March 28th at 8:00 a.m. Please tune in to watch these vital developments. Jan Pachul's complete speech can be found at http://www.srtv.on.ca/speech.html For more information, please contact Jan Pachul directly at 416.693.7400, srtv@s... [truncated], or visit the Star Ray WWW site at http://www.srtv.on.ca (via Bob Chandler, ODXA via DXLD) ** CHINA. 6115 \\ MW 666, Voice of Strait, Friday and Sunday in English 0900-1000 (Roland Schulze, Philippines, BC-DX Mar 22 via DXLD) ?? What kind of program in English? (gh, DXLD) ** CONGO DR. Okapi? Seems to have some problems already: not on air last night nor this morning (Vashek Korinek, RSA, DXplorer Mar 21 via BC-DX via DXLD) Any reports from Okapi 9550 since Sunday? Here in Salzburg I can only listen to Cuba and the CRI transmitter in Kunming after 2200 UT, but nothing from our African giraffe. The frequency is free here in CEu after 2000 UT (Christoph Ratzer, Austria, OE2CRM, DXplorer Mar 20 via BC-DX via DXLD) 9550 R Okapi, at 0241 opera, English ID "Radio Okapi broadcasting from Kinshasa. Time now for..." sound effects, more English, address given for Hirondelle Foundation, says broadcasts on SW on 9550 and mentions "2 hours UTC", 0257 instrumental IS. This seems to be on a weekend schedule. Poor, QRM/Cuba in Spanish (Peter Monterey [sic], CA, DXplorer Mar 24 via BC-DX via DXLD) ** CUBA. I now do 99%+ of my international listening on the NET or local FM, but stories like this are reasons International Broadcasters should think multiple times about dropping shortwave (Larry Nebron, CA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ============================================================ From Wired News, available online at: http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,51270,00.html CUBA BANS PC SALES TO PUBLIC By Julia Scheeres, 2:00 a.m. March 25, 2002 PST The Cuban government has quietly banned the sale of computers and computer accessories to the public, except in cases where the items are "indispensable" and the purchase is authorized by the Ministry of Internal Commerce. News of the ban was first reported by CubaNet, an anti-Castro site based in Miami. According to the organization's correspondent in Havana, the merchandise -- which had been sold freely in the capital since mid-2001-- was yanked off store shelves in January. See also: - [links presumably in WIRED original] Cuba Not So Libre With the Net - Faint Voices Rise From Cuba - Fidel Won't Like This Website - Cuba Hears Call for Wireless - Everybody's got issues in Politics The computer departments of the retail stores were divided into two zones: a well-stocked area for government buyers, and a smaller area where the public could buy diskettes, CDs and other such items. A store employee told the correspondent she was forbidden from discussing the move, which was also referred to briefly in a newsletter published by the U.S.-Cuba Trade and Economic Council. Early attempts to confirm the information independently were unsuccessful. Dozens of messages to Cuban retailers and government officials in Cuba went unanswered. Cuba's spokesman in Wáshington, Luís Fernández, was consistently evasive. "If we didn't have an embargo, there could be computers for everybody," Fernández replied when asked this question: Are computer sales to the public banned in Cuba? Several weeks later, a government employee in Cuba sent Wired News, through a Web-based e-mail account, a copy of a resolution mandating the ban. In an interview using an instant-messaging service, the source -- who asked to remain anonymous -- criticized the decree and said it had generated a great deal of controversy within government circles after it was unilaterally mandated by the Minister of Internal Commerce, Bárbara Castillo. According to Article 19, Chapter II, Section 3 of the ministry's Resolution No. 383/2001: "The sale of computers, offset printer equipment, mimeographs, photocopiers, and any other mass printing medium, as well as their parts, pieces and accessories, is prohibited to associations, foundations, civic and nonprofit societies, and natural born citizens. In cases where the acquisition of this equipment or parts, pieces and accessories is indispensable, the authorization of the Ministry of Internal Commerce must be solicited." The source's decision to send the information was especially daring in light of a gag law that mandates a 3- to 10-year prison term for anyone who collaborates with "enemy news media." Because government officials refused to comment on the ban, the reason for the move is a matter of speculation. The rise of independent journalists in Cuba, who published articles on the Internet criticizing the Castro regime, may have something to do with it. The correspondents, who risk jail time for their "subversive" reports, send their stories by fax, e-mail or phone dictation to supporters in Miami. "We believe our website had something to do with it," said Manrique Iriarte Sr., who helps run the website for the Cuban Institute of Independent Economists, which launched a few weeks before the ban was passed in late December. The economists' site offers a sharp contrast to the rosy Marxist dream proffered by Castro, including news of opposition arrests and detailed reports on the decrepit state of the island economy. The site is blocked in Cuba. Iriarte said he visited several Havana stores in January where employees told him computer equipment was only available for "accredited state entities." The move didn't surprise Cuba-watchers in the United States. "This just reflects a further restriction on communications with the outside world," said Eugene Pons, of the Institute for Cuban and Cuban American Studies at the University of Miami. The government already requires Cubans who can afford Internet accounts -- which cost $260 a month, while the average Cuban salary is $240 a year -- to register with National Center for Automated Data Exchange (CENAI), Pons said. For those who do manage to log on, the Internet experience is limited: The government-controlled ISPs block links to certain foreign media, anti-Castro sites and pornography. The government has also admitted to monitoring e-mail. To circumvent such spying, residents use Web-based e-mail accounts and chat services to make their communication harder to trace. Indeed, the Cuban source used a Web-based account to reply to a message sent to the person's government account. "If I disappear from cyberspace one day, it's because they found out I was talking to you," the source said. Related Wired Links: Cuba Zine: Viva La Revolución July 26, 2001 Our RAM in Havana June 7, 2001 Silicon Island: A Cuban Fantasy? June 6, 2001 Cuba Picks Euro Cell Standard May 2, 2001 Feds Say Fidel Is Hacker Threat Feb. 9, 2001 Copyright (C) 1994-2002 Wired Digital Inc. All rights reserved. (via Larry Nebron, DXLD) ** CUBA. Re Castro`s Rebellious Daughter... This ran in local paper with photo, and the mic logo said WQBA 1140. Isn't this the daughter who began life in the back seat of Fidel's car? (if you consider began life to be 9 months before birth) (Bob Foxworth, FL, NRC-AM via DXLD) Sure, she`s admittedly his, er, love child (gh, DXLD) ** EGYPT. Cairo remains terrible in English to North America at 2300 on 9900, with R. Nederland Spanish QRM from 9895. Hit or miss for #2 tx at 0200 on 9475. Usually 9480 Moscow QRM to LAm in Spanish (Bob Thomas, CT, March 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** FALKLAND ISLANDS. Saw the item in DXLD 2-048 about the British Ham who received transmissions about the invasion. I dug up an old magazine format publication I had titled "The Falklands Story" by John Beattie of the Daily Star, copyright 1982, Express newspapers Ltd. "And for two weeks after the invasion, the islanders' only link with Britain was through the efforts of a brave radio ham, known then only as "Bob", who managed to transmit valuable information and intelligence about the invaders. Later he was identified as 28-year- old Bob MacLeod - one of the 112 islanders held under armed guard for 38 days in Goose Green recreation hall before being freed by British forces." So some of the story was known in 1982 (Larry Russell, MI, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** FINLAND. SWL Winterfest on Radio Finland There will likely be a report from SWL Winterfest on Radio Finland's "Capital Weekend" show this coming weekend (Sat. and Sunday March 30- 31st). Capital Weekend airs on Saturdays at 1 pm Finnish time (1100 UT) on Capital FM (97.5 in Helsinki), as well as on 13755 and 17820 kHz SW. The broadcast can be heard again on Sundays at 7.30 am (530 am UT) on Capital FM, some FM stations elsewhere in Finland, as well as on Radio Finland's satellites. The broadcast is also rerun on Sundays at 11 pm (2100 UT) on Capital FM, as well as on 9720 and 11985 kHz SW. 73 (Mika Makelainen, http://www.makelainen.com/dx hard-core-dx via John Figliozzi, swprograms via DXLD) But, but, the different A-02 schedule begins in the middle of this; see previous info here (gh, DXLD) ** GERMANY [non]. A printed Summer Schedule from Transmission Management, DW, headed Alaska/Canada makes some interesting selections in times, sites and frequencies, supposedly for this region, including English via Kigali: 0900-0945 21560, 1100-1145 21665, 1900-1945 11805, 2100-2145 9875, 15135 (via Richard Lemke, St. Albert, Alberta, CANADA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY/USA [non]. Voice of Hope via Biblis Actually this Voice of Hope / High Adventure Ministries transmission via Biblis is already in progress; on the Feb 22 visit Wolfgang learned that Biblis just started to air something for Deutsche Telekom (something = HAM programming) 1700-1900 on 9815 and that the IBB headquarters is in negotiations with DTAG about a future cooperation. I must add that the 80 degree azimuth is part of the original arrangement for Jülich itself, the respective line in the original Excel file reads as follows: 9495 1700 1900 29,30 110 80 217 1234567 310302 271002 VOH 100 KW aus Biblis This means that if Jülich would handle this slot then they would use antenna #110 with a beam heading of 80 degrees. The current Biblis operation has slightly different azimuths with a break/switch at 1800: 9815 1700-1800 VOA DTK1 VAR BIB 02 088 9815 1800-1900 VOA DTK1 VAR BIB 07 063 Indeed the Jülich transmitters are quite busy during these hours, so some transmissions were already "outsourced" to Wertachtal and Nauen, and now also the IBB started to do some work for DTAG with its otherwise underused facilities in Germany. But hey, why not let DTAG broker idle capacity (if there is any) on IBB facilities outside Germany, too? (Kai Ludwig, Germany, March 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY [and non]. CRU Corrected on Deutsche Telekom. Re: ``Actually, - Deutsche Welle does not own transmitters itself`` [in Germany!, but Deutsche Welle is shareholder together with Merlin on Antigua; at Sines, Portugal, Kigali, Rwanda, and Trincomalee, Sri Lanka --- wb] The German external service has always relied on transmission facilities of the Deutsche Bundespost or, today, Deutsche Telekom. - There are several transmitter sites in Germany used for international short wave broadcasting. Since the unification of Germany Deutsche Welle transmissions have also been broadcast from facilities on East German soil. Today they use 500 kW-transmitters in Southern and Eastern Germany. - Because of this, the 100-kW-transmitters at the Juelich site have become redundant and Deutsche Telekom in the mid-90s started selling airtime to keep the station alive. According to Telekom staff actually in the business of selling the airtime say, selling the time just helps saving the jobs at the station. - The Juelich station has about ten 100-kW-transmitters. The number of 28 may relate to antennas. Finally, - Sentech which operates the short wave transmitter site at Meyerton, South Africa, is also selling airtime. So, I would suppose, that they are also in the race (Dr. Hansjoerg Biener, World Conference on Religion and Peace, Mar 4, via BC-DX via DXLD) ** HAWAII. Re: ``Snowstorm knocks AM station off-air in Hawaii! Wow! What a headline. And, it's true. KNUI Kahului 900 has its transmitter atop Mt. Haleakala and a freak wind and snowstorm on January 19 blew the station off-air. It's since returned, using about 1.66 kW instead of the normal 5 kW but should power up again real soon. (Melvin Ah Ching`s Hawaiian Radio and TV Guide via March NZ DX Times via DXLD)`` Glenn - I don't think KNUI is on Mt. Haleakala. Mt. Haleakala is 10,000 feet above sea level. I visited Maui last fall and stayed about a mile from what I believe is KNUI's transmitter site (with KAOI-1110 diplexing off it). I have taken helicopter tours of Mt. Haleakala twice and there's nothing resembling an AM tower up there. 73, (Dennis Gibson, CA, March 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Of course, that makes sense and the story doesn`t. How about an FM transmitter up there? BTW... (gh, DXLD) 900 HAWAII KNUI Kahului, Mar 23 1405 - Excellent signal of SE Asian folk-pop tunes, and male announcer in Tagalog or minority lang. S- 9+20db level on Western Beverage (Guy ATKINS, Grayland Dxpedition, WA, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** HUNGARY. Glenn: In DXLD 2046 I caught a news item in Spanish about re-inauguration of Spanish, Italian and French broadcasts from R. Budapest (starting from March 31 '02). There was only Spanish schedule given. Here's the schedule for French and Italian that was announced in today's English broadcast. The new broadcasts were described as "news bulletins." French 0430-0445 6025, 7165 2015-2030 6025, 7235 Italian 2030-2045 6025, 11755 2130-2145 6025, 11885 According to Alexandr Yegorov's news item in Russian DX_Bistro, R. Budapest is planning to cut its daily Ukrainian broadcasts from 30 to 15 min. in order to fund new language services. It is possible that other broadcasts will be shortened as well. Surprisingly, the official site of R. Budapest promotes the "new" summer schedule valid from March 25, 2001 (Sergei Sosedkin, IL, March 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) More on R. Budapest: The Hungarian international broadcaster will be restructured and become part of the first national program (Kossuth Radio). The Hungarian language service will mainly take over rebroadcasts from the national channel. While broadcasts in German, English and Russian remain unchanged, the foreign language services will be reduced from 30 to 15 minutes. On the other hand Radio Budapest will start broadcasts in French, Spanish and Italian. These 15 minutes programs consist of news and music. Csaba Banky (Radio Budapest, German service via Vasily Gulyaev in DX-Bistro via Sergei Sosedkin, March 27, DXLD) ** INDONESIA. 909, RRI Sorong, Mar 24 1315 - Nostalgia music selections ('Greensleeves' etc.); male and female announcers in Indonesian; signal in and out of noise. Lagu romantik music 1339; mentions of 'dari Jakarta' 1344. More lagu romantik 1350; phone interview 1355; music over TOH to announcer talk 1403. Woman announcer with mention of Jakarta and Sorong 1405. This catch was the highlight of the DXpedition for most participants; Indonesia is a very rare logging on MW from the Pacific NW (Guy ATKINS, Grayland Dxpedition, WA, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. USA: VOLKSWAGEN SIGNS AGREEMENT WITH XM AND SIRIUS SATELLITE RADIO | Excerpt from press release from XM Satellite Radio on 25 March Washington DC, 25 March: Volkswagen of America, Inc., which also encompasses Audi of America, today announced it has signed distribution agreements with Sirius Satellite Radio and XM Satellite Radio, to offer Volkswagen and Audi customers in the United States a choice of satellite radio services in the coming years. XM and Sirius are each broadcasting a satellite radio service, offering 100 channels of digital audio entertainment coast to coast for a low monthly fee. Specific vehicle installation plans and timing will be announced separately by Volkswagen and Audi in the future. "We are thrilled to add Volkswagen and Audi to the list of automakers that have embraced satellite radio," said Joseph P. Clayton, President and CEO of Sirius and Hugh Panero, President and CEO of XM, in a joint statement. [puff alert] XM is transforming radio, an industry that has seen little technological change since FM, almost 40 years ago. XM's programming lineup features 100 coast-to-coast digital channels: 71 music channels, more than 30 of them commercial-free, from hip hop to opera, classical to country, bluegrass to blues; and 29 channels of sports, talk, children's and entertainment. XM also brings to the car, for the first time on radio, the same diverse selection of 24-hour news sources available in the home on cable and DirecTV. General Motors in November rolled out factory-installed Delphi-Delco XM radios in Cadillac DeVille and Seville models, and will expand to a total of 23 Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Olds and Pontiac models this year. Isuzu dealers will begin to offer XM radios to customers in April. XM radios are available at major electronics retailers nationwide including Best Buy, Circuit City, Tweeter, Ultimate Electronics, participating RadioShack Dealers and Franchisees, Crutchfield, Good Guys, CarToys, Audio Express and Sound Advice; and at independent retailers. Leading manufacturers such as Sony, Alpine and Pioneer offer a broad array of XM radios that easily enable any existing car stereo system. XM's strategic investors include America's leading car, radio and satellite TV companies - General Motors, American Honda Motor Co. Inc., Clear Channel Communications and DirecTV. For more information, please visit XM's web site: http://www.xmradio.com Media Contacts: Tony Fouladpour Volkswagen of America, Inc. 248-754- 5064 tony.fouladpour@vw.com Mindy Kramer Sirius Satellite Radio 212- 584-5138 mkramer@siriusradio.com Charles Robbins XM Satellite Radio 202-380-4316 charles.robbins@xmradio.com Jennifer Cortez Audi of America, Inc. 248- 754-4729 jennifer.cortez@audi.com Source: XM Satellite Radio press release, Washington, in English 25 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** IRAN. While many international broadcasters are depending more on rebroadcasting to reach their audiences, Iran is increasing its use of brute force radio transmitters to send signals across national boundaries. The Voice of the Islamic Republic of Iran reports that IRIB - Iran's Voice and Vision broadcasting organization, in cooperation with an Iranian university, has built a one-megawatt radio broadcast transmitter. The report does not say what frequency this will use, or even if it's medium wave or SW. It does say that this is only the world's sixth one million watt radio broadcast transmitter (Baber Shehzad, NL of Pakistani Dxers, via WWDXC BC-DX Mar 19 via DXLD) ** IRAQ/KURDISTAN [non]. Voice of Iraqi People can be received after 1800 on 3900 in Arabic. ID: Huna sawt ash shaab al Iraqi. This station is different from mentioned in Kvadrat one known as Republic of Iraq Radio, Voice of Iraqi People and using 1053, 4785 and 9563. Another station signing off after 1700 is Radio Station Freedom, Voice of the Communist Party of Iraqi Kurdistan. ID in Kurdish is: Era Ezgay Azadiya, Dengi hizbi Shuyul Kurdistani Iraqa. Voice of the Iraqi Communist Workers Party, 01.55 on 4000 in Arabic. ID: Sawt al hizb al Shuyul al Ummali al Iraqi. (Vladimir Rozhkov, Kansk, Russia, via Kvadrat) Kvadrat editor's comment: according to ClandestineRadio.com, Voice of the Iraqi Communist Workers Party have been inactive since August 1999 (Vladimir Kovalenko, Tomsk, Russia, Signal March 27 via DXLD) ** ISRAEL. On today's Jerusalem Post front page (print edition) it does confirm that Israel changes the clock forward one hour at 1 AM this Friday morning (Thurs night/Fri morning). (Doni Rosenzweig, Israel, March 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ISRAEL. Glenn, Moshe [Oren, Bezeq] phoned me last night and advised me that KI will continue with their broadcasts until ONE JULY. At that time they will have to find additional finances to continue with their broadcasts. He gave me a schedule to monitor for the WCNA which included English, Hebrew and Persian. Hang in there (George Poppin, San Francisco, March 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ISRAEL. Kol Israel update: at least 3 more months. Today's Jerusalem Post mentions that the shortwave broadcasts will continue for at least the next three months. http://www.jpost.com/Editions/2002/03/26/News/News.45871.html SHORTWAVE BROADCASTS STAY - FOR NOW --- By Gil Hoffman JERUSALEM (March 26) - After receiving countless letters from angry Diaspora Jews, the Israel Broadcasting Authority decided yesterday not to eliminate its shortwave broadcasts. The broadcasts are heard in 11 languages by hundreds of thousands of people throughout the world. The IBA decided to maintain the broadcasts for at least the next three months, while it seeks funding from the Jewish Agency, the Immigrant Absorption Ministry, and organizations dealing with the Diaspora. Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and Tzipi Livni, the minister in charge of public relations in the Prime Minister's Office, pushed to save the broadcasts at Sunday's cabinet meeting. Livni expressed outrage that at a time when the country needs to deepen its connection with the Diaspora and improve its public relations, such an important tool is being eliminated to save a little money. Minister-without-Portfolio Ra'anan Cohen, in charge of enforcing the IBA's mandate to broadcast internationally, said he was compelled to reverse the decision by the tremendous outcry from readers of The Jerusalem Post throughout the world. "These broadcasts represent the only living connection between the State of Israel and the Jewish Diaspora," Cohen said. "The Diaspora is one of the most important targets of the IBA, and reaching such an audience justifies its very existence." The IBA board had decided to replace the shortwave broadcasts with transmission via the Internet and satellite, starting April 1. A large percentage of those protesting the decision were listeners in countries without widespread access to advanced technologies, like Romania, Georgia, and Russia. The IBA broadcasts daily in English, Russian, French, Yiddish, Ladino, Spanish, Romanian, Hungarian, Georgian, Bukharian, and Mugrabi (via Daniel Rosenzweig, Israel, March 26, and via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** ISRAEL. Two pieces from the Israeli newspaper Ha'aretz concerning a flap over programme content on Reshet Bet, particularly cancellation of some talk programming. ** ISRAEL. OPPOSITION MOUNTS TO PLANNED CHANGES AT RESHET BET Cancellation of current events discussions marks the `death of democracy,' charge critics. By Uri Ayalon Israel Radio's Reshet Bet broadcasts were stopped again yesterday during the scheduled time slot of "Behetzi Hayom" (from noon to 2 P.M.) in protest over the firing of the program's regular editor, Nili Amir. This time, the 1 P.M. news was also not broadcast. It was the first time workers had refused to broadcast a news program since the large-scale strike action at the Israel Broadcasting Authority in 1987. During the two-hour work stoppage yesterday, workers met to discuss the dismissal of Amir, the reduction in overtime pay, and the intentions of Amnon Nadav, the director of the radio, to change the broadcast format on Reshet Bet, canceling all of the "personal" current event programs, such as "Inyan Aher" and "Hakol Diburim," which make up the main part of Reshet Bet's programming schedule and are presented by a regular host. This last decision, approved on Sunday by the radio council of the IBA plenum, has aroused considerable opposition both within and outside the IBA. Nahman Shai, the IBA chairman, asked the authority's acting director-general, Yosef Barel, not to take any steps to implement the decision before it is discussed by the IBA plenum. Those opposed to canceling the "personal" programs are arguing that the Prime Minister's Bureau is behind these plans in an attempt to quash critical discussion of the events of the day and replace them with news broadcasts that leave no room for a range of opinions.... http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=145526&contrassID=2&subContrassID=5&sbSubContrassID=0&listSrc=Y&itemNo=145526 And an editorial: http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=145529&contrassID=2&subContrassID=3&sbSubContrassID=0&listSrc=Y&itemNo=145529 (via Bill Westenhaver, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ISRAEL. HJC REJECTS LEGALIZATION OF ARUTZ 7 RADIO STATION Glenn, Another view of the story from: http://new.globes.co.il Shmuel Dekalo, 26.03.2002 17:13 The High Court of Justice (HJC) today rejected the Telecommunications Law amendment making the Arutz 7 radio station legal. The HJC ruled that the amendment violated freedom of occupation and was therefore null and void. The ruling was written by Judge Theodor Or, with the concurrence of judges Aharon Barak, Shlomo Levin, Mishael Cheshin, Tova Strasberg-Cohen, Dalia Dorner, Dorit Beinish, Itzhak Englard and Eliezer Rivlin. The HJC was petitioned by MK Haim Oron (Meretz), MK Eitan Cable (Labor), MK Avraham Poraz (Shinui) and regional radio stations. In February 1997, the Knesset approved an amendment to the Telecommunications Law that legalized Arutz 7. The relevant clause said that whoever set up or operated a public radio station in Israel for five consecutive years before January 1999 and continued operating it after the said date would be considered as having been granted a license under the Telecommunications Law. Or ruled that the amendment effectively granted a license for operating a radio station without a tender. All the petitions filed with the court challenged the legality of such a consequence. At the beginning of his analysis of the implications of the amendment, Or said it violated the freedom of occupation and did not come within the exemptions allowed for by the basic law. Needless to say, Or says, that granting a license and a concession to radio stations operating without a license is improper. It offers a prize to offenders, thereby gravely undermining the rule of law, in addition to undermining the freedom of occupation of potential competitors, without advancing any social objective. Published by Israel's Business Arena on 26 March, 2002 (via Mike Terry, UK, DXLD) HIGH COURT NULLIFIES PIRATE RADIO LAW PASSED BY KNESSET By Dan Izenberg The High Court of Justice today nullified a law passed by the Knesset retroactively legitimizing pirate radio stations that had been operating for five consecutive years. Click here to read more: http://www.jpost.com/Editions/2002/03/26/LatestNews/LatestNews.45891.html (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) Here`s a fuller story about this: HIGH COURT OVERTURNS KNESSET LAW LEGITIMIZING ARUTZ 7, PIRATE STATIONS By Dan Izenberg JERUSALEM (March 27) - The High Court of Justice yesterday nullified a law retroactively legitimizing pirate radio stations, including Arutz 7, that had been operating for five consecutive years. Click here to read more: http://www.jpost.com/Editions/2002/03/27/News/News.45960.html (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) Ha'aretz story re the court decision against the legalization of pirate radio stations: COURT RULES ARUTZ 7 BROADCASTING IS ILLEGAL By Moshe Reinfeld A nine-justice panel of the High Court of Justice yesterday ruled unanimously that the amendment to the Bezeq Law that enabled Arutz 7, the right-wing pirate radio station, to broadcast, is illegal since it violates the Basic Law on Freedom of Occupation. The decision prompted cries of outrage by right-wing MKs, and the National Religious Party called for a special Knesset session during Pesach recess to pass a law to circumvent yesterday's decision.... http://www.haaretzdaily.com/hasen/pages/ShArt.jhtml?itemNo=146010&contrassID=2&subContrassID=1&sbSubContrassID=0 73- (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** JAPAN. --- Notice from NHK WORLD --- NHK World Radio Japan's frequencies will be were changed at April 1st, 2002. [sic] http://www.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/ [go there only if you want an exercise in tedium and frustration] Welcome to NHK WORLD e-GUIDE Greetings everyone. We are proud to bring to all of our subscribers the first issue of NHK WORLD e-GUIDE, a new program information service provided by NHK WORLD.This inaugural issue focuses on the new programs starting in April. The next issue will be out on March 29. Every Friday from then on, this magazine will tell you all you need to know about the following week's programs. NHK World Radio Japan - In English - ((((((((((((((( Japan Music Treasure Box ))))))))))))))) Wednesday, 12:25 - 12:59 p.m. (JST), etc. [UT +9] This program introduces the alluring world of Japanese sounds. It features popular Japanese children's and other songs, with commentaries on history, customs and traditions. The beautiful moving words and melodies reveal scenery, livelihoods and traditions that shift with the each passing season. ((((((((((((((( Pop Joins the World ))))))))))))))) Saturday, 15:10 - 15:59 (JST), etc. Pop music is very popular in many parts of the world and in many communities of various ethnic groups. It conveys messages on such themes as love, hope, dreams, life, society and peace around the world. Pop Joins the World focuses on popular songs from the global music scenes, with brief profiles of the singers and history, culture and folk tradition, of the regions of origin. This program aims to spread through music people's earnest hope for world peace in the 21st century. ===We welcome your comments on programs and programming== * NHK WORLD TV worldtv@intl.nhk.or.jp * NHK World Radio Japan info@intl.nhk.or.jp ================================================== * The program information and broadcast times presented in NHK WORLD e-GUIDE may be changed without notice. * For inquiries about subscription (free) and delivery of NHK WORLD e-GUIDE: pr02@intl.nhk.or.jp (via Wolfgang Büschel, Jon Standingbear, DXLD) ** JAPAN. Radio Tampa to reduce broadcast times. The Japanese commercial SW broadcaster has announced plans to substantially reduce its Second Network broadcast times. From Apr 1, this network will be on the air ONLY on Saturdays and Sundays local days in Japan - the weekday services will be abolished. New (UT) schedule will be 2300- 0900 3945 and 6115, 2300-0800 9760 (Koji Yamada, Japan, BC-DX Mar 23 via DXLD) ** KENYA. 23-Mar-02 at 1122 UT, 4935 Kenya BC Corp, 14231, Unbelievable catch, tentative, English service, YL and OM with international sports news, poor signal but enough to catch snippets; Nairobi, Kenya, 10/100kW (Bruce Jensen, San Lorenzo CA, Icom R75, Alpha Delta DX-Ultra and 65' random wire phased through MFJ-1026, ShortWaveRadio yahoogroup via DXLD) I agree, it`s unbelievable (gh) ** LIBERIA. 6100, "Voice of Liberia" (so announced), 0630 Mar 19 with. 6100? I listen yesterday around 2230 UT on 5100 to the same Voice of Liberia with international pop music, s-off at 2300 UT (Christoph Ratzer, Austria, DXplorer Mar 24 via BC-DX via DXLD) It's the same station as on 5100. I'm not sure exactly what time they come on 6100; the frequency is blocked by DW until (I think) 0600. Seldom reported, it seems, but the signal is generally decent enough. Frequency is listed in PWBR and shown on their website http://www.afric-network.fr/afric/liberia/liberia.html (which does not, however, show 5100). (Jerry Berg, MA, DXplorer Mar 24 via BC-DX via DXLD) ** LITHUANIA/UKRAINE/RUSSIA. On March 20, the Lithuanian R and TV Commission awarded a new private company - R Baltic Waves International - with a 5-year broadcasting licence for the following AM channels: 630 kHz 200 kW ERP = 24.4 dBkW (~250 kW) ND Viesintos (to be moved to Vilnius region) - for daytime operations. 1386 kHz 1000 kW ERP = 32.1 dBkW (~1600 kW) ND Sitkunai (or new site in Kaunas region) - for nighttime operations. The transmitter operator is the Lithuanian R and TV Transmitting Center. RBWI plans tests on 1386 kHz with 150 kW. The Lithuanian Telecommunications Regulatory Authority has contacted the respective Russian authority to take away the harmful interference on 1386 kHz, which is emitted from the Bolshakovo radio center, Kaliningradskaya oblast (1200 kW, 275 deg). (Radio Baltic Waves International press release, 22.3.2002 via Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, BC-DX via DXLD) Comment by BT: 1386 kHz was assigned to a 1000 kW (with a maximum ERP of 31.2 dbW, ie. 1600kW) transmitter in Kaunas (USSR) in the Geneva MW/LW Plan 1975. When the USSR was dissolved, the ITU re-registered all transmitters to the successor states, according to the geographical coordinates given in the Geneva Plan. Thus, 1386 kHz was registered as "Kaunas, Lithuania", it is now a "Lithuanian frequency". Soviet or later Russian authorities never registered the site "Bolshakovo" or "Kaliningrad", which means that the operation of Bolshakovo or any transmitter in the Kaliningrad oblast on 1386 kHz is seen by the ITU as a violation of international telecommunications agreements. This concerns quite a number of frequencies in the successor states of the former USSR. For example, 1467 kHz which is used by a 150 kW transmitter at the radio centre in Maiac, Moldova (Pridnestrovye) was originally registered for a 300 kW in Kyiv in the Geneva Plan. It was never registered for a Moldovan site by Soviet or Moldovan authorities. Hence, the ITU registered it as a "Ukrainian frequency" after the end of the USSR. As late as in 1999, Ukrainian authorities have re-confirmed this registration for a transmitter in Kyiv at the ITU (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, BC-DX Mar 22 via DXLD) Was soll man denn davon halten, dass den Litauern das jetzt, nach ueber zehn Jahren, auf einmal einfaellt? Gibt es wirklich konkrete Plaene (Stichwort Finanzierung) zum Bau eines Grosssenders oder ist das ein reines Politikum? Zur Legitimitaet der Sendungen aus Bolschakowo: Was ist mit 1215 kHz? Soweit ich das ersehen kann ist die Frequenz im Genfer Wellenplan nicht koordiniert, jedenfalls nicht fuer Leistungen, die auch nur in der Naehe der aktuell gefahrenen 1200 kW liegen (von den frueher eingesetzten 2000 kW ganz abgesehen). Auch deshalb kann ich mir eine freiwillige Raeumung von 1386 kHz nicht recht vorstellen, da man sicher selbst die Kohle von devisenzahlenden Nutzern der Frequenz einfahren moechte, auf die man bei RBW ja abzielen duerfte (Kai Ludwig, Deutschland, BC-DX Mar 25 via DXLD) ** MADAGASCAR. 5010, Radio Madagascar 1848-1901* March 26, English and then French pop song, announcements by man in presumed Malagasy, anthem, interval signal as on Dave Kernick`s site and off. Fair on clear channel (Mike Barraclough, Letchworth, UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) March 26, Madagascar 5010 closed down at 1902. Seems they are back on normal schedule. But no positive id even this time. Sign-off march/anthem and interval signal were the same I reported March 17. No trace of the parallel 90 mb outlet. 73 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) [non?] I listened 1725-1800z to 5010.0 on March 26 and at 1800z the signal became unreadable through possible atmospherics. Although the music was coming through OK, talk was somewhat muffled between. Grey line was over Cameroon at that time and I thought I heard Douala mentioned. Really not sure, will monitor some more. 73 (Piet Pijpers, The Netherlands, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hi Piet. I based my logging this as Madagascar to what I heard March 17. The parallel 3287.5 on 17th gave me some trust this being what I logged. And March 26 the closing ceremonies were almost identical. But, I did listen to this only some 15 minutes, so I can't say what was on this frequency at the time you were listening :-). Let's keep on monitoring. Thanks for the message 73 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, March 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) See also CAMEROON ** MONTENEGRO. INFORMATION SECRETARY FAVOURS RETAINING RADIO YUGOSLAVIA | Text of report in English by Yugoslav state news agency Tanjug Belgrade, 25 March: Radio Yugoslavia is the only shortwave media of great importance for the world public and the diaspora and it should be preserved in the redefined state union of Serbia and Montenegro, said Monday [25 March] Montenegrin Information Secretary Bozidar Jaredic. In a statement for Radio Yugoslavia, Jaredic pointed out that the programmes of that electronic media, in 12 languages, reach every part of the globe, which is important for the affirmation of the positions of Montenegro and the establishment of new relations with Serbia, as well as for the affirmation of the reformist policy of Montenegro and of its potentials. Source: Tanjug news agency, Belgrade, in English 1629 gmt 25 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. I've got the A-02 schedule online at http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/html/scheduleao2.html I will be off tomorrow, but if you (or any of your correspondents) notices anything amiss, please let me know and I'll try to fix it on Friday (Andy Sennitt, 1749 UT March 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NEW ZEALAND. RADIO NEW ZEALAND INTERNATIONAL FEARS CUTS | Text of report by Radio New Zealand International on 25 March The chairman of the board of New Zealand's public broadcaster says it may have to reduce the services of Radio New Zealand International further. The output by RNZI was halved four years ago because the then government, led by Jenny Shipley, cut funding while considering outright closure, and this year the government refused to cover the extra costs incurred to pay sharply higher electricity bills. The head of the RNZ board, Brian Corban, told a parliamentary select committee in Wellington that although the shortwave service is important, at the moment his efforts to reverse the cuts have not been successful. [Corban] At the moment we are down to absolutely skeletal broadcasting. We're having to look at contemplating cutting further. Source: Radio New Zealand International, Wellington, in English 2100 gmt 25 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) Geez, what more can they cut? Very little of its own production left, and one transmitter less than 24 hours a day (gh, DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. 27/03/02 Frequency Schedule from 31 March - 05 May 2002 UTC kHz TARGET 1650-1750 6095 NE Pacific, Fiji, Samoa, Cook Islands 1751-1850 11725 NE Pacific, Fiji, Samoa, Cook Islands 1851-2050 15160 All Pacific [also heard in Europe] 2051-0458 17675 All Pacific [also heard West Coast USA] 0459-0658 15340 All Pacific [also heard in Europe] 0659-1105 11675 All Pacific 1106-1305 11675 NW Pacific, Bougainville, East Timor, Asia 1306-1649 6095 Usual Closedown is 1305 UT - this frequency is for occasional over-night broadcasts to the Pacific for Sports commentaries or Cyclone Warnings Adrian Sainsbury, Technical Manager, Radio New Zealand International P O Box 123, Wellington, Tel: +64 4 474 1430, Fax: +64 4 474 1433 Mobile: +64 (0) 25 504 578 Web: http://www.rnzi.com (27 Mar 2002) (via Wolfgang Büschel, DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. From RNZI web-site Updated: 18 March, 2002 From Saturday March 23rd Radio New Zealand International (RNZI) launches a new line-up of weekend programmes especially for New Zealand's Defence Forces serving overseas. The programmes are funded by the Armed Forces Canteen Council and the New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF). The programmes will be produced and presented by Radio New Zealand broadcaster Katrina Batten. They'll include news and features from home, sports, entertainment and news from the NZDF. The two hour programmes will be broadcast to the Asia/Pacific region on Saturday and Sunday at 1105 UT (23.00 NZST). An hour will be repeated on Saturday at 1905 UT for listeners in Europe and for the Pacific at 0705 NZST Sunday . Forces Radio will be available as down- loadable audio file on the RNZI web site at http://www.rnzi.com The new programmes will compliment existing weekday re-broadcasts of Radio New Zealand's National Radio network which are aimed at service personnel serving in the Asia/Pacific area. Katrina Batten has worked in a number of roles in the radio industry over 15 years. She began her career as a Studio Operator for Radio New Zealand working in Wellington and in commercial radio in New Plymouth. After a stint overseas, including some radio work in London, she returned and qualified as a journalist. This led to reporting work, various roles for RNZI and the production of National Radio's current affairs programme Late Edition. The introduction of digital production equipment at Radio New Zealand led Katrina into the training field and eventually back to her first love ? sound engineering. However, she has continued to present National Radio's overnight programme from time to time and is now looking forward to taking up this new role. She says "the programmes are an opportunity for all NZDF personnel to keep up with what's happening at home. Along with news of what's happening in NZ, we'll also include lots of lighter news, plus some music and fun. All contributions, including messages from home to personnel overseas, are welcome". Katrina can be contacted at kbatten@radionz.co.nz or through RNZI at fax 64 4 474 1433 or phone 64 474 1437 (via Paul Ormandy, Host of The South Pacific DX Report http://radiodx.com DX LISTENING DIGEST) What's the Armed Forces Canteen Council? Sounds like a bunch of mothers of Defence Force personnel have got together in the tuck shop and have decided to fund broadcasts to their loved ones through raffles. <grin> (David Onley, Myrtleford, Victoria, Australia, ARDXC via DXLD). ** NIGERIA. See CAMEROON ** OKLAHOMA. KOSU screws up again. In NPR ATC, Tue Mar 26 at 2149 UT, automation made a one-minute promotional break, ignoring the fact that the Yiddish Radio Project series was running, supposed to override the usual break. There is nothing more off-putting than a station not paying attention to its own output. No doubt all affiliates were warned beforehand about this change in the usual format, but NPR does so at its peril. Apparently KOSU runs the cutaways by timer rather than inaudible cues from the network, which no doubt were suppressed in this instance (Glenn Hauser, Enid, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PAPUA NEW GUINEA. BANDSCAN 3/23/02 1054 UT 2410 R. Enga not heard 3205 R. Sandaun strong with US pops 3/23 3220 R. Morobe faint-tentative 3/23 3235 R. West New Britain strong with PNG pop mx countdown 3245 R. Gulf good; old bluegrass tunes; ID @ 1100 "R. Gulf, Voice of the Seagull" 3260 R. Madang strong; childrens stories in Tok Pisin 3275 R. Southern Highlands strong in Tok Pisin 3290 R. Central not heard 3305 R. Western poor signal, but definitely them in Tok Pisin. Seemed to have transmitter problems with signal cutting in and out. At 1123, rapid increase in signal strength, old US R&B tune. 3315 R. Manus not heard 3325 R. Bougainville probably them, behind RRI Palangkaraya 3325 R. East Sepik not heard 3345 R. Northern not heard 3355 R. Simbu not heard 3365 R. Milne Bay not heard 3375 R. Western Highlands not heard 3385 R. East New Britain not heard 3395 R. Eastern Highlands not heard- ute only 3905 R. New Ireland strong in Tok Pisin 4890 NBC Port Moresby excellent with US pops ------------------------ (Guy Atkins, DXing at Grayland, WA, AOR AR7030 with mods/JPS NIR- 12/ERGO software; 900-1200 ft. SW, W, and NW Beverage antennas with "Cat-a-Lac" terminations, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** PARAGUAY. Amigos! Visité a Radio América el viernes pasado. Lastimosamente no pude ver las nuevas instalaciones en el nuevo QTH ya que estaba un poco alejada del QTH actual. Hablé mucho con el Sr. Mur que es una persona muy cordial y amable quien me explicó mucho sobre los detalles ya conocidas aquí en la lista, sobre la antena y direcciones etc. También demostró tener mucho conocimiento de las demás emisoras paraguayas, especial aquellas que anteriormente han servido en la onda corta. Explicó que el transmisor de onda corta es totalmente transistorizada y opera con bajo voltaje, lo que hace posible inclusive hacerlo funcionar a baterías. También me presentó al Presidente de la institución el Pastor José A Holowaty, o mejor dicho que sin el permiso de éste, no me podía mostrar nada. El Pastor me mostró los 2 estudios, entretanto equipado con dos consolas Gates Harris que anteriormente había estado, según entendí, en la KGEI. El Pastor no era así tan abierto como lo es el Sr. Mur, además no tenia mucho interés en que vea las instalaciones nuevas, casi al contrario. Representa una "línea" evangélica muy conservadora, no reconociendo prácticamente a nadie de las demás denominaciones, ya las considera como iglesias que se han "desviado" del camino. No permite las músicas con ritmos modernos; por tal motivo difunden mucho la música clásica. El Sr. Mur al final me propuso venir otro día para ir a mirar en el nuevo QTH. El nuevo QTH está en Villeta en la misma región donde anteriormente estaba la radio. Ahí ya se ha instalado la nueva antena para la onda media del tipo 5/8 (la actual es de ¼ y por ende bajito, 50m.). También se esta instalando un nuevo transmisor de 1 kW para esta banda. Tanto para la onda media como para la de onda corta se espera hacer emisiones de prueba dentro de más o menos dos semanas. Cuando tenga algo más información, les comunicaré. 73 de (Levi Iversen, Paraguay, March 27, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** PERU. 4750.1, RADIO SAN FRANCISCO SOLANO. Sondor. 0218-0231* Marzo 24. Presentando música vernacular, luego con el cierre de emisión así: ``...Amables oyentes, Radiodifusora San Francisco Solano, la voz de la parroquia San Miguel Sondor y Sondorillo, finaliza sus transmisiones correspondientes al día de hoy. Les agradecemos la gentileza de escucharnos, nos despedimos hasta el día de mañana cuando estaremos reanudando nuestras cotidianas transmisiones. Buenas noches... Paz y Bien....`` 5557.8, RADIO COMERCIAL. Lajas. 2350-0230 Marzo 24. Nuevo nombre, ex Radio Lajas. A pesar que Malm en SWB vía DXLD la reporta operando en 6642.72, escuché esta emisora que sucede en la frecuencia a Radio Lajas, pero continúa siendo del Sr. Alfonso Medina Burga; presentando música tropical y tecnocumbias y con largos bloques de comerciales incluyendo Funeraria Nuevo Jerusalén, Centro Dental Chayotopa, Centro Naturista Las Plantas Curan cuando Dios quiere, en el programa Atardecer Tropical. ``...a través de la gigante y entretenida programación de Radio Comercial Lajas...`` Entre los locutores estuvo Julio Apolinar Díaz quien aparece reseñado el un reporte de Henrik Klemetz en Dateline Bogotá 1996 sobre la emisora Radio Lajas. Mencionan dirección en Jr. Rosendo Mendivil 585. 5855v, RADIO AMERICANA. Nueva Cajamarca. 2301-0115 Marzo 23. Presentando el Programa ``El Perú y su Folclor``. Luego un bloque de anuncios de Caja Rural San Martín, Restaurante Brisas del Mar, Botica San Lucas. ``...tu radio, mi radio, nuestra radio...Americana...`` ``...diferente, diferente a las demás así es tu Radio Americana....`` La primera noticia sobre esta emisora a través de Malm en SWB vía DXLD quien la reportó en 5854.6v: en mi opinión esta emisora trabaja con los equipos de la Radio Nueva Cajamarca, que operaba en este mismo rango de frecuencias hace algunos meses, ya que presenta el mismo sonido y la misma variación en la frecuencia ya que cuando inicia transmisión arranca en los 5849.2; luego recorre el dial hasta los 5858, presentando desajustes en el audio. Además presenta luego de las 0100 el programa Nochecitas Vernaculares, el cual tiene el mismo nombre de un programa de la desaparecida Radio Nueva Cajamarca. Notada con cierre a las 0202* y apertura a las *1100 (Rafael Rodríguez, Bogotá, Colombia, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** PHILIPPINES. New 9582.3 PBS [Malolos?] again active. Noted at 0035- 0912* UT. In Tagalog. Transmission break at 0250-0252 UT. Ex 9618.4 kHz. 35543. Active March 7th and 8th, inactive 9th and 10th (Roland Schulze, Philippines, BC-DX Mar 13 via DXLD) Only Mon-Fri sce??? (wb) As I recall, the power and location listed in WRTH '02 were based on data in a QSL letter received from the station a few years ago, which seemed plausible. I doubt that it can be from an IBB transmitter, given the weak signal, variable frequency and intermittent operation. Personally I last heard it in Dec 2001 listening in Bali, where it was audible in the late afternoon LT. The only other locations where I've heard it are within the Philippines and in Sabah/Sarawak Malaysia. I haven't had a chance to check lately. My guess is that the IBB story could have arisen from confusion between this relay of PBS domestic services, and the PBS's external service Radyo Pilipinas which is transmitted via the IBB SW facilities in the Philippines (Alan Davies, Indonesia, BC-DX Mar 23 via DXLD) Further investigation has turned up a scan of the QSL letter and data card on Hans van den Boogert's website at http://members.tripod.com/DXlogbook/logs-1998-dur2-qsl.html according to which it's a 250 watt transitter "Modified BC-610 US army signals corps" at Marulas, Valenzuela, Metro Manila (Alan Davies, Surabaya, Indonesia, DXplorer Mar 24 via BC-DX via DXLD) ** PORTUGAL. Radio Portugal A02 Radiodifusão Portuguesa (RDP) Internacional Broadcast schedule A02 (all programmes in Portuguese) From Monday to Friday: Europe 0500-0755 9815, 9840 0645-0800 11850 0800-1200 12020, 11960 1600-1900 15445+, 15125, 17650 1900-2300 13720-s M.East-India 0100-1500 21810 1000-1200 21830 Africa 1600-1900 17680 1900-2300 11945-s 0500-0700 15585 North America 1200-2300 17575-s 2300-0200 9715,11655 Venezuela 1900-2300 21540-s 2300-0200 13700 1000-1200 21655 Brazil-C.Verde-Guinea 1600-1900 21655 1900-2300 21800-s Brazil 2300-0200 13660, 15295 On Saturday and Sunday: Europe 0700-1345 12020, 13640 0830-1000 11995 1400-2000 13770 1400-2000 15555+ 1900-2300 13720-s 0000-1655 21830 Africa 1700-2000 17680 1900-2300 11945-s North America 1200-2000 17575+ Venezuela 1200-2000 17615 1900-2300 21540-s 0700-2000 21655 Brazil-C.Verde-Guinea 2000-2300 21800-s -s: Only for Special transmissions +: Possibility to extend until 23.00 ------------------------------------ (via Ramón Vázquez Dourado, Spain, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** QATAR. A71MA is active on 20m around 0420 UT (Bob Thomas, CT, March 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SIERRA LEONE. Hello everywhere, there can be heard still something original on short wave! Who would have thought that the local radio station of a rather poor African country, which is hit by a civil war, transmits a 30 minutes advertising block? This happened yesterday night on SLBS Freetown on 3316 kHz. The station came in with unusually strong signal (SINPO partly 44334!). There could be heard several commercials like advertisement for the "Ladies Night" of a local disco, for a song festival at Victoria park, which seems to be a public place in Freetown, as well as - very surprising - a commercial spot for Holsten beer! Holsten is a well known brewery in northern Germany. As a German I enjoyed this commerical very much and on that reason I decided to record it and to prepare an audio clip (236 KB). On the clip one can listen to the national anthem of Sierra Leone, too. Things like that you cannot hear every day from Africa. If anyone has interest, please let me know in a personal mail. Anyway I have to correct now my former conception of Africa. Loggings in detail: SIERRA LEONE 3316 SLBS Freetown, 24th of March 02, 2255-0003, English and local language, religious program until 2305 followed by commercial spots, modern African music, national anthem, sign off at 0003. SINPO partly 44334 (Michael Schnitzer - michael_schnitzer@web.de hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** THAILAND. 6765.32, Bangkok Meteorological Radio, at 1320. Weather by M then 1338 IS, followed by M in local dialect. Terrible ute just above restricted filter on the WJ8712P to just 1.10 wide. Repeated IS, followed by English ID at 1345. Then local weather in English, followed by IS then weather in Thai (Don Nelson, WA, DXplorer Mar 18 via BC-DX via DXLD) ** U K. I suppose you heard my e-mail to WriteOn read on Friday. They still haven't figured out the problem, since I just discovered that the 30 March - 5 April week is up on the BBC schedules web site, but the later weeks are still unavailable in the Americas stream. Also, much of Friday 5 April is still blank, the way the previous week was for a month or so now! They have complete skeds for that week for Africa and East Asia, but later weeks have incomplete little grids without full data. And people expect the web to take the place of real paper documents! Sigh... (Will Martin, MO, March 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ``Difficulty entering the information into the database`` was the excuse. Greenfield Collexion cancellation was also objected to by Will. Harriet Greene, commissioning editor: ``...WS refreshes its output from time to time, to make sure it is offering relevant programmes with wide appeal... a reduction in overall amount of serious music, but... Concert Hall will start taking suggestions from listeners.`` That means, no, it is not being replaced by a similar programme, there will be an overall reduxion in classical music, and it is *not* relevant. Typical weaseling instead of giving a direct, honest answer. I just heard the final Greenfield Collexion via 2NUR at 1705 UT March 27. Greenfield was typically upbeat as he said goodbye, and played his opening theme all the way through, to conclude. Announcer then plugged Concert Hall which is open to requests now for one week a month. A lot of good that will do. Note that the usual repeat Sunday 2330 on Am/Eu streams will not happen, as by March 31 the new schedule will be in effect. Your last, best chance to hear it will be UT Thursday 0405 (gh, DXLD) ** UNITED KINGDOM. TOUGHER EXPECTATIONS FOR THE BBC Public Service Broadcasters who enjoy great privilege should expect tough regulation, says Culture Secretary Tessa Jowell. Speaking to broadcasting (TV and Radio) executives, at the Westminster Media Forum in London, earlier this week, Tessa Jowell announced: * The draft Communications Bill will contain proposals to ensure that the BBC will be more heavily regulated than any other broadcaster, with a new hierarchy of obligations for public service broadcasters * The review of BBC News 24 will go ahead and will be lead by Richard Lambert, former editor of the Financial Times, who will report to the Secretary of State by the end of June 2002. * A decision on BBC3 will be taken when further work is done on the market impact of a new channel Spelling out her belief that the BBC's goal should be winning new audiences instead of chasing ratings, Tessa said: "High share for good programmes is not a problem, but ratings are not the sole test for the BBC. A new service funded by a universal fee needs to reach as many people as possible. The BBC will ultimately be judged on quality, innovation, the ability to challenge, the desire to take risks and the ability to make the market, not follow it. It should not fail on these and use ratings as the excuse." "Public service broadcasting has a special place in the British psyche. Public service broadcasting is not a Heritage phrase. It is not the costume drama of broadcasting. It has been a vital part of our past, but I'm going to ensure it is a vital part of the digital future. Public service broadcasting is a straightforward contract: the state offers certain privileges to some channels, and in return each channel provides something of worth beyond that which the market alone would provide." "But being a public service broadcaster is not a licence to compete, unfettered, with all those commercial services which have to fight in the marketplace without any protection from the state. The BBC is loved by viewers and listeners worldwide, but of all the public service broadcasters, the BBC is the most privileged and for that reason it should be regulated more stringently. That is why I am announcing that a new hierarchy of public service obligations will be included in the Bill. Quite simply, the more public privileges the broadcaster receives, the tougher it will be regulated." Tessa Jowell also dispelled myths that the BBC will not be regulated by Ofcom. "Much of what the BBC does will be policed by Ofcom," she said. "But the BBC will also continue to keep their unique system of regulation by the Governors. Not because their burden should be light, but because it should be the heaviest." (The Radio Newsletter, 19/03 via Mike Barraclough, Letchworth, UK) ** U K. DANCERS REPLACE BBC ONE GLOBE http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/entertainment/tv_and_radio/newsid_1895000/1895151.stm (via Ivan Grishin, DXLD) END OF THE WORLD IS NIGH FOR BBC The BBC is dumping the globe, the symbol of its heritage as the world's pre-eminent broadcaster, in favour of a new series of ``multicultural`` logos http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/0,,2-249049,00.html (via G. Pollard, DXLD) ** U K [non]. Subject: RADIO EZRA - NEW SERIES Dear Friends and colleagues in DX-ing. Radio Ezra is due to commence a third series consisting of thirteen half hour weekly broadcasts beginning on Saturday 6th April 2002 between 2330 and 0000 UT. The frequency will be 17665 kHz and the target zone is Western North America. The transmitter location is Russia. I will be producing a limited number of QSL cards for the series and would be most grateful for any reception reports. Please enclose an International Reply Coupon or $1 to cover return postage. Radio Ezra used to carry the broadcasts for the Water Into Wine Ministry project but I have recently canceled this project and the station now has its own new website which features plenty of information about the station's recording studio, equipment, transmitter details and broadcast schedule. Check it out! Best wishes John D. Hill (Station Owner) ***************************************************** Radio Ezra, PO Box 16, Stockton on Tees, TS18 3GN, United Kingdom Fax: +44 1642 887546 http://www.radioezra.com "my glory will I not give to another" ISAIAH 42:8 ***************************************************** (Hill, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. http://www.washtimes.com/world/20020326-77709460.htm BUSH OPPOSES BILL TO RESTRUCTURE VOA By Ben Barber, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The Bush administration and Congress are at odds over a proposed restructuring of the Voice of America and other aspects of U.S. public diplomacy intended to improve the way the United States delivers its message to the world. Rep. Henry J. Hyde, chairman of the House International Relations Committee, said passage of the Freedom Promotion Act, which he sponsored, was crucial to countering hostile views of America such as those broadcast by the Qatari television station Al Jazeera. But the measure has been set aside because of opposition from the Bush administration. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher cited fears the legislation would reduce the "flexibility" of the president to run foreign policy and determine America's message to the world. Mr. Hyde, Illinois Republican, has proposed far more than reorganizing the nation's public broadcast services, which include Radio Free Europe, Radio Marti and a new service broadcasting to the Middle East. His bill would enhance the authority of the undersecretary of state for public diplomacy, a position created after the U.S. Information Agency was absorbed into the State Department in 1998. "If we are to be successful in our broader foreign-policy goals, America's effort to engage the peoples of the world must assume a more prominent place in the planning and execution of our foreign policy," Mr. Hyde said. "The task of countering misinformation and propaganda regarding the United States is a never-ending one, but we must go about this task more aggressively and more systematically, rather than simply reacting to crises as they occur." His bill would strengthen the power of Undersecretary of State Charlotte Beers, create a fund of $495 million for public diplomacy and mandate numerous other training and exchange programs. Mr. Hyde also has called for spending $7 million to create a satellite television broadcast system aimed at counting hostile views of America widely seen in the Muslim world. Rep. Tom Lantos of California, the ranking Democrat on Mr. Hyde's committee, said, "If we are to prevent future terrorist attacks, we must launch a concerted campaign to win over people across the globe who are subjected to anti-American misinformation and hate. "Unfortunately, we have been outgunned, outmanned and outmaneuvered in the information war for too long." Perhaps the most controversial aspect of the bill would create an International Broadcasting Agency with a powerful director to replace or oversee the eight-member bipartisan Broadcasting Board of Governors. The board, created as a "fire wall" to prevent U.S. government interference in U.S. foreign broadcasts over the Voice of America and Radio Free Europe, became independent in 1999. The BBG also oversees Radio Free Asia, Radio and TV Martí, Radio Afghanistan and the Middle East Radio Network (MERN), which has been broadcasting only since last week. BBG communications coordinator Joan Mower objected that the replacement of the independent broadcast governors in the Hyde bill "would destroy the fire wall [between the broadcasters and the U.S. government] that the BBG was created for." But Hyde spokesman Sam Stratman said the BBG members "are a part-time board, micromanaging the [broadcasting] agency. The bill proposes a single person appointed by the president for a five-year term." Both the Clinton and Bush administrations tried at different times to halt VOA broadcasts of interviews with Chinese dissidents or Osama bin Ladin. Broadcasters called such efforts political interference in their mission to provide an objective news service (via Kim Elliott, DXLD) ** U S A. US-BACKED RADIO SAWA LAUNCHES --- 26 March 2002 The new Middle East Radio Network, a US Government-sponsored Arabic language broadcasting service aimed at young people, had a low-key launch on 22 March. The service uses the on-air identification 'Radio Sawa' (Together), and is initially available on FM in Amman and the West Bank on 98.1 MHz and in Kuwait City on 95.7 MHz. Agreements have been signed to broadcast in Qatar and Bahrain, and negotiations are being held to obtain mediumwave and FM frequencies in other Middle East countries. The service will also broadcast digitally on the Nilesat, Arabsat and Eutelsat Hotbird satellites. Programming initially consists of music and promotional announcements, with a news service due to begin in a few weeks' time. MERN is expected to be fully operational by late summer 2002. The Broadcasting Board of Governors received approx $35 million from Congress to fund MERN in fiscal year 2002, a figure that includes $16.4 million for one-time capital costs for transmitters. Station's Web site is at http://www.ibb.gov/radiosawa/ (© Radio Netherlands Media Network via DXLD) The Radio Sawa web site at http://www.radiosawa.com states that: "Radio Sawa is a service of US international broadcasting, which is operated and funded by the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG), an agency of the US government. The BBG serves as a firewall to protect the professional independence and integrity of the broadcasters. One of the guiding principles of Radio Sawa is that the long-range interests of the United States are served by communicating directly in Arabic with the peoples of the Middle East by radio. Radio Sawa seeks to win the attention and respect of listeners. In reporting the news, Radio Sawa is committed to being accurate, objective and comprehensive." (BBC Monitoring Mar 27 via DXLD) ** U S A. This is the guy touted to be following in the 'Shep' tradition (Chet Copeland, NYC, DXLD) KSTP-AM'S MISCHKE BEGINS NATIONAL SYNDICATION MONDAY Kristin Tillotson, Star Tribune March 22 "I would hate to be the person trying to sell my radio show," said T.D. (Tommy) Mischke, KSTP-AM's evening star, with typical self- effacement. "People ask me to explain it, and I can't." Starting Monday, the live "Mischke" show will be available nationally through a syndication deal cut between the independent distributor Jones Radio Network and St. Paul-based Hubbard Broadcasting, owner of KSTP (1500 AM). Amy Bolton, general manager for Jones, wouldn't say how many stations have signed up yet, but she claims strong interest in radio markets from Milwaukee to San Diego. Mischke, whose radio career began as a "frequent caller" to someone else's show, has garnered strong Arbitron ratings for nine years in what is traditionally a tough slot: 8 to 10 p.m. Not bad for a guy who said he plans each show by "getting up in the morning and thinking about how to fill two empty hours that night. I can't really narrow it down beyond that. "I can tell you what I'm not -- a conservative political talk-show host," he said. "It's a pretty homogenized world out there right now. I'm gonna throw a curve ball at these folks, and [Jones] must feel listeners are ready for something different." Bolton confirmed: "There's a lot of Rush Limbaugh wannabes out there," she said. "Even Bill O'Reilly is more of the same. Mischke pays homage to the days when radio was pure entertainment. He's destination listening, not just somebody mouthing off in front of a mike." This is the first national syndication deal that Hubbard has struck outside its own family of stations, said program director Joe O'Brien: "We decided it was a good match, as much for their marketing expertise as anything else." Mischke, who began talks with Jones about a year and a half ago, said that with no advance promotion he expects a slow start and hopes things pick up in the summer. He called the network's promise that they wouldn't pressure him to change a thing "critical to my decision. They don't want me to broaden my frame of reference." Bolton said: "I liken it to the movie 'Fargo.' It's a cult hit; either you like it or you don't." Mischke said he doesn't know "whether that means people will be laughing with me or at me, but I do think there's a certain Midwestern sweetness, a less jaded personality, that I don't mind maintaining." (via Chet Copeland, DXLD) ** U S A. Glenn, You have mentioned that Dr. Dean Edell is one of your favourite programs. I found his webpage, which also lists where his show can be found. http://www.healthcentral.com/drdean/drdean.cfm 73, (Ivan Grishin, Ont. March 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) One state at a time ** U S A. I am hearing a pirate daily on 1710 khz. I've caught them between 0600 and 0730 ELT 1100-1230 UT]. Over-modulated bad cassette machine quality audio of male preachers in Yiddish? Hebrew? and English combined with various types of Israeli music. No transmissions on Saturday morning as per their holy day. It has deep fades as if it is on SRS. The TIS stations from NYC don't show this propagation. Is this possibly one of the Boston pirates? No ID has been heard yet - or any indication about location. Thanks in advance for your comments, (Karl Zuk N2KZ about 45 miles north of NYC, IRCA via DXLD) Karl, That's Lubavicher Radio broadcasting from Crown Heights. Many of us in the NYC area have heard it. I sent an email to their website a few months back asking for a verie and never received a reply. Hope this helps! (Dave Hochfelder, New Brunswick, NJ, ibid.) I've possibly have heard this one here in Coastal North Carolina before. It was something I thought was Spanish, but who knows, all I know is I couldn`t understand the program content. The signal here was in the noise level and could only be received by putting the radio on lower side band. The navigation beacons and the static was neck and neck with their signal here as well (Bob Carter, Operations/Engineering, WGAI, IRCA via DXLD) ** U S A. From Eric Houg: There will be a Crazy College Easter show this Friday at 10 PM [EST] on WHYY [also webcast]. http://www.whyy.org/91FM/womenhistspecials.html (via Joel Rubin, swprograms via DXLD) ** U S A. Hopefully no April's fools; the CP for 50/1.4 kW in Nebraska will be on as KKSC from April 1. This per info from the CE of Waitt Radio (KKAR, KOZN, KOIL etc). They will run directional patterns both day and night - alas, I'm afraid the night pattern won't favour Scandinavia. From the world's Northernmost DX-er (Bjarne Mjelde, N- 9980 Berlevag, Norway, N.Lat 71, E.Long 29, Receivers: AOR AR7030+, K+D KWZ-30, Palstar R30, MWDX yahoogroup via DXLD) That should impact on 1020 Perry OK, or does it deserve protexion? (gh, Enid) ** U S A. From CBS Marketwatch.com 6:07 PM ET Mar 25, 2002 RUKEYSER DISMISSED ON `WALL STREET WEEK' OWINGS MILLS, Md. (CBS.MW) - Louis Rukeyser was sacked from "Wall Street Week" on Friday, removed three months earlier than expected after the financial television pioneer discussed his contract dispute with the show's owner on camera. Maryland Public Television, which announced last week it would begin a new show later this year without Rukeyser, said it will air alternative programming before revising "Wall Street Week' next fall with a host from Fortune Magazine, which is owned by AOL Time Warner. Rukeyser went on his show Friday and told viewers his version of what had happened to force him off the air, and promised that he would return on another station with his popular show. MPT resented his behavior, and that was that. Meanwhile, a CNBC spokeswoman said that the cable financial news network is speaking with Rukeyeser about possible joining its team. CNBC is a General Electric property. Michael Holland, a New York money manager and a panelist on the final program Friday, said Rukeyser was "resolute and confident" before the program and "relieved, joyful and anticipatory afterward" when he and Rukeyser had dinner at a steak house in Baltimore. For Rukeyser, it was a sad end to a brilliant 32-year-career at the helm of America's most durable and venerable business-news TV show. But Holland summed up the 69-year-old Rukeyser's mood as "life will be fine," and Rukeyser himself said last week that he has had several offers for a new home for his show. For Rukeyser, a move to a rival network would be the ultimate vindication. And CNBC would benefit because it is trying to establish its business-news network in primetime. Further, Rukeyser's demographics - he is a favorite with seasoned investors - would work well on CNBC. The network is anxious to broaden its programming and appeal to a wider group of viewers. CNBC has gone so far as to begin airing the Senior PGA golf tournaments on the weekends. Rukeyser has achieved pop culture status in his time on the air. With his easily identifiable silver hair, refined air and twinkling smile, he has become a fixture (via Ivan Grishin, Ont., DXLD) ** U S A. MARYLAND PUBLIC TV TO FIRE RUKEYSER By JAIME HERNANDEZ, Associated Press Writer, March 25, 7:39 AM EST BALTIMORE -- Maryland Public Television is firing Louis Rukeyser from its popular finance and investment program, saying the longtime host used the show to discuss a contract dispute and promote his new program. Robert J. Shuman, MPT's president and CEO, said Sunday night that "Wall $treet With Louis Rukeyser" aired for the last time Friday. Rukeyser, the show's host for all of its 32 years, said last week that he was leaving the program as it was being revamped by MPT. Alternate shows will be used until the station launches its new "Wall $treet Week with Fortune" next fall, he said. "We were surprised and saddened that he chose to use the show as a medium to air contract disputes and promote his new show," Shuman said. "The purpose of the show is anything but that. The qualities of this show aren't attached to one single person." Shuman said he has not spoken to Rukeyser since last week but that he was being informed of the station's decision to fire him. Rukeyser's contract with MPT ends June 30.-- Shuman declined to discuss details of the contract. Rukeyser, who gives a commentary at the opening of each show, started Friday's program by criticizing MPT for the new show's format. He also thanked viewers for their "amazing outpouring of support" after the station announced last week that he would no longer be the show's host. "Another weekly program with me as host and commentator will be on television," he said. "I want to assure all our loyal viewers ... that Louis Rukeyser will still be very much around." Rukeyser told the audience that the "woods are full of smart television executives who are wonderfully excited at the prospect of producing the new Louis Rukeyser program." He also asked viewers to write to their local public television stations and demand that they air his new show. Rukeyser said Sunday that he was still considering offers from several public and commercial television outlets and would decide which one to go with in a week or two. MPT, which normally retransmits the latest "Wall $treet With Louis Rukeyser" on Sundays, didn't do so this weekend because of Rukeyser's comments, Shuman said. The station also didn't post its usual transcript of Rukeyser's latest opening statement on its Web site. "All I can tell you is that many, many viewers are telling me how angry they are not to be able to find this commentary," Rukeyser said. The station entered a partnership with Fortune magazine to produce a new version of the show. Rukeyser, 69, was offered a senior commentator role on the new program but declined, saying he didn't want to have anything further to do with MPT. MPT officials said the shake-up was necessary because the show's audience and expectations had changed, and they felt Fortune was a powerful partner. One of the new program's co-hosts will be a Fortune editor. His show, which has received widespread acclaim and boosted viewership of public television around the country, claims to plug into every businessman in America. Though he did not have any ownership rights over the show, he said he did have co-production rights. Wall $treet With Louis Rukeyser: http://www.pbs.org/mpt/rukeyser/ Copyright (c) 2002, The Associated Press Link to the article: http://www.sunspot.net/sns-ap-wall-street-rukeyser0325mar25.story Visit http://www.sunspot.net (via Ivan Grishin, DXLD) Later: -------------------- RUKEYSER SAYS HE CAN'T BE FIRED -------------------- By Associated Press March 25, 2002, 11:04 PM EST OWINGS MILLS, Md. -- Louis Rukeyser, who was fired from his namesake show by Maryland Public Television, said he didn't work for the company to begin with. "MPT cannot 'fire' me because I am not now, and never have been, its employee," Rukeyser said in a statement, noting their contract to produce the show expires in June. MPT, which announced last week that it was reformatting the program, "Wall $treet Week with Louis Rukeyser, fired the host Sunday because he used his weekly introduction on Friday's show to promote his new program. MPT president and chief executive Robert J. Shuman didn't immediately return an Associated Press phone call seeking comment Monday. Rukeyser, who gives a commentary at the opening of each show, started Friday's program by criticizing MPT for the new show's format. He also thanked viewers for their "amazing outpouring of support" after the station announced last week that he would no longer be the show's host. "Another weekly program with me as host and commentator will be on television," he said. "I want to assure all our loyal viewers ... that Louis Rukeyser will still be very much around." Rukeyser told the audience that the "woods are full of smart television executives who are wonderfully excited at the prospect of producing the new Louis Rukeyser program." He also asked viewers to write to their local public television stations and demand that they air his new show. On Monday, Rukeyser said the two sides would split after the contract ends June 30, 2002, but his production company was "ready, as always, to live up to its end of the deal." Copyright (c) 2002, The Associated Press Link to the article: http://www.sunspot.net/sns-ap-wall-street-rukeyser0326mar25.story (via Ivan Grishin, DXLD) ONE IN A CROWD As PBS chops away at its distinguishing elements, its fans wonder if it will start looking - and programming - like everybody else. David Folkenflik March 27, 2002 The mission used to be indispensability. From its birth 33 years ago, PBS sought to create and distribute programs that Americans couldn't find anywhere else on the television dial. Big Bird, Julia Child, Monty Python, Evelyn Waugh and Ken Burns all cut memorable figures on the country's cultural landscape, the subjects of praise and parody, thanks to PBS. Now, the aim is relevance. In the past week, Louis Rukeyser's ouster from Maryland Public Television's Wall Street Week With Louis Rukeyser has directed a spotlight on public broadcasters as they scramble to compete with cable outlets and their commercial cousins.... Copyright (c) 2002, The Baltimore Sun -- Link to the article: http://www.sunspot.net/bal-to.tvradio27mar27.story (via Ivan Grishin, DXLD) ** U S A. From: http://saveinternetradio.org America's fledgling Internet radio industry could be effectively killed on May 21st if the U.S. Copyright Office accepts the recommendations of its recent Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panel ("CARP") recommendation concerning Internet radio royalty rates and record-keeping requirements. Congress passed a law in October, 1998, the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA) which established that webcasters must pay "performance rights" fees to record labels for the music they play. That law instructed the Copyright Office to set the appropriate rate. However, the CARP's recommended rates are currently more than 100% of most Webcasters' gross revenues! The Copyright Office is required by Congress to decide whether to accept, reject or modify the rates and terms set forth in the report by May 21, 2002. If they accept the CARP panel's recommendation, most observers believe that the decision will effectively kill Internet radio as an industry, as the decision will bankrupt all but the three or four largest webcasters. The purpose of this website The purpose of this website is to help concerned individuals have a voice in trying to encourage the U.S. Copyright Office to "set aside" the CARP recommendation - or, alternatively, Congress to amend the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA) - in time to prevent the industry from being effectively shut down. WHAT YOU CAN DO: Send a letter to your Congressman and Senators! Explore the wonders of Internet radio (while it still exists): Guides to Internet radio stations include RadioJump!, Radio Crow, and VirtualTuner.com. Also see the menu at left, a little bit lower on this page, for links to about 20 webcasters and our "Webcasters (partial list)" page here. Good background material: http://www.educause.edu/issues/dmca.html The current Copyright Office response to e-mails from concerned citizens: Subj: Re: Please don't kill the Internet! Date: 3/7/02 3:19:16 PM US Eastern Standard Time From: copyinfo@loc.gov (Copyright Information) To: GTORadio@aol.com We are responding to your recent communication regarding the Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panel ("CARP") report delivered on February 20, 2002. That report recommends rates and terms for the statutory license for eligible nonsubscription services to perform sound recordings publicly by means of digital audio transmissions ("webcasting") under 17 U.S.C. §114 and to make ephemeral recordings of sound recordings for use of sound recordings under the statutory license set forth in 17 U.S.C. §112. The proposed rates and terms for webcasters operating under a statutory license announced on February 20, 2002, are the recommendations made by a panel of three independent arbitrators. The Panel made its recommendations after a six-month hearing. During this period, webcasters, broadcasters and copyright owners offered evidence for what the appropriate rates and terms should be for the public performance of a sound recording over the Internet. At the conclusion of this process, the Panel submitted its recommendations and a report explaining its rationale for the recommendations to the Copyright Office. The public version of the panel's report has been posted to the Copyright Office website. The panel's recommendations are now being reviewed. Under the law, only parties to the proceeding may request that the panel's recommendations be modified or set aside. These comments will be carefully considered during the review process. There is, however, no provision in the law for comments from the general public. A final determination as to the rates and terms will be made when the review process is completed. =========== "I read the summary which says that artists need to be compensated because permanent digital copies are involved. What this idea totally ignores is that the sound quality of 95% of streams because of bandwidth limitation is far inferior to the original CD and is in no real sense a competitive copy that anyone would want to listen to other than as a broadcast stream. They are out to get what they can. If they were genuinely concerned about competition with CD sales, they would have limited the levy to streams exceeding 64kbps which can reasonably compete with CD sound quality and they would have billed over the air FM stations because they can be input to a computer sound card to generate a much better quality digital file than almost all current streams available." -- Tony Carlson, Berkeley, CA (in Save-Our-Streams message board) ============ Another perspective on the size of the royalties: A Webcaster with one listener (e.g., himself) listening all the time would have to pay $.0014 x 15 x 24 x 365 = $184 in royalties per year. (This assumes 15 songs per hour.) Invite some family and friends to listen, get your average audience size up to 100 listeners, and you have an annual royalty payment of $18,400! If you've been doing this for three years, your retroactive bill is going to be $55,200 (all via Mike Terry, UK, DXLD) RAIN today: Arbitron asks for 5-year hold on webcasting fees Dear Mike, Arbitron is speaking out in support of broadcasters and webcasters hoping to show Congress that the CARP royalties will mean the death of Internet radio. Yesterday, the company announced it has sent a letter to the House Judiciary Committee requesting a five-year moratorium on CARP webcasting fees. Today's issue of "RAIN: Radio And Internet Newsletter" is devoted to the entire text of Arbitron's letter to Congress. There's also Kurt Hanson's RAIN Analysis of the letter. You can read both on the RAIN homepage at http://www.kurthanson.com Sincerely, Paul Maloney Editor RAIN: Radio And Internet Newsletter P.S. We have several other stories "in the hopper" right now concerning webcasters' efforts to save their industry. Please feel free to check back with RAIN later today, or our "Save Internet Radio" site anytime at http://saveinternetradio.org Thanks! (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. Dan Gillmor: Bleak future looms if you don`t take a stand IF THE FEW CONTROL THE ALL... "Media conglomerates are in a merger frenzy. Telecommunications monopolies are creating a cozy cartel, dividing up access to the online world. The entertainment industry is pushing for Draconian controls on the use and dissemination of digital information. If you're not infuriated by these related trends, you should at least be worried." San Jose Mercury News 03/26/02 Full story: http://www.siliconvalley.com/mld/siliconvalley/2922052.htm (VIA WWW.ARTSJOURNAL.COM/ via Chet Copeland, DXLD) ** U S A. Airplane crash into tower... http://www.wral.com/news/1304816/detail.html (via Fred Vobbe, NRC FMTV via DXLD) ** U S A. Radio station WWRB is well heard here in Ireland at 0000 GMT on both 6890 and 5085. Best heard in USB with religious varients. 73 (Ciaran Mc Carthy, March 27, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. MOTHER ANGELICA CONTINUES IMPROVING, SENDS EASTER GREETINGS Irondale, AL, Mar 22 (EWTN) — ``Please tell everyone that I'm getting better. Thank you for your prayers. God bless you,`` said Mother Angelica as she offered an Easter greeting to her ``family`` around the world while she continues to recover from a stroke she suffered at her monastery in Hanceville, AL on Christmas Eve. The stroke, which hospitalized Mother Angelica for nearly a month, left her with a partial paralysis on her right side and speech impairment. Since returning to her monastery, Mother has continued to undergo more than five hours of physical and speech therapy each week. Sister Mary Catherine, Mother Vicar of Our Lady of the Angels Monastery, said Mother is improving each and every day. ``She now has the full use of her right arm and her speech is improving almost as quickly. Mother is sleeping well, eating well and she has regained most of the weight she lost while she was in the hospital,`` she continued. ``Mother looks good!`` Mother Vicar said in addition to her daily prayers, Mother Angelica uses a walker to go from her room to the chapel to spend an hour a day in adoration before the Blessed Sacrament. Her nuns visit with Mother individually or in small groups each evening and it's not unusual to hear laughter coming from her room as Mother jokes with them. ``Mother says she considers herself blessed to be allowed to go through this time of trial,`` Sister Mary Catherine said. ``But she is anxious to fully recover and get back with her 'family'.`` Meanwhile, as Easter approaches, the Spiritual Bouquet for Mother Angelica that is posted on EWTN's website http://www.ewtn.com continues to receive prayer intentions from around the world for Mother's complete recovery. According to the Network, to date, nearly one half-million Our Fathers have been pledged and 266 thousand Rosaries, 43 thousand Novenas, 69 thousand Holy Hours and 142 thousand Masses have been offered. A spokesperson for EWTN said the Network has also received nearly 25,000 letters and cards and thousands of emails and telephone calls from well-wishers. (Catholic Radio Update March 25 via DXLD) ** U S A. FCC INTERNATIONAL BUREAU REORGANIZATION The reorganization of the FCC is effective today. FCC International HF Broadcast stations are now regulated by the Strategic Analysis and Negotiations Division of the International Bureau. All weblinks to FCC HF broadcast pages must now be changed to contain the letters sand instead of pnd. Example: the FCC HF Broadcasting Page was at http://www.fcc.gov/ib/pnd/neg/hf_web/hf.html it is now at http://www.fcc.gov/ib/sand/neg/hf_web/hf.html Many links on this page still need updating. Changing pnd to sand in other links seems to work (Donald Wilson, March 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [non]. V. of Hope via Biblis: see GERMANY ** U S A. Glenn, Below is an updated schedule for AFN, if case this is of interest. I managed to pick up two new frequencies for the freq section for May, always pleased to do that. Thanks (Gayle Van Horn, MONITORING TIMES) Navy Media Center in Washington Update to the current schedules for the US Navy AFN broadcast on their website and NPR. They indicate that the NPR broadcast schedule isn't correct and made a correction to the schedule for the Guam broadcast. Below is the new accurate schedule for AFN shortwave transmissions. Switchover from night to day, etc is based on local time at the transmitter site. Location Band Daytime Nightime Key West, FL Upper Sideband 12689.5 kHz 12689.5 kHz RR, Puerto Rico Upper Sideband 6458.5 kHz 6458.5 kHz Sigonella, Sicily Upper Sideband 4993 kHz 10940.5 kHz Guam (Barrigada) Upper Sideband 13362.0 kHz 5765.0 kHz Diego Garcia Upper Sideband 12579 kHz 4319 kHz Hawaii Upper Sideband 10320 kHz 6350 kHz The QSL@mediacen.navy.mil email address is still good for reception reports to get their QSL letter for the AFN broadcast (via Gayle Van Horn, MT, DXLD) ** URUGUAY. Según noticia aparecida hoy en el diario local EL TELÉGRAFO, a partir de mañana miércoles 27 de marzo a la hora 21 local, la emisora CASINO FM 96.3 de Paysandú, Uruguay, comenzará a emitir toda su programación "on line" por internet. La dirección es http://www.paysandu.com/casinofm Saludos (HORACIO E. COLACCE, NUEVO PAYSANDU. URUGUAY, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** YEMEN. Republic of Yemen Radio with a test transmission on 909: I picked them up around 2230 UT, an Arabic song followed by this announcement by a YL: Yemeni Radio with testing transmission from HUDAYDAH. Radio Yemen would like to hear from the listeners worldwide who are picking up this test transmission, here's the address: Radio Yemen - testing transmission, P. O. Box 3263, San'a - Yemen phone 00 967 33 111 93 or 00 967 33 111 92 Fax 00 967 32 197 01 e mail: radionet@y.net.ye [not 100% sure of the e mail address] (Tarek Zeidan, Egypt, SU1TZ, BC-DX Mar 24 via DXLD) Known e-mail address: yradio@y.net.ye Yemen R, YEM (wb) Nice that Tarek Zeidan got down all the details. The e-mail is wrong; it should be yradio@y.net.ye but they announce radio.@y.net.ye ! It is strong, stronger than Iraq at night, must be in the 100-300 kW range. (Mauno Ritola, Finland, to Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, BC-DX Mar 26 via DXLD) The wavelength announced is "330" meters (pronounced something like "tälät miya tälätiina metran") which corresponds to 909 kHz. Also, the last number before the "kiloherz" was "tessa" which is nine, so it must be 909 kHz announced. At what time did you hear this? (Mika Makelainen, RealDX yahoogroups via DXLD) They are fairly strong all evening from about 1900 until 0100 sign- off. 73, (Mauno Ritola, Finland, RealDX yahoogroup via DXLD) ** YUGOSLAVIA [non]. See MONTENEGRO ** ZAMBIA. 4965, 1541-1610, R. Christian Voice, Mar 23, Christian pops to trumpet fanfare 1559, local QRM buzz over top-of-hour (bad timing!), and into man and woman talking in English. 'He's The One For Me' song 1603. 'Christian Voice... the right call, every day of the year' ID at 1608. Poor, but periods of fair-good level approaching Zambia SS, and a full TWO hours past local SR. Only audible on SW Beverage antenna (longpath). Still in at 1620 with Christian drama, and signal was going through odd propagational peaks every 20 seconds or so (Guy Atkins, Grayland WA DXpedition, hard-core-dx via DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. Strange stuff on 10 MHz just behind WWV. ``The Whistler`` and two guys with Spanish phrases with accents. One likes to do a drawn-out ``hola.`` First heard 0310 UT March 22. They played for a few minutes, then went off. A few WORs back, I think you mentioned someone brought up hearing ``The Whistler`` on HF (Bob Thomas, CT, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 2-048, March 25, 2002 edited by Glenn Hauser, wghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted afterwards at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd02.html For restrixions and searchable 2002 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn WORLD OF RADIO #1123: (STREAM) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1123.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1123.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1123.html NEXT AIRINGS ON RFPI: Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0700, 1300 on some of: 7445-AM/USB, 15039, 21815-USB NEXT AIRING ON WWCR: Wed 1030 on 9475 UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIALS Keep up the great work you do! I listen to WOR every week on WWCR 5070 on Saturday night 0330 UT [Sunday] (Petro Giannakopoulos, GA) Also see IRELAND ** AFGHANISTAN. 'SERIOUSLY FLAWED' DRAFT MEDIA LAW A proposed media law currently being drafted in Afghanistan contains "serious flaws" which, if enacted, would have a harmful effect on freedom of expression, warns the International Press Institute (IPI). In a letter to the head of Afghanistan's interim government, Hamid Karzai, the group says the draft Law of the Press needs a "radical re- assessment." Only Afghan citizens are permitted to print publications, a restriction that would weaken the local media, IPI argues. A proposed ban on foreign investment in Afghan media could leave local outlets too weak to withstand potential government pressure, IPI says. The draft law also requires private media owners to obtain government permission to operate, but there are no stated criteria for granting or denying such permission. In addition, there is no provision for private ownership of such companies. The draft law also grants the government control over the distribution of foreign publications. (International Freedom of Expression Exchange Clearing House, http://www.freemedia.at 19 March via RFE/RL Media Matters via DXLD) ** AFGHANISTAN [non]. The station on 8700 USB is audible here March 24 as late as 1930. Last three days the signal has been very weak compared to what it used to be. Today soon after 1810 I had severe QRM and lost the signal for a long time. I wonder if it is now USB plus some carrier, also somewhat audible in AM mode. Or the QRM ute may produce the carrier. My Icom is very poor with AM. Information Radio or someone else taking its place? The format sounds similar it was weeks back. 73 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I.R. was never reported on that late, nominally until 1730, but often closed by 1500, I recall (gh, DXLD) And still there at 2300. Maybe 24h/day now? At one point they had a two minute loss of audio and the carrier disappeared for that period too. So some kind of reduced carrier USB (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) SITE(?) 8700 USB, Presumed Information Radio still heard here today, 1645 local music, 1715 announcements by lady in vernacular mentioning Afghanistan, Pakistan and Al Quaeda, back to music, 1730 more announcements by man but my local noise level had increased so copy difficult, back to music 1735 and still on 1742 tune out. Barely audible at tune in, had faded up by tune out but still weak though easy copy when local noise level low. Just prior to the 1714 bulletin what I assume was another station came on the frequency with a man making two or three brief announcements in unknown language and then saying Over (Mike Barraclough, Letchworth, UK, March 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Northern Italy (Bologna) March 25 on 8700U is audible with strong signal but with QRM, music only. 73, (Lucio Ardito, swl I4-883, JN54rn, Racal 1792 + dipole, 1829 UT, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AFGHANISTAN. Look for Mark, VK4KMT, to join the YA5T team. He is expected to fly to Dubai on March 25th and then into YA-land in about 5 days. His mode of preference is SSB, so this will help the guys waiting for SSB action (KB8NW/OPDX March 25/BARF-80 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** ARGENTINA. 29810 LSB, Feeder, 2220 Mar 23, Fair at tune in, but rose to exceptional level by 2252, and remained quite good till signal went off at 2330. // 15820 LSB, but much stronger. Program consisted of a football match commentary. Game was between Argentina and Venezuela. I did hear one ID given around 2249, which sounded like "Radio Chaco Re?", but not sure since I don't speak the language (David Hodgson, TN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ARGENTINA. 15820, Radio Rivadavia, Buenos Aires. 2040-2050 March 23. LSB mode. Sports programme. Results of second division argentine fútbol championship. ID: "Somos Rivadavia". Ann.: "Rivadavia Noticias en Perú", Advs: "Viaje con el Nuevo Rápido a Santiago del Estero". 44444 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentine, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AUSTRALIA. KEITH GLOVER KEITH GLOVER KEITH GLOVER KEITH GLOVER --- contrary to information on page 269 of the 2002 edition of `Passport to World Band Radio`, former Radio Australia personality Keith Glover has not died, but is living in retirement in Melbourne. Although he and his wife Gwendoline have both had health problems in recent years, Keith's distinctive voice can still be heard from time to time in charitable activities around Melbourne. Keith made several trips to NZ to meet with SWLs and DXers and was guest auctioneer at the 1975 DX Convention in Christchurch (March New Zealand DX Times via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. ABC Radio 70 years old: This year the ABC celebrates the 70th anniversary of broadcasting to the nation. In 1932, under the Australian Broadcasting Commission Act the Australian Broadcasting Company, a private company which at that time ran eight metropolitan and four regional radio stations, became the public broadcaster - the Australian Broadcasting Commission. The changeover from private to public broadcaster took place at 8pm on 1 July that year. The 12 stations operated by the new-born ABC were 2FC and 2BL in Sydney; 3AR and 3LO in Melbourne; 4QG in Brisbane; 5CL in Adelaide; 6WF in Perth; 7ZL in Hobart and the relay stations 2NC in Newcastle; 2CO at Corowa, 4RK in Rockhampton and 5CK at Crystal Brook. On 1 July, in celebration of the anniversary, the ABC will launch its seventh radio network, DIG, an internet only radio station. The all- music service is designed for the 30-50 age bracket and will particularly feature contemporary Australian music. Plans are currently underway to reunite the remaining ABC radio stations that originally joined to create a special anniversary program. All Divisions and Networks will contribute to the 70th anniversary celebrations through special programming and participation in local events (AMT Australian Radio News, March via DXLD) ** AUSTRIA. Radio Austria International A'02 (English only extracted from printed folder) 0130-0200 -9870, 17860 - Daily -To North America 0532-0600 -6155, 13730 - Daily -To Eu/ME/Af 1130-1200 -6155, 13730 - Daily -To Eu/ME/Af 1130-1200 -21780 - Daily -To Asia/Australia 1330-1400 -6155, 13730 - Daily -To Eu/ME/Af 1530-1600 -9870, 17860 - Daily -To North America 1605-1700 -1476 (MyMusic)- Sun -To Eu/ME/Af 1830-1900 -6155, 5945 - Daily -To Eu/ME/Af 1900-1930 -1476 - Daily -To Eu/ME/Af 2130-2200 -6155, 5945 - Sun-Fri-To Eu/ME/Af Regds (Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, 25/3/02, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Note the 1530 broadcast; surely NAm is not the target on 9870; and 17860 would be Sackville, ex-17865, ex-1630; earlier version claimed the entire hour 1500-1600 would be in German. It seems this English broadcast, the only one reliably heard in C and WNAm, is always an afterthought (gh, DXLD) {looking at this again later, it has the same problem as last season, layout confusing. 17860 is surely not meant to be at 0130, any more than 9870 at 1530; et al.? -gh} ** BOLIVIA. 5964.87[73], Radio Nacional Huanuni, 1010-1015, several ments de Bolivia, seeming transmitter jump from .87 to .73 at 1017. On 5927.10, R. Dif. Minería, 1000-1035 (Bob Wilkner, Margate, FL, March 25, R75, NRD535D, with on the grass 10 meter "longwire", DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BURKINA FASO. 4815, March 19 at 1900 "Radio Burkina - la radio numéro un" with Burkina Inter Actualités. They spoke about the role of the mass-medias regarding the coming elections in the country. Seems to have difficulties making up their minds re the SW frequency. O=3 (Christer Brunström, SW Bulletin via Thomas Nilsson, DXLD) 5030 kHz, 2157-2400 sign off. Fair to good reception March 24 with live coverage of "Semaine Nationale de la Culture" continuing after news, lots of live music, commentary in French and local language. I did a search and this event is apparently under way until March 30. (Wade Smith, New Brunswick, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. No end in sight to 1-day CBC walkout CHARLIE FIDELMAN, Montreal Gazette, Saturday, March 23, 2002 The 24-hour walkout at CBC is now a blackout with no light at the end of the tunnel as each side calls on the other to make the next move. Striking CBC workers won't be allowed back in until "we sit down and get a new agreement" or protocol in the labour dispute is reached, CBC spokesman Marc Sévigny said. "We're not taking the onus of the lockout. Our position is that it's a strike. They walked out. By law, the link between the worker and the employer is broken. There's no such thing as a 24-hour strike," Sévigny said. On Wednesday, the union representing 1,300 journalists and production staff - the Syndicat des Communications de Radio-Canada - announced the 24-hour walkout in protest against stalled labour negotiations. 'It's No Picnic' The action canceled most English and French local radio and TV programs, including Daybreak, hosted by Dave Bronstetter, Newswatch with Dennis Trudeau and Radio-Canada's Téléjournal anchored by Stephan Bureau. It was to end at midnight. The next step, Sévigny said, should be "a sign from the union that they really want to sit down and talk. Except that now it's going to be a new agreement." The walkout was announced after CBC tabled its final offer on Wednesday. Union officials called it an ultimatum, not an offer. They didn't present it to the membership because it was practically identical to the offer rejected on Saturday, when 89 per cent voted in favour of strike action, union president Michel Couturier said. Key issues include raises, pay equity and job security, he said. "We had a mandate to go out for 24 hours and we exercised it," he said at a press conference in the basement of St. Pierre Apôtre Church, facing the picket line around the CBC building on René Lévesque Blvd. E. Agreement Unlikely It's not likely an agreement would have been reached by midnight last night given that talks have lagged since last June, he said. "We're ready to talk. We've been ready since June," he said, adding that the ball is now in the CBC's court. A party mood prevailed on the picket line with many young protesters jumping up and down to keep warm. Cars driving by the pickets honked their horns in support. "It's like a day off, but with a lot of stress," said Nancy Wood, host of CBC's two-hour Radio Noon. Many fear a repeat performance of of the 1980 strike that dragged out for eight months. "This is my first strike, but that's what a lot of us are afraid of," Wood said. "You don't make a lot of money at the CBC, so it's pretty scary." © Copyright 2002 Montreal Gazette (via Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** CANADA. Evidently there's a labor dispute of indeterminate duration between SCRC and the CBC affecting CBC operations in Quebec and SRC operations throughout Canada. "Vinyl Cafe" is being aired on RCI in place of the regular Sunday evening fare to the USA between 0200-0300 UT (Mon.) There was a brief announcement of the dispute near the beginning of the transmission (after the news). The RCI web site only has a "temporarily suspended" note on the Maple Leaf Mailbag page. CBC Montreal's web site does give notice that there will be no new content there for the duration of the labor dispute (John Figliozzi, NY, March 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. I don't know how this happened, but Radio One management cared enough for Quebec to give us an original replacement program called Morning Edition instead of Daybreak. The host is Bill Herald (or Held, it is really still too early for me today!). The newsreader is Janet Irwin (Erwin?). Here's how the show has been carved up until now: World Report, intro, Quebec weather, Commentary, syndicated report on the Canadian composer of Lord of the Rings, Quebec weather, regoional news, BB King (It's Early in the Morning), interview on a 400-year-old law that prevents charities from performing advocacy work, Quebec news headlines at 8:46, Academy Awards, music from Shrek, Quebec weather. Gee, sounds sort of like... NPR's Morning Edition. (Who'd have thunk?) I have no idea where it's from (given the audio quality, it's either from here or Toronto; if it came from anywhere else, it would sound like a low bitrate Internet stream). A lot of the interval music is familiar to me, then again maybe all CBC local shows use the same music. Funny enough, there still seems to be fill music on Radio-Canada. Looks like either: a) CBC Radio One is more organized to replace striking workers or b) managers at Radio-Canada have much more moral fortitude. Will the suits put this much effort to replace RCI programs? Of course, Daybreak was at one time one of CBC Radio One's most highly rated local morning shows, right? Wonder what they'll do at lunch and for drive-home (Ricky Leong, QB, 1410 UT March 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hi Ricky et al! Yeah, I was listening to the "Morning Edition" on Radio One 88.5, and noticed that they were trying to stick in as many of the regular features as possible. That included the network Business Report show at 5:45 AM, Bob Johnston's "Day in History" feature at 6:25, and a sports report from the national studio just before 7 AM. (They were trying to contact the usual finance guy from London, Jeremy Stretch (sp?) from RBC Capital Management, just after 6:50 AM, but that fell through.) I noted down the names of Bill Gerrold (sp?) and Janet Irwin, and decided to look them up in the CBC national phonebook. Guess what? Both are management personnel, and neither is from anywhere near Montréal. Janet Irwin is Executive Producer of English Radio in Fredricton, NB; Bill Gerald is Regional Director of Radio, English Radio News and Current Affairs, in Regina, SK. I have no idea where either of these people were broadcasting from, but there's always the possibility that they were brought to Montréal, and are at the Maison de Radio-Canada. Janet Irwin was doing news headlines on the noontime show. At the beginning, Patricia Pleszczynska, Director of English Radio in Québec, came on to tell us that the first hour (noon to 1 PM) would be the Ontario regional noon programme, and that the second hour would be a documentary about the singer/musician Lorraine Klassen. Don't know what they'll do about the afternoon show. The morning programme, by the way, was also being fed to Moncton, but I didn't hear any mention of Moncton for the noon show. Again, don't know what will happen from 4 to 6 PM. 73- (Bill Westernhaver, QC, March 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. RADIO CHANGES CAUSING STATIC AMONG LISTENERS BUT CBC REVAMP IS MERELY A REJIG Sid Adilman ENTERTAINMENT COLUMNIST, Toronto Star, March 23 Shock waves are reverberating around the executive offices of CBC Radio. CBC Radio One program director Adrian Mills, CBC Radio vice-president Alex Frame and key staff are masterminding what they call the first major revamp of the national network's programming in 30 years. Changes will be made as of September, but not everyone likes what they've been hearing about them so far. Many outraged listeners are calling the revamp an undeserved slap on the ears for their loyalty. Mills and Frame have said one reason for the program changes is that CBC Radio One should appeal to "younger listeners." This has alarmed listeners, most of whom are 55 and older. They take those two words to mean a radical switch to a steady stream of hip-hop music, or worse. The response has been angry letters and e-mails to Mills and newspaper columnists. Inside CBC, there is fury, too.... http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1016665303931&call_page=TS_News_Columnist s&call_pageid=970599109774&call_pagepath=Columnists (via Ivan Grishin, Mike Cooper, Sergei Sosedkin, DXLD) ** CHINA (non). Very interesting for me fact is CRI relays its Spanish transmissions at 0100 and 0300 via Brasília on 9665. I received 0100 transmission on March 17 with SINPO=23541. Parallel frequency was 11650 (Vladimir Kovalenko, Tomsk, Russia via Signal for DX LISTENING DIGEST) I still have my doubts this is really the site. Could some of our Brazilian readers absolutely confirm this? (gh, DXLD) ** COSTA RICA [and non]. Besides Sunday 1800, UT Mon 0000, 0600, 1200 on RFPI, James Bean`s Spiritual Awakening broadcast/webcast schedule: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spiritualawakening/message/1490 and discussion group itself: http://www.egroups.com/group/spiritualawakening (RFPI Weekly Update via DXLD) ** CUBA [non]. CASTRO'S REBELLIOUS DAUGHTER LEADS VITRIOLIC RADIO ATTACK FROM MIAMI As Cuba's communist regime enters its twilight years, a family feud is fuelling democratic hopes --- Cuba after Castro: Observer special Ed Vulliamy in Havana, Sunday March 24, 2002, The Observer A savage new voice of opposition to Fidel Castro's regime is being beamed into Havana from a Miami radio station. The owner of that voice is Fidel's daughter. Over the past month Alina Fernández Revuelta has become the latest talk-show host to hit the cacophonous airwaves in Cuba's fin-de- communist epoch. 'Buenas noches, amigos' - good evening, friends - she kicks off the show, entitled Simplemente Alina - Simply Alina. The programme makes no mention of who she is - 'people just know,' she says. Of all the dissidents hovering over Castro's final years, Fernández may be among the most damaging. 'I do not refer to Mr Castro as my father,' says Fernández. 'I do not love him, I am his exile.' Fernández's opposition to her father's regime is the stuff of heated family drama. It is also the story of the child who came to hate her father and everything that he represented, and defected to ally herself with his bitterest enemies, a group that has for years plotted in Miami for his downfall. Disgusted with Cuban politics as a young woman, Fernández joined the opposition, only to find herself persecuted by her father's government. She defected to the US in 1993, travelling on a false Spanish passport and heavily disguised via Madrid, before introducing herself to the Cuban exile opposition - literally, across a table in its unofficial headquarters, the Versailles restaurant in Miami's Little Havana. In 1997 Fernández published a memoir describing visits by her father engulfed in 'stinking' cigar smoke and his omnipotent presence in her early life. She recalls one box-wrapped gift of a doll for her to play with: of himself, with full beard, military fatigues, red star epaulettes, cap and boots. The emergence of the soft-spoken Fernández as the new star of Cuba's exile radio comes hot on the heels of the revelation last year that Castro had another love-child, Francisca Pupo, also living in Miami. Fernández was also born illegitimately, the fruit of a summer fling between Castro and a Havana socialite, Natalya Revuelta, while both were married. She communicates only by letter with her mother and is harshly denounced by her aunt - Castro's sister, Juanita Castro, who also lives in Miami. 'I would like to be in touch with family members' in Havana, Fernández says, 'but I just can't do it, I'm the enemy. It's ridiculous, but that's the way it is.' In the dynastic politics of Cuba, the personal is political. When Castro dies, his brother Raúl, Defence Minister, is slated to take over. Fernández is of a younger generation, and at 46 is unhappy with the way her father and his relations have kept power. She is 'doing whatever I can to spread the reality of life in Cuba'. Last week Fernández - whose show began six weeks ago - led a debate on how Mexico handed back to the authorities a bus-load of asylum-seekers who poured into its Havana embassy. 'We cannot forget what happens to Cubans who have been returned to the regime,' she said. Another show gathered together survivors of the infamous Mariel boatlift in 1980 of 125,000 refugees, her guests recounting their ordeals at home and at sea. She has even invited members of the hated right-wing Cuban American National Federation on to her programme. Her hope for change, she says, lies in 'democracy, not charismatic leaders, because some dynamic leaders become dictators', she says. 'Gandhi was a good leader. Nehru was a good leader. But Fidel has ruined his own country. My generation has been the victim of the manipulation of Cuban history.' The station's programming director, Chuny Montaner, said: 'She has a soft approach, but that doesn't mean she's soft at all.' A recent interview shows Fernández to be a nervous, complex woman, prone to biting her nails. Other accounts detail four marriages and a battle with anorexia (via Mike Terry, UK; Sergei Sosedkin, IL, DXLD) Full story at: http://observer.co.uk/international/story/0,6903,672977,00.html Time, station, frequency, of her program; webcast??? (gh, DXLD) ** DUCIE ISLAND. Pilot stations Stu/WA2MOE, Yoshi/JE2EHP and Jay/AF2C have been keeping the DX community well informed over the past week on the activity and status of VP6DI. As this was being typed, reports indicate that the team is tired but in good spirits. Over the past weekend there has been some activity on 80/40/17 meters. On 160 they make no promises. The operator N9TK (VP6DI) reported that the vertical antenna intended for use on 160 and 80 is giving the operators trouble. They are trying to repair it. Also, there is word that there is something wrong with the RTTY equipment. The VP6DI team is scheduled to cease operation on March 27th and leave the island that evening (their time). They intend to arrive on Henderson Island (OC-056) on March 28th. This is a rare IOTA. They will only stay for one day and depart Henderson on March 29th. On March 30th, they will arrive at Pitcairn (long enough to eat lunch). On April 1st, they are expected to arrive back in Gambier, and all should be back home by April 3rd. Remember, QSL Manager is Garth Hamilton, VE3HO, for all HF operations only. QSL Manager for all 6 meter QSOs is Kan, JA1BK. A log search is or will be available at: http://www.big.or.jp/~ham/dx.html (KB8NW/OPDX March 25/BARF-80 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** ECUADOR. HCJB WORLD RADIO A02 BROADCAST SCHEDULE final (31 March 2002 - 26 October 2002; Revised 7 March 2002) excerpt: ENGLISH --- all daily 0100 0400 9745 100 351 N. Amer. (E) 0100 0330 11960 50 330 N. America 0100 0600 21455 30 35/225 Eur./S. Pac. 0200 0330 21470 100 40 India 0330 0400 11960 100 330 N. America 0400 0600 11960 100 327 N. America 0400 0600 9745 100 324 N Amer. (W) 0600 0800 11680 250 36 Europe 0630 1430 21455 30 35/225 Eur./S. Pac. 0700 1100 11755 100 228 S. Pacific 1100 1430 12005 50 43 Caribbean 1100 1430 15115 250 352/128 N/S America 2000 2200 17660 100 41 Europe 2030 2200 21455 30 35/225 Eur./S. Pac. (Doug Weber, HCJB via Wolfgang Büschel, DXLD) ** FALKLAND ISLANDS [and non]. Unsung Hero of the SW CLYDEBANK RADIO HAM HELPED TO WIN BACK THE FALKLANDS Sun 24 Mar 2002, STEPHEN FRASER, Scotsman ARMED with a shortwave radio in a room in his Clydebank home, he was Britain's secret weapon in the Falklands war. Les Hamilton was the amateur radio operator who told the British government the islands had been invaded and the only person in Britain to be in regular radio contact with islanders during the Argentinian occupation. He was the vital link through which details of enemy troop movements and the success of RAF bombing raids were fed back to the Ministry of Defence. The information he provided was considered so important to the success of the war that within minutes his information was relayed to the task force in the South Atlantic. Yet until now Hamilton's role has been a closely guarded secret, known only by senior British politicians, military intelligence officers and a select band of amateur radio enthusiasts. Full story at: http://news.scotsman.com/scotland.cfm?id=322342002 (via Sergei Sosedkin, DXLD) Are his callsign, and those of hams in the Falklands further in the story, ever mentioned? Of course not! (gh, DXLD) ** FRANCE. Dear Glenn: This may not be earth-shattering news but I heard after 0500 Radio France International broadcasting to East Africa on 13610. Since I'm a shortwave deprived North American where the BBC doesn't broadcast to us, and the Voice of America can barely be heard on shortwave in NA, any reputable news source on shortwave is welcome (Charlie Harlich, Mar 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. Here the A02 Jülich schedule, marked as draft, so last- minute changes are possible. Note the regular use of IBB Biblis for High Adventure Ministries. [see USA non for remarks...] For Wertachtal only the FEBC 250 kW transmission and 6140 from 1555 are shown while Nauen does no longer appear in this schedule at all, but probably the transmissions to be transferred to these sites are just not determined yet. Deutsche Welle daily 0600-1555 6140 120 (1555-1900 WER 130 deg.) RNW, booked by Deutsche Welle daily 1027-1225 6045 ND RTBF daily 0257-0459 9495 160 Sat, Sun 0427-0459 daily 0500-0712 17580 160 Sat -0959, Sun -0806 daily 0957-1206 21565 160 Sat 1000-1117, Sun 1057-1117 daily 1457-1716 17570 160 Sat 1557-1716 VRT/RVi daily 0457-0656 13685 115 daily 0657-0726 5985 265 daily 1729-1856 13710 120 Sat 1757-1956 5910 ND Hrvatska Radio daily 2300-0059 9925 230 daily 0100-0259 9925 300 daily 0300-0459 9925 325 daily 0500-0659 9470 230 daily 0700-0859 13820 270 Swiss Radio International daily 0555-0800 15445 160 17685 200 daily 1625-1815 15220 115 17735 115 daily 1825-2130 15220 160 17580 200 Democratic Voice of Burma daily 1455-1530 17805 70 daily 2330-0030 9490 80 Sagalee Bilisummaa Oromoo Wed, Sat, Sun 1700-1759 15750 125 Tigrean International Solidarity for Justice and Democracy Wed, Sat 1600-1629 15530 125 Rádio Ecclésia daily 0500-0559 15545 160 daily 1800-1859 13810 160 Sat 1800-2130 United Methodist Church daily 0400-0559 11645 145 13810 160 daily 1700-1859 13820 145 15265 160 Trans World Radio Mon-Fri 0655-0820 6045 ND Sat 0645-0750 6045 ND Sun 0645-0820 6045 ND daily 1230-1245 9490 130 Sat 1600-1645 7135 115 9690 120 Adventist World Radio daily 0400-0500 9570 115 daily 0600-0730 11610 200 Sat, Sun 0900-1000 11880 145 daily 1600-1659 13720 115 daily 1700-1759 15235 115 daily 1900-2030 15485 200 IBRA-Radio daily 1645-1715 13840 80 daily 1900-1930 13710 190 daily 2000-2100 9655 115 daily 2230-2330 9405 190 Evangeliumsradio Hamburg Sun 0858-1000 6045 ND Wed 1730-1759 6015 ND Universelles Leben (Radio Santec) Sun 0100-0129 9435 90 Sun 1600-1629 15670 175 Tue, Wed, Thu 1630-1659 6015 ND Sun 1800-1829 15750 145 Sun 1900-1915 15565 115 Christian Science (prgr. in German) Sun 0900-0959 5985 115 Family Radio (WYFR) daily 1600-1800 13855 145 daily 1700-1900 9695 60 daily 1800-1900 15775 160 daily 1900-2000 9495 115 daily 1900-2200 13855 200 Voice of Hope / High Adventure Ministries daily 0700-0800 5975 290 daily 0700-1200 21590 115 daily 1200-2100 15715 115 daily 1330-1430 15775 70 daily 1330-1635 17550 90 daily 1600-1700 13810 145 daily 2000-2100 6175 ND --- via IBB Biblis: --- daily 1700-1900 9495 80 ************* Remnants Hope Ministry Sat 0800-0900 13810 250 Sat, Sun 1200-1300 6110 295 Radio Reveil Paroles de Vie Thu 1830-1859 15750 145 The Overcomer Ministries daily 1200-1459 5975 290 daily 1300-1559 13810 115 Sun 1500-1555 6015 290 Sun 1555-1800 6015 ND FEBC via Wertachtal (250 kW) Thu, Fri 1800-1830 11895 120 LRT / Radio Vilnius -- backup arrangement daily 0000-0100 9855 295 SRI -- backup arrangements for Sottens daily 0555-0800 21750 160 daily 0825-1030 21770 160 daily 1625-1815 21720 145 daily 1825-2130 13645 140 daily 2155-2400 9885 240 DRM test arrangements daily 0600-2000 5850 290 daily 0900-1700 6110 60 (via Kai Ludwig, Germany, March 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GREECE. Today is Greece Independence Day - March 25th. Not sure what VOG will have on to celebrate this day on SW (Petro Giannakopoulos, GA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** HAWAII. Meanwhile, in Hawaii Hawaii Hawaii Hawaii Hawaii, local NPR outlet KIFO 1380 KIFO 1380 KIFO 1380 KIFO 1380 KIFO 1380 has been sold to Utah based Legacy Communications and NPR uses the sales proceeds to expand FM coverage in the islands. Legacy then plans to move KIFO to 1370 1370 1370 1370 1370 so a Washington state station can redirect its signal on 1380 and avoid interference to and from Hawaii. What would Alan Roycroft say! Now, this Legacy outfit has a bit of a track record according to the Honolulu Star-Bulletin newspaper. They also own 1170 1170 1170 1170 1170 the old KOHO KOHO KOHO KOHO KOHO which used to broadcast in Japanese. In the last two years, it's gone from KOHO to KBUG, to KBNZ to KZEZ, back to KBNZ and then to KENT KENT KENT KENT KENT in January 2002, and now it's gone altogether. Silent that is. (Gee, and I missed all those call changes too!) The plan is: KENT 1170 KENT 1170 KENT 1170 KENT 1170 KENT 1170 moves to join the KIFO tower, which sheds KLHT 1040 to its own new tower (because it can't run 10 kW from this location as the local FCC monitoring station is between the tower and downtown) and the double harmonic interference of 690 on 1380 disappears with KIFO's move to 1370. This reads like a QSL from Alan Roycroft, but shows that Al must still be putting some spanners in the works! Snowstorm knocks AM station off-air in Hawaii! Snowstorm knocks AM station off-air in Hawaii! Snowstorm knocks AM station off-air in Hawaii! Snowstorm knocks AM station off-air in Hawaii! Snowstorm knocks AM station off-air in Hawaii! Wow! What a headline. And, it's true. KNUI Kahului 900 KNUI Kahului 900 KNUI Kahului 900 KNUI Kahului 900 KNUI Kahului 900 has its transmitter atop Mt. Haleakala and a freak wind and snowstorm on January 19 blew the station off-air. It's since returned, using about 1.66 kW instead of the normal 5 kW but should power up again real soon (Melvin Ah Ching`s Hawaiian Radio and TV Guide via March NZ DX Times via DXLD) ** HUNGARY. As announced over "DX Blockbuster", from A 02 the same shall be shortened due to introduction of a new co produced programme. A new DX programme "DX Corner" will be aired with latest DX news every Friday. 73's (Swopan Chakroborty, Kolkata, India, March 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRAN. SAVAK: A NEW PRETEXT FOR MEDIA REPRESSION IN IRAN? By Bill Samii Judiciary chief Ayatollah Mahmud Hashemi-Shahrudi warned in a 6 March speech that people linked to SAVAK (the previous regime's intelligence and security organization) and the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency have been active in cultural and artistic centers. He went on to say that "the enemy" has "infiltrated the press and cultural and artistic institutions," state radio reported. This appears to be the most recent excuse for the Iranian government's closure of publications -- about 60 in the last two years, excluding student publications -- and its imprisonment of around 20 journalists over the same timeframe. Nor is the alleged SAVAK link relevant in all the current press-related trials. Often the complainants are hard-line institutions such as state radio and television (Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting), the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps, the Senate-like Guardians Council, and so on. Furthermore, some of the difficulties faced by the provincial press are often due to various practical problems linked to more mundane issues. Hashemi-Shahrudi's claims about SAVAK are linked with the current trial of 73-year-old journalist Siamak Purzand. The closed and unannounced trial of Purzand began in early March, "Iran Daily" reported on 9 March, and during the proceedings he allegedly confessed to having a relationship with SAVAK. Purzand was jailed in November, and the conservative "Jam" weekly subsequently claimed that he received millions of dollars from the American Iranian Council and then distributed some of that money among the reformist newspapers. The reformist "Noruz" daily on 6 January questioned how "Jam" knew all this when no official organization has acknowledged Purzand's arrest. The authorities have no reason to hold Purzand, Hanny Megally of Human Rights Watch said in mid-March, adding that "the judicial authorities are making a mockery of rule of law in Iran." In a 15 March statement from Paris, Reporters san Frontiers condemned Purzand's trial and expressed concern about possible psychological pressure on Purzand to confess. Indeed, Purzand had left telephone messages on his wife's answering machine in Los Angeles, begging her and their daughters not to make any comments about the trial and not do interviews with foreign radios. Purzand's wife, lawyer and human rights activist Mehrangiz Kar, said in an interview with RFE/RL's Persian Service that her husband has been brainwashed in prison. In some notable cases, those standing trial are parliamentarians. Such trials are meant to silence them and intimidate other members of parliament. The Tehran Public Court summoned "Hambastegi" publisher and parliamentarian Qolam Heidar Ebrahimbay-Salami to face complaints filed by the Hajj and Pilgrimage Association and the East Azerbaijan Water and Sewage Company, the Islamic Republic News Agency (IRNA) reported on 11 March. He already faces 18 complaints filed by the Guardians Council, the Isfahan Ansar-i Hizbullah (a hard-line pressure group), the Islamic Open University, and the prosecutor-general. Another case involving a reformist member of the parliament is that of Mohsen Mirdamadi, the publisher of "Noruz." On 4 March, he was found guilty on 22 separate charges, including libel, attempting to incite the public, violating election regulations, insulting state officials, and publishing lies. The charges against him were filed by the state broadcasting organization, the Basij Resistance Force (which is part of the Revolutionary Guards), and the Elections Supervisory Board. Jailed journalist Emadedin Baqi, who already is being held in Evin Prison, was brought before the court on 19 February because of a complaint filed against him by the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps, "Noruz" reported on 21 February. Baqi objected because neither he nor his lawyer had received prior notification, so the hearing was postponed. Baqi will have a week-long home leave starting 18 March if he posts a 100 million-rial (about $57,143 at the official rate) surety bond, IRNA reported. Imprisoned journalist Akbar Ganji will have a home leave too if he puts up 600 million rials. The appeals court confirmed the closure of "Asr-i Ma," the weekly put out by the Mujahedin of the Islamic Revolution Organization (MIRO). Managing Editor Mohammad Salamati's 26-month jail sentence was reduced to 17 months, "Noruz" reported on 6 March. The original sentence was handed down on 15 December. On 17 March, furthermore, Minister of Islamic Culture and Guidance Ahmad Masjid-Jamei announced that the judiciary chief agreed to suspend the verdict pending further appeals, IRNA reported. The sentences of publisher Shahla Lahiji and writer and former editor Mehrangiz Kar (she is married to imprisoned journalist Purzand) were reduced to six months' imprisonment, calculated as time served, and a 500,000 rial (about $285 at the official rate) fine, the Writers in Prison Committee of International Pen reported on 27 February. They originally were tried for their participation in an April 2000 conference in Berlin and in January 2001 were sentenced to four years' imprisonment. They had remained free pending the appeal, and Kar is in the U.S. for medical treatment. The Association of Iranian Journalists, meanwhile, on 4 March called on judiciary chief Hashemi-Shahrudi to lift the ban on "Guzarish-i Film" monthly and "Cinema-yi Jahan" weekly, which were shut down in January. According to IRNA, Shahrudi has directed Tehran Justice Department chief Abbas Ali Alizadeh to lift the ban two separate times to no effect. It is not just the reformists who stand trial after complaints by hard-line individuals and institutions. "Kayhan" is a hard-line daily linked with the supreme leader's office, and in early-March Managing Editor Hussein Shariatmadari was questioned by press court judge Said Mortazavi and then freed on 300 million rials (about $171,430) bail. According to an 11 March report in the apparently irritated "Kayhan," the complainants were "the ministries of Science, Interior, Islamic Culture and Guidance, and Oil; as well as the managing director of Steel Parts Company; Mohsen Kadivar; Ahmad Hakimipur; Latif Safari; Mehrangiz Kar; Pak Party; a number of those who had lit candles at Mohseni Square for those who were killed in 11 September in America; someone convicted for abduction, rape, corruption and prostitution; and the prosecutor-general." In contrast to Hashemi-Shahrudi's claims about the enemy's infiltration of the press, some Iranian officials have spoken out on the harmful effect of the press bans and the trials of journalists. Deputy Speaker of Parliament Mohsen Armin warned, "We cannot chant slogans in support of unity and then start arresting people and closing down newspapers," according to the 13 March "Bonyan." And the Council of Former Parliamentary Deputies on 3 March issued a statement calling for the lifting of the press bans and the release of political prisoners, IRNA reported. Such a step would reinforce national solidarity and block the efforts of the U.S. and other Iranian enemies, the former parliamentarians said. Provincial journalists face legal harassment and provincial publications face the possibility of having their licenses suspended, too, but the provincial press also is affected by greater practical obstacles than the Tehran-based media. A 21 January editorial in Yazd Province's "Sarv-i Abarkuh" said that its biggest problem is the "enormous cost of printing." Sales are inadequate to meet costs so there is a dependency on advertising revenue. Depending on advertising sales is not practical "in a small town where small businesses have difficulty meeting their own expenses," and state subsidies are too small. Another problem, according to "Sarv-i Abarkuh," is the dearth of professionally trained journalists, typesetters, administrators, and office equipment. The publication also must pay to receive Islamic Republic News Agency articles (Bill Samii is editor of "RFE/RL Iran Report" http://www.rferl.org/iran-report/ (via RFE/RL Media Matters via DXLD) ** IRAQ [and non]. Editorial Analysis: BROADCASTS FOR THE IRAQI PEOPLE International attention has now extended to include Iraq as well as Afghanistan. The state of Iraqi broadcasting and the level of media beamed in that politically isolated state could play a part in the war of words that is so often heard before, during and after military action. Audience research data from Iraq is non-existent, which makes it difficult to assess the impact of any individual programme, broadcaster or nation. Since 1991, broadcasts from Iraq have been almost inaudible outside its borders. Considerable damage was done to Iraq's once impressive broadcast installations. Domestic radio and TV is the most accessible in the parts of Iraq controlled by Saddam Husayn. BBC Monitoring has heard Baghdad radio's main service in Arabic on six mediumwave and two shortwave frequencies. The station also announces five different regional FM frequencies. In December 1998 two Arabic sources said Baghdad radio was using mobile transmitters and these may well have been FM. Other domestic services heard recently have been Voice of Youth run by Saddam's son Udayy and Holy Koran Radio. Services that have not been heard recently are Voice of the Masses, the domestic and Persian and Kurdish services from Baghdad and the infamous Mother of Battles Radio. Of the domestic TV services, only the Iraq Satellite Channel is seen on a number of satellites, although the main domestic TV service and to a lesser extent, Udayy's channel Youth TV, are available terrestrially. The radio and TV bands in Iraq are therefore open to incoming signals. Given the erratic operation of some Iraqi broadcasts, there is little evidence of an infrastructure that could jam incoming radio or TV services to any great effect. So what else is available to the Iraqi citizen? Anyone who possess a shortwave and mediumwave radio will have access to a wide range of general Arabic-language services from the Middle East as well as the UK, USA, Russia and France, amongst others. These include US-funded Radio Free Iraq, operated by Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty from studios in Prague. It is probably the most audible in technical terms and may reach a sizable audience. There are several clandestine radio efforts too, which may take a small listening share: Voice of the Iraqi People in Arabic which is the radio of the Iraqi Communist Party; Al-Mustaqbal Radio in Arabic/Kurdish from the Iraqi National Accord, Voice of the Iraqi Republic from Baghdad/Voice of the Iraqi People and the latest, Radio Mesopotamia/Radio of the Two Rivers, which for four hours a day seems to be aimed at younger people. There is likely to be an upsurge in clandestine media activity if the political and military temperature continues to rise. Another such station, with INC and US backing, could be established on a mountain straddling the Iraq-Iran border in an area controlled by the Kurdistan Socialist Democratic Party. It could easily reach Baghdad on FM - and just as easily be blocked by relatively small local jamming stations. US psyops Commando Solo flights, delivering radio broadcasts from aircraft have also been used in recent conflicts, most recently, and probably with some effect, in Afghanistan. If Iraq comes under direct military threat and they want news, most Iraqis still don't have access to satellite TV, although some older analogue receivers may be available to some viewers. In September 2001 the London-based Iraqi National Congress (INC), a US-funded umbrella organization of groups opposed to President Saddam Husayn, launched Hurriyah or Liberty TV - aimed at Iraq. It broadcasts on a westerly trans-Atlantic satellite in a digital format unlikely to be available to many Iraqi viewers. Observers have questioned whether the opposition will be able to have a significant impact on Iraq's political structure through a satellite channel. Even if no single source has an overwhelming effect in Iraq, some media, including the pan-Arab TV channels do get through and London and Washington have less direct control of their message. The war against terror is not yet over and the war on the airwaves to influence hearts and minds is continuing too (© BBC Monitoring March 22 via DXLD) ** IRELAND. Glenn[n], thanks for all the work you put into DXLD. It's a prime source for my 'hit list'. Regarding recent postings of Irish church relays, last night (24th March) saw 2 received down on this side of the world by myself and Craig Seager. Frequencies were 27285 and 27155 both in NBFM as others have noted. Times were from 1120 tune-in till 1205 f/out with fair strengths on peaks. So, if they make it here they will make it to other places on this side of the world! Best Regards, (John Schache, Bathurst, Australia, DX LISTDNING DIGEST) ** ISRAEL. http://www.jpost.com/Editions/2002/03/24/LatestNews/LatestNews.45771.html CABINET NIXES ALL IBA SHORTWAVE PROGRAMMING By Gil Hoffman, March, 24 2002 Shortwave radio broadcasts in eleven languages heard by hundreds of thousands of people around the world will end a week from today after the cabinet approved the Israel Broadcasting Authority budget this morning. Minister-Without-Portfolio Ra'anan Cohen pledged last month not to let the budget pass unless the shortwave broadcasts were returned to the budget, but his office said today that "the pressure was too great" and he caved in. Cohen is the minister in charge of enforcing IBA regulations, which require that the IBA broadcast to the Diaspora. Prime Minister Ariel Sharon said this morning that the Broadcasting Authority and Israel Television Channel 1 sometimes, "Serve the interests of Israel's bitterest enemies." To read more, http://www.jpost.com/Editions/2002/03/24/LatestNews/LatestNews.45760.html IBA officials said they believe broadcasting on the Internet and via satellite satisfies the regulation, even though the Internet is not available in many parts of the world. When founder Yosef Barel was named interim IBA director-general last week, foreign-language news staffers hoped the would cancel a decision to cut shortwave radio broadcasts in 11 languages heard daily by hundreds of thousands of people throughout the world. But that hope ended earlier last week when Israel Radio director Amnon Nadav wrote a letter to Bezeq, which had carried the broadcasts, asking the company to stop transmitting them as of April 1. The letter said the broadcasts would instead be available via satellite and on the Internet, in five to seven languages. "Hardly anyone receives shortwave radio anymore, and if they do, they receive poor quality reception," Barel told The Jerusalem Post. "Now the broadcasts will have much better quality at a much lower cost." The decision came despite hundreds of letters from angry Diaspora Jews. The cut is intended to save the IBA NIS 6 million at a time when it is making cutbacks wherever possible due to a multimillion shekel debt. IBA staffers are especially concerned about ending the broadcasts in languages of countries where Internet and satellite are not readily available. Among the letters protesting the decision are many from listeners in Georgia, Lithuania, and Romania. "These broadcasts are an important lifeline for the many living in Britain who wish to be kept up to date with impartial news and to hear interviews with government ministers not subject to editing by news outlets such as BBC, CNN, and Sky, which have tended to give very different perspectives of recent events in Israel," wrote Neville Nagler, director-general of the Board of Deputies of British Jews. Israel Radio spokeswoman Carmela Yisraeli wrote Nagler and others last month that the proposal to cut the broadcast had been reconsidered. However, her use of the words "in the meantime" meant the battle was far from over. Barel said a decision to move IBA English News to Channel 33 has been delayed from April 1 to "the end of April," blaming the delay on his predecessor, Ron Galinka. The IBA began laying the infrastructure last month for Channel 33 to be available to those who lack cable and satellite systems. The channel is to become a Middle East satellite network broadcasting Arabic news and IBA English News. The channel will feature two half- hour English newscasts nightly (via Daniel Rosenzqeig, NY, 1321 UT March 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I just got word that they have postponed the implementation till May 1, for further deliberations (Daniel Rosenzweig, 1510 UT March 24, DX LISTENING DIGERST) ** ISRAEL. Kol Israel update - israelradio.org closing as part of cutbacks. I don't have any updates regarding the 1 month extension... but this was posted on http://www.israelradio.org today: "The Israel Broadcasting Authority has announced that overseas broadcasting will end on March 31, 2002. A statement says that the IBA will cease shortwave broadcasting and instead organize the placing of some programming on the internet and satellite but it has not given a timescale or any details of this activity. This site will no longer be able to operate as will all rebroadcasts on other networks and radio stations outside of Israel. A new web site of `Friends of Israel Radio` will soon be operating." --------- (via Daniel Rosenzweig, 2244 UT March 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I've been told that the rescheduling the cutbacks to May 1, came from Bar-el. (That's what I was originally told, but I had no idea who Bar- el was!) Bar-el is the interim Director General, the man who was previously nominated (Galinka) was not ratified and left. As Bar-el is new, he hasn't been briefed on this matter, so he couldn't take a position. Officially, at this point, though, the date is still March 31 (Daniel Rosenzweig, 1200 UT March 25, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** KOREA NORTH. Ed, P5/4L4FN, showed up over the weekend on 15 meters SSB (21225 kHz after 2230z). Really no new detail to report this week. (KB8NW/OPDX March 25/BARF-80 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** KOREA SOUTH. Atención! REPUBLICA DE COREA: Respondiendo a muchas críticas y reclamos de oyentes de España por las dificultades en la recepción de sus emisiones y después de largas luchas e insistencias por parte del Servicio Español, Radio Corea Internacional cambia su esquema a partir del 31 de marzo de 2002. A través del programa Antena de la Amistad del 24/3/02, Sonia Cho y Ramiro Trost anunciaron las novedades al respecto: "Creo que son noticias importantes para la onda corta, veremos como andan esas frecuencias", dijo Ramiro en su reciente mensaje electrónico. Este es el nuevo esquema de transmisión de KBS en español: (las horas son UT y novedades van en negritas [perdidas en txt]) 1000 a 1100 7550 Europa 9580 América del Sur 11715 América del Sur (vía Sackville) 1600 a 1700 6150 Europa 2000 a 2100 7275 Europa 9870 Oriente Medio y África 15575 Europa 0100 a 0200 15575 América del Norte 0700 a 0800 13670 Europa En conclusión, se eliminan la emisión de las 1800-1900 (9515//9870 kHz) para Oriente Medio y Africa y la frecuencia de 11810 en la emisión correspondiente a las 0100-0200 dirigida a América del Sur. Se agregan dos emisiones más hacia Europa: 1600-1700 y 0700-0800 y una frecuencia: 15575 en la habitual emisión de las 2000-2100. De esta forma, Radio Corea Internacional pasa de su anterior esquema de cuatro horas al nuevo esquema de cinco horas diarias de transmisión en idioma español. ¿Se reactiva nuestro idioma en la onda corta?. Saludos cordiales de... (Rubén Guillermo Margenet, Argentina, Mar 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO. Viernes, 15 de marzo 9:20 PM PRESENTAN LIBRO SOBRE LA RADIO PÚBLICA EN MEXICO (CNI EN LÍNEA) Tras la presentación del libro "Dimensiones de la radio pública en México", en el Palacio de Bellas Artes, el autor Luís Ernesto Pi Orozco señaló que la radio pública en México es una opción buena y necesaria frente a la oferta comercial. El ex director de Radio Educación explicó que resulta de vital importancia la existencia de opciones que divulguen la literatura, ciencia, arte, derechos humanos, ópera y todo aquello que sea importante para la sociedad, y que no promueven las estaciones privadas. Por su parte, el periodista Jorge Meléndez Preciado subrayó que el volumen "Dimensiones de la radio pública en México" contiene reflexiones de fondo, experiencia y cuidado en no aceptar ideas. Meléndez Preciado indicó que la televisión ha perdido puntos de rating por su actual programación, algo que le da a la radio un lugar importante, por lo tanto es necesario apoyarle con mayor presupuesto. Durante la presentación, el autor comentó que en su libro se "divulga la realidad de la radio pública, tratando de contribuir a una apreciación crítica desde un punto de vista objetivo", con lo cual busca hacer recapacitar al lector sobre la importancia de la radio en México (Héctor Garcia Bojorge, México, Conexión Digital Mar 24 via DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS "Alfa Lima International", 15070, 300 watts! "Skull" card on blue paper + info sheet with all QSL details filled in. Signer: Alfred. In 17 days by post for S.A.E. (used) and $1 (Bill Flynn, Cave Junxion OR, 3/24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NETHERLANDS. Here's the Radio Netherlands program guide again, this time for the shortwave transmissions only, rearranged in strict UT time and day order, and any inconsistencies hopefully removed: RADIO NETHERLANDS PROGRAMME GUIDE MARCH 31-OCTOBER 26TH 2002 0930-1125 As/FE/Pac 9790 12065 13710 1030-1225 Eur 6040 9860; NAm 5965 1430-1625 As/FE/Pac 9890 11835 12075; NAm 15220 1730-1830 Af 6020 7120 11655 1830-2025 Af 6020 7120 9895 13700 17605 21590 2330-0125 NAm 6165 9845 0430-0530 NAm 6165 9590 Sunday 0000-0030 Music 52-15 0030-0100 Roughly Speaking 0100-0105 News 0105-0125 Europe Unzipped 0430-0435 News 0435-0455 Europe Unzipped 0455-0500 Insight 0500-0530 Roughly Speaking 0930-0938 News 0938-0955 Sincerely Yours 0955-1000 Week Ahead 1000-1030 Dutch Horizons 1030-1035 Eur/NAm: News 1030-1100 As/FE/Pac: Aural Tapestry 1035-1055 Eur/NAm: Wide Angle 1055-1100 Eur/NAm: Week Ahead 1100-1108 As/FE/Pac: News 1100-1130 Aural Tapestry 1108-1125 As/FE/Pac: Wide Angle 1130-1200 Dutch Horizons 1200-1205 News 1205-1225 Sincerely Yours 1430-1438 News 1438-1455 Sincerely Yours 1455-1500 Week Ahead 1500-1530 Dutch Horizons 1530-1600 Aural Tapestry 1600-1608 News 1608-1625 Wide Angle 1730-1735 News 1735-1755 Sincerely Yours 1755-1800 Week Ahead 1800-1830 Dutch Horizons 1830-1835 News 1835-1900 Wide Angle 1900-1930 Aural Tapestry 1930-2000 Dutch Horizons 2000-2005 News 2005-2025 Sincerely Yours 2330-2335 News 2335-2355 Sincerely Yours 2355-2400 Week Ahead Monday 0000-0030 Dutch Horizons 0030-0100 Aural Tapestry 0100-0105 News 0105-0125 Wide Angle 0430-0435 News 0435-0455 Sincerely Yours 0455-0500 Week Ahead 0500-0530 Dutch Horizons 0930-1000 Newsline 1000-1030 Research File 1030-1100 As/FE/Pac: EuroQuest 1030-1100 Eur/NAm: Newsline 1100-1125 As/FE/Pac: Newsline 1100-1130 Eur/NAm: EuroQuest 1130-1200 Research File 1200-1225 Newsline 1430-1500 Newsline 1500-1530 Research File 1530-1600 EuroQuest 1600-1625 Newsline 1730-1800 Newsline 1800-1830 Research File 1830-1900 Newsline 1900-1930 EuroQuest 1930-2000 Research File 2000-2025 Newsline 2330-2400 Newsline Tuesday [original sked said 1130-1325 for Europe for Tuesday but I'm sure that's a misprint for 1030-1225] 0000-0030 Research File 0030-0100 Euroquest 0100-0125 Newsline 0430-0500 Newsline 0500-0530 Research File 0930-1000 Newsline 1000-1030 Music 52-15 1030-1100 As/FE/Pac: A Good Life 1030-1100 Eur/NAm: Newsline 1100-1125 As/FE/Pac: Newsline 1100-1130 Eur/NAm: A Good Life 1130-1200 Music 52-15 1200-1225 Newsline 1430-1500 Newsline 1500-1530 Music 52-15 1530-1600 A Good Life 1600-1625 Newsline 1730-1800 Newsline 1800-1830 Music 52-15 1830-1900 Newsline 1900-1930 A Good Life 1930-2000 Music 52-15 2000-2025 Newsline 2330-2400 Newsline Wednesday 0000-0030 Music 52-15 0030-0100 A Good Life 0100-0125 Newsline 0430-0500 Newsline 0500-0530 Music 52-15 0930-1000 Newsline 1000-1030 Weekly Documentary 1030-1100 As/FE/Pac: Dutch Horizons 1030-1100 Eur/NAm: Newsline 1100-1125 As/FE/Pac: Newsline 1100-1130 Eur/NAm: Dutch Horizons 1130-1200 The Weekly Documentary 1200-1225 Newsline 1430-1500 Newsline 1500-1530 The Weekly Documentary 1530-1600 Dutch Horizons 1600-1625 Newsline 1730-1800 Newsline 1800-1830 The Weekly Documentary 1830-1900 Newsline 1900-1930 Dutch Horizons 1930-2000 The Weekly Documentary 2000-2025 Newsline 2330-2400 Newsline Thursday 0000-0030 The Weekly Documentary 0030-0100 Dutch Horizons 0100-0125 Newsline 0430-0500 Newsline 0500-0530 The Weekly Documentary 0930-1000 Newsline 1000-1030 Aural Tapestry 1030-1100 As/FE/Pac: Research File 1030-1100 Eur/NAm: Newsline 1100-1125 As/FE/Pac: Newsline 1100-1130 Eur/NAm: Research File 1130-1200 Aural Tapestry 1200-1225 Newsline 1430-1500 Newsline 1500-1530 Aural Tapestry 1530-1600 Research File 1600-1625 Newsline 1730-1800 Newsline 1800-1830 Aural Tapestry 1830-1900 Newsline 1900-1930 The Research File 1930-2000 Aural Tapestry 2000-2025 Newsline 2330-2400 Newsline Friday 0000-0030 Aural Tapestry 0030-0100 Research File 0100-0125 Newsline 0430-0500 Newsline 0500-0530 Aural Tapestry 0930-1000 Newsline 1000-1030 A Good Life 1030-1100 As/FE/Pac: The Weekly Documentary 1030-1100 Eur/NAm: Newsline 1100-1125 As/FE/Pac: Newsline 1100-1130 Eur/NAm: The Weekly Documentary 1130-1200 A Good Life 1200-1225 Newsline 1430-1500 Newsline 1500-1530 A Good Life 1530-1600 The Weekly Documentary 1600-1625 Newsline 1730-1800 Newsline 1800-1830 A Good Life 1830-1900 Newsline 1900-1930 The Weekly Documentary 1930-2000 A Good Life 2000-2025 Newsline 2330-2400 Newsline Saturday 0000-0030 A Good Life 0030-0100 The Weekly Documentary 0100-0125 Newsline 0430-0500 Newsline 0500-0530 A Good Life 0930-0936 News 0936-0955 Europe Unzipped 0955-1000 Insight 1000-1030 Music 52-15 1030-1035 Eur/NAm: News 1030-1100 As/FE/Pac: Roughly Speaking 1035-1055 Eur/NAm: Europe Unzipped 1055-1100 Eur/NAm: Insight 1100-1106 As/FE/Pac: News 1100-1130 Eur/NAm: Roughly Speaking 1106-1125 As/FE/Pac: Europe Unzipped 1130-1200 Music 52-15 1200-1205 News 1205-1225 Europe Unzipped 1430-1436 News 1436-1455 Europe Unzipped 1455-1500 Insight 1500-1530 Music 52-15 1530-1600 Roughly Speaking 1600-1606 News 1606-1625 Europe Unzipped 1730-1735 News 1735-1755 Europe Unzipped 1755-1800 Insight 1800-1830 Music 52-15 1830-1835 News 1835-1900 Europe Unzipped 1900-1930 Roughly Speaking 1930-2000 Music 52-15 2000-2005 News 2005-2025 Europe Unzipped 2330-2335 News 2335-2335 Europe Unzipped 2355-2400 Insight (c) 2002 (Radio Netherlands web site; rearranged by John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. RNZI frequency schedule From 31 March-5 May: (as announced on 25 Mar Mailbox RA file) 1650-1750 6095 1750-1850 11725 1850-2050 15160 2050-0500 17675 0500-0700 15340 0700-1100 11675 E. Timor, EAsia, NW Pac- 1105-1305 11675 Special overnight when necessary 6095 Forces for NZ Forces overseas: 11-13 Sat; 19-20 Sat: For forces in Bosnia. The forces broadcasts are also on on Sunday (Joel Rubin, swprograms Mar 25 via DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. See SOUTH CAROLINA [non] ** NIGERIA. VON TO COMMENCE IGBO, YORUBA SERVICES SOON This Day (Lagos), March 25, 2002, by Kunle Akogun, Lagos In its sustained efforts to widen its listenership both locally and internationally, Voice of Nigeria (VON) plans to commence broadcasting in Igbo, Yoruba and German languages before the end of June this year. This is in addition to its existing six-language broadcasts in English, French, Hausa, Fufudi [sic], Kiswahili and Arabic. VON's Director General Mr Taiwo Allimi, who disclosed this, said the organisation was fully prepared for the three additional language services, having already re-engineered three of its super power transmitters. He told select media representatives at an interactive session in Lagos that to enhance the viability of the nine-language services, two other transmitters are currently being re-engineered, adding "with time, five transmitters will be running, one of which will be on stand-by during maintenance and another will be dedicated solely for languages' broadcasts". Allimi also hinted that before the end of May, VON will have developed its own website to project the best of Nigeria's cultural heritage. The Director General who was appointed about three years ago, said VON was almost moribund by the time he took over, adding "our mandate was to revive the organisation and make it the most effective and enduring instrument that will continue to expose the value of democracy and the developments in the country to the outside world." He said towards this, he had been able to put a lot of structures on the ground. For instance, Allimi said, he realised early enough that if VON is to cover Nigeria effectively to the outside world, it would not do to sit down in Lagos and Abuja alone, adding "this was why we started to open zonal offices in Gombe, Calabar, Sokoto and Ekiti." He said the same goes for the coverage of Africa to the world, pointing out that "we can't sit down in Nigeria and say we are covering Africa, and we have opened a bureau in South Africa." The VON boss said global broadcasting must promote world peace, development, universal understanding and world friendship. He said with this in mind, VON would not cover any conflict from the perspective of conflict alone but also from the perspective of efforts geared towards finding solution to the conflict. He acknowledged the support of president Olusegun Obasanjo and Minister of Information and National Orientation, Prof. Jerry Gana as well as the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to VON since he took over and pledged to sustain the new VON's status of the "sole broadcaster of Nigerian viewpoints by radio to the outside world". (from allafrica.com via Sergei Sosedkin, DXLD) ** PARAGUAY. 680, ZP11, R. Caritas, main transmitter was destroyed in January 2002 in a fire caused by a transit accident. They suffered 500 million Guaraníes in damages or approximately 100.000 US dollars. They are now back on the air using a reserve transmitter working with 1 kW. Now and then they are leaving the air (Dom Mur via Editor ARC: Thord Knutsson via Tore Larsson, DXLD) ** PERU. 6347.2, Radio Unión, Lima. 0835-0900 March 21. Romantic music in Spanish. Ann.: "Te invitamos a tu programa, de lunes a viernes, de 4 a 5 de la tarde... Universitaria". ID as: "Radio Unión S.A., en sus tres frecuencias: 880 kilociclos, 6115 kilociclos, en onda corta y ... en FM estéreo, con estudios en Avenida Central 1217, Piso 12, San Isidro...". Audio very distorsionated. 34433. On March 22, I heard Radio Unión on 6348 at same hour with 34433 too (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentine, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SOLOMON ISLANDS: Re DXLD 2-047: Hi Glenn, The story referred to the murder of a NZ career diplomat (Bridget Nicholls) in Honiara. She had been in Honiara a short while and was knifed to death in her garage within a patrolled area. Another NZer was killed a short time ago and all NZers have been told to be prepared for emergency evacuation. No- one has been arrested for her murder yet (Paul Ormandy, Host of The South Pacific DX Report, Mar 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SOUTH CAROLINA [non]. Can anyone shed light on my mystery? Fundamentalist American preacher Brother Stair`s programme THE OVERCOMER is being rebroadcast on 88.4 FM somewhere in the Canterbury province [of NEW ZEALAND]. SWLs will be familiar with Brother Stair from his broadcasts carried on Deutsche Telekom shortwave transmitters. The FM relay was audible widely - from about 90 km north of Christchurch (north of Waipawa) to Ashburton in the south (80 km south of Christchurch). Even in Christchurch, where 88.4 is dominated by guardband station Pulse FM; I could sometimes hear Brother Stair in elevated locations like the hills above Sumner. Such widespread coverage could mean multiple transmitter locations, or an antenna in a very elevated location. Does anyone have ideas on this? The only suggestion to date is that it could be related to a religious commune in the Waipawa area (Bryan Clark, March NZ DX Times via DXLD) ** SPRATLY ISLAND. Reports indicate that the Vietnam Amateur Radio Club (VARC) plan to be on from here during April. They will use the callsign XV9TH, however, specific dates are unknown. More details are forthcoming (KB8NW/OPDX March 25/BARF-80 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** TAIWAN / FRANCE. L'émission de Radio Taipei Internationale à destination de l'Afrique de l'ouest, via un émetteur d'Issoudun, sera diffusée entre 2200 et 2300 TU sur 12060 kHz. La transmission est prévue pour fin mars (NDR : probablement le 31, avec le début de la nouvelle saison). Il n'a pas été possible d'obtenir dans l'immédiat un horaire plus tôt dans la soirée (Radio Taipei Internationale - 16 mars -- les informations sont issues de http://perso.wanadoo.fr/jm.aubier via DXLD) ** TAIWAN. CBS-R. Taipei Int'l European broadcasts from 2200 to 2300 UT can be heard on 15600 and 11565 starting March 31st. These are relayed via WYFR. All other frequencies will remain the same (CBS-R. Taipei Int'l website via Daniel Sampson, Arcadia, WI, Prime Time Shortwave via DXLD) http://www.triwest.net/~dsampson/shortwave/ ** TURKEY. This is the English broadcast schedule of the Voice of Turkey that will be effective from 31 March to 27 October 2002: Europe: 0300 - 0400 (*) 11655 0300 - 0400 (*) 9650 1230 - 1330 17830 1830 - 1930 9785 2200 - 2300 12000 2200 - 2300 11960 North America: 0300 - 0400 (*) 11655 0300 - 0400 (*) 9650 2200 - 2300 11960 2200 - 2300 12000 Australia: 1230 - 1330 17615 2030 - 2130 9525 Asia: 0300 - 0400 7270 1230 - 1330 17615 2030 - 2130 9525 Africa: 0300 - 0400 7270 (*): The transmission frequency of the English Programme between 0300- 0400 UT will be changed from 11655 kHz to 9650 kHz on 02 September 2002 (via Ramón Vázquez Dourado, Spain, DXLD) We have already had this but in different versions, and I missed 7270 (gh, DXLD) ** U K. BBC World Service - A02 - English Service March 31 - October 27, 2002 [gh excerpts from a complete schedule, some strange new transmissions] 0200-0230 m-f 9510 eu 9820 am 1100-1530 12105 sa 1115-2130 m-f 11675 eu, am (via Gayle Van Horn, Monitoring Times, DXLD) ** U S A. BRIDGE SHOULD BE NAMED FOR FESSENDEN Hatteras, NC "Island Breeze", March 2002 Letters to the Editor On Christmas eve, 1906, wireless telegraph operators aboard ships off Norfolk, Virginia, and in the Caribbean, instead of dots and dashes, heard in their headsets Christmas music, then someone speaking, then a violin playing. Unheard of! What it was, was radio. It was the first radio broadcast ever. From Brant Rock, Mass., using methods he had patented and equipment he had designed while experimenting on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, R.A. Fessenden accomplished this remarkable feat. Earlier, in 1900 at Cobb Island, Md., Fessenden, while experimenting with wireless telephony, for the first time sent and received intelligible speech by electromagnetic waves over a distance of one mile. Then, in 1902, 100 years ago, R.A. Fessenden sent the first musical notes ever relayed by radio waves from Buxton, Cape Hatteras, some 48 miles north to Roanoke Island. A new, five-mile-long bridge almost completed, from Manns Harbor to Roanoke Island needs a name. This bridge crosses the path of the musical notes first sent north to Roanoke Island from Buxton by Fessenden. Much later North Carolina's most famous entertainer, Andy Griffith, used this "thing" called radio to promote his classic monologue, "What it was, was football." To help promote the naming of this new bridge The R.A. Fessenden Memorial Bridge, people should send their recommendations to the Dare County Commissioners, P.O. Box 1000, Manteo, NC 27954. Lee Browning, Buxton, NC (via Jay Novello, NC, DXLD) ** U S A. From DXLD 1-080, May 31, 2001: Dear Glenn, enclosed are three pictures of a shortwave transmitter site south of Ft. Worth, TX on I-35W. In all my research I have not been able to find out what SW station this belongs to. A telephone call to KAIJ about this site to their main engineer proved to me this was not theirs, as their engineer told me their SW transmitter site is north of Dallas (Richard Swanson, San Antonio, May 26, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I have been on that highway not too long ago, and did not notice the towers, but judging from the photos, would be hard to miss now, immediately adjacent to the Interstate. A mileage sign next to them shows they are on the east side, 4 miles S of Burleson, 14 mi S of Ft Worth. At least seven towers have wires strung between them, meeting at least at two center points (multiple dipoles?) Perhaps someone will recognize this configuration, or this site. It`s certainly not a SW broadcasting station, but some military or commercial user (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST 1-080) Guys, These towers are actually a failed amusement ride. The inventor of the ride is from Australia. This was the first attempt to start it in the US. A miniature scale airplane hangs between the towers from the cables strung between them. The patron then is allowed to operate the aircraft which operates in a circle about the hanging cable. The local residents deemed it to be too loud and successfully petitioned the local city council to shut them down early last year (Clay Ratliff, March 24, 2002, via DXing.com for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. RADIO STATION WILL TEST INCREASED POWER LEVELS From http://www.columbian.com [Vancouver, WA, near Portland OR] Saturday, March 23, 2002 By SCOTT HEWITT, Columbian staff writer Radio station KVAN will test increased broadcast power levels next week, and people who notice new or aggravated interference problems are invited to call the station at 360-514-9601. But calling doesn't necessarily mean anything will get fixed. The station has one interference-fighting engineer going door-to-door in east Vancouver, near the station's four broadcast towers; even if there's a flood of calls he will likely get to just a handful before the testing is over. The rest of any complaints related to the raised power level will be addressed after power goes up for good, according to KVAN general manager Mark Ail. That long-sought power boost now seems unlikely to happen until late this year. KVAN, 1550 AM, got an initial green light from the Federal Communications Commission to boost its broadcast power from 10,000 to 50,000 watts years ago. Getting all the engineering done and tested has been a painstakingly slow process. That testing will widen the swath of land potentially affected by interference from the four radio towers at Northeast 34th Street and 155th Avenue, Ail said. "Our expectation is that ... new people will experience interference," he said. Ail said he doesn't know whether the problem will intensify for those already experiencing it, or return to those who've had it fixed. Here's what Ail said will happen next week: During daytime business hours on two or three days -- which days still aren't certain and could be affected by variables like weather -- KVAN will power its towers up to 50,000 watts. "We'll raise power up and take some readings and bring it back down," said Ail. That will be followed, in two or three weeks, by further technical adjustments and eventually more testing. There could be several rounds of testing before consulting engineers sign off on the project, Ail said. After that, it could be anywhere between 45 and 120 more days before the FCC gives its final approval to the power boost. Neighbors in east Vancouver are worried that the power boost will aggravate a host of radio-interference problems they already experience -- mostly with KVAN. For years neighbors have complained about radio sound and static on phone and TV reception, computers that can't get or stay online, and even toasters, microwave ovens and garage door openers that kick on and off by themselves. Because interference problems often originate with inexpensive equipment and appliances that aren't well shielded against radio signals, the FCC doesn't require broadcasters to fix interference problems. KVAN has been taking complaints and working its way down the list of complainants for years. On Friday, Ail said that KVAN has received 469 complaints to date and continues to work on 18 of them. All the others, he said, have been resolved to the complainant's satisfaction. Affected neighbors contacted Friday had varying opinions. Jim Hamilton, president of the Parkside Neighborhood Association, said his interference problems were solved when he bought a better telephone and that he hasn't heard any new complaints lately. But Gus Potter, a vice chair of the Parkway East Neighborhood Association, said she doesn't believe neighbors are "all that satisfied or happy" with the interference situation in the area. Residents have noticed that interference decreases in rainy, wet weather and increases when it's dry, she said, so any slowing of complaints is temporary only. Potter said radio sound used to come from her TV and her burglar alarm, but KVAN's traveling engineer solved the problem. RADIO INTERFERENCE? Call Mark Ail at KVAN: 360-514-9601 (via Mike Terry, UK, DXLD) ** U S A. A little DXLD item about the 1710 station was quoted on the NRC list and led to this heated thread: (gh) It's interesting to note that the illegal left wing pirate operation Lubavicher/Chassidic Radio on 1710 kc remains on the air unscathed by the FCC, while at the same time the FCC has closed down every right wing pirate operation on MW and SW! Must be political correctness! 73, (Thomas Giella, KN4LF, NRC-AM via DXLD) I've been able to log the pirate based largely on the music and some clearly Jewish references, but I've been unable to follow the talk on the station due to its very weak signal and imperfect modulation. However, I can't for a minute believe Lubavitcher or Chassidic Jews to be anywhere even remotely left-of-centre. We've attached these two labels (L and C) to the station, and if this is a leftie outfit, our labels and understanding of this pirate must be way off the mark. That said, I have been waiting to see what the FCC would do. I am curious, and not keeping track of the tiny handful of FCC busts -- which right- wing (or other) pirates have been busted in, say, the last year? (Saul Chernos (who could have been a rabbi but lacked faith, discipline and a whole lot more), ibid.) Thomas, I believe Lubavitcher Radio is a purely religious organization broadcasting entirely in Yiddish. The NYC guys would know better, but I've not heard any of any left wing political propaganda from this station (Chuck Hutton, ibid.) Test # 1 - are they interfering with anybody else ? On 1710 ? Not likely. Test # 2 - are they overtly political in content and/or overly critical of the government? Not that I've noticed from others' loggings - I've yet to hear the station here. Test # 3 - is there any prior history of illegal/unlicensed broadcasting activity by the operators ? Not that anyone has yet discovered. Having answered these questions, to me at least, answers why the FCC hasn't and perhaps won't act (Russ Edmunds, Blue Bell, PA, ibid.) As a general rule, FCC busts are triggered either by complaints of interference or complaints from competing stations. I suppose with the station on 1710 it's not interfering with anybody, and since I'm not aware of any commercial Jewish religious stations in NYC there really isn't anybody to complain. They'll probably bust it eventually but I suspect the high-powered commercial pirates in Florida are a higher priority (Doug Smith, ibid.) Hmmm. I take it you're comparing the continued operation of Lubavicher Radio to the FCC ordered shutdown of McIntyre's station in the 1970s. Let's look at this more closely. Politics has nothing to do with it. Until recently, when the FCC stopped enforcing anything, they shut down many pirates, all across the political spectrum. Most pirate operators, in fact, would probably classify themselves as libertarian or anarchist, depending on whether they consider themselves right or left. Furthermore, in what specific respects is the Lubavicher station "left wing?" It's not exactly advocating gay rights, tree-hugging, or a worker's revolution; it's just a religious station. And how would you know if it is advocating those things? I doubt that you can hear it for yourself in Florida, or if you can that you listen regularly. So please explain your basis for asserting that it's a "left-wing" station. Rest assured that there is no left-wing "conspiracy so immense" to infiltrate the FCC. There are not 57 card -carrying members of the Communist Party, taking orders from the Kremlin, running the FCC. As a member of the left-wing-east-coast-academic-intelligentsia, I can assure you that we don't secretly control the government. Honest... If anything, the FCC is openly controlled by the large media corporations. This is called "regulatory capture," the process by which a regulatory agency, originally established to safeguard the public interest, becomes a tool of the industry it's supposed to oversee. The FCC is aiding and abetting an ongoing process of concentration in the media, a concentration tending toward monopoly. This process started during the Clinton administration, and the current FCC commissioners are more than happy to continue it. Witness the spectacular growth of Clear Channel, and the erosion of local programming on the dial. A destructive effect of this concentration of capital is concentration of control over the production and distribution of information and entertainment. The trend toward monopoly goes hand in hand with a trend toward mediocrity and uniformity. Indeed, the FCC seems intent on blocking access to the airwaves by anyone except the giant media corporations. Witness the death of low-power FM, which would have opened up a small portion of the spectrum to community-based organizations of all political stripes, from "left-wing" community groups to "right-wing" religious organizations. The spectrum is a public resource and of right ought to belong to the people, not a handful of corporations. A primary function of the FCC should be to ensure that there is room on the airwaves for a diverse range of entertainment and opinions, all across the political spectrum. Then we wouldn't need pirates (David Hochfelder, NJ, ibid.) My comments on Lubavicher/Chassidic Radio were not intended to be political, just an observation. However I have received directly and via the NRC e-list, emails that are political so here is my "last" two cents on the subject. The Jews invented Communism and have in the past and continue to at this time use the morally bankrupt system to destroy this country. The FCC track record for many years has been to silence mainly right wing radio stations only. What few left wingers like the recent Berkley FM pirate that the FCC has pursued, have received protection from leftist federal judges. the 1st amendment is reserved nowadays only for the left, period! (Thomas Giella, FL, ibid.) Now how can you call that non-political?????? Your message comes across as a total right wing political diatribe. If you have the willingness to say the rest of what you said, be honest about this part too. By the way, I object totally to your allegation of Jewish conspiracies. That stuff has no place on this list as it is totally out of the subject area. It has no place elsewhere either, as it nothing more than negative, hate based xenophobia (Chuck Hutton, ibid.) Well, I have been trying to find a moderate talk show on commercial radio here in the Dallas-Fort Worth market since Jim Bohannon was shut out here. Neither NPR nor an occasional peanut-powered pirate can compete for the minds of those who can be entertainingly frightened into believing that all our woes are part of some all-powerful conspiracy on either the left or right or some mysterious extraterrestrial power that's manipulating sunspots and earthquake- producing faults. Deregulation that began in the Reagan years has made it virtually impossible for a family business to start up in any retail field, including broadcasting. Such seemingly liberal ideas as OSHA and minimum wage laws do not hurt the big businesses who can afford the fines for hiring illegals or the bribes to keep the regulators away. For the regulators, who have to show some results to justify their budgets, it's much easier to clamp down on a mom-and-pop store than it is on a major manufacturer with political clout. I can't find a good classical music station between 88.1 and 91.9 anymore, where the spectrum sounds like wall-to-wall preachers who tell us that God is for big business and against balanced government. The knee-jerk political correctness we get from the left is currently being swamped by the rhetoric designed to lead us back to the days when whatever markets there were were cornered by the robber barons. (That sounds like a political campaign oratory, doesn't it, where one side takes its dire prediction of the results of an action and claims that the dire result is advocated by the proponents of the action.) Meanwhile, the trash that we see on our TV sitcoms, our violent cop shows, the outrageous dialogue from the fake wrestlers and the Jerry Springers and Rosie O'Donnells plus what we hear on the radio from Howard Stern and his many imitators are controlled by good-old, unregulated, maximum-profit, bottom line free enterprisers. It's a sort of a marriage of the worst of liberalism ... freedom to sin ... and the worst of conservatism ... big profit no matter what. As one who was able to visit East and West Berlin in 1957 - before the wall went up - where a vivacious, free population spurred in part by Marshall Plan stimulation and the capitalist, free enterprise model provided a stark contrast to the dull, drab, listless, society controlled by iron-fisted foreign military power, I lost my fear of the threat of communism. My only surprise was that it took so long for the human spirit in eastern Europe to rise up and remove the insult to freedom the Russians imposed. Ugh, that's more than I really wanted to say ... and my apologies to those on the list for prolonging this kind of editorial comment (John Callarman, Krum TX, ibid.) I really feel compelled to reply. Disclaimer: I'm not Jewish or a communist, so I have no axe to grind, except to oppose such erroneous and offensive remarks. The First Amendment gives someone the right to say stupid things in public, but this list is not the proper forum to advocate female infanticide, devil worship, anti-semitism, or any other extreme political viewpoint. Let's get things back to radio. If anyone wants to reply to this, have at me off-list. Thomas Giella once again wrote: ``The Jews invented Communism and have in the past and continue to at this time use the morally bankrupt system to destroy this country.`` 1. It's bigoted. Period. It`s like saying that Italians invented organized crime or the Irish invented political corruption. 2. It's very close to the Nazi justification for the Final Solution. Furthermore, if memory serves, Thomas Giella posted remarks to this site a few months ago saying that the United States could do with less Communist ideology and more Fascist ideology. At the time I'd assumed that he didn't mean Fascist racial ideology or militarism. Now I'm not so sure. 3. It's wrong. Communism as an economic philosophy has diverse origins, ranging from late 18th and early 19th century French writers to good ol' American protestants who launched communal experiments before the Civil War. So Marx was a Jew. But Lenin, Stalin, Mao, and Castro weren't. Equating a political philosophy with an ethnic group is just plain wrong. 4. It's baseless. It's absurd to assert that Jews and/or Communists are currently gnawing away at the vitals of the republic. Where's the evidence? Jewish control of the media or banking system? Perhaps the Protocols of the Elders of Zion? In fact, Thomas, you represent a far more serious threat to the republic, particularly to the values of tolerance, diversity, and level-headed political debate that have made this country great for over two centuries. Extremism in the defense of bigotry IS a vice (to paraphrase Sen. Goldwater, a Jew!). (David Hochfelder, ibid.) Tom, it's guys like you who give the left their best ammunition to make conservatives look like idiots. Unfortunately, those of us on the right have to deal with people like yourself claiming to be on our team and making us all appear foolish (Rick Shaftan, ibid.). ...I blame it all on the Illuminati and the Trilateral Commission. I can say this with confidence because my tinfoil baseball cap liner, diet of "Garlique" and conscientious use of Gold Bond Medicated Foot Powder have kept me free of these atheistic prevert attempts to mess with our Precious Bodily Fluids! Guys, if there existed so competent a group of conspiracies as people suggest, we'd all have been carrying those "666" RF ID tags for decades by now and V. I. Lenin's body would be on display in the Mausoleum in Times Square. Never ascribe to malice that which can be adequately explained by greed and stupidity. The nearest thing we seem to have to a Dark Empire right now is Clear Channel - and they're busy choking after biting off more than they could swallow.... Sheesh (Jack D. Ripper aka Lee Reynolds, ibid.) The "Clear Channel is in financial trouble" comment is all over the listener based boards as well. It is not true. They have very low debt, and excellent analyst opinions. If there is a debt crunch, look for IBM and GE to go out of business first as they have a greater debt to equity ration than Clear Channel (which bought most of its properties via merger or equity offerings, not debt). (David Gleason, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. Glenn: WLW did have a two hour documentary broadcast for its 80th anniversary on March 23, 2002. This was from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM EST. Here is their 80th anniversary newspaper article. http://enquirer.com/editions/2002/03/17/tem_wlw_700_turns_80.html (Artie Bigley, OH, March 24, DF LISTENING DIGEST) Wish we had known about it (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. THE COUNTRY MUSIC COUNTRY RADIO IGNORES March 24, 2002 By NEIL STRAUSS The roots-music soundtrack to "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" won album of the year at the Grammy Awards last month. Will country radio start playing traditional country music now? http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/24/arts/music/24STRA.html?ex=1018009525&ei=1&en=d985ea0c1eb36376 (Via Ricky Leong, Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. There is a very good article about voicetracking in Denver's Westword this week. It is on line at http://westword.com/issues/2002-03-21/message.html/1/index.html (Patrick Griffith, Westminster, CO, USA, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. CARL MCINTIRE - FUNDAMENTALIST RADIO EVANGELIST From: http://www.miami.com Posted on Sun, Mar. 24, 2002 Los Angeles Times Service The Rev. Carl McIntire, a firebrand fundamentalist radio evangelist who railed against communism, liberalism, racial integration, sex education, evolution and water fluoridation from his broadcast pulpit for four decades, has died. He was 95. McIntire died of natural causes Tuesday in Voorhees, N.J. From 1938 to 1998, McIntire served as pastor of Collingswood Bible Presbyterian Church in Collingswood, N.J. From 1948 until his death, he served as president of the International Council of Christian Churches, a group of fundamentalist denominations. During the peak of his popularity in the 1960s, McIntire's daily half- hour 20th Century Reformation Hour radio program was carried on more than 600 stations in the United States and Canada. McIntire's belief that every word of the Bible was inspired by God and his ultraconservative political views earned him a loyal radio following. But McIntire, who called himself ''the servant of the Lord in a very Holy Cause,'' had a flair for making his views heard off the air as well. In 1971, he led 14,000, mostly middle-age demonstrators down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., demanding a U.S. victory in Vietnam and promising, ``We are going to keep this country from falling to the communists.'' McIntire also picketed meetings of religious groups, including the World Council of Churches, where he protested appearances by religious leaders from behind the Iron Curtain, who he said were KGB agents. In the late 1960s, McIntire faced criticism of his own when his radio broadcasts got him into trouble with the Federal Communications Commission. Civic and religious groups were complaining that the station on which McIntire broadcast his program served as an outlet for what one clergyman called ''highly racist, anti-Semitic, anti-Negro, anti-Roman Catholic'' sentiments (via Mike Terry, DXLD) Didn't he once run or was rumoured to be starting an offshore radio station in the US? (Mike Terry, BDXC-UK via DXLD) Yes he ran one, Radio Free America. He owned WXUR-AM and WXUR-FM in Media Pennsylvania which were closed down by the FCC, they said he had failed to keep proper logs but the station was getting complaints also that they were violating the Fairness Doctrine which at the time stated that all sides of an issue should be aired. They closed on 5th July 1973 and he announced he would start Radio Free America. The MV Columbus anchored off Cape May in the last week of August and following some tests started regular broadcasts 19th September at 12:23 pm while sailing back and forth between Cape May and Avalon on 1160. I have a tape of the first broadcast recorded in Philadelphia and reception is not too good, after a hymn McIntyre opens by complaining about his licences being revoked, I will put some extracts on Tapecircle. By 4.00 pm they received complaints of interference from WHLW 1170 in Lakewood, New Jersey, though there were reports that this station had decided two weeks before RFA came on air that they would file a complaint and, in fact, the interference was only on the fringes of their area and was not severe. RFA closed at 10:14 pm. The next day a judge in Camden, New Jersey issued an order restraining RFA from making any further transmissions until 1st October when it would be decided whether it would be made permanent. The FCC filed complaints of interference from WHLW and from KSL 1160 Salt Lake City, 1160 was a clear channel frequency; the only other American stations on 1160 were local daytime only stations. As the Columbus had American registration McIntyre was liable to a one year jail sentence or a $10,000 fine for operating a radio station on board a US vessel under the 1934 Communications Act. A low power test on 1608, which McIntyre said RFA would use if they ever returned to the air, was made on 23rd September, whilst the ship was still in port! However RFA was not allowed to return, the legal cases dragged on and in March 1974 the order forbidding the station to broadcast was made permanent. The station had a 10 kW RCA transmitter, run at 5 kW, and an end fed inverted V supported by a 100 foot mast (Mike Barraclough, UK, BDXC-UK via DXLD) ** U S A. On 14275-USB, from around 2042 UT March 25, intermittent music QRM to Glenn Baxter`s K1MAN, IARN transmission. Mostly oldies; very strong here, up to 20 over 9; went off at least for a while at 2100 allowing IARN to be heard again (David Hodgson, TN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Also audible here, then into QSOs about the jamming (gh, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [non]. As above under GERMANY: Voice of Hope / High Adventure Ministries --- via IBB Biblis: --- daily 1700-1900 9495 80 !!! I believe this may be a first, a US government facility being used to broadcast private gospel huxters, a clear violation of separation of church and state. Apparently this is being done since Deutsche Telekom is the intermediary, perhaps overflow Jülich cannot handle?? Of course, private US SW stations have carried US government broadcasts under certain circumstances, e.g. KNLS with Radio Free Asia (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** USA. DX-ing with Cumbre Saturday 1230 edition on 9930 was finally cancelled and changed to sermon program which has been heard for the last two weeks (Vladimir Kovalenko, Tomsk, Russia via Signal for DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hawai`i ** UZBEKISTAN. UZBEK WEBSITE LAUNCHED RFE/RL's new Uzbek-language website, http://www.ozodlik.org was launched on 20 March. The Ozodlik.org site, designed by the RFE/RL Internet team, is based on traditional Uzbek designs and is updated daily with news, reports, and features. Nine weekly feature programs cover press reviews, women's issues, science and technology, ecology, religion, music, and crime and society. Three feature programs are available as audio pieces and the remaining are text articles in Cyrillic Uzbek. An instruction page for reading Uzbek texts with Cyrillic fonts is also included. Ozodlik.org uses the Cyrillic alphabet so that RFE/RL's Uzbek content is easily accessible. In future, there are plans to also offer Latin-based texts. All broadcasts from RFE/RL's Uzbek service are streamed live on the Internet, recorded, and made available as on-demand files. Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty is the first international broadcaster with an Uzbek audio and text website. (RFE/RL Internet Team and RFE/RL Uzbek Service, 21 March via RFE/RL Media Matters via DXLD) THE INTERNET IN UZBEKISTAN. Although Uzbekistan was branded an "Enemy of the Internet" by Reporters without Borders (RSF) three years ago, the country has recently experienced noticeable growth in Internet availability. Six years ago, the country only had a single U.S.-funded Internet service provider (ISP), Pertka –- which mostly provides e- mail services for students. Today, there are dozens of ISPs. However, the cost of Internet usage remains extremely high relative to average earnings and so usage is mostly restricted to e-mail. Recently, the Uzbek government adopted a special program on Internet services development which promises to make the Internet available, in the technical sense, to 150,000 rural users by 2004. There are disparate reports on the current number of Internet users in Uzbekistan. The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) estimates that there are about 7000, but Uzbek officials believe the total is around 200,000. Another measure of the growth of Uzbekistan's Internet can be seen in the Yahoo!-compiled directory which today lists 220 recommended sites, whereas five years ago it was limited to 25. Most of these links from the Yahoo Uzbekistan directory are in English, but a number of news sites have content in Russian and English. Only about 10 sites have Uzbek-language content, including those of the two opposition parties ERK (Mohammad Solih) and BIRLIK (Abdurakim Polatov), which are based outside the country. Another level of challenge for Uzbek websites is choosing which alphabet to use. In the early 1990s, Uzbek orthography was officially changed from the Cyrillic to the Latin alphabet. However, not many Uzbeks over the age of 30 can read the Latin alphabet, and so the transition hasn't been completely adopted. In 2000, Microsoft introduced an Uzbek font in the Cyrillic alphabet, thereby supporting continued online reliance on Cyrillic. Some very official sites –- most notably that of the Uzbekistan Presidential Press Center -- are available only in Russian or English but not in Uzbek (RFE/RL Internet Team and RFE/RL Uzbek Service, 21 March, via RFE/RL Media Matters via DXLD) ** VIETNAM. 12019.86, VoV 1130-1230 with Asian music, then 1230 "Welcome to the Voice of Vietnam" and into news items in English, good signal (Bob Wilkner, R75, NRD 535D, Margate, FL, March 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ZIMBABWE. Dear Glenn - The Zimbabwe audio is again available from http://www.zbc.co.zw in Windows Media format. 73, (Erik Køie, Copenhagen, March 24, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. 5796, 14 March at 0325 with music; I stayed here as it was tango non-stop on the record player or in the CD, but it was nothing real and elegant from La Plata, but instead more like heavy dance shoving on a mosquito rich evening in Finnish Karelen. Only Q 2 (Johan Berglund, SW Bulletin, via Thomas Nilsson, DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. 6715 Korean religious. March 24 at 1844 sign-on with two-three words by male, then he started singing. Boy, that man loves to sing, sounds he took couple of "one more times" at the end. At 1903 a short prayer. Then the usual stuff. Checking around 2000 show goes on, but rechecking at 2011 they were gone. The ute was off this Sunday. 73 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ KEEPING A-02 SECRET Glenn, In view of your comments, I just checked the HFCC site an it says 'A02 Operational Schedule will be available here around 2 April 2002.' http://www.hfcc.org/data/index.html (Andy Sennitt, RNW, March 25, DX LISENING DIGEST) CALENDARIO RADIOFÓNICO, por Ruben Guillermo Margenet, MES DE ABRIL 1 1925 Comenzó sus transmisiones Radio Dinamarca 1 1930 CX6 SODRE (ex CWOA Radio Oficial), Montevideo-Uruguay 1 1937 SABC, Sudáfrica (3320 Khz) 1 1938 Radio Santa Fé, Bogotá-Colombia (4965 Khz) 1 1939 Golpe de estado del Gral. Franco en España. 1 1949 CBN, Newfoundland, Canadá (640 Khz) 1 1958 Radio Greenland (650/710 Khz) 1 1959 Radio Pio XII, Siglo XX-Bolivia (5952 Khz) 1 1973 Voice of Free Korea pasa a llamarse Radio Korea, Seúl 1 1982 Primer programa "Actualidad DX", RAE-Argentina (realización de Gabriel Iván Barrera) 1 1982 Radio Swaziland (6165 Khz) 1 1986 Se crea ADU Asociación DXman Uruguay, Montevideo 1 1992 Primer programa de TV de DW vía Satélite hacia el mundo 1 1994 Ultimo programa en portugués a través de VOA, USA 1 1999 Cierre de R. Minería, Santiago-Chile por problemas económicos 1 Día del Operador de Audio en Colombia. 2 1872 Muere Samuel Morse 2 1923 WOW, Nebraska (590 Khz) 2 1925 WIBA, Wisconsin (1310 Khz) 2 1962 Tropas argentinas recuperan las Islas Malvinas 2 1974 Picadilly Radio, UK (1152 Khz) 2 1992 CBC R. Canadá Int. inaugura transmisor en Sackville 3 1953 Radio América, Venezuela (890 Khz) 3 1954 Primer programa en idioma extranjero de DW (5 minutos en español, inglés, francés y portugués) 3 1958 KIRL, Missouri (1460 Khz) 3 1990 KBS comienza a emitir vía Sackville-Canadá 4 1937 R. Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Chile (1450 Khz) 4 1983 Country Sound Radio, UK (1476 Khz) 4 1986 Radio San Nicolás, Perú (5471 Khz) 4 1989 GEM AM, UK (945 Khz) 4 1989 Xtra AM, UK (1152 Khz) 5 1922 KKOB, New Mexico (770 Khz) 5 1922 KMBZ, Kansas City (980 Khz) 5 1922 WBAA, Indiana (920 Khz) 5 1922 WRTH, Saint Louis (1430 Khz) 5 1924 LR11 Radio Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina 5 1967 R. Cristal Internacional "570 AM", Sto. Domingo, Rep. Dominicana 5 1992 Autogolpe de estado en Perú. Alberto Fujimori 6 1947 WHOI Salinas, Puerto Rico (1210 Khz) 6 1965 Primer satélite de Comunicaciones. Early Bird (Intelsat 1), USA 6 1966 XERUY Mérida, México (1120 Khz) 6 1984 RGS Radio Grupo Sur - Fundación, Montevideo-Uruguay 6 1990 KCBC, UK (1584 Khz) 7 Día del Cartero en Argentina y otros países 7 1922 WJPC, Chicago (950 Khz) 7 1982 LRA60 Radio Nacional Islas Malvinas-Argentina 8 1928 HIX, República Dominicana 8 1964 Radio Alvorada de Londrina, Brasil (4865 Khz) 8 1989 North Sound Two Radio, UK (1035 Khz) 8 1996 Radio 1521, Irlanda del Norte (1521 Khz) 9 1944 Radio Victoria, Lima-Perú 9 1969 Radio Anguila (1505 Khz) 10 1922 WBBR [sic], New York (1130 Khz) 10 1924 WHO, Iowa (1040 Khz) 10 1945 LU5 Radio Neuquén, Argentina (580 Khz) 10 1954 RAI Radio Audizioni Italiana - Aniversario, Italia 10 1981 Caribbean Beacon, Anguilla 11 1936 Radio Cusco, Perú (6203.7 Khz) 11 1949 SIRA Servicio Internacional Radio Argentina, Buenos Aires 11 1957 Radio Garoua, Camerún (5010 Khz) 11 1969 Radio Veritas, Filipinas 11 1980 Great Yorkshire Gold, UK (1035 Khz) 12 1922 KBBT, Oregon (970 Khz) 12 1923 Primer emisión en Colombia de Estación Internacional de Morato 12 1924 WLS, Illinois (890 Khz) 12 1949 Ondas Azuayas, Ecuador (4980 Khz) 12 1954 Rock around the clock. Bill Halley & The cornets, USA (Primer gran éxito del Rock'n Roll) 12 1961 Regreso a la Tierra del Vostok 1, URSS (Yuri A. Gagarin) 12 1962 RCN Caquetá, Colombia (1440 Khz) 12 1999 Radio Mosoj Chaski, Cochabamba-Bolivia (3310 Khz) 14 Día de las Américas 14 1912 Hundimiento del Titanic (SOS recibido en N. York por David Sarnoff) 14 1942 Radio América, Lima-Perú (6010 Khz) 14 1972 La Voz de la Selva, Iquitos-Perú 14 1980 Radio Quepos, Puerto de Quepos-Panamá 14 1997 Radioemisora Carabineros, Chile (820 Khz) 14 2000 Radio Altair, emisora virtual de la Universidad de Antioquia, Colombia sólo emite por Internet: http://altair.udea.edu.co 15 1921 WSPD, Ohio (1370 Khz) 15 1947 Radio Berlín Internacional, ex Rep. Democrática de Alemania 15 1947 RNW Radio Nederland Wereldomroep - Aniversario, Holanda 15 1967 Se funda en México el grupo radial "MVS", dueña de 67 emisoras entre ellas: Pulsar y Radio Activo. 15 1981 Radio Nacional, San José de Costa Rica (590 Khz) 15 1994 R. Internacional Honduras en onda corta (4930 Khz) 16 1922 KFI, California (640 Khz) 16 1948 Azad Kashmir Radio, Pakistán (4790 Khz) 16 1995 Isle of Wright Radio, Irlanda del Norte (828 Khz) 17 1922 KNBR, San Francisco (680 Khz) 17 1925 CJVI, British Columbia, Canadá (900 Khz) 17 1958 Radio Tarma, Perú (4775 Khz) 17 1960 KICY, Alaska (850 Khz) 18 1926 Polskie Radio, Polonia (6135 Khz) 18 1934 CHSJ, New Brunswick, Canadá (700 Khz) 18 1970 LT20 Radio Junín, Prov. de Buenos Aires-Argentina (1470 Khz) 19 1976 BBC Radio Aberdeen, UK (990 Khz) 20 1922 CFUN, British Columbia, Canadá (1410 Khz) 20 1923 Primer emisión de radio en Brasil: R. Sociedade do Rio de Janeiro 20 Día Internacional de Guglielmo Marconi, ONU 21 1922 KSL, Utah (1160 Khz) 21 1980 Radio Satélite, Cajamarca-Perú (6724.3 Khz) 22 1928 Radio Clube do Pará, Brasil (4885 Khz) 22 1932 La Voz del Trópico, República Dominicana (790 Khz) 22 1947 WTOB, North Carolina (1380 Khz) 22 1980 Radio Metropolitana, La Paz-Bolivia (6195 Khz) 23 1934 La Voz de Carabobo, Valencia-Venezuela 23 1959 LS5 Radio Rivadavia, Buenos Aires-Argentina (630 Khz) 23 1961 Canal 4 Montecarlo - Aniversario, Uruguay 23 Día del idioma castellano 24 1938 LV4 Radio San Rafaél, Mendoza-Argentina (620 Khz) 24 1976 LR9 Radio América, Buenos Aires-Argentina (1190 Khz) 24 1997 CB82 Radioemisora Carabineros de Chile (820 Khz), Santiago- Chile 25 1922 WSOY, Illinois (1340 Khz) 25 1948 LV15 Radio Villa Mercedes, San LUis-Argentina (640 Khz) 25 1948 CMBF Radio Musical Nacional, La Habana-Cuba 25 1874 Guglielmo Marconi - Aniversario nacimiento, Bolonia-Italia 26 1922 WBAP, Texas (820 Khz) 26 1986 Explota reactor N 4 en Central Atómica de Chernobyl-Ucrania 27 1958 LU13 Radio Necochea, Prov. de Buenos Aires-Argentina (960 Khz) 27 1791 Samuel Morse - Nacimiento, USA 27 1926 Primera emisión de prueba de Radio Ayre, Caracas-Venezuela 27 1932 CX30 Radio Nacional, Montevideo-Uruguay 27 1950 Radio Intercontinental, España (918 Khz) 27 1958 Radio Carmelo, Uruguay (1460 Khz) 28 1922 WOI, Ames (640 Khz) 28 1948 WSAR, North Carolina (1480 Khz) 28 1954 Radio Clube de Paranaense en onda corta, Brasil (11935 Khz) 29 1922 WTVN, Ohio (610 Khz) 29 1922 WBAX, Wilkes-Barre (1240 Khz) 29 1924 DW Deutsche Welle, Alemania (6075 Khz) 29 1971 BBC Radio Derby, UK (1116 Khz) 29 1974 Radio Padilla, Bolivia (3476 Khz) 30 1949 CKRD, Alberta, Canadá (700 Khz) 30 1950 WRDZ, Ohio (1260 Khz) 30 1957 Radio Guaiba, Porto Alegre-Brasil (720//6000//11785 Khz) 30 1963 Radio Guatapurí, Colombia (740 Khz) 30 1991 Radio RSA - Cierre de servicios, Johannesbourg-Sudáfrica. (hoy emite como Channel Africa y sigue perteneciendo a SABC) 30 1993 Virgin Radio, UK (1215 Khz) Las fuentes de esta información son: Roberto Scaglione (BCL Sicilia News)-Italia; Radioactividades-Uruguay, Héctor Arboleda-Colombia y Rubén Guillermo Margenet-Argentina (Conexión Digital 3/24 via DXLD)### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 2-047, March 23, 2002 edited by Glenn Hauser, wghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted afterwards at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd02.html For restrixions and searchable 2002 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn WORLD OF RADIO #1123: (STREAM) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1123.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1123.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1123.html NEXT AIRINGS ON RFPI: Sun 0000, 0600, 1200, 1830?, 2430? on some of: 7445-AM/USB, 15039, 21815-USB NEXT AIRINGS ON WWCR: Sun 0330 on 5070; Sun 0730, Mon 0100, 0600 on 3210, Wed 1030 on 9475 ** AFGHANISTAN. MISSION CONCLUDED FOR US PSYOPS AFGHAN BROADCASTS | Text of report in English by Radio Netherlands "Media Network" web site on 21 March Commando Solo: Mission Accomplished, 21 March 2001: The fleet of EC- 130E Commando Solo aircraft that were used for US psychological warfare operations in Afghanistan returned to their base in Pennsylvania this week after almost six months of continuous operation. The 40-year-old aircraft flew over 300 missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Their shortwave frequency of 8700 kHz was heard by listeners around the world. The six specially equipped aircraft will now be upgraded to permit them to relay material from satellite. In Afghanistan, as in previous missions, most of the material was pre-recorded, with the occasional live broadcast by a native speaker if circumstances required it. For more details of the operation, see this page in our Afghanistan media dossier: http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/html/afghanistan.html [BBC Monitoring confirms that the US psyops Information Radio broadcasts, which had been observed on mediumwave 864 kHz and shortwave 8700 kHz since 14 October 2001, are no longer heard.] Source: Radio Netherlands "Media Network" web site, Hilversum, in English 21 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) Aha that explains it why I haven't heard them lately (Robin L. Harwood, Tasmania, Mar 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** AFGHANISTAN [non]. Re reports of Commando Solos are back home. March 22 at 1435 on 8700U same kind of programming as last several months. Rather weak signal, maybe poor conditions. If this is still Information Radio, it must be (and has been?) land based. 73 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 8700, Information Radio, 14 Mar, 1518-1535, SINPO 35343, sometimes decreased to 25332. Most of the time music was played. Two short info messages sounded, each lasted less than two minutes. One of messages was in Pushtu, another one in Dari. USB mode (Dmitri Mezin, Kazan, Russia, Signal via DXLD) ** ANDAMAN and NICOBAR ISLANDS. See INDIA ** ARGENTINA? 13363.50 LSB: The mystery station heard on this frequency occasionally could be an Argentine Armed Forces outlet, more common on 15820 LSB. Relays material from various Argentinian radio stations. On Thursday morning from 0605 UTC onwards I heard a Spanish language Night Show with a female presenter. Lot of talk/phone-in stuff, plus music by Duran2, Eric Clapton and others. Also B.A. weather and news after 0630 UTC. Varied and enjoyable. Sad to note strong QRM on AFRTS frq 6,458,50 night and day. That´s new. Annoying utility stuff similar to that heard on 13362.00 USB during daytime. Oh, boy! Best 73`s, Helo (Kari Helopaltio, Finland, March 21, hard- core-dx via DXLD) Very likely it is Argentine. That frequency is listed for them in Domestic Broadcasting Survey (Denmark). Other listed frequencies are 8098, 15820, 20276, 29810. Possibly there are also other frequencies used by them. 73 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, ibid.) ** AUSTRIA. A-02 schedule for AWR via Moosbrunn: 7165 MOS 300 kW/non-dir 1600-1630 German to Eu 7230 MOS 300 kW/non-dir 0700-0800 German/English to Eu 9820 MOS 500 kW/090 deg 0200-0300 English/Urdu to SoAs 11665 MOS 500 kW/100 deg 0330-0400 Persian to ME 11710 MOS 500 kW/145 deg 0300-0330 Oromo to EaAf 15175 MOS 500 kW/190 deg 1900-2000 Arabic to NoAf 15355 MOS 500 kW/215 deg 2000-2100 Dyula/French to NoWeAf 15355 MOS 500 kW/215 deg 2100-2200 English to NoWeAf 15410 MOS 500 kW/100 deg 1630-1700 Persian to ME 15460 MOS 500 kW/145 deg 1700-1800 Arabic to EaAf/ME 15470 MOS 500 kW/115 deg 0400-0500 Arabic to ME 15470 MOS 500 kW/145 deg 0500-0600 Arabic to EaAf/ME 15470 MOS 500 kW/190 deg 0600-0700 Arabic to NoAf 17555 MOS 500 kW/115 deg 1800-1900 Arabic to ME 17780 MOS 500 kW/215 deg 0730-0830 Dyula/French to NoWeAf 17780 MOS 500 kW/215 deg 0830-0930 English to NoWeAf (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 22 via DXLD) ** AZERBAIJAN. At last, I managed to catch the Voice of Azerbaijan on MW frequency 1296 kHz. I've become convinced in the possibility of such a reception after I've got the signal of Radio Liberty relay via Baku (it was on 13 March after 1900). "What a pity, why did I not tune in earlier, Voice of Azerbaijan has a Russian service at 1830", so I thought. Well, the evening of 16 March brought some success. I listened to Russian broadcast at 1830-1853. It was weak, periods of deep fading occured every 4...5 minutes, but nevertheless, I've pick up some definitive items and wrote a report. A number of political reports and news about Caspian states co-operation were aired that day (Dmitri Mezin, Kazan, Russia, Signal March 21 via DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. RADIO COSMOS - Cochabamba MW 770 7130 Mar/17 1730 -1745 s.off 6036 Mar/17 1745 -1830 s.off 3405 Mar/20 0135 Testes de Transmissão ? (Rogildo F. Aragão, Cochabamba, Bolivia, @tividade DX Mar 22 via DXLD) Added 3405 to earlier report ** BRAZIL. Esquema das transmissões da Rádio Gaúcha, Porto Alegre-RS em ondas curtas: ZYE 850 / 49 m: 6020 kHz 0900 - 0400 ZYE 851 / 25 m: 11915 kHz 0900 - 0300 http://www.clicRBS.com.br atendimento@c... [truncated by yahoogroups] (Claudia Landell, Rádio Gaúcha, @tividade DX Mar 22 via DXLD) ** BURMA [non]. MADAGASCAR(non): A-02 schedule for Democratic Voice of Burma via RNW/Madagascar: 17495 MDC 050 kW/055 deg 1430-1530 Burmese to SEAs (ex 17490/17805) 11715 MDC 200 kW/055 deg 2330-0030 Burmese to SEAs (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 22 via DXLD) ** CANADA. Just listened to the Première Chaîne of Radio-Canada at midnight EST. The newsreader read a quick scripter about the failed negotiations between the U.S. and Canada over softwood lumber, then went straight to a script about the failed negotiations between the union (SCRC) and CBC management. Fill music began 12:01 a.m. A cultural programme began at 12:05 a.m. This note appears after the weather on the RCI website: "Dear subscribers: I'm the editor who does this task during the week. But I won't be doing it on Friday because I'll be on a one-day labour strike. I enjoy the task and appreciate the idea of having readers. All this to say that the Cyberjournal-web bulletin may fall by the wayside once or twice in coming weeks because of strikes or lockouts. Please be patient, at least for a while; things may straighten themselves out. We want very much to bring you this service, the only daily Canadian news bulletin on the Internet, unless I' m mistaken. Thanks for reading us." (Ricky Leong, QU, March 22, DXLD) "CBC SET TO LOCK OUT STRIKERS, UNION SAYS" http://www.canada.com/montreal/montrealgazette/story.asp?id=06E73346-EA44-4463-AF7D-D1A1FAE68763 This does affect RCI, with our on-air people, production assistants and newsroom staff being on strike. You certainly will be noticing the strike when you tune into RCI! 73- (Bill Westenhaver, QU, March 22, and via Ricky Leong, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Viz.: CBC SET TO LOCK OUT STRIKERS, UNION SAYS by Charlie Fidelman, Montreal Gazette, Friday, March 22, 2002 A labour dispute at the CBC is threatening to develop into more than a short 24-hour blackout. While one side is on strike, the other is threatening a lockout. Striking employees set up picket lines at the CBC's René Lévesque Blvd. broadcast office as of midnight, throwing English and French local radio and television programs off the air. But the strike action won't darken television screens completely or shut down radio because management will be taking over the newsroom. "It won't be a black screen," CBC spokesman Marc Sévigny said of television programming. "We will be in replacement mode." News programs and information shows with well-known hosts on the CBC and RDI, the French all-news channel, "will be replaced with something," he said. "Most managers aren't comfortable in front of a camera or microphone." There will be Saturday hockey - the visuals only - without the usual commentary. There will be some news programming and short news bulletins. Mostly, there will be music. "Obviously we cannot maintain the same service in the news section, but we will do our best," Sévigny said. Shows already in the can or produced elsewhere are not expected to be affected. Employees and support staff at the CBC's French-language news service in Quebec and New Brunswick have been threatening strike action since negotiations with management broke off Tuesday evening. Yesterday, the union representing 1,300 staff - the Syndicat des Communications de Radio-Canada - announced a 24-hour walkout as of midnight. But CBC officials say they will not accept the walkout. Workers shouldn't expect to come waltzing back to work the following day, Sévigny warned. "From our point of view it's a strike, not a 24-hour walkout. And before they can come back, we need a new agreement - a protocol." Does that mean that without such an deal on the table, workers can expect to be locked out? "These are your words," Sévigny replied. "The union knows the risks." Union representatives have accused the CBC of intimidation tactics. "The CBC is a fascist firm," union spokesman Daniel Roney said. "And you can quote me saying that." The company has "run a campaign of terror, threatening workers that they'll 'stay outside for months.' " "But for us, it's only a 24-hour strike," he said. If CBC proceeds with a lockout, it will find itself with a serious public relations problem, he added. Frustrated with negotiations that stalled since last June, workers voted 89 per cent in favour of a strike on Saturday. "Conciliation didn't work," said union president Michel Couturier. Negotiations broke down Wednesday, Couturier said, when the CBC tabled its final offer. Key issues include pay equity and freelance or part- time employment status. The union wants Radio-Canada to hire half of all employees on regular duty who are now designated as temporary staff. "It's really too bad for listeners, which is why we're only going out for 24 hours," he said. "We want to send a message to CBC: "Come back to the table and talk." A strike could affect employees in Montreal, Quebec City, Sherbrooke, Moncton, Chicoutimi, Sept-îles and and Trois-Rivières. The last major CBC labour dispute that ended in a strike/lockout was in 1980-81. "It was a very long strike - about eight months," Sévigny recalled. © Copyright 2002 Montreal Gazette (via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) RCI relay of SRC-AM at 1700 UT on Friday, Mar 22, consisted of fill music and announcements (in French) about strike (Mike Cooper, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I was just reading some stuff on the SCRC (SRC union's) web site. Their members will insist on returning to work tonight at midnight... Meanwhile, CBC management says one-day strikes don't exist, and the worker can't come back in. (Ricky Leong, early UT Sat Mar 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** COSTA RICA. We had a report from southern US of RFPI putting a spur on 21295 LSB. This was a very small one, about half a watt, but of concern. It turns out this happens only when both SSB transmitters are on at the same time, 21815 and 7445. So now we will avoid that happening. Plan in future to run AM again on 7445; now it is running almost full power on SSB, but that pushes the limit of the DC blocking capacitor. We have a donated DC blocking capacitor about to be tested. Hope to finish tuning the new antenna for 7445 in a week or two so it can be mounted atop the 200 foot tower, and then full power can be run on AM, gaining about 6 dB over present level. This should benefit most more distant listeners in Eu, SPac, NNam. We have a bartering situation: antenna worker who doesn`t mind climbing high tower, in exchange for James doing some high voltage repair work for him on ground. The antenna is a simple dipole with corner reflector made of many wires behind it. Thanks to a Canadian donating a nice computer, RFPI`s webcast is reliable, at 2200-1400 UT weekdays, 24 hours on weekends (RFPI Mailbag with James Latham and Joe Bernard, first airing 2000 UT March 22, notes by gh for DXLD) The night before, RFPI asked me to check out the 21295 spur. Could not hear it here around 0030 UT, but isn`t that the DXpedition frequency, currently very active with Ducie Island, so everybody must be monitoring it. I then figured out how 7445 and 21815 would put a spur on 21295: 3 x 7445 = 22335; 22335 is the same separation from 21815, 520 kHz, as 21815 is from 21295 (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA [and non]. DEFENSE ANALYST PLEADS GUILTY TO SPYING FOR CUBA By Neely Tucker, Washington Post Staff Writer Wednesday, March 20, 2002; Page A01 Colaboración Armando F. Mastrapa III, New York, E.U. La Nueva Cuba Marzo 20, 2002 ---------------------------------------------------------------------- The Defense Intelligence Agency's senior analyst for Cuban issues pleaded guilty yesterday in U.S. District Court in Washington to being a spy for Fidel Castro's government, admitting that for 16 years she used her highly classified position to steal top-secret information and pass it along to a nation the State Department lists as supporting international terrorism. Working with shortwave radios, encrypted transmissions and a pay phone outside the National Zoo, Ana Belen Montes gave the Cuban government the names of four U.S. "covert intelligence officers" working in Cuba. She also told Cuban officials about a "special access program related to the national defense of the United States" and disclosed that the U.S. government had tracked down the location of various Cuban military installations, federal prosecutors said yesterday. Montes, 45, apparently was motivated not by money -- her defense attorney and federal prosecutors said yesterday she worked for no more than "nominal" expense reimbursements -- but by her moral outrage at U.S. policy toward the impoverished island nation. "She engaged in these activities because of her belief that U.S. policy does not afford Cubans respect, tolerance and understanding," said Plato Cacheris, her attorney. "She was motivated by her desire to help the Cuban people and did not receive any compensation." Montes pleaded guilty yesterday to one count of conspiracy to commit espionage, a crime that could carry the death penalty. But federal prosecutors agreed to a 25-year term if she tells the FBI and other investigators all the details she knows about Cuban intelligence activities, according to the plea agreement. Judge Ricardo M. Urbina set a September sentencing date, meaning Montes has six months to be debriefed by investigators. That debriefing may prove to be a cache of counterintelligence information, as the indictment revealed yesterday said that Montes spied for the Cuban government at least from the time she joined the DIA in 1985 until her arrest Sept. 21 last year. "Montes used her position as an intelligence officer and, subsequently, a senior intelligence analyst . . . to gather writings, documents, materials and information, classified for reasons of national security, for unlawful communication, delivery and transmission to the government of Cuba," said Ronald Walutes, the assistant U.S. attorney prosecuting the case, reading from the indictment. "Those statements are true and accurate," Montes said when Urbina asked her whether the charges were correct. Luís M. Fernández, spokesman for the Cuban diplomatic mission in Washington, declined to comment. Montes, a U.S. citizen of Puerto Rican descent, was a well-known if quiet figure in Washington's Cuba-watching community. She was a fixture at Georgetown University's Caribbean Project, an unofficial study group composed of academics, policy analysts and activists with an interest in Cuba. "I don't think I ever heard her voice an opinion" about U.S. policy, said Wayne Smith, a study group member who is a former chief of the U.S. interests section in Havana. "During coffee breaks, when everyone else would stand up and talk, she usually stayed at her desk." It was unclear yesterday how much damage was done by Montes' spying. The four agents she identified to the Cuban government are "alive and safe," according to U.S. Attorney Roscoe C. Howard Jr. Government officers who attended yesterday's hearing declined to say if they knew whether Cuba passed along the information to hostile countries or organizations. Montes has a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. She moved from the Justice Department to the DIA, the 7,000-member U.S. agency that produces military intelligence about foreign countries, in 1985. She lived alone in an apartment in the 3000 block of Macomb Street NW, worked at Bolling Air Force Base and went undetected until the fall of 2000. Acting on classified information, FBI agents began tracking her movements. They obtained court permission to enter her apartment and copy computer data. Agents found that Montes communicated with Cuba by high-frequency, encrypted transmissions that she picked up on a shortwave radio. She sent information back by using pay phones in Northwest Washington and Bethesda to transmit similar encoded information to an electronic pager number. "This was a classic case of espionage and counterespionage," said Van A. Harp, head of the FBI's Washington field office. Copyright © 1997-2002 - LA NUEVA CUBA NOSTROMO PUBLISHING CORP. All Rights Reserved. 73's (via Oscar, and Sergei Sosedkin, DXLD) U.S. INTELLIGENCE ANALYST ADMITS SPYING FOR CUBA AT LEAST 16 YEARS DEFENSE DEPT. EMPLOYEE REVEALED IDENTITIES OF FOUR UNDERCOVER AGENTS Associated Press, The Baltimore Sun, Marzo 20, 2002 WASHINGTON - A U.S. intelligence analyst who revealed the identities of four undercover agents to Cuba pleaded guilty yesterday to espionage. She could spend 25 years in federal prison. Ana Belen Montes, 45, was spying for Cuba from the time she started work at the Defense Intelligence Agency in 1985 until her arrest Sept. 21, prosecutors say. By that time, she was a senior intelligence analyst and had used short-wave radio and coded pager messages to give Cuba U.S. secrets so sensitive they could not be fully described in court documents. "Yes, those statements are true and accurate," Montes told U.S. District Court Judge Ricardo Urbina after the charges were read. When Urbina asked whether one reason she had agreed to plead guilty was "the fact that you committed the crime," she said, "Yes." Roscoe Howard Jr., U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, said law enforcement officials did not know whether any of the information Montes transmitted to Cuba was shared with other countries. However, the Sept. 11 attacks on New York and Washington heightened the need to "get her off the streets," and influenced the timing of her arrest, he said. Howard added that, to the government's knowledge, Montes received only nominal payments for expenses. He would not speculate on her motivation. A U.S. official familiar with the case, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Montes was believed to have been recruited by Cuban intelligence when she worked in the Freedom of Information office at the Justice Department, between 1979 and 1985, and was asked to seek work at an agency that would provide more useful information to Cuba. The four undercover agents whose identities she revealed, Howard said, are safe. According to court papers, Montes communicated with the Cuban Intelligence Agency through encrypted messages and received her instructions over short-wave radio. The instructions were issued in numerical code, which she translated into Spanish text with a computer program provided by Cuba. From public pay phones, she then used a prepaid calling card to send coded numeric messages to a pager owned by Cuban intelligence. Those messages, prosecutors said, typically were codes for "I received message" or "danger." The FBI secretly searched Montes' residence under a court order May 25 and uncovered information about several Defense Department issues, including a 1996 war games exercise conducted by the U.S. Atlantic Command, authorities said. A message from her Cuban contact said, "Practically everything that takes place [during the exercise] will be of intelligence value. Let's see if it deals with contingency plans and specific targets in Cuba." The DIA, based at Bolling Air Force Base in Washington, provides analyses of foreign countries' military capabilities and troop strengths for Pentagon planners. Copyright © 1997-2002 - LA NUEVA CUBA NOSTROMO PUBLISHING CORP. All Rights Reserved. 73'S (via OSCAR, DXLD) ** ECUADOR. Radio HCJB will cancel its live streaming in the near future; only on-demand RA and MP3 will remain; see this posting from the German A-DX list: ------ From: "Markus Weidner" weidner@gsm-news.de To: a-dx@elitas.com inter-net-radio@yahoogroups.com Subject: [A-DX] HCJB streicht Livestream Der ecuadorianische Missionssender Radio HCJB http://www.andenstimme.org plant, den Internet-Livestream seines Programms in naher Zukunft einzustellen. Das wurde heute in der deutschsprachigen Sendung "Land und Leute in Südamerika" bekannt gegeben. Die deutschsprachigen und plattdeutschen Programme für Europa stehen aber weiterhin on demand in Real Audio und MP3 zur Verfügung (Markus Weidner, Biebergemünd, via Kai Ludwig, Germany, DXLD) But they don`t specifically say English or other language streaming will be cancelled, just Germans... (gh, DXLD) ** ECUADOR. 2960.21, Radio Atlántida, Alausí (2 x 1480 harmonic) 1011- 1031 Mar 21, Talk about natural products and medicines. 1015 ID in passing "...por Radio Atlántida...", 1031 Andean flute instrumental. Very briefly // 5920.42 (4 x 1480) where ID was actually heard. Fair to poor signal (Mark Mohrmann, VT, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** FRANCE. 25926 NBFM, Comité Departemental du tourisme de la Charente-Maritime (the local tourism office for departement Charente- Maritime, in La Rochelle). 2123 March 21. This 1 watt French tourist information service continues to be heard fairly regularly in the southern USA. Last fall, I counted as many as 10-20 carriers all jammed together between 25924-8 kHz. The problem then was all those FM signals tended to cancel each other out, so even though signal strength was at times good, audio was quite difficult to produce. Today I noted there was only 1 carrier present, which means that the FM audio is much easier to hear. The French government has allocated 5 frequencies in which these 1 watt transmitters may operate. They are: 25845, 25880, 25925, 26000 and 26035 kHz. There maybe a number of signals on each frequencies. At his time I am only hearing one signal on 25926. For more info on this TIS: http://www.csa.fr http://tif.journal-officiel.gouv.fr/2000/12561001.tif http://tif.journal-officiel.gouv.fr/2000/12562001.tif http://tif.journal-officiel.gouv.fr/2000/12563001.tif The best time to DX this one in SE NAm is around 2000-2130 when the first point of refraction through the F layer of the ionosphere is experiencing dusk. I am observing the peak time rapidly getting later and later as the days lengthen here in the northern hemisphere (David Hodgson, TN, IC R-75, 5.5 meter dipole fed with 300 ohm twin line into an antenna tuner, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** INDIA. 4760 AIR Leh, 1439, Leh under dominant Pt Blair, with music while M and W are talking on Pt Blair. Music more middle eastern for Leh (sung with chanting) while Pt Blair has movie style subcontinental music. Air Leh becomes dominant after 1440 and continues with Woman announcer. 5040, AIR Jeypore, 1414 Mar 18, Subcontinental music followed by usual program of Hindi News and EE news after Bottom of Hour. Strongest signal of the Indians during the mornings at Grayland, with S9+20 levels. 5050 AIR-Aizwal, 1456 Mar 18, Man in barely understandable proper Queen's English under dominating Chinese. AIR at 5050.01 and Chinese at 5049.97. Very difficult to hear these days as the Chinese dominates (Don Nelson, WA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) See also SIKKIM ** INDONESIA. 2960.02, RPDT Mangarrai, 1115 Mar 17, Lagu Lagu Romantik program with M at lower levels than music. Into church program at 1137 with Christian music. Mangarrai was at absolutely armchair levels for three days. ID at Top of Hour after SCI and into Jakarta News feed. Nearby Ngada was also heard but with relatively low levels of audio that made listening difficult (Don Nelson, Grayland WA DXpedition, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** INDONESIA. Glenn, The Voice of Indonesia's webcast was not heard at 0800 March 22, but was on in English at 0820 when I checked again. After that, technical problems caused the webcast to occasionally drop out for a few seconds at a time. (Ivan Grishin, Ont., March 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL INTERNET. Hello opera lovers, I have posted the new schedules for Opera on the Internet for the next two weeks. They can be found at: http://www.angelfire.com/or3/opnetradio/thiswk.htm http://www.angelfire.com/or3/opnetradio/nextwk.htm The Collector`s Guide to Opera Recordings and Videos: http://www.geocities.com/ehub035 = http://www.operacast.com (Geoffrey S. Riggs, rec.music.classical.recordings March 23, via John Norfolk, DXLD) I`ll include these links somewhere on MONITORING REMINDERS page (gh) ** ITALY. Hi Glenn, IRRS Milan in the 41 mb is not always heard on 7120 kHz here in Finland. Their transmitting power 8.5 kW is relatively low and 41 mb is really crowded in this part of the world. So there`s always heavy QRM. That`s why I like to use LSB or USB. By the way I heard IRRS yesterday evening around 22 UT on 3985 kHz. This channel should be far better for you American DX-ers, I suppose! Best of 73´s (Jouko Huuskonen, Finland, March 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** JAPAN. The latest information on NHK WORLD by e-mail Dear Viewer and Listener of NHK WORLD, Thank you for your patronage of NHK WORLD. This notice is being sent to everyone who has e-mailed NHK in the past. We are writing to tell you about the impending launch of our ``NHK WORLD e-GUIDE,`` to provide viewers and listeners with the very latest program schedules and information. It will be sent out by e-mail in Japanese and English versions every Friday. We will send the Japanese version to everyone who has e-mailed us in Japanese, and the English version to those who have e-mailed us in English or other languages. If you don`t want to receive the service, please cancel it from the NHK home page: http://www.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/ NHK hopes that the ``NHK WORLD e-GUIDE`` will bring you even closer to NHK WORLD. NHK International Planning and Broadcasting Department (via Joe Hanlon, PA, DXLD) ** LITHUANIA. There's only one change between the winter schedule and the summer schedule. The 0030 UT broadcast, which was on 7325 kHz, will be on 11690 kHz as of 31 March. The full schedule, then, is: To North America: 2330-2400 UT on 9875 kHz 0030-0100 UT on 11690 kHz To Europe 1900-1930 UT on 666 kHz MW 0930-1000 UT (the next day) on 9710 kHz. This last program is a repeat of the previous evening's broadcast. Let Vladas Dobilas, host of "Mailbag", and the rest of the Radio Vilnius staff know what you think of their programs: Snail mail: Radio Vilnius, Konarskio 49, Vilnius, Lithuania email: radiov-@lrt.lt -- (Ted Schuerzinger, swprograms via DXLD) ** MADAGASCAR. 4990 [Radio Malagasy]: This station backed by Marc Ravalomanana has moved to 4985. Poor reception around 1900 while 9685 is still there (Mahendra Vaghjee, Mauritius, 20 March 2002, hard-core- dx via DXLD) There may have been others since our last reference to Weekend Edition, and another excellent report on the Mad. Situation from Julie McCarthy was on NPR Morning Edition, Fri Mar 22, at 1443 UT. Ondemand after 1700, via http://www.npr.org/programs/morning specifically: NPR's Julie McCarthy reports that a disputed presidential election in Madagascar is playing out in the island nation's economy. One side is setting up an oil blockade that's also cutting off supplies of raw materials and ruining the tourist trade. Fifty-thousand people could be left out of work. (5:12) http://www.npr.org/ramfiles/me/20020322.me.07.ram Mentions i.a. that gasoline shipments into the capital are blockaded. Would this impact RN`s Talata relay? (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO [and non]. On the meaning of Mexican slogan ``La Consentida``, DX Listening Digest #2-046 and NRC-AM list. In English you cannot see from one single word, for instance the adjective ``powerful``, if it is meant for a person or an inanimate object, and less so if it is referring to a woman or a man. Contrary to what is the case in English, Spanish words, nouns and adjectives, have feminine or masculine gender, and so you can understand from a casual adjective if it is meant to be an attachment to a feminine or a masculine noun. That is why ``la poderosa``, the powerful one, with the typical –a ending for feminine words, should refer to something feminine, either a human being, or a radio station (``emisora`` ends in -a and is a feminine word), or both at a time. Such ambiguities are very common in Spanish speaking countries. On page 23 in my book ``Latin America by Radio`` (Helsinki, 1987), there is a list of Mexican slogans, all of which have been deliberately chosen to provide a catchy ambiguous meaning, for instance the following: La Tigresa, La Doña Norteña, La Tremenda, La Favorita, La Super Sabrosa, La Costeñita, La Campeona, La Reina del Mar, La Rancherita Contenta, La Pantera, La Chica, La Divertida, La Consentida, La Jarocha, La Correcaminos, La Pirata del Caribe, La Super Fiera, La Chica alegre del cuadrante, La Cotorra de tu radio. Take whichever Latin America country, and you will find more of this. Let me take just one single example, the Bolivian Radio Pío XII, owned by a Catholic order and much involved in dealing with human rights issues of their primary listenership, which is the indigenous mining population of the Bolivian Altiplano. The slogan to be heard on the air, and seen on their pennants, says ``Tu Compañera permanente``, ``Your permanent /female/ companion``. When a Spanish speaking ham operator is talking to another ham, he will sometimes refer to his XYL as ``la primerísima``, which of course implies that there might in fact be some other women in his life, a mistress, ``una consentida``. Having consented to an intimate relationship with a married man, she expects him to take care of some of her material needs, too, spoiling her with presents of all kinds. Trying to clarify the little understood slogan ``La Consentida``, may I add the following. In many Latin American countries, having an extramarital affair is not necessarily looked upon as totally negative by third parties, unless, of course, you are the married man and the victim of your wife`s escapades. For better, or for worse, this is the way it is in countries where `macho` values are accepted. And so slogans such as ``La Consentida``, ``the favorite /woman/``, ``the mistress``, carry a clearly sexual connotation. The same goes for many other less obvious slogans such as ``Qué buena``, even if written as ``Ké Buena``, which is just one out of hundreds of more elaborate compliments a Spanish language speaking male would use when describing a sexually attractive female. If the same characteristic, ``buena`` in this case, is applicable to ``música``, ``emisora`` etc. then there is an added bonus to the slogan, depending, of course, on the intended target audience. ``Su emisora predilecta``, your favorite station, is a slogan commonly used by Ecos del Torbes, in Venezuela. This slogan is plain, and the object is clearly stated. It refers to ``emisora`` with no other connotations implied. And their audience is probably rather adult than adolescent (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, Mar 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO. 9705, Radio Mexico International Thanks White tip. 1400 Mar 20, back here and weeks of distortion on 9310v. Good signal with programming in Spanish, better than // 11770 (Hans Johnson, FL, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Yes, I have not found the spur lately either (gh, Mar 23, DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. Frequency Changes On Sunday 31 March Radio Netherlands, along with other international broadcasters, makes its seasonal shortwave frequency changes. Most of our English broadcasts remain at the same times, but those beamed to Europe move one hour earlier UTC, that is 1030-1225 and 2030-2230 UTC. Details of the summer frequencies and programming can be found on the pages of our English language section at http://www.rnw.nl/en/html/tuning_in.html The complete technical schedule for all languages (plus relays of other broadcasters) will go online in the course of next week. Our Programme Distribution Department is still making final changes. New Radio Netherlands QSL Cards Radio Netherlands has launched a series of eight new QSL cards showing different scenes from a typical Dutch morning. We've put a preview of them on the Web site. Picture no. 4 was taken by Internet Producer Willemien Groot. The other pictures were taken by our Technical Webmaster Martien Sleutjes. Note that size limitations on this page don't do justice to the quality of the printed cards, which is outstanding. We anticipate that this series will be very popular, so get writing those reception reports! http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/html/qslcards.html (Media Network Newsletter Mar 22 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. Radio Netherlands programme guide March 31-October 26th 2002 North America and Canada [sic] 1130-1325 UTC 5965 kHz [sic -- see below] 1430-1625 UTC 15220 kHz 2330-0125 UTC 6165 and 9845 kHz 0430-0530 UTC 6165 and 9590 kHz Details for World Radio Network 0400-0500 UTC, 1200-1300 UTC, 2200-2300 UTC How to Hear WRN - North America Via direct-to-home satellite WRN1 & 2 may be received throughout North America WRN1 is broadcast on Telstar 5, 970ø West, Transponder 27, 12177 GHz, Vertical Polarisation, 23,000 Msym/s, FEC 2/3, DVB MPEG2 and choose Audio Channel WRN1 (English) or WRN2 (Multilingual) More details on the WRN website [for some reason, times below begin at 1030 while above schedule says transmissions begin at 1130, which is correct?] [1130 in winter, 1030 in summer --gh] Sunday [into UT Monday] 1030 News 1035 Wide Angle 1055 Week Ahead 1100 Aural Tapestry (new series) 1130 Dutch Horizons 1200 News 1205 Sincerely Yours 1225 Week Ahead (WRN only) 1230 Dutch Horizons (WRN only) 1300 Sign off (WRN) 1430 News 1438 Sincerely Yours 1455 Week Ahead 1500 Dutch Horizons 1530 Aural Tapestry (new series) 1600 News 1608 Wide Angle 1625 Ends 2200 News 2205 Wide Angle 2225 Week Ahead 2230 Dutch Horizons 2300 Sign off 2330 News 2335 Sincerely Yours 2355 Week Ahead 0000 Dutch Horizons 0030 Aural Tapestry new series) 0100 News 0105 Wide Angle 0125 Ends 0400 Dutch Horizons (WRN only) 0430 News 0435 Sincerely Yours 0455 Week Ahead 0500 Dutch Horizons 0530 Ends Monday [into UT Tuesday] 1030 Newsline 1100 EuroQuest 1130 Research File 1200 Newsline 1225 Press Review (WRN only) 1230 Research File (WRN only) 1300 Sign off (WRN) 1430 Newsline 1500 Research File 1530 Euroquest 1600 Newsline 1625 Ends 2200 Newsline 2230 Research File 2300 Sign off 2330 Newsline 0000 Research File 0030 Euroquest 0100 Newsline 0125 Ends 0400 Research File (WRN only) 0430 Newsline 0500 Research File 0530 Ends Tuesday [into UT Wednesday] 1030 Newsline 1100 A Good Life 1130 Music 52-15 1200 Newsline 1225 Press Review (WRN only) 1230 Music 52-15 (WRN only) 1300 Sign off (WRN) 1430 Newsline 1500 Music 52-15 1530 A Good Life 1600 Newsline 1625 Ends 2200 Newsline 2230 Music 52-15 2300 Sign off 2330 Newsline 0000 Music 52-15 0030 A Good Life 0100 Newsline 0125 Ends 0400 Music 52-15 (WRN only) 0430 Newsline 0500 Music 52-15 0530 Ends Wednesday [into UT Thursday] 1030 Newsline 1100 Dutch Horizons 1130 The Weekly Documentary 1200 Newsline 1225 Press Review (WRN only) 1230 Weekly Documentary (WRN only) 1300 Sign off (WRN) 1430 Newsline 1500 The Weekly Documentary 1530 Dutch Horizons 1600 Newsline 1625 Ends 2200 Newsline 2230 The Weekly Documentary 2300 Sign off 2330 Newsline 0000 The Weekly Documentary 0030 Dutch Horizons 0100 Newsline 0125 Ends 0400 Weekly Documentary (WRN only) 0430 Newsline 0500 The Weekly Documentary 0530 Ends Thursday [into UT Friday] 1030 Newsline 1100 Research File 1130 Aural Tapestry (new series) 1200 Newsline 1225 Press Review (WRN only) 1230 Aural Tapestry (WRN only)) 1300 Sign off (WRN) 1430 Newsline 1500 Aural Tapestry (new series) 1530 Research File 1600 Newsline 1625 Ends 2200 Newsline 2230 Aural Tapestry (new series) 2300 Sign off 2330 Newsline 0000 Aural Tapestry (new series) 0030 Research File 0100 Newsline 0125 Ends 0400 Aural Tapestry (WRN only) 0430 Newsline 0500 Aural Tapestry (new series) 0530 Ends Friday [into UT Saturday] 1030 Newsline 1100 The Weekly Documentary 1130 A Good Life (new series) 1200 Newsline 1225 Press Review (WRN only) 1230 A Good Life (WRN only) 1300 Sign off (WRN) 1430 Newsline 1500 A Good Life 1530 The Weekly Documentary 1600 Newsline 1625 Ends 2200 Newsline 2230 A Good Life 2300 Sign off 2330 Newsline 0000 A Good Life 0030 The Weekly Documentary 0100 Newsline 0125 Ends 0400 A Good Life (WRN only) 0430 Newsline 0500 A Good Life 0530 Ends Saturday [into UT Sunday] 1030 News 1035 Europe Unzipped 1055 Insight 1100 Roughly Speaking 1130 Music 52-15 1200 News 1205 Europe Unzipped 1225 Insight (WRN only) 1230 Roughly Speaking (WRN only) 1300 Sign off (WRN) 1430 News 1436 Europe Unzipped 1455 Insight 1500 Music 52-15 1530 Roughly Speaking 1600 News 1606 Europe Unzipped 1625 Ends 2200 News 2205 Europe Unzipped 2225 Insight 2230 Roughly Speaking 2300 Sign off 2330 News 2335 Europe Unzipped 2355 Insight 0000 Music 52-15 0030 Roughly Speaking 0100 News 0105 Europe Unzipped 0125 Ends 0400 Roughly Speaking (WRN only) 0430 News 0435 Europe Unzipped 0455 Insight 0500 Roughly Speaking 0530 Ends Europe summer 2002 1030-1225 UTC 6045 and 9860 kHz 2130-2330 UTC 1512 kHz mediumwave (AM) Astra 1G digital satellite 0930 (Sun only), 1130, 1230, 1430, 1530, 1830, 1930, 2030, 2130, 2330, 0030 Details for World Radio Network: 1300-1400 UTC How to Hear WRN - Europe: Via direct-to-home satellite In the United Kingdom and Ireland, WRN EuroMax English is broadcast on SKYdigital channel 872 on Astra 2 at 28 degrees East For the rest of Europe WRN EuroMax English can be heard on Eutelsat Hotbird 5, 13 degrees East, Transponder 94, 12597 GHz, Vertical, Symbol Rate 27500 Mbaud, FEC 3/4, MPEG2 DVB Audio Stream Select WRN EuroMax English from audio menu. More details on the WRN website Sunday 1030 News 1035 Wide Angle 1055 Week Ahead 1100 Aural Tapestry (new series) 1130 Dutch Horizons 1200 News 1205 Sincerely Yours 1225 Ends 1300 News (WRN only) 1305 Sincerely Yours (WRN only) 1325 Week Ahead (WRN only) 1330 Dutch Horizons (WRN only) 1400 Sign off (WRN) 2030 News 2035 Sincerely Yours 2055 Week Ahead 2100 Dutch Horizons 2130 Aural Tapestry (new series) 2200 News 2205 Wide Angle 2225 Week Ahead 2230 Ends Monday 1030 Newsline 1100 EuroQuest 1130 Research File 1200 Newsline 1225 Ends 1300 Newsline (WRN only) 1330 Research File (WRN only) 1400 Ends (WRN) 2030 Newsline 2100 Research File 2130 Euroquest 2200 Newsline 2230 Ends Tuesday 1130 Newsline 1200 A Good LIfe (new series) 1230 Music 52-15 1300 Newsline 1325 Ends 1300 Newsline (WRN only) 1330 Music 52-15 (WRN only) 1400 Ends (WRN) 2030 Newsline 2100 A Good LIfe (new series) 2130 Music 52-15 2200 Newsline 2230 Ends Wednesday 1030 Newsline 1100 Dutch Horizons 1130 The Weekly Documentary 1200 Newsline 1225 Ends 1300 Newsline (WRN only) 1330 Weekly Documentary (WRN only) 1400 Ends (WRN) 2030 Newsline 2100 The Weekly Documentary 2130 Dutch Horizons 2200 Newsline 2230 Ends Thursday 1030 Newsline 1100 Research File 1130 Aual Tapestry (new series) 1200 Newsline 1225 Ends 1300 Newsline (WRN only) 1330 Aural Tapestry (WRN only) 1400 Ends (WRN) 2030 Newsline 2100 Aural Tapestry (new series) 2130 Research File 2200 Newsline 2230 Ends Friday 1030 Newsline 1100 The Weekly Documentary 1130 A Good Life (new series) 1200 Newsline 1225 Ends 1300 Newsline (WRN only) 1330 A Good Life (WRN only) 1400 Ends (WRN) 2030 Newsline 2100 Roughly Speaking 2130 The Weekly Documentary 2200 Newsline 2230 Ends Saturday 1030 News 1035 Europe Unzipped 1055 Insight 1100 Roughly Speaking 1130 Music 52-15 (new series) 1200 News 1205 Europe Unzipped 1225 Ends 1300 Newsline (WRN only) 1330 Roughly Speaking (WRN only) 1400 Ends (WRN) 2030 News 2035 Europe Unzipped 2055 Insight 2100 Music 52-15 (new series) 2130 Roughly Speaking 2200 News 2205 Europe Unzipped 2225 Insight 2230 Ends Africa summer 2002 1730-1830 UTC 6020, 7120 and 11655 kHz 1830-2025 UTC 6020, 7120, 9895, 13700, 17605 and 21590 kHz Intelsat 707 satellite: 0930, 1030, 1430, 1530, 1730, 1830, 1930, 0030, and 0430 Sunday 1730 News 1735 Sincerely Yours 1755 Week Ahead 1800 Dutch Horizons 1830 News 1835 Wide Angle 1900 Aural Tapestry (new series) 1930 Dutch Horizons 2000 News 2005 Sincerely Yours 2025 Ends Monday 1730 Newsline 1800 Research File 1830 Newsline 1900 EuroQuest 1930 Research File 2000 Newsline 2025 Ends Tuesday 1730 Newsline 1800 Music 52-15 1830 Newsline 1900 A Good Life 1930 Music 52-15 2000 Newsline 2025 Ends Wednesday 1730 Newsline 1800 The Weekly Documentary 1830 Newsline 1900 Dutch Horizons 1930 The Weekly Documentary 2000 Newsline 2025 Ends Thursday 1730 Newsline 1800 Aural Tapestry (new series) 1830 Newsline 1900 The Research File 1930 Aural Tapestry (new series) 2000 Newsline 2025 Ends Friday 1730 Newsline 1800 A Good Life 1830 Newsline 1900 The Weekly Documentary 1930 A Good Life 2000 Newsline 2025 Ends Saturday 1730 News 1735 Europe Unzipped 1755 Insight 1800 Music 52-15 1830 News 1835 Europe Unzipped 1900 Roughly Speaking 1930 Music 52-15 2000 News 2005 Europe Unzipped 2025 Ends Asia/Far East summer 2002 0930-1130 UTC 9790, 12065 and 13710 kHz 1430-1625 UTC 9890, 11835 and 12075 kHz AsiaSat 2 satellite: 0930, 1030, 1430, 1530, 1730, 1830, 1930, 0030, and 0430 Sunday 0930 News 0938 Sincerely Yours 0955 Week Ahead 1000 Dutch Horizons 1030 Aural Tapestry (new series) 1100 News 1108 Wide Angle 1125 Ends 1430 News 1438 Sincerely Yours 1455 Week Ahead 1500 Dutch Horizons 1530 Aural Tapestry (new series) 1600 News 1608 Wide Angle 1625 Ends Monday 0930 Newsline 1000 Research File 1030 EuroQuest 1100 Newsline 1125 Ends 1430 Newsline 1500 Research File 1530 Euroquest 1600 Newsline 1625 Ends Tuesday 0930 Newsline 1000 Music 52-15 1030 A Good Life 1100 Newsline 1125 Ends 1430 Newsline 1500 Music 52-15 1530 A Good Life 1600 Newsline 1625 Ends Wednesday 0930 Newsline 1000 Weekly Documentary 1030 Dutch Horizons 1100 Newsline 1125 Ends 1430 Newsline 1500 The Weekly Documentary 1530 Dutch Horizons 1600 Newsline 1625 Ends Thursday 0930 Newsline 1000 Aural Tapestry (new series) 1030 Research File 1100 Newsline 1125 Ends 1430 Newsline 1500 Aural Tapestry (new series) 1530 Research File 1600 Newsline 1625 Ends Friday 0930 Newsline 1000 A Good Life 1030 Weekly Documentary 1100 Newsline 1125 Ends 1430 Newsline 1500 A Good Life 1530 The Weekly Documentary 1600 Newsline 1625 Ends Saturday 0930 News 0936 Europe Unzipped 0955 Insight 1000 Music 52-15 1030 Roughly Speaking 1100 News 1106 Europe Unzipped 1125 Ends 1430 News 1436 Europe Unzipped 1455 Insight 1500 Music 52-15 1530 Roughly Speaking 1600 News 1606 Europe Unzipped 1625 Ends Pacific summer 2002 0930-1130 UTC: 9790, 12065 and 13710 kHz AsiaSat 2 satellite: 0930, 1030, 1430, 1530, 1730, 1830, 1930, 0030, and 0430 Sunday 0930 News 0938 Sincerely Yours 0955 Week Ahead 1000 Dutch Horizons 1030 Aural Tapestry (new series) 1100 News 1108 Wide Angle 1125 Ends Monday 0930 Newsline 1000 Research File 1030 EuroQuest 1100 Newsline 1125 Ends Tuesday 0930 Newsline 1000 Music 52-15 1030 A Good Life 1100 Newsline 1125 Ends Wednesday 0930 Newsline 1000 Weekly Documentary 1030 Dutch Horizons 1100 Newsline 1125 Ends Thursday 0930 Newsline 1000 Aural Tapestry (new series) 1030 Research File 1100 Newsline 1125 Ends Friday 0930 Newsline 1000 A Good Life 1030 Weekly Documentary 1100 Newsline 1125 Ends Saturday 0930 News 0936 Europe Unzipped 0955 Insight 1000 Music 52-15 1030 Roughly Speaking 1100 News 1106 Europe Unzipped 1125 Ends (Radio Netherlands web site via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND (non). Further to comments re our most famous composer Douglas Lilburn in the March 15 and 21 editions of DXLD, check out the link at http://www.southwest.org.nz/ Best 73, (Bryan Clark, Auckland, New Zealand, March 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Spepcifically, http://www.southwest.org.nz/dl/htm/index.htm ** NIGERIA [non]. U K(non): A-02 schedule for Salama Radio via Woofferton: 15250 WOF 250 kW/170 deg 1900-2000 Arabic to WAf (ex 15475 for A-01 season) (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 22 via DXLD) ** PAPUA NEW GUINEA. 3905, 0947 Mar 18, Usual female announcer in Tok Pisin. Discussion on local survey results, time check at 0948 and ID for Radio New Ireland. Into CW music. ID at TOH and into local news in EE by M. Weather report for islands by M in EE " take precaution while going out to sea during bad weather. Weather warnings have been repeatedly ignored", says emergency office. Asked the people "to listen to avoid bad accidents. This has been the news in English". Then into Tok Pisin news by M (Don Nelson, Grayland WA DXpedition via Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** PERU. New on 5032 (former frequency 6011): Radio LTC (Leoncio Torres Callao) from Juliaca/Perú. ID: "en transmisión Radio LTC" (Andy Schmid,- Pennant Museum (via RAF) , Mar 22, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** PERU. Continua muito díficil acompanhar a Rádio Unión, Lima. Esta emissora apresenta uma variação excepcional de sua freqüência em onda curta; oficialmente é listada em 6115 kHz, mas desde alguns meses é reporta em diversas freqüências fora da banda de 49 metros. Rogildo Fontenelle Aragão, de Cochabamba, Bolívia nos envia mais estes informes da Rádio Unión : 6348 0150 22/03 R.U nión, Lima ID "La mejor opición, Unión la radio" 0311 22/03 R. Unión, Lima ID YL "Unión, la radio" 1055 22/03 R. Unión, Lima ID "Unión la radio, la mas potente del Perú" 6297v 2314 22/03 R. Unión, Lima ID "...en la más potente del Perú, Radio Unión, El mundo del automovil". Má modulação e freqüência variando (@tividade DX Mar 22 via DXLD) ** SIKKIM. 3390, AIR Gangtok, 1313 Mar 18, M with long speech in local dialect. Excellent on SW Beverage at Grayland, with stunning subcontinental music program. F announcer. Subcontinental music continues with dawn enhancement giving a stunning S7 signal level, and staying up for over 90 minutes at listenable levels. After 1430, program format changes from subcont. to Western music from the 1970's. One ID mentioning Gangtok heard (Don Nelson, WA, Cumbre DX via DXLD) see also INDIA ** SOLOMON ISLANDS. 5019.19, 1005, Mar 18 Man speaking to local government body, giving condolences to the government of New Zealand and the family of the deceased Deputy Prime Minister for the violence done by the people of Solomon Islands last Friday (local people apparently killed him). Parliament in mourning today. Local announcer in Tok Pisin dialect. Mention of 'Big Fella ...' (Tok Pisin for important person). ID and end of program at 1033, into music program. Ad for Computing Services company. Ad for advertising spots. Timecheck by M, into Church program. SIBS is unusually strong this season (Don Nelson, Grayland WA DXpedition, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** SOMALILAND. RADIO HARGEYSA LAUNCHES NEW AMHARIC SERVICE | Text of report by Somaliland's Radio Hargeysa on 21 March The spokesman of Somaliland's Ministry of Information and National Guidance has said that today, 21 March 2002, witnessed the launch of a new service in Radio Hargeysa. The service will broadcast in the official Ethiopian language, Amharic. The spokesman said the new service would be among the services of [word indistinct] languages which had been existing in Radio Hargeysa. The Amharic service will broadcast for 15 minutes daily. The spokesman further said the objective of launching the new Amharic service was to strengthen the brotherly and neighbourly relations between the two countries. Source: Radio Hargeysa in Somali 1700 gmt 21 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** SPAIN. Horario A02 de R. Exterior de España en español a partir del 31 de marzo del 2002: Europa: 0500-0700 9710 0500-0900 12035 0900-1700 15585 1700-2300 7275 1700-2100 9665 (sábado) 1700-2000 9665 (domingo) Oriente Medio: 0500-0700 17665 0900-1700 21610 Africa: 0900-1400 21540 1700-1900 17755 (lunes-viernes) 1400-2000 17755 (domingo) 2200-2300 7270 Guinea Ecuatorial: 1400-1700 17755 1500-1700 15385 (lunes-sábado) Norte de Africa e Islas Canarias: 2300-0200 11680 2300-0500 9620 Norteamérica: 1300-1500 17595 (lunes-viernes) 0200-0500 6055 1900-2300 15110 2300-0500 9540 1000-1300 21700 (lunes-viernes) Sur de Norteamérica: 0200-0600 6025 1200-1500 15170 (domingos) 1100-1400 15170 (lunes-viernes) 1600-2300 17850 (sábado) 1500-2300 17850 (domingo) Sudamérica: 0800-1700 21570 (lunes-viernes) 1000-1700 21570 (sábado-domingo) 1700-1900 17715 1500-1800 21700 (lunes-viernes) 1200-2100 21700 (sábado) 1200-2000 21700 (domingo) 2300-0200 11780 2300-0500 15170, 9620 Norte de Sudamérica: 0000-0400 6020 1000-1300 11815 (lunes-viernes) 1600-2300 11815 (sábado) 1200-2300 11815 (domingo) Centroamérica: 1000-1300 21700 (lunes-viernes) 1500-1800 21700 (lunes-viernes) 1200-2100 21700 (sábado) 1200-2000 21700 (domingo) 2300-0500 9540, 15160 0200-0600 3350 1100-1400 9765 (lunes-viernes) 1600-2300 9765 (sábado) 1200-2300 9765 (domingo) Australia: 0700-0900 21610, 17770 Japón: 1000-1200 9660 Filipinas: 1200-1400 11910 ------------------------ (Ramón Vázquez Dourado, España, March 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SPAIN. This is the English broadcast schedule of the Spanish Foreign Radio that will be effective from 31 March to 27 October 2002: North America: 0000-0200 6055 kHz -az 290º 0500-0556 6055 kHz -az 290º Europe: 2000-2100 9690 kHz -az 38º (monday-friday) 2205-2300 9690 kHz -az 38º (saturday-sunday) Africa: 2200-2300 9595 kHz -az 170º (saturday-sunday) ------------------------------ (Ramón Vázquez Dourado, Spain, March 23, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SRI LANKA [non]. MADAGASCAR(non): A-02 schedule for Tamil Broadcasting Corp. via RNW/Madagascar: 17495 MDC 050 kW/055 deg 1230-1325 Tamil to SAs (ex 21590 via DTK/JUL) (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 22 via DXLD) ** SUDAN [non]. U K(non): A-02 schedule for Millennium Voice via Wooferton: 21550 WOF 250 kW/140 deg 1330-1430 Arabic to CAf (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 22 via DXLD) ** THAILAND. Radio Thailand Network 3 now operates 24h on 918 kHz in Bangkok. The format has changed slightly, with more live presentation, and at the top of most hours a 5-minute BBC WS news bulletin is relayed followed by a short bulletin of news about Thailand. A segment in French is now broadcast daily at 1430-1500, all other times appear to be in English (Alan Davies 2.3.2002, MV-Eko Info-Desk, March, Arctic Radio Club via Editor Olle Alm, DXLD) ** THAILAND. Vox populi: Next time you're in Kanchanaburi, check out Thailand's very first community radio station. Civil service mandarins say it's illegal. Residents can't get enough of its bright 'n' breezy format. Stay tuned Story by VASANA CHINVARAKORN Picture by YINGYONG UN-ANONGRAK There's a buzz of excitement in this most atypical of studios _ the very first community radio station that Kanchanaburi folk can claim as their own. Everything here goes out live. There are no pre-recorded slots. Regular call-ins keep presenters on the spot. And spontaneity is the name of the game for the hosts themselves are often doing this for the first time.... Andy gave me this link but I could never get anything but a 404: http://www.bangkokpost.com/en/Outlook/21Mar2002_out31.html Finding it instead via the Post homepage, the current funxioning URL for this rather long story actually turned out to be: http://www.bangkokpost.com/en/210302_Outlook/21Mar2002_out31.html and there is an accompanying story about this at: http://www.bangkokpost.com/en/210302_Outlook/21Mar2002_out32.html (Glenn Hauser, DXLD) ** TURKEY. Glenn, Voice of Turkey's English service from March 30th 0300-0400 : 11655 (Europe and North America) 7270 (Asia and Africa) (11655 will be changed to 9650 on September 2nd) 1230-1300 : 17830 (Europe) 17615 (Australia & Asia) 1830-1930 : 9785 (Europe) 2030-2130 : 9525 (Australia and Asia) 2200-2300 : 12000, 11960 (Europe and North America) Regards (Jean-Michel AUBIER, France, March 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** UKRAINE. Hi Glenn, I note there is some confusion about whether or not Radio Ukraine is on shortwave at present: Yes, they are. Kopani 1000 kW is indeed silent but the 100 kW transmitters at Brovary are on air, and I think Kharkov is on regular service, too. Regarding the observed delay: Probably the RealAudio encoding/streaming indeed took 6 minutes in this particular case. When listening to the German programme tonight at 2100 the stream was 35 seconds behind shortwave (usual 5905) (Kai Ludwig, Germany, March 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Glenn, actually last night I heard R. Ukraine Int. back on its North American frequency of 7375 kHz. If I'm not mistaken they are using it from midnight to 6 UT. Reception between 0100 and 0500 was ranging from excellent to very good. Those who enjoy Ukrainian music should take advantage of both SW and Internet broadcasts now. For it's only a matter of time before RUI disappears from both outlets due to unpaid bills (Sergei Sosedkin, IL, Mar 22, DX LISTENING DIGEST) On 22 March, 1000 kW transmitter in Mykolaiv was switched on again on 7375 kHz after 2-month interruption. Meanwhile the Concern RRT is considering the using of Lviv's 1000 transmitter again for RUI's transmissions (Alexander Yegorov, Ukraine, 22 Mar, WWDXC via DXLD) Radio Ukraine International Tentative Summer Broadcasting A02 Schedule (effective from 31 March 2002) Freq Time UT Transmitter site Azimuth Target Area 5905 1600-0100 Kyiv 254 S.-W. Europe 6020 1600-2300 Kyiv ND C. Europe 7150 0200-0600 Mykolaiv 4 N.-E. Europe 7150 1600-2100 Mykolaiv 4 N.-E. Europe 7320 2300-0300 Kharkiv 55 Russia 7410 0400-0800 Kharkiv 277 W. Europe 9620 0400-0900 Kyiv 254 S.-W. Europe 9640 0000-0400 Kyiv 74 Russia, N. Kazakhstan 9640 1400-1800 Kyiv 74 Russia 9950 2000-2400 Kyiv 307 N.-W. Europe 11705 0500-1100 Kyiv 264 W. Europe 11705 1900-2300 Kyiv 264 W. Europe 11840 0400-1300 Kyiv 93 Russia, W. Kazakhstan 11950 1700-2300 Kharkiv 290 W. Europe 12040 2300-0400 Mykolaiv 314 N. America [1000 kW] 12045 1100-1700 Kharkiv 55 Russia 13590 0600-1600 Kharkiv 290 W. Europe 15520 0800-1400 Kyiv 307 N.-W. Europe Transmission schedules in various languages are as follows: GERMAN (one hour long): at 1700 5905, 6020, 11950 at 2000 5905, 6020, 9950, 11950 at 2300 5905, 7320, 9950 ENGLISH (one hour long): at 2100 5905, 6020, 9950, 11705, 11950 at 0000 5905, 7320, 12040 at 0300 7150, 12040 at 1100 11840, 15520 UKRAINIAN programmes are transmitted on all frequencies and at all times are as shown above except at the time reserved for German and English programmes. ROMANIAN (30 minutes long): at 1700, 1930 and 2100 on 657 kHz MW (Chernivtsi, 25 kW) Notes: 1. The output of all SW transmitters is 100 kW, except on 12040 kHz where the power is 1000 kW. 2. The Schedule is subject to changes. Regds, (via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, Mar 22, DXLD) Like I said in MONITORING REMINDERS, time varies for DX program on RUI. Good thing I brought up webcast early Sat Mar 23 because this week it started at 2218, ``The Whole World on the Radio Dial``. The presenter Alex Yegorov started off plugging the new webcast; explained what `DX` means (and I do not accept the X = unknown in this case now gaining currency -gh); English speaking staff at RUI cannot QSL MW and LW DX reports; FM DX in Finland; a reception report from Jonathan Murphy; another from 83-year-old Tom, WD3JJK/qrp, USA on a crystal set, which had QRM from three other stations (surprise). Must have been the 7375 megawatt. Lasted until 2232, then Hello from Kyiv (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U A E. U S A(non): A-02 schedule for AWR via Al-Dhabbaya: 6025 DHA 500 kW/100 deg 0000-0100 Hindi English 6055 DHA 500 kW/100 deg 0000-0100 Hindi/English 6145 DHA 500 kW/045 deg 0230-0300 Dari 9600 DHA 500 kW/090 deg 1600-1700 Marathi/English 11775 DHA 500 kW/045 deg 0300-0400 Russian/English 11945 DHA 500 kW/225 deg 0300-0330 Tigrina 11955 DHA 500 kW/205 deg 0330-0400 Somali 11975 DHA 500 kW/230 deg 0300-0330 Amharic 13705 DHA 500 kW/075 deg 1500-1600 Punjabi/Hindi 15320 DHA 500 kW/085 deg 1300-1330 Bangla 15320 DHA 500 kW/060 deg 1330-1400 English 15320 DHA 500 kW/060 deg 1400-1500 Urdu 15520 DHA 500 kW/225 deg 1700-1800 Amharic/Tigrina 17630 DHA 500 kW/120 deg 1430-1500 Sinhala 17630 DHA 500 kW/075 deg 1500-1530 Nepali 17630 DHA 500 kW/105 deg 1530-1600 Malayalam 17665 DHA 500 kW/225 deg 1630-1800 Somali/Afar/Oromo 17710 DHA 500 kW/100 deg 1400-1430 Hindi 17740 DHA 500 kW/045 deg 1300-1400 English/Russian 17835 DHA 500 kW/060 deg 1100-1300 Mandarin Ch 17860 DHA 500 kW/105 deg 1330-1500 Tamil/Telugu/Kannada 73 from (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 22 via DXLD) ** U S A. VOA LAUNCHES NEW MIDDLE EAST RADIO NETWORK | Text of press release from the US International Broadcasting Bureau on 21 March Washington, DC, 21 March 2002: The Middle East Radio Network (MERN), a unique, US government-sponsored Arabic language broadcasting service, goes on the air across the region Friday, 22 March 2002, in the initial phase of a 24-hour, seven-day-a-week service. "Now, listeners across the Middle East will have an opportunity to get their news, information and entertainment in a whole new format," said Norman J. Pattiz, a member of the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG). The BBG oversees all US, non-military, international broadcasting and spearheaded creation of the service. "They'll also be able to learn the truth about America and what it stands for," Pattiz said. When it debuts first on FM radio stations in Amman, Jordan and Kuwait City, Kuwait, MERN will be called Radio Sawa, which means "together" in Arabic. MERN, a pilot project of the Voice of America, will also be available to millions of listeners through the digital radio satellite channels of Nilesat, Arabsat and Eutelsat HotBird. Marc Nathanson, chairman of the BBG, said MERN is an example of how the board "is focused on making sure that US international broadcasting does the best job possible reaching people whose sources of news are often biased and anti-American." Pattiz, head of the BBG's Middle East committee and a driving force behind MERN, called Friday's startup "Phase One". He added: "We'll be rolling this out in phases, starting with music and news promotions." News programmes will begin airing a few weeks after the launch. MERN, aimed at Arab listeners under age 30, will broadcast news, analysis, interviews, opinion pieces, roundtables, sports, weather, music and features on a variety of political and social issues in five regional Arabic dialects targeted to Jordan and the Palestinian areas, Egypt, Iraq, Sudan and the Gulf states. MERN is expected to be fully operational by late summer 2002. President George W. Bush praised MERN at a 25 February 2002 ceremony celebrating VOA's 60th anniversary. "The Voice of America's new Middle East Radio Network will offer music, reliable news, and information in Arabic, and an opportunity to better understand American principles and American actions," Bush said. The president cited Pattiz, who is the chairman of the Westwood One radio network, for his "perseverance and dedication" to the MERN project. MERN will be distributed by medium wave (AM) and FM, the most popular bands in the Middle East, as well as by satellite and the Internet. Besides Jordan and Kuwait, the US government has signed rebroadcast agreements on FM frequencies in Doha, Qatar; Manama, Bahrain; and Abu Dhabi and Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Negotiations are under way in several other countries to obtain frequencies. MERN staff, journalists, producers, and technicians will be based in Washington, DC and in Dubai, using a state-of-the-art broadcasting facility. Mouafac Harb, a leading journalist in the Arab world, has been hired as MERN's news director. A former Washington bureau chief for the London-based newspaper, Al Hayat, Harb also worked for Newsweek magazine. Earlier, Harb was general manager of radio and television at the National Broadcasting Network of Lebanon. Harb, who will run the news division, said MERN was committed to producing "objective, fair and balanced" news. The BBG received from Congress approximately 35m dollars for MERN in fiscal year 2002, including 16.4m dollars for one-time capital costs for transmitters. "Broadcasting services such as MERN are the best high-yield, low-cost weapon in our arsenal. They are the most cost-effective way of reaching the outside world," said Tom Korologos, a BBG member. [Contact: Joan Mower Phone: +1 202 260 0167; E-mail: jmower@ibb.gov] Source: US International Broadcasting Bureau press release, Washington, in English 21 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** U S A. This weekend on the last "Special Program in the Time Slot Formerly Occupied by Communications World": Relatively little is known about the Voice of America from the end of World War II through the 1950s. This weekend's half hour is devoted to a conversation with Barry Zorthian, who worked in VOA newsroom and management positions at VOA from 1947 to 1960. Also an excerpt from a VOA tenth anniversary special (1952), reflecting the political rhetoric of that time. All the best, (Kim Andrew Elliott, Analyst, Office of Research, International Broadcasting Bureau/Voice of America, swprograms via DXLD) Should still be available ondemand via WRN at least ** U S A. Lubavicher/Chassidic Radio, Brooklyn NY?; 1710 AM, 3/21 0040-0210*?, Relaying call-in program on Jewish topics. 0115 song/chant and disappeared 0117-21. Back with commentary by Male without calls. Poor w/fair peaks; LSB and notch help with utilities but very tough copy. This log blessed by Rabbi Wolfish (Harold Frodge, MI, Free Radio Weekly via DXLD) ** U S A. CARL MCINTIRE, 95, FIREBRAND PASTOR By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer Posted on Thu, Mar. 21, 2002 The Rev. Carl McIntire, 95, the fiery anticommunist preacher in South Jersey whose multimillion-dollar ministry eroded amid battles with government agencies and theological disagreements with fellow Christian leaders, died Tuesday at Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Voorhees. At the height of Mr. McIntire's popularity in the mid-1960s, his broadcasts could be heard daily on more than 600 stations. The pastor's conservative message of fundamental Christianity and conservative politics amassed legions of followers whose donations helped him build an international ministry. But Mr. McIntire's mission was marked by battles with the Federal Communications Commission, local municipalities, and fellow Christians. He and his followers pitted themselves against dirty books and movies, racetracks and labor unions, sex education, gay rights, evolution, socialized medicine, dancing, smoking, drinking and fluoride in water. "I think you'd have to say that he was the most consistent fundamentalist of the 20th century," said the Rev. Martin Marty, a University of Chicago religion scholar and Lutheran pastor. "Whatever he decided was the truth he followed to the very end, no matter how few friends or colleagues were left." Curtis Bashaw, Mr. McIntire's grandson, put it differently: "He was willing to lose the physical and temporal things because of his beliefs." Those beliefs had been cultivated during a childhood spent on American Indian reservations in Oklahoma, where his mother and grandmother were missionaries. His first theological fisticuffs came when he, as a student, departed the Princeton Theological Seminary with scholar J. Gresham Machen over what the professor called the seminary's "trend toward socialism and modernism." Machen and his followers then organized Westminster Seminary in Glenside. Mr. McIntire graduated from the school in 1931 and was ordained a Presbyterian minister. Not long after being named pastor of a 1,200-member Presbyterian church in Collingswood, Mr. McIntire supported Machen again when his mentor concluded that the denomination's overseas ministry was too liberal. Ultimately, the pair's schism with the denomination grew so severe that they were defrocked by the church. Most of Mr. McIntire's congregation withdrew from the denomination and formed the Presbyterian Church of America, still in Collingswood. In 1948, Mr. McIntire lost a court battle to hold on to his church building, and his congregation marched from it to a tent erected on a nearby apple orchard. Soon, the Presbyterian Church of America was also troubled by internal debate, with Mr. McIntire again finding it too left-leaning. He left to start yet another denomination, the Bible Presbyterian Church. The denomination grew steadily. Mr. McIntire established its base in Cape May, where he purchased the Christian Admiral hotel and turned it into a retreat center. His media arm encompassed radio stations and a publishing division. He traveled among right-wing elites, hosting Irish Protestant leader Ian Paisley and visiting Ferdinand Marcos' Philippine palace. But Mr. McIntire's ministry would change swiftly after he took on the FCC in 1970. The agency revoked the license of the minister's radio stations, contending that he failed to uphold the Fairness Doctrine by programming overwhelmingly conservative shows. Mr. McIntire refused to provide a more balanced mix of shows, and his stations were taken off the air in 1973. He attempted to circumvent the order by broadcasting from a "pirate" television station aboard a converted World War II minesweeper anchored in international waters off Cape May. But an injunction delivered by a Coast Guard vessel silenced the station. Over time, debts forced Mr. McIntire to sell his retreat in Cape May and other properties. He retired as a Bible Presbyterian Church pastor three years ago, after more than six decades. His weekly show on Camden's WTMR-AM has consisted of rebroadcasts of sermons. At the time of his death, Mr. McIntire was president of the International Council of Christian Churches, a conservative body he founded in 1948, with much of its membership overseas. In 1992, Fairy D. Davis McIntire, the minister's wife of 61 years, died. In 1995, he married his longtime secretary, Alice Goff. In addition to his wife, Mr. McIntire is survived by a son, Thomas; daughters, Celeste McIntire Bashaw and Marianna Clark; and 13 grandchildren. Burial will be at Harleigh Cemetery, Camden. The full article will be available on the Web for a limited time: http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/obituaries/2904540.htm (c) 2001 Philadelphia Inquirer and wire service sources. All Rights Reserved (via Ivan Grishin, DXLD) Another version: CARL MCINTIRE DIES AT AGE 95; CONSERVATIVE RADIO PREACHER http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A5652-2002Mar22.html (via Tom McNiff, Burke, Virginia, DXLD) ** U S A. WWCR A02 Summer Schedule (Copied/pasted from WWCR website) Transmitter #1 - 100 KW - 46 Degrees FREQ TIME (CT) TIME (UTC) DATES 9.475 4:00AM- 5:00AM 1000-1100 31 Mar 02-06 Apr 02 15.685 5:00AM- 4:00PM 1100-2200 31 Mar 02-06 Apr 02 9.475 4:00PM- 6:00PM 2200-0000 31 Mar 02-06 Apr 02 3.210 6:00PM- 4:00AM 0000-1000 31 Mar 02-06 Apr 02 9.475 4:00AM- 5:00AM 0900-1000 07 Apr 02-31 May 02 15.685 5:00AM- 5:00PM 1000-2200 07 Apr 02-31 May 02 9.475 5:00PM- 7:00PM 2200-0000 07 Apr 02-31 May 02 3.210 7:00PM- 4:00AM 0000-0900 07 Apr 02-31 May 02 9.475 4:00AM- 5:00AM 0900-1000 01 Jun 02-31 Aug 02 15.685 5:00AM- 5:00PM 1000-2200 01 Jun 02-31 Aug 02 9.475 5:00PM- 8:00PM 2200-0100 01 Jun 02-31 Aug 02 3.210 8:00PM- 4:00AM 0100-0900 01 Jun 02-31 Aug 02 9.475 4:00AM- 5:00AM 0900-1000 01 Sep 02-26 Oct 02 15.685 5:00AM- 5:00PM 1000-2200 01 Sep 02-26 Oct 02 9.475 5:00PM- 7:00PM 2200-0000 01 Sep 02-26 Oct 02 3.210 7:00PM- 4:00AM 0000-0900 01 Sep 02-26 Oct 02 Transmitter #2 - 100 KW - 85 Degrees FREQ TIME (CT) TIME (UTC) DATES 13.845 7:00AM- 7:00PM 1300-0100 31 Mar 02-06 Apr 02 5.935 7:00PM- 7:00AM 0100-1300 31 Mar 02-06 Apr 02 13.845 7:00AM- 8:00PM 1200-0100 07 Apr 02-31 May 02 5.935 8:00PM- 7:00AM 0100-1200 07 Apr 02-31 May 02 13.845 7:00AM- 9:00PM 1200-0200 01 Jun 02-31 Aug 02 5.935 9:00PM- 7:00AM 0200-1200 01 Jun 02-31 Aug 02 13.845 7:00AM- 8:00PM 1200-0100 01 Sep 02-26 Oct 02 5.935 8:00PM- 7:00AM 0100-1200 01 Sep 02-26 Oct 02 Transmitter #3 - 100 KW - 40 Degrees FREQ TIME (CT) TIME (UTC) DATES 12.160 7:00AM- 5:00PM 1300-2300 31 Mar 02-06 Apr 02 5.070 5:00PM- 7:00AM 2300-1300 31 Mar 02-06 Apr 02 12.160 7:00AM- 6:00PM 1200-2300 07 Apr 02-31 May 02 5.070 6:00PM- 7:00AM 2300-1200 07 Apr 02-31 May 02 12.160 7:00AM- 7:00PM 1200-0000 01 Jun 02-31 Aug 02 5.070 7:00PM- 7:00AM 0000-1200 01 Jun 02-31 Aug 02 12.160 7:00AM- 6:00PM 1200-2300 01 Sep 02-26 Oct 02 5.070 6:00PM- 7:00AM 2300-1200 01 Sep 02-26 Oct 02 Transmitter #4 - 100 KW - 90 Degrees FREQ TIME (CT) TIME (UTC) DATES 9.475 8:00AM- 4:00PM 1400-2200 31 Mar 02-06 Apr 02 7.435 4:00PM-11:00PM 2200-0500 31 Mar 02-06 Apr 02 7.560 11:00PM- 8:00AM 0500-1400 31 Mar 02-06 Apr 02 9.475 8:00AM- 5:00PM 1300-2200 07 Apr 02-31 May 02 7.435 5:00PM-11:00PM 2200-0400 07 Apr 02-31 May 02 7.560 11:00PM- 8:00AM 0400-1300 07 Apr 02-31 May 02 9.475 8:00AM- 5:00PM 1300-2200 01 Jun 02-31 Aug 02 7.435 5:00PM-11:00PM 2200-0400 01 Jun 02-31 Aug 02 7.560 11:00PM- 8:00AM 0400-1300 01 Jun 02-31 Aug 02 9.475 8:00AM- 5:00PM 1300-2200 01 Sep 02-26 Oct 02 7.435 5:00PM-11:00PM 2200-0400 01 Sep 02-26 Oct 02 7.560 11:00PM- 8:00AM 0400-1300 01 Sep 02-26 Oct 02 (via Alan Roe, Teddington, UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. FW: PERMIT TO LISTEN TO SHORTWAVE IN MICHIGAN? ----- Original Message ----- From: "SOAP" SOAP@Simple-Object-Access-Protocol.com Newsgroups: rec.radio.shortwave,alt.law-enforcement Sent: Friday, March 22, 2002 7:29 AM Subject: Permit to listen to shortwave in Michigan? FCC HF BROADCASTING PAGE High Frequency Broadcasting (HF) also known as Shortwave Broadcasting is a radio service licensed by the FCC to operate between 5,950 kHz and 26,100 kHz. This is an international broadcast service where transmissions are intended to be received by the general public in foreign countries. The rules applicable to this service are located in Part 73 Subpart F of the FCC Rules. http://www.fcc.gov/ib/pnd/neg/hf_web/hf.html TITLE 47--TELECOMMUNICATION CHAPTER I--FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION PART 73--RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Subpart F--International Broadcast Stations Sec. 73.701 Definitions. The following definitions apply to terminology employed in this subpart: (a) International broadcasting stations. A broadcasting station employing frequencies allocated to the broadcasting service between 5,950 and 26,100 kHz, the transmissions of which are intended to be received directly by the general public in foreign countries. (A station may be authorized more than one transmitter.) There are both government and non-government international broadcasting stations; only the latter are licensed by the Commission and are subject to the rules of this subpart. http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/get-cfr.cgi?TITLE=47&PART=73&SECTION=701&YEAR=2001&TYPE=TEXT Does any police department in Michigan broadcast on shortwave frequencies? If not, why is the Michigan State Police concerned enough about shortwave broadcasts to require a permit to listen to shortwave broadcasts in a motor vehicle? There is no doubt that shortwave broadcasts are meant to be received by the general public. Shortwave is a form of broadcasting, just like AM/FM radio and Television, The rules for broadcasting (AM/FM/TV and Shortwave) are in Part 73 of the FCC rules Suppose you are a motorist driving on a highway in Michigan, you are pulled over for a minor moving violation, the officer asks "what radio station are you listening to?" You tell the officer that you are listening to WCMU from the Central Michigan University. http://www.cmuradio.cmich.edu/ The officer asks "do you have a permit to listen to WCMU?" You explain "Citizens don't need a permit to listen to the radio!" If the citizens of Michigan are free to listen at AM/FM radio without a permit, why do we need a permit to listen to shortwave broadcasting stations. The Michigan permit application makes several reference to a shortwave receiving set, then it makes several references to police frequencies. What is the intended goal of this permit? Shortwave radio and police radio are separate issues. The current text of this "short wave permit" has unintended consequences. Most people refer to broadcasters such as the BBC when they talk about shortwave. http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/ Police departments can be assigned 10 frequencies in the shortwave band under Part 90 of the FCC rules. Frequencies listed in kHz: 2366, 2382, 2390, 2406, 2430, 2442, 2450, 2458, 2482 and 2490 If I wanted to listen to police dispatches, I would use a police scanner that tunes to the VHF/UHF/800MHz frequencies listed in Part 90. I wouldn't bother with shortwave. http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/get-cfr.cgi?TITLE=47&PART=90&SECTION=20&YEAR=2001&TYPE=TEXT Michigan State Police MCL 750.508 Application for short wave permit in a vehicle to monitor police frequencies. I hereby make application to equip a vehicle with a short wave receiving set capable of receiving police frequencies. http://www.mpscs.com/com-022.pdf (.pdf file) (via Mike Terry, UK, DXLD) No doubt the cited 120mb frequencies for police use were abandoned sesquidecades ago, but the outdated regulation may still be on the books (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. From Radio World Newspaper - http://www.rwonline.com/ AM IN-BAND, ON-CHANNEL DIGITAL RADIO SYSTEM (IBOC) DAYTIME ONLY - FOR NOW The working group of engineers evaluating the AM IBOC system of Ibiquity Digital Corp. reportedly plan to recommend that the AM system be used in this country (US) - during the day only. http://www.rwonline.com/dailynews/one.php?id=1358 (via Brian Smith, ODXA Mar 22 via DXLD) Viz.: AM IBOC DAYTIME ONLY - FOR NOW The working group of engineers evaluating the AM IBOC system of Ibiquity Digital Corp. reportedly plan to recommend that the AM system be used in this country - during the day only. Members of the DAB Subcommittee of the National Radio Systems Committee have concerns about potential interference to first adjacent channels and on the skywaves transmitted by clear channel stations during nighttime operation if AM IBOC were used. "With the data we had, we could not endorse AM IBOC at night. There's too much potential for interference. There were real concerns brought on by the way AM propagates at night," said a committee member. He believed Ibiquity planned further tests for the AM system and stressed that during daytime hours IBOC AM will be a "tremendous" improvement. Most listeners could not tell IBOC AM audio apart from FM analog in tests, he said. The DAB Subcommittee plans to vote on the report at its meeting at NAB2002. At that point, it would be delivered to the FCC (Radio World online Mar 21 via DXLD) ** U S A. Upcoming specials on KCRW Santa Mónica, The Home of the Homeless: UT Wed March 27 0300-0400 Jewish Stories from the Old World to the New UT Wed March 27 2230-2300 Capitol Steps: Politics Takes a Holiday, April Fool Special [and on many other NPR stations] UT Wed March 27 2300-2400 One People, Many Voices -- Passover special (Info@KCRW March 23 via DXLD) ** U S A. W$W has long been one of my favorite PBS shows. It put Owings Mills, MD on the map. I had thought the show was essentially his [Louis Rukeyser`s] creation, from concept through production. I saw this year-old article which may have some relevance: http://www.current.org/pbs/pbs0108.html. The current dust-up can be viewed here (long URL) http://www.quicken.com/investments/news_center/story/dj/?story=/news/stories/dj/20020321/on20020321000554.htm&column=P0DFP Looks like the decision was MPT's, and complaints should be sent there. The story was first broken here: http://www.sunspot.net/entertainment/tv/bal-te.to.rukeyser22mar22.story?coll=bal%2Dhome%2Dheadlines The MPT website offers a comments link and also offers a discussion board at their website http://www.mpt.org/about/contact.cfm MPT, Fortune appear set to oust Rukeyser http://www.sunspot.net/bal-to.wall21mar21.story (Richard Cuff, Mar 22, swprograms via DXLD) ** U S A [non]. AWR A-02 via AUSTRIA and UAE are filed here under those respective countries, q.v. (gh) ** VIETNAM [non]. AUSTRIA(non): Voice of Vietnam via Moosbrunn A-02: 9725 MOS 100 kW/320 deg 1800-2000 English/Vietnamese/Vietnamese/ French to Eu (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 22 via DXLD) ** VIETNAM [non]. CANADA(non): A-02 schedule for Voice of Vietnam via Sackville: 6175 SAC 250 kW/212 deg 0100-0300 English/Vietnamese/Vietnamese/English to NAm 6175 SAC 250 kW/268 deg 0300-0500 Spanish/Vietnamese/Vietnamese/English to CAm (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 22 via DXLD) ** VIETNAM [non]. U K(non): A-02 schedule for Voice of Vietnam via Skelton: 9715 SKN 250 kW/150 deg 2000-2130 Russian/Vietnamese/Vietnamese to Eu (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 22 via DXLD) ** WESTERN SAHARA [non]. 7460, radio of S.A.D.R, 16 Mar, 2030-2101, SINPO 44333, in Arabic. Hard to say the exact station name: ID starts with "Idhaatu wataniya..." and ends with "...shaabi sahrawi". Probably this ID contains the Sahara state name. Songs, talks, news at 2059 (Dmitri Mezin, Kazan, Russia, Signal via DXLD) ** ZIMBABWE. ZBC seem to have opened another SW frequency, heard on 6175 in our mornings (Chris Hambly, Australia, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ZIMBABWE [and non]. We have a short-wave radio broadcast to Zimbabwe. Now the Zimbabwe govt. have set up a station next to ours and thereby causing a heterodyne whistle. Can you tell me where I can get some good advice on how to combat this problem? Many thanks for your help Richard - Webmaster SW Radio Africa 6145 kHz on the 49m band http://www.swradioafrica.com (via Ed Janusz, via Sheldon Harvey, March 22, DXLD) VOICE OF THE PEOPLE One new transmission that I inadvertently failed to mention is a morning broadcast of Voice of the People via Madagascar which started in early March at 0330-0430 UTC on 7120 kHz. Following the result of the presidential election in Zimbabwe, Voice of the People has indicated that it intends to continue this extra transmission. The station has also opened a Web site at http://www.voxpop.co.zw/ Note that it opens with a Flash presentation that will take a while to load. If you don't have Flash or don't want to wait for it to load, point your browser at http://www.voxpop.co.zw/website/weare.html (Media Network Newsletter Mar 22 via John Norfolk, DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. 6715-USB, Mystery Christian program in Korean continues to be heard on Fridays and Sundays. Audible in Europe between 1859v- 2018v [Sun] and on ECNA 2200v-2330v [Fri]. Reception seems to indicate a site in Europe. Kim made a few comments on the latest file I sent him: There is preaching ... Get out of here, Satan!... I pray, amen at revival service (Hans Johnson, Cumbre DX thanks Green and Savolainen, via DXLD) +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ KEEPING A-02 SECRET Early UT March 23, I went to the websites of major international broadcasters whose A-02 schedules have not yet appeared in DXLD (and some which have), and with only a couple exceptions no one had yet posted the A-02 schedules, tho by now they must be pretty firm. It seems stations see no need to post info until the last minute. Their loss, as some of us are in a position to give them some accurate publicity in monthly publications, or even slightly in advance of going into effect (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 2-046, March 21, 2002 edited by Glenn Hauser, wghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted afterwards at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd02.html For restrixions and searchable 2002 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn WORLD OF RADIO #1123: (STREAM) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1123.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1123.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1123.html FIRST AIRINGS ON RFPI: Fri 1930, Sat 0130, 0730, 1330, 1800, 2400 on some of: 7445-AM/USB, 15039, 21815-USB NEXT AIRINGS ON WWCR: Sat 0600, Sun 0330 on 5070; Sun 0730, Mon 0100, 0600 on 3210 AIRINGS ON WORLD RADIO NETWORK: Sat 0900 rest of world, 1500 NAm DX PROGRAMS has been updated again by John Norfolk: http://www.worldofradio.com/dxpgms.html UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIALS I wanted to thank you for all the work that you do putting the digest together. I've recently returned to the world of shortwave listening. I have a 9 year old boy and he is finding great interest in it. I bought a DX 398 and we are having a good time. I was surprised to see all the NPR stuff in your digest, maybe it was just coincidence but the March 18th digest was the first i saw and it had 5 or so mentions of NPR. I've been there for 13 years and came to NPR as a lover of radio. I look forward to listening and checking out some of the stations in the digest. All the best (Bob Boilen, director, All Things Considered) Mr. Hauser - I must admit I sold my SWR years ago, and now regret it. Although I'm involved in broadcasting still, I miss the fun of SWR. Honestly, until I stumbled on your website tonight, I thought that there really wasn't much happening on the SW bands. I guess I was wrong! Looks like I need to turn off the computer and fire up the old radio more often. Thanks for the fun times when I was younger...and THANKS for still being around to help me revive an old hobby! (Doug Krile, Corporate Director of News and Public Relations, Equity Broadcasting Corporation, Little Rock, AR) ** AFGHANISTAN. Commando Solo update: http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020320/ap_on_re_as/guard_broadcasters_1 PENGATON [SIC] RADIO LEAVES AFGHANISTAN Wed Mar 20, 6:46 AM ET By MARC LEVY, Associated Press Writer MIDDLETOWN, Pa. (AP) - One of Afghanistan's most popular radio stations for the past few months has gone off the air. The 193rd Special Operations Wing of the Pennsylvania Air National Guard arrived home Tuesday after six months of flying day and night around Afghanistan, broadcasting messages and music to Afghans as part of the Pentagon's psychological warfare against the Taliban. "They've pretty much been on the air in the Middle East for the last several months, nonstop," said Col. Jim Lillis, the squad's vice commander, one of a couple hundred people on the guard's home tarmac at Harrisburg International Airport as the crews disembarked. Some of the crew members flew home in the same planes they flew in Operation Enduring Freedom: 40-year-old C-130s equipped with thousands of pounds of broadcasting equipment. The unit flew over 300 missions, each lasting nine hours. Its motto: "Never seen, always heard." The 10,000-watt broadcasts tried to get a wide range of messages across to Afghans who had hidden radios from the repressive Taliban. Listeners were told how to approach food drops, warned to stay indoors or away from U.S. soldiers during fighting, and assured that it was terrorists, not them, who were under attack. "We know they had radios stashed away," said Senior Master Sgt. Michael Kovach, a 46-year-old flight supervisor who has been with the unit since 1986. Some of the broadcasts were aimed squarely at the Taliban. "Attention Taliban! You are condemned. Did you know that?" one said. And another: "Our forces are armed with state-of-the-art military equipment. What are you using, obsolete and ineffective weaponry?" Afghan music was included because past missions had shown that music was a big draw to listeners. One of the songs broadcast was an old Afghan anthem that had been banned by the Taliban, Kovach said. The U.S. military's only unit of its kind, the 193rd has flown over most of the planet, from Panama to Kuwait. It has six of the specially equipped C-130s, which are capable of transmitting television broadcasts. Eventually, all will be able to relay live satellite feeds. While the radio messages, delivered in local languages, are usually broadcast from recordings, crews occasionally bring aboard a native speaker to do a live broadcast. Unit members say they were told by a number of sources in the military that the broadcasts were widely heard on the ground. Inside the planes, two huge banks of broadcast equipment mounted to steel supports loom over six swiveling seats at the controls. It seems a dreary place to spend nine hours at a time, but the unit members see their mission as a humanitarian one. "It's doing a good cause without going in and throwing things down people's throats," said Lt. Dawn Junk, a pilot. "You can do more with less." (via yahoonews via Artie Bigley, via Mike Cooper, via Sergei Sosedkin, DXLD) Now the question is: when did 8700-USB cease operation, or has it? If still heard past March 18, it`s obviously not on these planes. Now they`re back, perhaps they can fill us in on the previously classified details. The yahoo story has a head-on photo of the craft (Glenn Hauser, WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DX LISTENING DIGEST) SITE(S)? 8700U Psyops Broadcast. After not hearing them for a few days, I thought they might be gone. Did some searching and confirmed it. This one is over (Hans Johnson, Mar 21) GUARDS RETURN HOME, Published March 19 2002 DAUPHIN CO. -- Some local Pennsylvania Air National Guard members are back home after serving six months overseas. The sixteen men and women are part of the guard's 193rd Special Operation Wing, and they were an important part of Operation Enduring Freedom. It's the moment Ralph Hall has been waiting for since September 28th. "We just heard last night that they were coming home." His son and grandson are members of the Pennsylvania Air National Guard 193rd Special Operation Wing. The wing was among the first guardsmen activated after the September 11th terrorist attacks, as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. "Our role was very big," says Alan Kaylor. "What we have is a flying broadcasting television and radio station we broadcast to the people on the ground." For many of the family members that were left behind when their loved ones were called to duty say Tuesday's return was both happy and sad. "In a way it is kind of exciting because they are serving their country. I have a lot of pride over that." Ralph says that pride was always coupled with a feeling of anxiety. "There's a lot of fear and concern because they are not out of harms way. It's good to have them back." For the members of the 193rd, it is now time to get back into the old routine and catch up with family and friends. "I just can't wait to get home," say Kristen Kaylor," and have him back again." The group broadcast Afghani music interspersed with messages urging Afghans to help out the Taliban, so their country could be returned to them (WPMT TV Harrisburg, via Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** AFGHANISTAN. BALKH RADIO ANNOUNCES NEW BROADCAST TIME | Text of report by Afghan Balkh radio on 21 March An announcement by the Balkh Province radio and television: The Balkh Province radio and television informs all compatriots that the Balkh radio new broadcasting time will be 1800 to 2100 local time [1330 to 1630 gmt] as of tomorrow 2 of Hamal, 1381 [22 March 2002]. Source: Balkh Radio, Mazar-e Sharif, in Pashto 1330 gmt 21 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) That`s the one on 1584 kHz, I recall (gh, DXLD) ** ALASKA. HAARP: O projeto baseia-se na "injeção" de sinais eletromagnéticos na ionosfera e estudar como se comporta a área afetada por essa irradiação. Essa "injeção de sinais" na ionosfera está ocorrendo desde o dia 15 de Março e acontecerá até o dia 28 de Março. As frequencias de operação são 3200, 3300 e 5800 kHz, iniciando às 0400 UTC até às 1400 UTC. Conseguí ouví-los no dia 18 em 5800 kHz e hoje, dia 20, em 3200 kHz. O sinal não se parece com nada com que já se ouviu antes nas Ondas Curtas. Quase se assemelha a uma música, variando-se a tonalidade e o oscilamento; às vezes assemelha-se ao som gerado por alarmes de automóveis. Enviei no dia 18 um email para askhaarp@i... [truncated by yahoogroups] com um informe de recepção e um arquivo de Real Audio mostrando que os captei. Após algumas horas recebí um email de resposta agradecendo o envio de meu informe de recepção e dizendo que estavam providenciando o meu cartão QSL. Recebí o QSL full data hoje (após 2 dias) e digo....MAS QUE QSL.....lindíssimo mostrando o parque de antenas e transmissores do projeto e com todos os dados da recepção anotados no verso. V/S: Ed Ele me pediu que enviasse um QSL a ele e acabei enviando um QSL artesanal feito com um cartão postal de Long Island. Para maiores detalhes sobre o projeto HAARP visitem o site: http://server5550.itd.nrl.navy.mil/projects/haarp/ O endereço para correspondência é: HAARP Gakona Facility, PO Box 271, Gakona, Alaska 99586, USA Tentem ouví-los no Brasil e enviem um informe de recepção. Vale a pena ter esse QSL em sua coleção (Marcelo Toníolo, Greenvale, NY (USA), JRC NRD 345, Dipolo 25 metros + MFJ959B, radioescutas via DXLD) ** ANTARCTICA. Radio LRA36, Base Esperanza, 15475.50 kHz, 1935-1940 Mar 19, Italian music: Eros Ramazzotti!, ID, very good signal but distorted modulation, SIO 352 (Daniele Canonica, Switzerland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ARGENTINA. Re LOL E-mail address truncated: Glenn, their e-mail is: onba@hidro.gov.ar 73 HAN, (Horacio A. Nigro, Montevideo, Uruguay, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BELGIUM. Hola Amigos de la Lista! Seguidamente, una información que quizás pueda interesar sobre una emisora pirata belga que suele escucharse regularmente por aqui en Argentina, y por ende, quizás en otras latitudes de nuestro continente. RADIO BORDERHUNTER, 15795 khz, probablemente viernes 22/3 *2300v+ sábado 23/3 *2300-0130v. domingo 24/3 *0900+ 25700 khz, sábado 23/3 *1800+ QTH: Ostra Porten 29; 44254 Ytterby, Suecia. E-mail: borderhunter@h... [truncated by yahoogroups] 73's GIB (Gabriel Iván Barerra, Argentina, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. Re Coari, 5035: Glenn, Esta emissora está ativa; eu realmente só posso ouvi-la quando R. Aparecida fica off entre 2200 e 2300 UT. Normalmente só aos domingos posso fazer esta escuta, não sei se R. Aparecida tem estado fora do ar todos os dias entre 2200 e 2300 UT, vou consultar o pessoal. Um abraço (Samuel Cassio, Brazil, March 19, WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. http://www.radios.com.br es un muy interesante sitio en el que se publica una relación de las emisoras brasileñas en AM, por orden alfabético de ciudades: http://www.radios.com.br/rela_am1.htm y en OC, por orden de frecuencia: http://www.radios.com.br/rela_ot1.htm (Gerson Luiz Carvalho, Brasil, Noticias DX Mar 19 via DXLD) ** BURKINA FASO. 5030, Radiodiffusion Nationale Du Burkina, 0611, Mar 19, Nice West African pop MX, with FF speaking M anncr. Strong signal, measured here at S9 with +10db peaks using 1/4 wave vertical. Thanks to Joe Talbot up in Red Deer, Alberta for helping me with the language (David Hodgson, TN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) It`s back on 4815, instead of 5030, around 1915 UT March 19 (Chris Hambly, Victoria, WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DX LISTNEING DIGEST) ** CANADA. CHIN'S JOHNNY LOMBARDI DEAD AT 86 Well-known Toronto personality was in frail health By Caroline Grech, Toronto Star Staff Reporter CHIN Radio founder Johnny Lombardi has died after a short illness. He was 86. Giovanni Scarola, news director of CHIN television, confirmed early this morning that Lombardi died in hospital last night. "It was not a long-term illness, but his condition was frail lately," Scarola said. "He was a news pioneer," Scarola said. "When he built the station in 1966 it was a novelty. The only consolation is that he at least got to see the expansion of the station. He was there when Ottawa approved a licence for a second station last year." "He was the guy that introduced multiculturalism to Toronto," Mayor Mel Lastman told radio station CFRB this morning. "He came up with a multicultural radio and promoted it and showed people they've got to be proud of what they are and who they are." Lastman also said Lombardi was a "great big part" of the city, helping to make it what it is. Lombardi was well known for his annual Toronto CHIN picnics featuring Miss CHIN bikini contestants. The Second World War veteran and son of Italian immigrants received many accolades in his life, including the Order of Canada. Johnny Lombardi Way was named after the popular broadcaster in the Little Italy district of Toronto. He was born in Toronto. Lombardi had a lifelong love for music and learned to play the trumpet as a young man. In his 20s, he formed the Benny Palmer Orchestra. Playing lead trumpet, Lombardi's Big Band sound was heard in dance halls across southern Ontario. In 1966, his dream to own a community ethnic radio station came true with CHIN Radio, which now serves over 30 cultural communities. CHIN broadcasts in over 30 languages, to more than 30 cultural communities in Toronto and southern Ontario. CHIN's goal was to "contribute to multiculturalism by providing a forum for understanding and tolerance between people across every national, racial, and religious origin," according to CHIN's Website. In 1974, CHIN expanded into television. CHIN broadcasts 10 hours of programming each weekend on CityTV. Funeral arrangements will be announced later today. With files from Canadian Press (via Mike Brooker, March 19, NRC-AM via DXLD) TORONTO MOURNS BELOVED 'MAYOR OF LITTLE ITALY' http://www.nationalpost.com/news/story.html?f=/stories/20020320/389906.html CHIN is, of course, on 1540 kHz. 73- (Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** CANADA. from http://www3.cbc.ca/sections/newsitem_redux.asp?ID=2217 TONY BURMAN NAMED EDITOR IN CHIEF CBC RADIO AND CBC TELEVISION NEWS AND CURRENT AFFAIRS Tony Burman has been appointed Editor in Chief for CBC News and Current Affairs for CBC Television and CBC Radio, effective immediately. As Editor in Chief, Tony will serve as CBC's chief journalist in interpreting CBC journalistic policy across all English media platforms - radio, television and Internet, as well as provide journalistic leadership around major events, elections and political conventions, as well as other special journalistic projects. "Collaboration and cooperation is increasing significantly among CBC's English media services, including CBC Television, CBC Radio, CBC Newsworld and CBC New Media," said Alex Frame, vice-president, CBC Radio. "As all parts of the CBC work more closely together as a team, we increase the value of our services to Canadians and further our objectives and mandate as Canada's national public broadcaster. Tony's pre-eminent position as a leader of journalistic policy, coupled with his unprecedented success recent years throughout national, regional and Newsworld news operations, makes him the ideal candidate to provide leadership to this initiative." "By having a single Editor in Chief for all of our platforms, we ensure continuity and consistency in the interpretation of our journalistic policy, and in the continued development of exceptional journalistic programming that spans all of our media lines," added Harold Redekopp, executive vice-president, CBC Television. "Under Tony's leadership, we will better align our resources, people and planning while respecting the integrity of all of our services - ensuring that each medium is able to express itself to the fullest. The goal is dual: to enhance the impact of the country's largest journalistic organization in a highly complex and fragmented media environment; and to continue to ensure that CBC exemplifies best practices in the management of a highly efficient and effective organization." For the past two years, Tony Burman has been executive director and chief journalist of CBC News, Current Affairs and Newsworld, responsible for leading and managing all of CBC Television's news and current affairs programming. Prior to this appointment, Burman was head of CBC Newsworld for two years, where he renewed the Newsworld program schedule and refocused the network on its news roots. One of Canada's most widely-experienced journalists, Burman has held a variety of senior programming and management roles at the CBC, and has produced many award-winning news and documentary programs for both CBC Television and CBC Radio (via Ricky Leong, March 20, DXLD) ** CANADA [non]. NY Daily News 3/21 WHERE THEY'VE GONE: AN 'SCTV' GUIDE Cast members' careers have stretched from H'wood to 'Oklahoma! By LANCE GOULD, Daily News Feature Writer If "SCTV" had parodied "Oklahoma!", it probably would have been renamed "Okinawa!", starred Billie Jean King and Julio Iglesias and featured cameos from Bob Hope, Merv Griffin and Jerry Lewis. As it is, the production of "Oklahoma!" opening tonight at the Gershwin Theater stars Andrea Martin, an "SCTV" veteran, and she'll be playing it relatively straight. Martin is just one of the alums of the cult Canadian sketch-comedy show who suddenly seem to be everywhere. "This is an opportunity to develop somebody with depth, and sketch comedy doesn't allow you to do that," says Martin about playing Aunt Eller in the musical. "It's not three minutes, as sketch comedy is. It's three hours. And the focus of this is not to get a laugh after each line - it's to tell the story." Martin, who was nominated for a Tony in the musical "Candide" and won the Best Featured Actress award in 1993 for her role in the Broadway musical "My Favorite Year," is best known for her work on "SCTV," particularly as Edith Prickley, the over-the-top manager of the fictional "SCTV" television station. But she wants to put Prickley's leopard-skin pillbox hat and horn-rimmed glasses well behind her. She stopped taking roles in sitcoms, hired the acting coach who helped Hilary Swank and Helen Hunt win Oscars, and focused on changing her image. Many of her "SCTV" castmates also have been undergoing career transformations. With the monster success of "American Pie," Eugene Levy has developed from a journeyman comic character actor into a star. His new TV series, "Greg the Bunny" (which starts Wednesday on Fox), is generating a media buzz. Levy also is at work on his third improv collaboration with Christopher Guest - a lampoon of folk singers. Martin Short morphs into his obese alter ego, Jiminy Glick, every Saturday in Comedy Central's "Prime Time Glick," a critical hit that began its second season last month with guest Tom Hanks. Harold Ramis has become one of the premier comedy directors in Hollywood. Ramis, who co-wrote "Animal House," also wrote and directed the Robert De Niro-Billy Crystal hit "Analyze This." The sequel, "Analyze That," starts shooting in New York in two weeks. Catherine O'Hara has co-starred in Levy's improv movies with Guest - she was the well-traveled Cookie Guggelman Fleck in "Best in Show" - and recently did a cameo with Ramis in "Orange County." Of the show's other regulars, Joe Flaherty played dads in the short- lived but critically hailed TV shows "Freaks and Geeks" and "Go Fish," and Dave Thomas was in last year's slapstick romp "Rat Race." Rick Moranis, who had a successful film career, has unofficially retired from show business. (John Candy, arguably "SCTV's" biggest star, died in 1994.) With the resurgence of many of its players' careers, interest in "SCTV" (which ran from 1976 to 1984) has risen. A long-rumored DVD project is in the works for late fall. And NBC aired old "SCTV" episodes after "Late Night With Conan O'Brien" for about a year until "Last Call With Carson Daly" started in January. When it was on the air, "SCTV" was in the shadow of its NBC stablemate "Saturday Night Live." SNL, because of its live broadcast, had an immediacy that hurt "SCTV" by comparison. "On 'SCTV'," says Short, the only regular to make the jump to SNL, "you'd write for six weeks, perform for six weeks and edit for six weeks. On 'SNL', you can be a star on Saturday night, go to the [post-show] party and enjoy your accolades - and if you don't have an idea on Sunday night, you feel like a total failure. It was more of a roller coaster." More demure than SNL, "SCTV" rarely touched on topics like sex or drugs, and it took place in the fictional town of Melonville, almost as far culturally from New York as Kabul. Still, the show was subtly dark and could offer devastating showbiz satires. "SCTV's" parody of the play "Evita!", called "Indira," featured Martin as the Indian prime minister Indira Gandhi and Flaherty as her adviser, yodeling country singer Slim Whitman. "We didn't have a lot of network interference," recalls Levy. "When they did have complaints, we would listen to them, nod and say 'Good point,' and then when they'd leave, we would go back to what we were doing. If they threatened to pull the plug on the show, we said, 'Let them do it.' We were young and kinda stupid." "SCTV," which was nominated for 13 writing Emmys (winning twice), is being recognized in Canada. The cast will get spots on Toronto's Walk of Fame in May, joining Wayne Gretzky, Gordon Lightfoot and other pillars of Canadian culture. "We became disproportionately large in Canada because of our notoriety," says Thomas. "We're sort of like old legends in Canada now." Adds Martin, "It truly was just to make each other laugh and have a vehicle to express ourselves. It really was just that, honestly. We had no aspirations at all that anything was going to happen." Original Publication Date: 3/21/02 (via Tom Roche, DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. Las emisoras radiales del departamento de Santander que transmitan publicidad del candidato presidencial Álvaro Uribe Vélez serán declaradas objetivos de guerra, anunció hoy el Eln. (El Tiempo, Bogotá, 20 de marzo 2002) Si las elecciones presidenciales colombianas se celebraran hoy, y no el próximo 26 de mayo, Álvaro Uribe las ganaría por abrumadora mayoría y sin necesidad de una segunda fecha de votación. Eln se refiere al Ejército de Liberación Nacional, la segunda organización guerrillera del país, y Santander es una región al nororiente de la capital Bogotá. Su capital es Bucaramanga (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** COLOMBIA. ELN THREATENS NORTE DE SANTANDER RADIOS THAT AIR PUBLICITY FOR URIBE | Text of report by Mexican news agency Notimex Bogota, 19 March: The rebel Colombian National Liberation Army (ELN) has today declared all radio stations in Norte de Santander Department which broadcast publicity for presidential candidate Alvaro Uribe Velez to be military targets. "We declare to be a military target any person or element that tends to support the presidential candidacy of Alvaro Uribe and, as a result, from now on the regional radio stations are prohibited from transmitting messages which refer to that campaign," the ELN warned. According to officials from that area, the authorship of the letter is attributed to the "Armando Cacua Guerrero" front of the ELN and it was sent to radio stations in Ocana municipality, 600 km northeast of Bogota. Uribe, the favourite according to the opinion polls to win the presidential elections to be held on 26 May, has strongly criticized the peace process and has promised, should he be elected, to strengthen the security forces for his presidency. Recent opinion polls put multi-party candidate Uribe in first place with 60 per cent, followed by Horacio Serpa (Liberal) with 24 per cent and former foreign minister and independent candidate Noemi Sanin with 5 per cent. According to the ELN, the second biggest active guerrilla group in the country [after the FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia)], Uribe Velez's campaign "is oriented to generate more violence and war in Colombia, which spoils all intentions of finding a political way out" from 40 years of armed internal conflict. The ELN is pressing ahead with negotiations with President Andres Pastrana's administration in Havana (Cuba) in order to agree on a bilateral truce for six months, which would imply a reduction in the conflict in Colombia. The cease-fire, which could be extended, would be the first step to consolidate a peace process with the ELN, in the next government, which should take office on 7 August. Source: Notimex news agency, Mexico City, in Spanish 0102 gmt 20 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. Policía "silenció" emisora de las FARC BOGOTA.--- La policía antinarcóticos destruyó la "Voz de la resistencia", emisora clandestina de las FARC que tenía cubrimiento en los 42 mil kilómetros de la liquidada zona de distensión. Los equipos de transmisión de la frecuencia 660 en AM fueron localizados por la policía a 25 kilómetros del municipio de Vistahermosa, en el Meta, en plena selva de los llanos orientales. Los equipos destruidos por las autoridades fueron una torre de 23 metros, un panel solar de energía, micrófonos, una consola y una repetidora ,así como una unidad solar (CARACOL via Henrik Klemetz) DESCUBREN EMISORA DE LAS FARC Marzo 21 de 2002, Reuters Bogotá http://www.elpais.com.co/historico/mar212002/NAL/A221N3.html Una potente emisora por medio de la cual las Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia, Farc, difundían música y mensajes revolucionarios, fue descubierta y bombardeada por la Policía Antidrogas en Vistahermosa, en el Meta. Mediante la estación, las Farc transmitían ilegalmente en amplitud modulada, frecuencia modulada y onda corta en la antigua Zona de Distensión. El director de la Policía Antinarcóticos, general Gustavo Socha, precisó que la emisora se descubrió dentro de las operaciones que se realizan para fumigar quince mil hectáreas de coca descubiertas en el antiguo enclave rebelde. Fueron destruidas una antena de 23 metros de altura, un panel solar, micrófonos, una consola, entre otros elementos (El País, Bogota, Mar 21 via Henrik Klemetz, DXLD) SE APAGÓ 'LA VOZ DE LA RESISTENCIA' Bogotá (Redacción Judicial de El Espectador, edición 21 de marzo de 2002). La central de la radioemisora clandestina de las Farc, 'La Voz de la Resistencia', fue descubierta ayer por agentes de la Policía Antinarcóticos en el municipio La Macarena, una de las cinco localidades de la antigua zona de distensión. El Director General de la institución, general Gustavo Socha Salamanca, precisó que la central de la radioemisora contaba con paneles solares, modernos equipos de transmisión y potentes antenas. ``Allí se estaban lanzando consignas, transmitiendo todas estas canciones, especialmente los vallenatos que llevan toda una serie de mensajes de los insurgentes``, afirmó Socha. Según el jefe policial, guerrilleros de las Farc coordinaban ``actividades de narcotráfico y atentados terroristas`` desde la central de comunicaciones de la radioemisora (via Henrik Klemetz, DXLD) ** CONGO. Brazzaville coming in well at 1945 UT March 19 on 5985 in French (Chris Hambly, Victoria, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CONGO DR. (KINSHASA) 9550, Radio Okapi. In an e-veri, Dominique Jaccard at Hirondelle's main office confirmed my reception as reported in Cumbre DX Special 390.2. This for an audio file sent to the info@hirondelle.org address. She confirms that this one is indeed coming from Kinshasa with just 10 kW [so much for my relay theory :)] Ms. Jaccard adds that they had some problems with the electrical supply at first but that they are now on 24 hours (via Hans Johnson, FL, Mar 18, Cumbre DX Special via DXLD) Glenn, 9550, not Hirondelle but Fidel's Voice. Heard a French language station at 0120 UT, but was RHC's French service instead, booming into Europe with S=9 +50 dB (Wolfgang Büschel, Germany, Mar 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Yes, Havana certainly dominates 9550 here too (gh, OK, DXLD) 9550.0, R Okapi first noted here yesterday Mar 15 (but have not listened for a couple of days prior to that) 2200-2330 in USB although also listenable in AM (nothing in LSB). Nice and strong signal. Mainly local pops with ID jingles and canned anmts, no other spoken word. Is coming through with a fair signal now (0900 UT), so possibly on 24 hrs/day? (Vashek Korinek, RSA, DXplorer Mar 16 via BC-DX via DXLD) Possibly the new Congo-Kinshasa coming through weakly here at 2001 UT with distinctly Congolese-sounding mx on the clear though weak on AM synch USB side with 353D and 7030+ through the SEIII. Best on DX- Ultra antenna (Tony Ward, Canada, VE3NO, ComputerViz; NYAA StarFest on-line, Mar 16 via BC-DX via DXLD) Tnx to above info from Vashek Korinek. Tony Ward heard this one from 2123 UT, weak signal but building. Improved a bit at 2137, and got a quick preliminary "Okapi" ID at 2138, a definite one at 2146. All soul-type vocals or African vocals, with occasional quick IDs between some songs. Signal rose and fell, as did the co-channel signal from Cuba which did not sound too healthy itself. Spillover from 9555 was also a problem. Still there at 2250 as I type this, with another ID and nominally dominant on the fqy; crisp audio helps it stand out (Jerry Berg, MA, DXplorer, Mar 16 via BCDX via DXLD) ** CUBA. Chicago Sun Times columnist Robert Novak says the head of the U.S. Interests Section in Havana has distributed "cheap shortwave radios" in Cuba: http://www.suntimes.com/output/novak/cst-edt-novak25.html (via Kim Elliott, DC, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA [non]. There was a discussion here a while back about the power output for the Radio Martí AM transmitter on 1180. A story in the current issue of Radio World confirms that they are 100 kW day and 50 kW night. The story is primarily about the recent $1.5M renovation and conversion to digital which is just being completed at their Miami studios (Patrick Griffith, Westminster, CO, USA, March 20, NRC-AM via WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DXLD) ** CUBA. Glenn, I've just received this from the Spooks group. Might be interesting to check it out. Can't do it here as it's the middle of the night! (Roger Tidy, GMT) ----- Original Message ----- From: "Nathan Kelderman" 123jimbo@bellsouth.net To: spooks@mailman.qth.net Sent: Wednesday, March 20, 2002 03:53 Subject: [Spooks] RHC Hello all, Don't know if this was already noted, but I heard Radio Havana Cuba on 12165 March 10 at 0300 UT. Audio was decent. Note the frequency, our good friend V2a. The frequency is not listed on their web page either as a new Spring frequency. Would have reported earlier but computer crashed. Nathan Spooks mailing list Spooks@mailman.qth.net http://mailman.qth.net/mailman/listinfo/spooks Visit http://www.spynumbers.com/ for complete information about Spy Numbers Stations (via Roger Tidy, UK, DXLD) ** FRANCE. The La Rochelle TIS station on 25926 is being heard as late as 2130 UT; now there seems to be only one carrier instead of several. Do not hear anything on the five other frequencies previously reported (David Hodgson, TN, March 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hear his amazing 1- watt tape on WOR 1123 ** GERMANY. Berlin Nalepastraße : Do you wonder how the old headquarter of GDR radio may look today? I just found some quite distressing pictures: http://www.geocities.com/dasteil/rundfunk.htm On this occasion I also found a mention of the computer programs GDR radio used to broadcast. The simple home computers from GDR manufacturing used ordinary compact cassettes to store data. GDR radio copied such cassettes to 15 inch per second reel-to-reel tapes which were played over the air, just through the console like actual audio records. Listeners only had to record these noises on cassette to get a copy of the program. Quite bizarre, but it worked, as long as undisturbed FM reception was ensured: http://www.osterburg.org/stefan/computer.html (Kai Ludwig, Germany, March 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. I had DW`s English stream on in the background and was somewhat startled to hear starting at 1501 UT Tue March 19, when I somehow expected news, a program on Deutsche Welle (pronounced as an English W) called ``Family Planning and Islam: The Gambian Approach``, apparently a co-produxion. There is a Gambia-Germany Family Planning Program in Banjul. Whew, we are fortunate that Germany is keeping down the Islamic population of Africa`s tiniest country (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GREECE. A-02 ERA-5 ERT Athens ERT S.A.: THE VOICE OF GREECE A02 SHORT WAVE TRANSMISSION SCHEDULE Effective from 31/03/02 to 27/10/02 (00:00) UTC Service Area GMT/UTC Frequencies Languages EUROPE 0000-0350 5865 7475 Gr 0400-0600 9420 15630 Gr 0600-0650 9420 15630 Gr, Eng 0700-0800 17905 15630 Gr, Eng 0800-1000 17905 15630 Gr, Eng 1100-1200 17905 Gr 1200-1250 12105 17905 Gr 1300-1400 9420 15630 Gr 1400-1500 9420 15630 Gr 1500-1700 9420 15630 Gr 1700-1800 9420 15630 Gr 1800-1900 9420 15630 Gr 1900-2000 9420 15630 Gr 2000-2100 9420 15630 Gr 2100-2200 9375 Gr 2200-2300 9375 Gr 2300-2400 7475 9375 Gr Foreign Language Transmissions 1200-1330 15650 Gr Ar 1330-1657 12105 D Rus E R Tr Bg Sc 1700-1800 12105 AI F 1800-1900 12105 BI Eng MW 0900-1800 792 Gr Ar D Rus E R Tr 2100-2230 792 Gr 2300-2400 792 Gr TASKEND 1200-1300 15650 Gr M.EAST, INDIAN OCEAN 0000-0350 15630 Gr 0400-0600 21530 17520 Gr 0600-0700 21530 17520 Gr 0700-0800 21530 17520 Gr 1200-1430 15650 Gr Ar MW 1000-1500 1260 Gr Ar D 2200-2230 1260 Gr ATLANTIC OCEAN 0000-0400 7475 9420 Gr 0400-0600 9420 15630 Gr 0600-0700 15630 9420 Gr 0700-1000 15630 17905 Gr 1100-1300 17905 Gr 1300-2050 15630 Gr 2100-2400 9375 Gr AFRICA 0000-0357 9420 Gr 2300-2400 12110 Gr JAPAN, PACIFIC OCEAN 0600-0800 15190 Gr AUSTRALIA 0000-0350 15630 Gr 0400-0800 17520 21530 Gr 0600-0800 15190 Gr 1200-1330 15650 Gr Ar 2100-2257 9420 12110 Gr 2300-2400 15650 Gr NORTH AMERICA 0000-0350 7475 Gr 1200-1500 9590 Gr 1600-2200 17705 Gr SOUTH AMERICA, PANAMA ZONE & SW AFRICA 0000-0357 9420 Gr 2000-2200 17565 Gr 2300-2400 12110 Gr (1) Gr=Greek, Eng= English, Al= Albanian, Ar=Arabian, Bg= Bulgarian, F=French, E= Spanish, I=Italian Pl=Polish, P=Portuguese, R=Romanian, Rus= Russian, S= Swedish, Sc= Serbocroatian, Tr=Turkish LIVE AUDIO URL: http://www.ert.gr Reports via e-mail: era5@ert.gr. Technical information: bcharalabopoulos@ert.gr ERT S.A. MACEDONIA STATION EUROPE 1100-1550 11595 EUROPE 1600-2250 9935 ERA 5 'THE VOICE OF GREECE' Messogion 432,15342, Ag. Paraskevi Attikis, Tel +301 6066308, 6066297, Fax +301 6066309 Macedonia Radio Station: Angelaki Str 2, 54621 Tel: +3031244979, Fax: +3031 236370 General Direction of E.RA (Engineering Div.): Messogeion 432, 15342, Ag. Paraskevi Attikis. Tel 301 606 6257, Fax +301 606 6243 (ERA-5 Greece, via WWDXC Germany, Mar 20 via DXLD) Note strange new frequency 17905, in the aero band carefully avoided by most broadcasters; will it really happen? (Glenn Hauser, WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DXLD) ** HUNGARY. Hola; Es con mucha ilusión que te pongo la siguiente información llegada desde unos minudos por parte de Radio Budapest. El nuevo 'schedule' en vigor del 31 de marzo 2002 de Radio Budapest incluye después 10 años de silencio emisiones en italiano, francés y español juntas a los otros idiomas. Es un éxito de la Conferencia EDXC del año pasado que esperaba hace unos meses. Espero que muchos oyentes de habla castellana puedan sintonizar a Radio Budapest en los siguientes horarios (español, 31.03-27.10.2002): 2045-2100 UT 6025 6145 2145-2200 UT 6025 11885 La emisión española inicia al término del informativo en italiano. Hay también algo de personal en esta emisión. Paolo y yo hemos participado a dos emisiones extraordinarias de Radio Buadpest en italiano em 1997 y 1999 y por fin llegamos a cumplir el sueño de una renovada emisión en idiomas latinos desde Hungría. 73's desde Florencia, (Luigi Cobisi, Secretario General del EDXC, Noticias DX March 19 via WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DXLD) Otras informaciones en el portal: http://edxc.multimania.com Radio Budapest, A-02 (31/03/2002 - 26/10/2002) English 0100-0130 9560 NAm English 0230-0300 9570 NAm English 1900-1930 6025 7130 Eur English 2100-2130 3975 6025 Eur (via Andreas Volk via WB, WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DXLD) ** INDIA. (01/03/2002) India is another vast nation adopting the Eureka 147 system as the future of radio. The public broadcaster, All India Radio (AIR) started regular experimental DAB transmission in New Delhi in April 1997. In a major initiative, AIR plans to launch regular DAB services in the country by the end of this year. Although the government has already given in-principle the go-ahead to AIR for initiating action on DAB, the project is subject to approval of the Tenth Plan, which is in the process of being finalised. To begin with, the DAB service, which is meant for all four metro cities (Delhi, Calcutta, Mumbai and Chennai), will only be available in Delhi. Six stereo channels are being planned for the Capital. The remaining three metros will receive DAB only in the second phase. The current challenge for India therefore is to bring receiver prices down to a realistic level for the price-sensitive Indian consumer. For that, AIR is in talks with UK-based manufacturers of DAB sets, one of which is expected to tie up with radio manufacturers in India for making DAB-enabled sets in the country. It is expected that sets manufactured in India will cost much less than the imported ones. (source unknown via Ardic DX Club via dx_india March 20 via DXLD) ** INDONESIA. Glenn, I'm listening to RRI Indonesia online with English at 2030. Probably started at 2000. Some real "hurtin' music" right now! (Ivan Grishin, Ont., March 19, WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Also check for English webcast hours at 0100, 0800 as on SW (Glenn Hauser, ibid.) Glenn, I only checked one time around 0100 this week (I think it was UT Tuesday) and they were not in English (sounded like Indonesian) but I'll make a point to check again. If you listened just before 1300 when they "sign-off", you will hear what I assume is the Indonesian national anthem, but they really do need a new tape of it, the one I heard this morning was just awful. They also keep the link up when they are off the air 1300-1730, but nothing is heard, other than some occasional test tones. Later: VOI is in English 0100 tonight [UT Mar 22]. Another example of a difficult accent to listen to. I had to pay close attention to the female newscaster. But it's still fun to listen, having very seldom heard them on SW. 73, (Ivan Grishin, Ont., DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. I would regret the failure of XM and/or Sirius. They provide vehicles for programming and formats that would not be viable on local radio stations. An audience of 0.1% in any Metro area is not worth bothering with, but 0.1% percent of the entire country could sustain a radio channel. The satellite radio services might have to look at (probably already have looked at) alternate business plans. One would be to drop the subscription fee altogether. The channels would be supported by advertising. Commercial radio is necessarily awful, especially if the amount of time devoted to ads is [not] kept within reasonable limits. At first, the numbers of XM and Sirius users would not attract advertisers. But, if the number of people signing up for satellite radio increases because it's free, the higher numbers will bring down the price of receivers and attract even more users. Another business plan is to make money by selling channel access to radio stations (or "radio stations") and program makers. Of course, when the program makers pay for access, rather than the satellites companies paying for the programming, much of the content will be very poor quality and perhaps even objectionable. But it might keep the satellite companies in business. The satellite radio companies could also function like a nationwide satellite SCA service. Each channel would be a pay radio channel. If you want old time radio 24 hours a day and are willing to pay for it, this service could provide it. Ditto Polka. Ditto computer talk. Ditto UFOs. Etc. Speaking for ke and not for voa/ibb/bbg/usg (Kim Andrew Elliott, DC, March 20, swprograms via DXLD) ** IRAN. CLOCKS TO MOVE FORWARD BY AN HOUR FROM MIDNIGHT 21 MARCH | Text of report by Iranian radio on 19 March The country's summer time will begin from 2400 on 1 Farvardin [2030 gmt 21 March], as the clocks are moved forward by one hour. In view of this change of time, the news on the Voice of the Islamic Republic of Iran [radio] will be broadcast at 2100 from Friday 2 Farvardin [1630 gmt 22 March]. Source: Voice of the Islamic Republic of Iran, Tehran, in Persian 1630 gmt 19 Mar 02 (via BBCM via WOR 1123, DXLD) But this traditionally has little if any effect on foreign language broadcasts (gh, DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. See LITHUANIA ** ISRAEL. Kol Israel cuts. Some new info: On March 20 the IBA Director of Finance sent a letter to Bezeq (countersigned by Director of Radio - Amnon Nadav) instructing them to cease shortwave transmission of Reshet Hei on March 31. Bezeq intends to interpret this literally but in the IBA there is confusion about what is Reshet Hei. For instance the IBA does not intend to include Persian but it is on Reshet hei (the confusion arises because administratively, salaries etc, it is with Reshet Dalet). English is on Reshet Alef and the IBA thinks this will be included. The matter comes up in the Knesset next week and the IBA is trying to force the issue. -- I've been told that this information will be in tomorrow's Jerusalem Post -- which would be available on the Internet this evening Eastern Time. I'll try to send the link when it comes in (Daniel Rosenzweig, March 21, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** JAMAICA. Hot off the press, here's what I did and didn't hear via saltwater daytime groundwave. No Jamaicans heard on: 560, 620, 750, 850, 1090. Jamaicans are broadcasting over 550, 580, 700, 720, 770. Quite some time ago I was asked by someone on the list about if 770 was in use in Jamaica. It is. I made a mini feature of this on tape. I don't ever recall logging any Jamaicans during the day offshore from W. Palm Beach and vicinity (Ron Gitschier, m/m, March 20, NRC-AM via DXLD) Re: ``From W Fla, a couple of Mexican stations can be heard during the day. Several years ago I could hear Jamaica-700 during the day from Jupiter, in very northernmost Palm Beach County, and of course ZNS on 3 frequencies, but when I was last there Jamaica was not heard.`` I was unclear in this posting. In 1992, my first visit to my (now -ex) mother in law in Jupiter, FL, I could 'easily' hear Jamaica 700 all day long, in summer conditions. Recent rechecks from the same area show no sign of their signal during the day. However I did not mean to imply the station was silent. In fact 700 and 720 are the only two Jamaican signals I hear regularly from Tampa, however only at night. The 700 daytime signal then was quite weak, of course, about s-1 and I had to go to Carlin Park (low noise level) to hear it. I have no idea what changed in this situation. I'll try to get back someday with a better receiver and loop and re-check it. It should be there at some low level (Bob Foxworth, FL, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** LITHUANIA. 7590, Tomorrow`s News Today at *1959-2010, 35333, English, 1959 s-on with Opening music. ID. News. Thanks for tip from Iwao Nagatani via Japan Premium No. 201 (Kouji Hashimoto, Japan, Japan Premium Mar 5) Obviously via Sitkunai, Lithuania (Wolfgang Büschel) Sitkunai operational schedule A02 season: 0000-0100 11690 310 100 RV Daily Lith.(30')/English(30') 0800-0900 9710 79 50 FBN Sat English 0900-1000 9710 259 100 RV Daily Lith.(30')/English(30') 1300-1400 9710 259 100 UL Sun German 2000-2030 7590 259 100 TNT Mo-Fri English 2300-2400 9875 310 100 RV Daily Lith.(30')/English(30') RV - R Vilnius (Foreign Service of Lithuanian Public Radio) FBN - Fundamental Bcing Network [no longer occasional tests? --gh] UL - Universelles Leben TNT - Tomorrow's News Today (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, BC-DX Mar 15) BC-DX has received information from a good source that R Barabari [IRAN clandestine] 7480 after a number of test transmissions is currently being relayed via Sitkunai, Lithuania (Wolfgang Büschel, BC- DX via DXLD) ** MEXICO. Those considering a reception report to this Mexican [on 660 heard during WFAN downtime], or any other by that name, may want to start with spelling it right. LA CONSENTIDA. I`ve always thought it a strange name for a radio station; perhaps David Gleason would explain what it means/connotes. Another tip: Spanish words, with the exception of occasional proper names, do not have double-S. So it`s Radio Progreso, not Progresso. 73, (Glenn Hauser, NRC-AM via DXLD) Literally, "the spoiled one" In Spanish, it means, sort of, a station that indulges or spoils or satisfies you. It is not a term that has a true English direct translation. Another good reminder would be that most Latin American stations don't use or care about their call letters. And "Progresso" with two "s" is an Italian soup brand (David Gleason, CA, ibid.) I wonder then if the "no, no, no, no, no!" after the slogan might be similar to the English phrases "Allow me!" or "Sit down! I'll take care of that!" or "Your money's no good here" or the like? (Steve Francis, Alcoa, Tennessee, ibid.) I think that it means a girlfriend or favorite girl (Kevin Redding, Mesa, Arizona, ibid.) Means "the Spoiled one" as in one who is "mimada" or showered with attention. No direct translation; idiomatic expression (Gleason, ibid.) Dave, I can't disagree with your translation, but interestingly all the people I work with say that it`s a favorite girlfriend. Where I work, we build jet engines and turbine engine parts. Almost everyone there is from northern Mexico. Almost 100% have told me that the translation is close to "favorite girlfriend." I would say that most come from Sonora, Sinaloa, Chihuahua and Zacatecas. I guess it`s another case of Spanish being different from place to place. Perhaps it depends on the context in which the term is used (Kevin Redding, Mesa, Arizona, ibid.) It sounds to me as if the girlfriend of favorite girl can easily become the spoiled one. Both definitions, thus, make sense, heh heh! (Qal R. Mann, Qo Median, Krum TX, ibid.) As Kevin rightly said, usage is very geography dependent; his definition is also within the general meaning... Most fun I had was trying to explain to a non-Hispanic GM that "Qué Buena" was not a catcall (Gleason, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** MYANMAR. Burmese Military Station: I checked 6570, after reading Adrian's report and I found that the station which was so strong a few months back is very weak now, BUT it is there. On my 40 mb two element yagi which is beaming towards Japan, I can hear it 1330-1600 with Burmese programming. On my long wire antennas it is barely audible, thanks also to the hash on the band. Best reception for me is when we have electricity cuts!! (Victor Goonetilleke, Sri Lanka, 4S7VK, DXplorer Mar 12 via BC-DX via DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. Glenn, Sounds Historical on RNZI is now 0806-1000 Sundays all on 11675. 73, (Ivan Grishin, Ont., DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NEW ZEALAND. Here's a link to an obituary in the Daily Telegraph of the NZ composer Douglas Lilburn (cf DXLD 2-043): http://news.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2001/06/22/db04.xml I first discovered Lilburn back in the mid-late Eighties, when I ran across an LP of New Zealand contemporary music which included his Aotearoa overture. It's a very nice piece, and would have some themes which would do nicely as linking music on RNZI broadcasts. Unfortunately, I've run across virtually nothing else by Lilburn in subsequent years, especially in the CD era. And here's a link to the Lilburn obituary in the Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/Archive/Article/0,4273,4221766,00.html 73- (Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** NIGERIA. The Voice of Nigeria has commissioned new studios... http://allafrica.com/stories/200203200057.html And the VON director and houseguests were robbed... http://allafrica.com/stories/200203040391.html (via Kim Elliott, DC, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NORWAY. Bruce Portzer forwards this message from Norway: Everyone: This message has some comments on listenability versus the signal-to-interference ratio. I've never seen it put quite that way before. For the record, 5-6 db equals one S-unit on a properly calibrated radio (Bruce Portzer, IRCA) "-----Original Message----- From: SvennM svennm@c2i.net To: Sorengo mwc@sorengo.com Date: Saturday, March 09, 2002 12:42 PM Subject: [mwc] Feedback Re-posting allowed Dear MWN Editor, We read about our project in a news item in the current MWN (World News), which also refers to BDXC and a comment about presumed nighttime interference from Radio Monte Carlo for our planned service on 216 kHz. We are pleased of your interest in our project, and encourage further constructive comments. Regarding the problem of nighttime interference, this is a problem found in all Europe and has its roots in the Geneva Plan, and is also due to the great number of transmitters in our part of the world, many of them high-powered, in a relatively small area. Anyone who wants to run an AM station in Europe will encounter this problem. And as you well know, it is already very evident even with some existing UK domestic services. In Norway, the following protection ratio figures were recognized when planning the 4 high-power channels of 155(153), 218(216), 630, and 1314 kHz for the 1974/1975 Geneva frequency conference, each 1200 kW. On the official 1977 coverage maps the boundary value used was <27 dB; in fact the basic values used were 30 dB for MW and 33 dB for LW. Let us refer to theory we have learned during our march forward: At 27dB, there will be good reception of both speech and music. At 20-27 dB, still relatively good reception, interference may be noticeable. At 10-20 dB, speech transmission may still be acceptable. We think people will listen to a signal with a signal to interference value down to 10 dB if the program is interesting enough. At 5 dB speech transmission may be possible, but the interference will be tiresome. We would also like to refer you to our website, where there are some calculations by our Norwegian consultant of how our service will do vs. R. Monte Carlo. http://www.northernstar.no Look up (in the left window) Coverage Maps Clear channel AM 216 and Open letter. In closing, In spite of the European interference problem AM radio does thrive with the right format. And now the sensational Digital AM is coming. Please look up the Digital AM/DRM link also to the left of our webpages and listen yourself to FM quality over 1000-1500 km. Most radio listeners agree that AM radio is interesting, no exciting! So do we, with great experience in listening in that field, and great knowledge of radio. But in the coming years it will be much more professionally interesting, no, exciting(!) than in recent years; AM radio licenses with very high power are very valuable already, and will in the future have even greater value. Svenn Martinsen, CEO, Chairman Northern Star International Broadcasters AS is a registered broadcasting company whose aim is to hold commercial radio licenses, and to trade in commercial radio and related media on a Christian foundation. http://www.northernstar.no Chairman S Martinsen; Directors E Morland, G Stokkeland Registration no.: 981 393 368 Registered office address: PO Box 153, N-5346 Ågotnes, Norway E-mail:gm@northernstar.no Phone: + 011 47 56 32 17 73 Fax +011 47 56 33 42 00" (via IRCA DX Monitor March 20 via DXLD) ** PAKISTAN. 15100, Radio Pakistan, Islamabad. 42 días. Recibido: tarjeta QSL, carta confirmatoria y adhesivos. V/S: ilegible. QTH: Pakistan Broadcasting Corporation, Headquarters, Broadcasting House, Constitution Avenue, Islamabad. El informe de recepción fue enviado en inglés vía e-mail. La dirección electrónica actual de Radio Pakistan se indica en la carta: cnoradio@isb.comsats.net.pk El idioma sintonizado fue el chino, confirmado en la carta. Este es un buen ejemplo de que pueden obtenerse QSLs de programaciones que se transmiten en idiomas muy distintos del nuestro; basta con redactar un informe de recepción detallado, con anotaciones sobre ciertas palabras escuchadas (nombres de personalidades, ciudades, etc). ¡Funciona!. (Rudolf Grimm, São Bernardo, Brasil, Noticias DX Mar 19 via DXLD) ** PARAGUAY. Este es un extracto del escrito dirigido por Dom Mur (Consultor Técnico de Radiodifusión América, de Asunción, Paraguay) a Thord Knutsson (Editor del WRTH) anunciando la próxima puesta en el aire en período de pruebas de esta emisora: "Comentarle que esperamos comenzar emisiones de prueba en el mes de abril, con un azimut de 184º desde el norte magnético. Nuestra principal zona de objetivo será Buenos Aires, en la frecuencia de 7,300 kHz, 41 metros. Si todo marcha bien, la potencia de salida del emisor será de 5 kW y la potencia radiada efectiva, de aproximadamente 1.58 MW. La fecha de comienzo prevista para las pruebas es el día 7 de abril. Toda la programación de Radiodifusión América será transmitida durante las 24 horas del día, mayoritariamente en español, con algunos segmentos en guaraní. Hay que hacer notar que la programación de Radio América, al tratarse de una emisora cultural y educativa, contendrá mucha música clásica (Vía Rudolf Grimm, São Bernardo, Brasil, Noticias DX Mar 19 via DXLD) Se ha mencionado como ``engaño`` [hoax] la noticia de un servicio de onda corta de Radio América, de Ñemby, pero en una breve e inmediata respuesta a una pregunta que le formulé por correo electrónico, el director de la emisora confirma que sí se piensa transmitir en una frecuencia de onda corta, como complemento a la frecuencia habitual de los 1480 kHz. No mencionó la fecha prevista para su apertura. El que firma el mensaje es el pastor José A. Holowaty, a quien se podía escuchar con regularidad a través de la onda corta de KGEI, La Voz de la Amistad, de San Francisco, emisora que fue clausurada hace ocho años. El pastor Holowaty se interesó entonces por los transmisores de onda corta de Radio Nacional de Chile, cuyos equipos más tarde, como ya es de amplio conocimiento, fueron adquiridos por Christian Vision (Henrik Klemetz, Suecia, 20 de marzo, COMPENDIO DE ESCUCHAS DX, WOR 1123) La información que Thord nos ha presentado es cierta, o sea hoy también el señor Mur me lo ha confirmado vía una conversación telefónica mantenida con él después de que el amigo Thord me enviara el número telefónico de la radio. Tuve una muy buena conversación con el Sr. Mur y le pregunté si le podía visitar para mirar las instalaciones a la cual él me invitó cordialmente. Informó que sé esta instalando en un nuevo QTH dos transmisores, una para la onda corta y la otra, un nuevo transmisor para la onda media. El QTH actual luego quedará solamente para los estudios y administración. Si es que todo me sale bien pienso visitar la radio el viernes. También le pregunté si la parte legal, o sea el permiso / licencia para operar en esta banda estaba arreglada a lo que le respondió que afirmativo, aunque aparentemente faltan algunos detalles.... Saludos de (Levi Iversen, Paraguay, Conexión Digital via DXLD) ** PERU. 5009v, Radio Altura, Cerro de Pasco, Mar 19 0105, ID "Radio Altura, sintonía sin frontera" The description below seems to be relay of R. Panamericana... 5009v, Radio Panamericana, ? Mar 17 2240, S-3, Salsa Music, ID "Radio Panamericana con todo..." 73 (Rogildo F. Aragão, Cochabamba, Bolivia, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** PERU. 6045.37, Radio Santa Rosa, 0915-0950, ID by YL, priest with congregation, religious service, "Gracias, Señor" repeated, woman singing a cappella religious music, excellent signal (Bob Wilkner, R- 75, Noise Reducing Antenna, Margate, Florida, March 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** POLAND [and non]. Radio Racja, from Poland to Belarus`, s/on at 0559 March 20 on 6095 kHz. IS and ID tape, the Polish tx's wobbler noise at medium level, i.e. not too annoying. SINPO 44333. 15455: Radio Maryja, the Polish Catholic station via Krasnodar- Armavir/Russia, at 0611 UT Ma 20 with a choir of a mass, at SINPO 54343. 73, EiBi (Eike Bierwirth, Rx=JRC-NRD525, 100m wire loop in the window, QTH for a year: Stary Petergof, RUS-78, St. Petersburg metropolitan oblast; Find all SW sked at http://www.eibi.de.vu/ DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** QATAR. Al-Jazeera: see USA ** SAUDI ARABIA. A VOA editorial on anti-Jewish content in the Sa`udi press received two mentions http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,48293,00.html http://www.jta.org/page_view_story.asp?intarticleid=11072&intcategoryid=3 The text of that editorial is at ... http://www.voa.gov/newswire/2d7ff27c.html (via Kim Elliott, DC, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SINGAPORE. All change in Singapore! MediaCorp has completely overhauled its MediaCorp SR ensemble. Seven Services are now being broadcast, of which six are exclusive to DAB:- CRUISE: oldies from the late 50s and 60s plus Jazz Standards and Jazz Fusion. CLUB PLAY: Singapore's Only Dance station JK-POP: The Latest Japanese and Korean Pop. CHINESE EVERGREENS: The Best Mix of Chinese Evergreen Classics. PLANET BOLLYWOOD: The Best of Bollywood. SYMPHONY: Singapore's Premier Classical Music Station. BLOOMBERG: Up-to-date news and financial information. Only Symphony is also available in analogue form, being transmitted on 92.4 MHz in the city state (Ardic DX Club via dx_india [off-topic] via DXLD) ** SLOVAKIA. R. Slovakia A'02 20 Mar'02 Radio Slovakia International Time And Frequency Schedule Summer 2002 (from March 31 to October 27, 2002) UTC Region Language Freq. 0100-0130 North America English 5930 49 Central America English 6190 49 South America English 9440 31 0130-0200 North America Slovak 5930 49 Central America Slovak 6190 49 South America Slovak 9440 31 0200-0230 North America French 5930 49 Central America French 6190 49 South America French 9440 31 0700-0730 Australia, Oceania English 9440 31 Australia, Oceania English 15460 19 Australia, Oceania English 17550 16 0730-0800 Australia, Oceania Slovak 9440 31 Australia, Oceania Slovak 15460 19 Australia, Oceania Slovak 17550 16 0800-0830 Western Europe German 5915 49 Western Europe German 6055 49 Western Europe German 7345 41 1300-1330 Eastern Europe, Asia Russian 9440 31 Eastern Europe, Asia Russian 7345 41 Eastern Europe, Asia Russian 5915 49 1330-1400 Western Europe German 5915 49 Western Europe German 6055 49 Western Europe German 7345 41 1500-1530 Eastern Europe, Asia Russian 13715 22 Eastern Europe, Asia Russian 11715 25 Eastern Europe, Asia Russian 9535 31 1530-1600 Western Europe Slovak 5920 49 Western Europe Slovak 6055 49 Western Europe Slovak 7345 41 1600-1630 Western Europe German 5920 49 Western Europe German 6055 49 Western Europe German 7345 41 1630-1700 Western Europe English 5920 49 Western Europe English 6055 49 Western Europe English 7345 41 1700-1730 Western Europe French 5920 49 Western Europe French 6055 49 Western Europe French 7345 41 1730-1800 Eastern Europe, Asia Russian 5920 49 Eastern Europe, Asia Russian 7345 41 Eastern Europe, Asia Russian 9485 31 1800-1830 Western Europe German 5920 49 Western Europe German 6055 49 Western Europe German 7345 41 1830-1900 Western Europe English 5920 49 Western Europe English 6055 49 Western Europe English 7345 41 1900-1930 Western Europe Slovak 5920 49 Western Europe Slovak 6055 49 Western Europe Slovak 7345 41 1930-2000 Western Europe French 5920 49 Western Europe French 6055 49 Western Europe French 7345 41 Regds, (Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, DX LISTENING DIGEST) [geez, I hate tabs. I thought I had the above all lined up, but am not going to spend any more time on it ---gh] ** SOUTH AMERICA. An informal survey of shortwave stations in S. America. To see it, go here: http://www.personal.psu.edu/faculty/b/d/bds2/dying.html 73 de (Phil KO6BB Atchley, swl via DXLD) It`s by Brett Saylor; reminds me of something Anker Petersen did, the disappearing tropicals (gh, DXLD) ** SPAIN. [Spurs] REE Madrid, still regularly audible, though putting a very faint signal on 4885 kHz for French program, e.g. around 1930 Mar 11: any idea of which REE channel may be causing this 60 mb spur? I tried 2 x 4885 kHz, but TRT (?) in Turk. was the only audible signal on 9770; REE in French was, however, noted on at least 7150 and 9595 kHz at that time (Carlos Goncalves, Portugal, BC-DX via DXLD) Would fit, if the formula 12035(Sp) - 7150(Fr) = 4885 kHz comes into effect!? (Wolfgang Büschel, BC-DX ed., via DXLD) ** SWEDEN. Hi, ask George Wood, who did edit that particular new A-02 schedule page, on both languages in English, and in Swedish too. The .XLS File shows only 1730 1179 and 6065 daily [white color, no weekdays/Sundays signs!], and 13580 Suns only in RED color !!! Swedish lang comments on page http://www.sr.se/rs/red/tabla/sve/svenska.pdf which is in CEST = UTC +2 hrs !!!! Swedish program A-02, also edited by George Wood: http://www.sr.se/rs/red/ind_sve.html This page noted a special broadcast on Sundays P4 Sport with [**] two asterisks signed: 6065 1700-1800 UT, or 1900-2000 Swedish Summer Time It's not stated clear, if also the MW 1179 is affected by that SPORTS P4 program. ... and the 6065 entry for 1700-1800 UT span on Sundays should be updated by Radio Sweden. 73 de wolfy df5sx (Wolfgang Büschel, BCDX via DXLD) Hi, No, according to the new schedule, the only frequency for Radio Sweden English on Sundays at 1730 UT is 13580 kHz. No 1179, as that is being used for sports in Swedish. It's a stupid schedule, but I'm not the one who puts it together. Take care, (George Wood, RS, ibid.) RADIO SWEDEN--Coming up on Radio Sweden: Thursday: In "HeartBeat", we visit the Health Fair, and laughing for health Friday: Our weekly review Saturday: In "Studio 49", the politics of the young, suicide, international adoptions Sunday: "Sounds Nordic" repeat, with Jenny Löfgren and the Swedish Eurovision Song Contest finalist (SCDX/MediaScan March 20 via DXLD) ** TAIWAN. New AWR outlets via Taiwan, maybe tests for KSDA replacements during refurbishing time span on Guam transmitter site in coming months. Der ab Ende Maerz gueltige neue Sendeplan von Merlin fuer den Sommer 2002 verzeichnet neue Sendungen von Adventist World R aus Taiwan fuer Suedostasien: 0100-0200 15445 kHz (Taipei 250 kW, 250 degr) 1400-1500 15490 kHz (Taipei 250 kW, 250 degr) Dies ist insofern bemerkenswert, als die Siebenten Tags Adventisten bereits ueber mehrere 100-kW-Kurzwellensender in Guam verfuegen, die eigentlich zur Versorgung dieses Zielgebietes reichen sollten. Die Buchung von Sendezeit mag ein Testlauf sein, da KSDA in den kommenden Jahren grundlegend modernisiert werden soll (Merlin A-02 schedule; via Dr. Hansjoerg Biener, Germany, BC-DX Mar 14 via WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DXLD) ** TURKEY. VOT A-02 in English, all 500 kW DSB: Eu/NAm 0300-0400 11665 changing to 9650 Sept 2 2200-2300 12000, 11960 Eu 1230-1330 17830 1830-1930 9785 Au/As 1230-1330 17615 2030-2130 9525 Spanish to Eu: 1630-1700 15150 (From complete spreadsheet sked via George Poppin, CA, WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DXLD) ** UKRAINE. Glenn, The 0100 March 19 RUI English transmission was delayed. We heard a Ukrainian announcement at 0102, then a selection from Beethoven`s 9th symphony, before the English broadcast started around 0106. Maybe someone didn't rewind the tape after the end of 2200 English broadcast? I agree with you, Glenn, the heavy accent of the host of the DX program makes for difficult listening, even at 16 kbits/s! But the weekend show's content was interesting. How dare he question the DX integrity of that listener! (Ivan Grishin, Ont., DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hi, Glenn. Read in DXLD Radio Ukraine is active again, but, didn't see a frequency listed; do you have the schedule for North America? (I miss hearing 'Music from Ukraine'). 73s (Bill Bergadano, KA2EMZ) Bill, I`m not sure they are active again on SW. Recent items have been about their new webcast, which is active. 73, Glenn UGH....webcasting.....do you have the URL in that case? Bill From the WOR DX Programs page: Ukraine DX PROGRAM: Radio Ukraine webcast at rtsp://real.nrcu.gov.ua:7554/encoder/rui.rm tnx Glenn....another streamer on the web; I`m not sure I will tune it in tho; I don`t like webcasting. Bill [Later:] Glenn- the URL you gave me did not run did not run do to an HTML error. Tom Sundstrom did locate the correct one: rtsp://real.nrcu.gov.ua:7554/encoder/rui.rm 16 kps sure stream feed, good quality, and I am disgusted I have to listen over my PC to radio. Bill Bergadano. Rechecked and the URL I gave you was correct; perhaps your browser or hotmail confused by the rtsp. Oh, come on, RUI ``reception`` via web is much better than it ever was on SW even with a megawatt, and now I can almost understand what they are saying (gh to Bergadano, via DXLD) ** UKRAINE. Hello, here is brand new information: Radio Ukraine International broadcasts now live in the web. The address is http://www.nrcu.gov.ua The live-stream includes also the programs in foreign languages like English and German. The times are parallel to the short wave schedule of the station; one of the English times is 2200 UT. I had problems during the start of the live-stream on the website. But after the direct certified lettercalling of the audio link in the Real Player I had reception of the German program on March 18th at 1800 UT. Here is the audio link: rtsp://real.nrcu.gov.ua:7554/encoder/rui.rm vy73, (Dietrich Hommel, Schwerin, Germany, March 19, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. Times UK: BBC'S DESERT ISLAND D. VS PRIVATE PASSIONS http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/0,,1442-235936,00.html Times U.K., Sat. Mar 16 Television & Radio Radio: Jonathan Lennie In addition to your eight pieces of music, we will give you the Bible and the Complete Works of Shakespeare, one other book and a luxury item. Sound familiar? If not, then you have probably been cast away on a remote island, for this year that venerable Radio 4 institution Desert Island Discs is 60 years old. To celebrate, the network is hosting a concert on Wednesday at the Festival Hall in London (scheduled for broadcast on March 23, R4, 6.15 pm), in which all the solo performers have been guests on the programme. DID began in 1942 and continued, under the control of its presenter Roy Plomley, to be a chat over what listeners imagined was tea and crumpets. Unfortunately, following Plomley`s death in 1985 and after a brief spell under Michael Parkinson, Sue Lawley got the gig. Gone was the tea and sympathy, replaced by ferocious inquisition; ``What do you mean you loved a man? Next record.`` But all is not lost and the spirit of Mr Plomley can still be heard over on Radio 3 on Private Passions. Amusingly, this became apparent when one of the guests, the conductor Richard Hickox, chose a piece of music by Patsy Cline; ``but I wouldn`t want it on the desert island,`` he declared. ``But this is not the desert island,`` retorted the somewhat abashed presenter Michael Berkeley. Indeed, it may not be set on that fantasy island, but Private Passions is currently superior to the show that it has copied because it is much more in sympathy with its originator. The chosen music provides a basis from which to have a conversation, rather than acting as a mere premise on which to interrogate the guests in a manner somewhere between Today and In the Psychiatrist`s Chair. Also, Berkeley is much more relaxed, as Plomley was; unlike Lawley who often lacks a similar rapport with her guests. The producers of DID would, no doubt, argue that Plomley`s deferential approach would seem twee to the modern audience, compared to the more thrusting and inquiring Lawley. But for those, like me, who enjoy a relaxed chat and think that investigative journalism should be left to the news programmes, here is to the original: long live Private Passions (via Chet Copeland, NYC, DXLD) ** U K. http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio3/speech/silentkey/sk1.shtml Here's something curious I found on the BBC Radio 3 web page which I think will be of interest to you and other short wave listeners. You can listen to the program via the Real Audio web link, and look at the QSL cards used for this "reconstruction." "Silent Key is an audio- field diary investigation into the history of radio enthusiasts and short-wave hobbyists recorded and assembled by David Ellis." (Ira Holmes, DX LISTENING DIGEST) P.S. Thanks for all that you've done for the short wave community over these many years. (Holmes) I publicized and caught the original webcast, but glad to hear R3 have it on demand, not something they usually do, I thought; at least they don`t have a handy ``listen again`` page like R4? (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. Rep Henry Hyde, chairman of the House International Relational Committee, has introduced his "Freedom Promotion Act of 2002" including a major reorganization of U.S. international broadcasting. For his press release and the full text of the bill, see the right column of the Committee home page [pdf]: http://www.house.gov/international_relations/ Despite early reports, the ranking Democrat, Tom Lantos, is not yet supporting this bill. Former FCC chairman Newton Minow has several suggestions for U.S. international broadcasting in a USA Today op ed: http://www.usatoday.com/news/comment/2002/03/19/ncguest1.htm (via Kim Elliott, DC, DX LISTENING DIGEST) excerpt: ...Al-Jazeera, the only 24-hour Arab news station, is a source of anti-American tirades by Muslim extremists and the favored news outlet of both Osama bin Laden and the Taliban. The service had its beginning in the mid-1990s, when the BBC withdrew from a joint venture with Saudi-owned Orbit Communications that provided news on a Middle East channel. The BBC and the Saudi government clashed over editorial judgment, and the business relationship fell apart. Into the breach stepped a big fan of CNN, Qatar's emir, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al- Thani. He copied CNN's satellite technology, hired most of the BBC's anchors, editors and technicians, and Al-Jazeera was born in 1996. Al-Jazeera first came to our national notice when it broadcast a 1998 interview with bin Laden in which he called upon Muslims to "target all Americans." Al-Jazeera broadcast the tape many times. Last year, the network's Kabul office received a videotaped message from bin Laden, which it transmitted around the world on Oct. 7. Hiding in caves, bin Laden could still speak to the world in a voice louder than ours because we allowed our story to be told by our enemies. Forty years ago, as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, I accompanied President Kennedy on a tour of our space-program facilities. When he asked why it was so important to launch a communications satellite, I said, "Mr. President, unlike other rocket launches, this one will not send a man into space, but it will send ideas. And ideas last longer than people do." I just never dreamed that the ideas millions of people receive every day would come from the likes of Al-Jazeera and be filled with hatred for our country. Al-Jazeera teaches an important lesson: The global marketplace of news and information is no longer dominated by the United States. Whether the message is one of hate or peace, in the globalized communications environment it is impossible either to silence those who send the message or stop those who want to receive it. Satellites do not respect national borders; like Joshua's trumpet, satellites blow walls down. On the receiving end, television antennas are like periscopes, enabling those inside to see what is happening outside. Why do we remain silent? Where were we when Al-Jazeera went on the air? It was as if we put on our own self-created burqa and allowed the voices of America, the voices of freedom, to become not even a whisper. I believe the USA must aggressively re-commit itself to public diplomacy -- to explaining and advocating our values to the world. I suggest three simple proposals: Above all, U.S. international broadcasting should be unapologetically proud to advocate freedom and democracy in the world. There is no inconsistency in reporting the news accurately while also advocating America's values. Does anyone seriously believe that the twin goals of providing solid journalism and undermining tyranny are incompatible? As a people, Americans have always been committed to the proposition that these goals go hand in hand. We need to put our money where our mouths are not. Our international broadcasting efforts currently amount to less than two-tenths of 1% of Defense expenditures. What if we invest the equivalent of 1% of the defense budget -- about $3.3 billion -- on international communications, or one dollar to launch ideas for every $100 we invest to launch bombs? This would be about six times more than we invest now in international communications. This could be a ratio sufficient to inform and persuade others of the values of freedom and democracy. More importantly, we should seek a ratio sufficient to lessen our need for bombs. We should use all of the communications talent we have at our disposal.... (Newton Minow, USA Today via DXLD) ** U S A. Regarding gh`s remark about WWRB having to provide access to a public file: this applies only to domestic AM, FM and TV stations. Shortwave stations, since they are not serving a local city of license, do not have to maintain such a file. And it is hazy about who, if anyone, anywhere, has legal standing to object to anything broadcast by a US SW station (gist of remarks to gh by George McClintock, WWCR, DX LISTENING IDGEST) ** U S A. From: http://www.wkyt.com [TV station in Lexington KY]. A former member of the Kentucky Militia is still at large after he allegedly fired shots at a deputy sheriff. 54- year old Steve Anderson is accused of attempting to gun down Bell County Deputy Scott Elder last October. Anderson then eluded police and a manhunt has been underway ever since. After five months of searching police are still following several leads concerning where Anderson might be. Anderson allegedly fired several shots at Deputy Elder during a routine traffic stop on US 25E. The suspect then fled to nearby Sam's Mountain where he escaped from the law. The television show America's Most Wanted will be featuring Anderson within the next few weeks. Police say the show should make finding the fugitive much easier. The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms is offering a $20,000 reward to help authorities capture Anderson. The suspect stands about 6 feet 2 inches and weighs nearly 240 pounds. He also has green eyes and dark hair. Anyone with information should contact the Bell County Sheriff's office or the Kentucky State Police. He used to run a shortwave pirate station that was on for several hours just about every day... (via Mike Terry, BDXC-UK via DXLD) ** U S A. Hello Glenn, The FCC has posted the HF seasonal operating frequency schedule today for March 31, 2002-October 27, 2002 at http://www.fcc.gov/ib/pnd/neg/hf_web/hfff0z02.txt This includes schedules for KAIJ, KFBS, KHBN, KJES, KNLS, KSDA, KTBN, KTWR, KVOH, KWHR, WBCQ, WEWN, WGTG, WHRA, WHRI, WINB, WJCR, WMLK, WRMI, WRNO, WSHB, WTJC, WWCR, WWBS and WYFR (Daniel Sampson, WI, Prime Time Shortwave, March 20, http://www.triwest.net/~dsampson/shortwave/ WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DX LISTENING DIGEST) No big surprises; confirms WBCQ`s new 11660 as already mentioned here; NO ``WWRB``, ``WWCV`` or even ``WWFV``, but just WGTG, making us wonder whether the other calls are out of Dave`s imagination. Also see WMLK item below for their registered but still yet to be activated 250 kW schedule. The Macon 4-hour-per week station, something which surely would not merit a license on AM or FM: 11910.0 2300 0100 WWBS 50 30 3,4,9 Sat-Sun I (via gh, DXLD) ** U S A. From WMLK`s lengthy history page http://www.wmlkradio.com/history.html It is our opinion that Radio Station WMLK is fulfilling end-time prophecy. First of all the call letters WMLK are significant because Almighty Yahweh pushed us in the direction of requesting them. We had other ideas for call letters. We discovered that all these call letters we had chosen were already in use, until we asked about selecting the letters MLK. These were available and assigned to the station. "MLK" stands for the consonants of the Hebrew word mal'ak which means "messenger or angel." The letters can also under a different set of vowel points mean king (melek). A vocalization of the word will also yield the definition "salt." (from http://www.wmlkradio.com via gh, DXLD) Still only heard on 9465, but: 9465.0 0300 0900 WMLK 50 53 27,28,39 9465.0 1600 2200 WMLK 50 53 27,28,39 9955.0 0300 0900 WMLK 125 53 27,28,39 15265.0 1600 2200 WMLK 125 53 27,28,39 (FCC A-02 via DXLD) ** U S A. Former WABC (770 AM) Program Director and New York Post writer John Mainelli has been named Program Director of WOR (710 AM), effective Wednesday, March 20th. Mainelli, who replaces David Bernstein, will aim to turn around declining listenership at the heritage talk (New York Radio Guide: A Guide to New York Radio Stations via Chet Copeland, DXLD) ** U S A. The KKEZ(FM) tower in Fort Dodge, Iowa, returned to Earth today. at the time of writing I have not found out why it collapsed. This makes the 4th tower I've heard about this year coming down. Is this a higher number than normal? the others were FOX 27 - Springfield, MO - Ice Storm KSEK - Pittsburg, KS - Ice Storm WFKT-TV - Near Raleigh, NC - Airplane (Glen Briggs, KB0RPJ, March 19, amfmtvdx via DXLD) RADIO TOWER DOWN (FORT DODGE-KWMT/KKEZ) -- A FORT DODGE RADIO STATION IS OFF THE AIR AFTER ITS TOWER COLLAPSED. AUTHORITIES AREN'T SURE WHAT HAPPENED, BUT THE 640-FOOT TOWER OF K-K-E-Z F-M WAS FOUND ON THE GROUND SHORTLY BEFORE THREE O'CLOCK TUESDAY MORNING. POLICE ARE INVESTIGATING. STATION MANAGER STEVE WINKE (WINK'-EE) SUSPECTS VANDALS. DAMAGE IS ESTIMATED BETWEEN 200-THOUSAND AND 250-THOUSAND DOLLARS. THE STATION'S ENGINEERS ARE WORKING TO GET THE STATION BACK ON THE AIR. IT MAY TAKE 45 DAYS TO REPLACE THE TOWER. EOM (from the KWMT web site. Pix at the KKEZ web site, via Charles W Wehking, ibid.) KKEZ site also refers to WHO-TV which has a report on the 6 pm news. Good full-screen video, under 2 minutes, available at http://www.whotv.com Downed tower is right next to KWMT-540 which still stands (gh, DXLD) Clear Channel's KKEZ FM (94.5) apparently lost their tower early Tuesday morning. WHO TV is reporting that vandalism is suspected. I'm not sure if this tower was shared with sister station KWMT AM (540) but they were apparently co-located. Photos of the downed tower on the KKEZ web site show one of the KWMT towers in the background. The KKEZ web site is at http://www.kkez.com/main.html (Patrick Griffith, Westminster, CO, USA, March 20, NRC-AM via DXLD) In wake of tower collapse story, can someone closer to IA confirm whether KWMT-540 is on the air? I can`t hear it in the null of TX, daytime, and I think I used to be able to, tho not tried for a long time (Glenn Hauser, Enid, OK, March 20, NRC-AM via DXLD) Glenn, they're on at a very low level, barely audible here in Topeka - (Paul Swearingen, KS, ibid.) After reading the messages this morning about KWMT, I called them to see what's up. Well, it isn't their #1 (north) tower. The 632' tower which also housed their FM antenna fell on the morning of 3/19 around 2 AM, possibly due to vandalism, leaving their short (320') tower for the AM. Day power is in the neighborhood of 1000 watts days and 170 watts night non-directional. The FM is operating off a 'very short' temporary structure hastily erected. Can only imagine what that is. They expect to be back on normal facilities in 45-60 days. This, according to the receptionist I talked to, who seemed fairly knowledgeable of what was going on. I also talked to their FM program director, who had no clue that the tall tower had anything to do with the AM station. !!!!!!! (Bill Hale in Fort Worth, ibid.) During the early 1970's, KWMT was heard by several DX'ers in the Northeast at sunset, myself included. I don't remember what power/pattern they ran then, and it was prior to all the flea-power nighttime operations, so it should be possible, although WLIX is dominant here daytimes, and as it approaches sunset, they usually end up sharing with WWCS (Russ Edmunds, Blue Bell, PA, ibid.) My understanding is that KKEZ used one of the two towers of KWMT's night array, which suggests that KWMT must have suffered at least some damage. My pictures of KWMT/KKEZ from last summer are at: http://www.fybush.com/site-010829.html and from looking at them, I thought KKEZ was on the tall stick that's also KWMT's day tower. Perhaps KWMT is running its day power into the shorter tower for now? (Scott Fybush, ibid.) It might also suggest interesting DX on 540, if they're going to have to operate non-directional while rebuilding (Mark Durenberger, ibid.) ARGH...just what I did not need, a non-directional KWMT here at night. It's tough enough being able to hear CBK, but getting anything else is extremely difficult. I guess that means chasing after KDFT and KNAK will have to go on the back burner, for now (Rick Dau, Omaha, NE, ibid.) Now`s our chance to test the limits of daytime groundwave DX on 540; states next to Iowa might have a chance at CBK, CBEF or KNMX, for instance. In a sharp null of KDFT Ferris TX, daytime, I can barely detect one or two other signals, subaudible heterodynes (Glenn Hauser, OK, March 20, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Once upon a time, KWMT held the distinction of having the largest daytime coverage of any signal in the United States. As proof, there were three successive years in the early 1960s where daytime bandscans were conducted at NRC conventions...Amarillo in '61, Indianapolis in '62, and Denver in '63. At all three locales, KWMT was the dominant station on 540 during the daytime. These days, KWMT has slipped to second behind KFYR, mainly for two reasons. One is that additional stations have sprouted up on 540 over the past 40 years in middle America, most notably in Jackson, WI (metro Milwaukee) and Ferris, TX (metro Dallas). The other is that KWMT's daytime signal just doesn't reach out in certain directions (mainly to the east and south) as well as it used to, and I believe this is due to changes that have been made in its antenna pattern over the years. Rick (listens faithfully to KWMT's country oldies program every Saturday morning!) (Rick Dau, Omaha, NE, NRC-AM via DXLD) Dear Glenn, This from my friend, and WOR listener, Debra Saylor, in Omaha: KWMT, 540, observed today, March 21, 7:00 AM Central, country music, I.D., into network news. Heard with normal strength here in Omaha. I haven't been paying attention to the station, so I can't say whether or not it was off the air, but it is definitely on now (Debra Saylor via Tim Hendel, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Nothing spectacular here, just a few random observations while spending Sunday at the beaches (Ft. DeSoto county park, Mullet Key) from 9:30 a.m till nearly 5 p.m. on an 87-degree day. Just the car Alpine radio used. Only worthy fauna sighting were about a dozen white pelicans on a sandbar near me, not too often seen this far down the coast in the winter. [evidently times below are UT?] 99.1 MHz FLORIDA (PIRATE) "Radio Sonique," Tampa; 1935+ 3/17, stereo, xlnt w/ nonstop Kreyol M (possible preacher), frequent references to "Kiskeya." Not on mid-morning through early afternoon on checks this day. (KRUEGER, Ft. DeSoto) 99.9 MHz FLORIDA "WECX" Eckerd College, St. Petersburg (non-licensed carrier curent low power); 1340+ 3/17, actually on the air (versus usual open carrier), with nonstop techno, stereo mode. On the return home, past the college, they were running urban/hip-hop, and an alleged M announcer who broke in with "uh, umm" and "Ahhh" near the end of a song. A real board op in the making. (KRUEGER, Ft. DeSoto) 102.1 MHz FLORIDA (PIRATE) "102.1," St. Petersburg; 1501+ 3/17 mono mode, seemingly nonstop mix of Christian vocals (about equally split between modern-urban and reggae versions). Later, around 1740, live announcer (the frequently-appearing "Don Jehs") with "Gospel On Sunday/Gospel Serenade" program. Gave a simple "You're listening to 102.1" ID (haven't noted the "Hot 102" slogan from when this aired hip-hop/gangsta rap format under seemingly different ownership -- or "WFLX" used more recently, for that matter -- in a while). Then, at 1758, after some old school soul, announced "We're gonna take a little time off. You're listening to 102.5 FM" and transmitter immediately off. Back on at 1925 recheck, and with Kreyol programming (first time I've noted Kreyol on this one), nonstop slow Kreyol gospel. (KRUEGER, Ft. DeSoto) "Florida Low Power Radio Stations" is at: http://home.earthlink.net/~tocobagadx/flortis.html (Terry L. Krueger, TOCOBAGA DX #63 - 18 March, 2002 CLEARWATER, FLORIDA, USA via DXLD) ** U S A. LAST DAY TO SAVE INDEPENDENT RADIO STATIONS SIGNALS FROM JAMMING by IBOC-DAB From alt.radio.digital: 20 March 2001 From: "Christopher Maxwell" wrfr@aol.com Date: 20 March 2002 23:01 Dear Supporters of Independent Radio, The Deadline for comment-replies in the FCC's consideration of new regulations that could force conversion to Digital Audio Broadcasting on the existing AM and FM dials is THURSDAY 3/21/02. Thus far all the FCC has heard from is mostly a cheerleading squad of huge corporations that own iBiquity, the very same company that will get money from selling the new technology! Even worse, the same huge companies are the main board members of the National Association of Broadcasters who are the sponsors of the organization that has been appointed by the FCC to test IBOC ! The Fox is running the Henhouse. America is founded upon a balance of powers, if you don't put in your part of the balance, they get what they want by default. All that`s needed is a simple comment, you don't have to say you KNOW there will be a problem, you can cite comments by Amherst, NPR and the Virginia Center for Public Press that cause concern and a need for better testing before implementation of these new regulations for a service called "IBOC-DAB". There is instructions, sample letters etc on the right side-bar of: http://www.DigitalDisaster.Org You could also use the sample letter below this signature. Here attached is the html document that pulls the images from the web (thus reducing email bandwidth). I also have a Word 97 version (minus the map). Also we have Public Service Announcements and our Congressional Testimony etc. posted on: http://www.DigitalDisaster.Org Thanks for the interest! Sincerely, Christopher Maxwell Secretary, Virginia Center for Public Press Radio Free Richmond Project http://www.RadioFreeRichmond.Org http://www.DigitalDisater.Org ============================= Sample Letter: ============= To: The Federal Communications Commission "From: ???? [State Your (or Station's) Name] "RE: Docket MM 99-325 (IBOC Digitalization) [If you are an individual, replace this line with info about the favorite weak station you are afraid of losing the ability to receive] "???? [am, is are] concerned that evidence and comments by some organizations that are NOT owners or members of iBiquity, the National Association of Broadcasters and the NAB sponsored NRSC testing organization may turn out to be valid issues and thus could destroy radio reception for many Americans. "We are filing these Reply Comments in regards THE VIRGINIA CENTER FOR THE PUBLIC PRESS, and others, who have offered evidence that implementation of In Band On Channel (IBOC) Digitalization could displace both aspiring stations and established stations as well. Both NPR and M Street newsletter have noted that the public has demonstrated that they want less ads and a greater variety of programming content. If any substantial portion of the VCPP, NPR and Amherst Alliance predictions and concerns are correct, we could DECREASE the variety and quality of programming content on the broadcast bands. This is not in the interests of smaller broadcasters or the public interest. We urge the Commission to proceed with re-investigation of the Eureka-147 alternative Digitalization technology, which would avoid the displacement problem. Eureka 147 would possibly accomplish this by being implemented in the US using the same frequencies as are already used in Canada, on the L-Band from 1452-1492 MHz. While in 1992, the US Military needed 1452-1492 MHz for missile test telemetry, now that the Canadians are transmitting Elvis on the L-Band, the military is already coming to agreements with the Canadians to begin protecting those Canadian stations and relinquishing some use of the L-Band. Furthermore, in December 2001, just a few months ago, the FCC Commission announced that in a complete reversal of 1992 decisions, the Commission is now reallocating portions of the L-Band for private civilian uses. Thus it is now politically and technically possible as well as more economically advantageous to re-investigate America joining the rest of the world in using the world accepted standard for Digital Audio Broadcasting on the L-Band. Even then, of course, the Eureka-147 technology should first be tested and evaluated as thoroughly as the IBOC technology has been. "In no event should IBOC Digitalization be adopted without full and complete testing and evaluation of the less disruptive Eureka-147 Digitalization technology." Sincerely, [Your Name here] (via Mike Terry, UK, March 21, DXLD) ** U S A. Dialing: CLEAR CHANNEL EYES SEVENTH STATION Clear Channel Communications might be adding a seventh radio station to its Chicago area cluster. The company is seeking Federal Communications Commission approval to move WHTE, a station planned for Downstate Johnson City, to west suburban Berwyn. M Street Daily reports that such a move would expose the signal --- at 1690 AM --- to a potential audience of 6 million listeners here. In Chicago, Clear Channel already owns WGCI-AM (1390), WGCI-FM (107.5), WKSC-FM (103.5), WLIT-FM (93.9), WNUA-FM (95.5) and WVAZ-FM (102.7). (Bob Feder, Chicago Sun-Times via George Thurman, March 20, DXLD) ** U S A. Rukeyser off Wall Street Week TV legend leaves show he created, hosted for 32 years; New version of show in works. March 21, 2002: 6:10 PM EST: http://money.cnn.com/2002/03/21/news/rueyser.ap.ap/index.htm (via Ivan Grishin, Ont., DXLD) {URL above is correct, rukeyser without the k -- gh, later} ** U S A [and non]. Just my humble opinion: Probably this RealOne player is so far offered in the United States only; when calling http://www.real.com from here in Germany (I guess they sort this out my means of the IP) I only get references to the two versions of RealPlayer 8. Indeed the RealPlayer 8 Plus for 30 USD is on top of the page; to find the free RealPlayer 8 Basic one has to scroll down to find a smaller link. Quite tricky, but I think "dark, hidden recesses of the site" is somewhat exaggerated. Out of curiosity I tried http://www.necn.com and instead of video streams I only got "You will need the RealPlayer to view this story. Would you like to download it?" Silly, I already have the RealPlayer 8 Basic on my system. But even more embarrassing was the next error message: The site uses ActiveX, which is supported by Microsoft's Internet Explorer only and quite a security risk (simply spoken it runs a program on your PC), so it is of course disabled on my system. Frankly, this site sucks, although I at least got no message that it will work with cookies enabled only. By the way, some guys consider the Windows Media Player as "spy player", at least when combined with Windows XP. Just a quotation, I have not devoted my attention on this matter so far. Regards, (Kai Ludwig, Germany, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VENEZUELA [+non]. La emisión número 100 del programa ``Aló, Presidente``, se emitió por Radio Nacional de Venezuela, Unión Radio y otras emisoras venezolanas, además de emisoras en Cuba (Telerebelde y Radio Habana Cuba) y Guatemala. Se inició a las 1400 horas UT y terminó casi 7 horas más tarde, por lo que, según se afirmaba, podía merecer su lugar en el libro de récords de Guinness. En el programa del domingo 17, realizado en en Monte Avila, de la capital venezolana, y en presencia de varios periodistas nacionales y extranjeros, el presidente habló por teléfono con sus colegas en Cuba, Guatemala y la República Dominicana. En el programa el presidente Chávez fustigó a la cadena RCN en Colombia, mientras que la cadena televisiva Caracol se salvó de la crítica presidencial por haber presentado sus disculpas por la transmisión de una noticia relacionada con Venezuela que luego se mostró falsa. En el periódico Tal Cual, del 18 de marzo, en un artículo titulado ``Aló despilfarro``, Alejandro Botía habla del costo del programa que se emite por radio y TV todas las semanas y siempre de localidades distintas. ``La cuenta por cada ´Aló´ puede treparse a los 12 ó 15 millones y más por programa.`` Y agrega, no sin una pizca de ironía, ``Pero la felicidad de un pueblo en sintonía con su líder bien lo vale. Y la felicidad del líder también``. (Henrik Klemetz, Suecia, 20 de marzo, COMPENDIO DE ESCUCHAS DX) ** WALES [non]. A-02 schedule for Celtic Notes in English via Merlin Communications: 2030-2100 Fri 7325 SKN 300 kW / 110 deg to Eu 0200-0230 Sat 9795 RMP 500 kW / 300 deg to NAm 1230-1300 Sat 17615*RMP 500 kW / 062 deg to Au/NZ *co-channel Voice of Turkey in Turkish and RDP International in Portuguese!!! (Observer, Bulgaria, March 19 via WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DXLD) ** YUGOSLAVIA [non]. [HCDX] Yugoslavia does not exist anymore. After 90 years of existence Yugoslavia disappears from the map of the world. ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Last week Serbia and Montenegro signed an agreement (Javier Solana was present) about the future of the state named - until that day - Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija). A new state called "Serbia and Montenegro" (Srbija i Crna Gora) is an alliance of two almost independent countries with one president Vojislav Kostunica (Voyislav Koshtunitsa). After 3 years, not earlier, the two countries may dissolve the alliance. The new alliance has two capitals: Beograd and Podgorica (Podgoritsa). Its economy is separated and there are two currencies: dinar in Serbia, euro in Montenegro. Serbia and Montenegro were what remained of the former Federative Republic of Yugoslavia composed of Serbia, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Macedonia. The countries regained their independence during several civil wars in the 90s. Vojvodina and Kosovo are parts of Serbia (Karel Honzik, the Czech Republic (Czechia), hard-core-dx March 20 via DXLD) ** ZIMBABWE [non]. V. of the People: Hi Glenn, I've been talking to our Programme Distribution Department, and it transpires that they did book an extra hour of airtime in the mornings, starting on 5 March. However, as you heard in the audio file, they were not able to make that date and launched on 8 March. It's at 0330-0430 UT. The extra airtime was booked for the days leading up to the election, but latest information is that they're going to make it permanent. So the full schedule is now 0330-0430 and 1700-1830 UT on 7120 kHz. The new frequency from 31 March will be advised shortly. Due to the heavy workload prior to the new broadcast season, and communications problems with Zimbabwe, my colleagues inadvertently forgot to notify me of this broadcast, and I have not seen any reports of it so far. A good job you spotted that announcement :-) 73, (Andy Sennitt, RN, WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DXLD) A-02 schedule for Voice of People via Madagascar 50 kW, 265 degrees: 0330-0425 7310 new morning transmission; 1630-1755 7215 retimed, ex 1700-1825 (Observer, Bulgaria, WORLD OF RADIO 1123, DXLD) +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ GUDAR Hi, Glenn! I was about to write and ask what "GUDAR" meant when I saw the other query and response in DXLD 2-043. I see you want to keep the actual acronym secret, so we all can guess at it. So here's my supposition: Guard Ur Data Accuracy Religiously! Oh, well, we'll see if anyone else has a better one... :-) (Will Martin, MO, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 2-045, March 18, 2002 edited by Glenn Hauser, wghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted afterwards at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd02.html For restrixions and searchable 2002 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn WORLD OF RADIO #1122: (STREAM) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1122.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1122.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1122.html NEXT AIRINGS ON RFPI: Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0700, 1300 on some of: 7445-AM/USB, 15039, 21815-USB DX PROGRAMS has been updated again anticipating more changes: http://www.worldofradio.com/dxpgms.html ** AFGHANISTAN. It has been reported that Chris, G0TQJ, will be going here around April 15th for two or three months. He is expected to try to get a license. If he does, look for him to be active on SSB and RTTY during his spare time. QSL via his home callsign (KB8NW/OPDX March 18/BARF-80 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** ANGOLA [non]. ALEMANHA - A Rádio Ecclésia pode ser captada, via Jülich, diàriamente, entre 0500 e 0559, em 11795 kHz. Também das 1800 às 1900, em 13810 kHz. Aos sábados, entre 1900 e 2130, em 13810 kHz, com o programa Debate Informativo. É o futuro de Angola, sem Jonas Savimbi, que está em jogo. Leia crítica em que abordo o desdém dos veículos de comunicação social do Brasil em relação à catástrofe dos nossos irmãos angolanos em: http://www.observatoriodaimprensa.com.br/artigos/ipub060320021.htm (Célio Romais, @tividade DX via DXLD) ** ARGENTINA. ESTACION DE SENALES HORARIAS LOL (Argentina): El Servicio de Frecuencias Patrones dependiende del Observatorio Naval de la Armada Argentina, conocido con su sigla LOL, transmite desde Buenos Aires, siendo sus características las siguientes: * ESTACIÓN EMISORA: LOL * UBICACIÓN DEL TXR: Buenos Aires (34 37 19 S / 58 21 18 W) * FREQUENCIAS PATRONES DE TXN: 5000, 10000 y 15000 KHz * POTENCIA: 2 KW * SISTEMA IRRADIANTE: Dipolo Trifilar Horizontal * HORARIO DE TXN: 1100-1200 UTC 1400-1500 UTC 1700-1800 UTC 2000-2100 UTC 2300-2400 UTC * FREQUENCIA DE MODULACIÓN: 440/1000 Hz (alternativamente) * INTERVALOS DE MODULACIÓN: (minutos de cada hora) H+03-05 H+23-35 H+43-45 H+08-10 H+28-30 H+48-50 H+13-15 H+33-35 H+53-55 H+18-20 H+38-40 H+58-00 minutos * ANUNCIO DE LA HORA: (minutos de cada hora) H+04 H+34 H+09 H+39 H+14 H+44 H+19 H+49 H+24 H+54 H+29 H+59 minutos * IDENTIFICACIÓN HORARIA: Grabación de voz femenina * EXACTITUD DE LAS FREQUENCIAS: Dos partes en 10E-10 * SEÑAL HORARIA DE PRESICIÓN: Durante toda la señal se emite un pulso de 5 milisegundos. Los intervalos de tiempo son exactos dentro de los 2 microsegundos y las señales horarias tienen un error normal menor que +/- 0s,01 Los informes de recepción son verificados con tarjeta QSL e información de la emisora en la siguiente dirección: QTH: Armada Argentina, Servicio de Hidrografia Naval, Observatorio Naval Buenos Aires, Av. España 2099, 1107 Buenos Aires, Argentina. E-Mail: onba@r... [truncated by yahoogroups] Web: http://www.hidro.gov.ar/ (Marcelo Cornachioni, Argentina, Conexión Digital March 17 via DXLD) ** BELGIUM. PIRATE. 15795, Border Hunter Mar 16 2339 UT, SINPO 44334 music including Johnny Cash mentioning e-mails from listeners (Wade Smith, New Brunswick, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BOLIVIA. RADIO COSMOS - Cochabamba, MW 770 7130 Mar/17 1730 Radio Cosmos, Cochabamba 1745 s.off 6036 Mar/17 1745 Radio Cosmos, Cochabamba 1830 s.off Would it be transmission test? (Rogildo F. Aragão, Cochabamba - Bolivia LOWE HF-225E Longwire 25m, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. Here are some of the stations I heard and IDed yesterday. The most interesting one will be R. Ribeirão Prêto on 3205 kHz which just reactivated its transmitter after a long period of inactivity. Heard in the city of Curitiba, in the south of Brazil, using a Sony 7600G, a 15 meter homebrew T2FD antenna and something vaguely resembling an EWE. kHz UTC SIO details: 3205, 0320, 544, R. Ribeirão Prêto, SP, Brazil reactivated ... PP talk program w/ ID at 0342 (Rik van Riel, SWBC topica list via DXLD) Hoje eu ouvi R. Ribeirão Prêto no 3205 kHz, pela primeira vez. 3205 0320 03/16 544 R. Ribeirão Prêto, programma com escutores ligando para estação de rádio e falando dos políticos, tempo e a sociedade, ID 0342 (Rik van Riel, PN, radioescutas via DXLD) It seems R. Ribeirão Prêto on 3205 kHz is back on-air after a long period of inactivity. I've heard them Friday night with good signal quality here in Curitiba, the program was political and social talk with listeners calling in, many mentioning of the city of Ribeirão Prêto and after almost half an hour a station ID (Rik van Riel, Curitiba, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BRAZIL. 5035, 10/03 2244, R. Educação Rural, Coari, Amazonas, música popular, OM "Agora, 1844 em Coari", ann de programa, 25322 (R. Aparecida fora do ar, voltou às 2300). SCM (Samuel Cássio Martins, @tividade DX via DXLD) I could be wrong, but seems Coari had not been reported in quite a while; reactivated? SCM got it only when a co-channel Brazilian happened to be off the air (gh, DXLD) ** BURKINA FASO. Fans of African music should check out Burkina Faso (from Kim Elliott's favorite city to pronounce: Ouagadougou) on 5030. The station identifies as Radio Burkina. I began listening about 2130 UT today and they are still going strong at 2230. The signal is the best I have ever heard from Africa on the 60M band. They are peaking 10 dB above Mauritania on 4845 and Ghana on 4915. Truly amazing signal with excellent audio and music. There are rather long periods of "man speaking in French" but the music and the audio quality is worth the wait. ~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-., (Joe Buch, DE, Mar 18, swprograms via DXLD) -*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^'~*-.,_,.-*~'^ ** CANADA. The following is a news item posted on CBC NEWS ONLINE at http://cbc.ca/news ____________________________________________________ CBC'S FRENCH NEWS SERVICE MOVES CLOSER TO STRIKE WebPosted Sat Mar 16 22:19:02 2002 MONTREAL -- Journalists at CBC's French-language news service in Quebec and New Brunswick have rejected the corporation's latest contract offer. They voted 68.5 per cent against the deal, which had been described by the CBC as its final proposal. More than 1,100 workers at Radio-Canada's newsrooms in the two provinces are already in a legal strike position, and could walk off the job by Thursday. The CBC issued a statement Saturday saying it's "very disappointed" by the vote. "(The) disappointment is all the greater because the offer is generous and enables employees to maintain their competitive position in the market," the broadcaster said. "Moreover, the offer provides solutions that are realistic and reasonable for both sides to problems raised by the union. It's not clear if journalists, including French radio and television on-air staff, will go on strike. A walkout could affect programming in Montreal, Quebec City, Chicoutimi, Sept-Iles and Moncton. Wages are one of the key issues in the dispute. Another is the union's demand that many temporary employees who have been working on a regular basis be given full-time staff positions. Copyright © 2000 CBC All Rights Reserved (via Ricky Leong, QC, and Daniel Say, CB, DXLD) ** CANADA. Another Morningside regular gone: Fredericton, N.B. - Veteran political commentator Dalton Camp has died in Fredericton. Camp was a long-time strategist for the Progressive Conservative Party who became a commentator and a passionate defender of Canadian sovereignty. He suffered a stroke in February but in March appeared be recovering and was released from hospital. But his condition deteriorated, he returned to the hospital and died Monday. Though he was a prominent backroom political strategist for decades, Dalton Camp was perhaps best known to the public for the weekly political panel on CBC Radio's Morningside with Peter Gzowski. He was the Conservative who sparred with New Democrat Stephen Lewis and Liberal Eric Kierans. Entire story at http://nb.cbc.ca/template/servlet/View?filename=jp_camp031802 (via Wade Smith, New Brunswick, March 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. But did they give the frequency? (Ricky Leong) M Street Directory had CKMK, Mackenzie, BC on 1240 kHz (gh) http://www.mackbc.com/mackenzieradio/ An interesting group who are trying to establish their own local radio station after Jimmy Pattison closed the existing local station. =========================================== On November 26th, 2001, The Jim Pattison Group/CKPG closed CKMK, ending a twenty-five year tradition of local broadcasting in the Mackenzie area. Although CKMK was operating in the black, the plan was to increase profitability by shedding expenses while retaining advertising revenue. But the closure was effected without consultation with local government, advertisers, employees or listeners. This `fait accompli` created a deep sense of disappointment and anger in the community. That reaction soon gave way to excitement with the realization that Mackenzie had been handed a golden opportunity. An opportunity to create a radio station tailored to the needs of the community rather than the corporate designs of the Jim Pattison Group. The Mackenzie and Area Community Radio Society (MARS) was formed with the goal of opening a new radio station to provide a quality local radio service. Subsequent to the closure of CKMK, CKPG had hoped to insert separate Mackenzie commercials in programming originating in Prince George and heard in Mackenzie, but under CRTC rules it is necessary to apply for a ``split feed`` before closing a local station. CKPG applied after closing CKMK. An attempt was then made to retain Mackenzie advertisers by offering $30 commercials on the main Prince George station for a loss leader rate of just $8. Bitter over the closure of Mackenzie`s radio station, the vast majority of CKMK advertisers have declined to transfer their advertising to CKPG. Thus MARS will not only serve a listener need for local information and programming, but will meet the needs of advertisers wishing to get their message to local consumers. The new station will be managed by former CKMK manager/morning show announcer J. D. McKenzie. (The entire CKMK staff and radio personalities are aligned with the new radio station.) J. D. McKenzie will operate the radio station under the guidance of the MARS board of directors. The board represents a wide cross section of the community, including business, industry, and education leaders along with other prominent citizens. (via Barry Rueger, South River, Ontario, CAJ list, via Ricky Leong, QU, March 17, DXLD) ** CANADA [non]. I have just been reading No 44 DXLD. Underneath your reference to me, under Canada is shown a Sked for RCI via HÖRBY. I cannot trace any broadcast in FRENCH Via HÖRBY at 2000 UT on 5850 on their Web Site and as far as I know ENGLISH is at 2000 on 5850, not 2100 (all UT of course) The FRENCH Broadcast is from SKELTON on 5995, 1900, as well as other frequencies. This 'Canada Saga' seems to go on and on!!!!!! (Ken Fletcher, Prenton, Birkenhead, 1855 UT 17th March 2002, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CHINA. Hi Glenn, I have been hearing the Chinese traditional music jammer from 3/2/02 until today (3/17/02), 1700 until after 2000 on 11945, 13690, 13745, 15510 in Central North America. These frequencies correspond with Radio Free Asia broadcasts in Mandarin Chinese (per the Klingenfuss Shortwave Frequency Guide.) 13690 had a bit of the broadcast under it today (3/17/02.) Generally I cannot hear the RFA broadcasts under the jammers, but just the Chinese music. OK background music for a while. 73's (Mark Taylor, Madison, WI, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CONGO DR? 9550 U+C R. Okapi 2035-0145 At tune-in, only audible on my 45 meter dipole oriented NE/SW, with SINPO 32332 in USB+carrier mode. Programming consisted primarily of "hi-life" type music, with an occasional Okapi jingle ID. Signal kept improving throughout the evening, and was dominant over Cuba at 0145 UTC, with SINPO 43444. Hard to believe they're only 10 kW as previously reported (George Maroti, NY, Mar 17, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Not a one-off, just checked and decent reception particularly as Cuba ran just open carrier from 0158 to 0200. Okapi jingle ID at 0159. New stations often seem to get out well, but I wouldn't be surprised if this was a relay with high power from somewhere instead of 10 kW from the Congo (Hans Johnson, FL, Mar 18, Cumbre DX via DXLD) So much for the report that they were really on 9555 (gh, DXLD) More confusion - Radio Okapi has some Web pages on the MONUC site at http://www.monuc.org/radio/radio.html There they give the frequency as 9550, but David Smith specifically told me 9555. I guess 5 kHz is not much difference if you're in the target area with an analogue radio (Andy Sennitt, Netherlands, March 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) There are some OKAPI reports of the last week/weekend, after a silent period in past two weeks, when never seen any reliable report on the DX press. Christoph/OE2CRM of Austria told me the answer from Kinshasa: "I would like to thank you about your email concerning OKAPI radio. I'm in charge for the sudies/install all technical features for all OKAPI radio stations in the Democratic Republic Of Congo (FM and shortwaves). Your comments are welcome. Cheers Georges/VE2EK" And Dominique Jaccard answered immediately and in short: "If you heard that jingle on radio, it came from Radio Okapi in Kinshasa. Sorry, impossible for the moment to do more. " So, it's obviously, that people of the Aid Organization Hirondelle are in duty of more important commitments at present, !!! than celebrate a DX hobby event show !!!. 73 (wb DF5SX BC-DX Top news via DXLD) ** DUCIE ISLAND. The Ducie Island DXpedition team is now active as VP6DI for about one week. First reports started showing up on the DX Clusters about 1915z Saturday. Remember the main frequencies for this operation are 21020 kHz for CW and 21295 kHz for SSB twenty-four hours a day. Note, please, that the expedition will have both 15 meter frequencies active at the same time. Other suggested frequencies are 14195 kHz for SSB and 14020 kHz for CW, as well as 28495 kHz for SSB. If conditions on the higher bands are poor, they will use 7045 kHz for SSB and 7005 kHz for CW. The operators will not be active on 75/80/160 meters and on the WARC until the last part of the operation. A frequency for CW on the WARC bands will be announced later. Per Yoshi, JE2EHP, states there will be 5 stations (Stations A, B, C, D and E). Stations A and B will share one tent and stations C, D and E will each have their own tents. The team will try to set up the A and B tent about 500 meters from the other tents. This arrangement is not carved in stone; there may be changes depending on the situation. Station A - 50 MHz, KW to a 4 element Yagi 14 MHz, 500W or a KW to a Four Square 7 and/or 3.5 MHz, 500W or a KW to an Inverted V Station B - 21 MHz SSB, KW to a 2 element phased array beam Station C - 21 MHz CW, KW to a 2 element phased array beam Station D - 28 MHz CW, (100W) to a 2 element phased array beam Station E - 18/24 MHz (100W) to a Vertical The Pilot Stations Yoshi/JE2EHP, Stu/WA2MOE and Jay/AF2C release the following statements on Friday about the VP6DI operation: 1. They decided that they will basically use 40m Inverted V for 40m and 75m. 2. They will try to utilize the 80/160m vertical which the VP8 team has left in the vessel Braveheart for Ducie team. 3. They are asking all the stations on SSB to call with a full callsign, NOT BY LAST TWO LETTERS. 4. They will stay on Ducie at least until next weekend (March 23/24th) by local time. 5. They will stop over at Hendersen Island for IOTA service just for one day on their way back to Pitcairn. QSL Manager is Garth Hamilton, VE3HO, for all HF operations only. QSL Manager for 6 meter operation is JA1BK. For the latest updates on this operation, it is recommend to watch the following Web sites: http://www.qsl.net/aa0mz/ducie.htm http://www.qsl.net/wd4ngb/ducie.htm http://www.ve3ho.com/ve3ho-qslmgr.htm SPECIAL ADDED NOTES (for VP6DI)...... * Propagation guru Lee, KH6BZF, reports the following propagation for the VP6DI operation: FOR ALL (dated March 17th): The propagation has been good this first day for VP6DI. K-indices from 0000 to 1800 UTC were: 0,0,0,0,1,1,1 that is a running Alpha of 1.5 The Solar Flux Index appears on the rise. At 1700 UTC this morning it was 185.6, a good sign. Also Aurora levels have been low. Last index was a level three (3). For the next week and a half will be HN (High Normal) now through the 20th March, the AN (Above Normal) propagation through the 25th March. If no Solar perturbations occur, we'll all be in "fat city!" * Mike, VK4DX, informs OPDX to tell its readers to check out the few audio files from the VP6DI operation on his "VK4DX Contest Calendar" Web site to hear what the pile up does sound like from "the other side". The URL is: http://www.vk4dx.net By the way, the "VK4DX Contest Calendar" Web page now also includes a U.S. contest calendar (state QSO parties 'n things) and the Australian contest calendar (KB8NW/OPDX March 18/BARF-80 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** FINLAND. Received from the A-DX-List. Time table of Finnish YLE Regionalprograms on MW and SW. Hallo Liste! Wenig bekannt ist, dass YLE Radio Finland eine ganze Menge an Regionalprogramme auf Kurz- und Mittelwelle überträgt. Hier der Sendeplan gültig vom 31.03.2002-27.10.2002. 0430 - 0500 UTC: 963 kHz in Finnisch Mo: Oulu Radio Di: Ylen läntinen Mi: Radio Itä-Uusimaa Do: Turun Radio Fr: Tampereen Radio 0700 - 0830 UTC: 11755, 6120, 963 kHz in Finnisch Sa: Radio Keski-Suomi 0830 - 0900 UTC: 21800, 11755, 6120, 963 kHz und 0915 - 0945 UTC: 11755, 6120, 963 kHz in Finnisch Mo: Etelä-Savon Radio Di: Radio Perämeri Mi: Kymenlaakson Radio Do: Radio Häme Fr: Radio Keski-Pohjanmaa Sa: Pohjois-Karjalan Radio 1205 - 1300 UTC: 11755, 6120, 963 kHz in Finnisch Mo: Lahden Radio Di: Satakunnan Radio Mi: Tampereen Radio Do: Etelä-Karjalan Radio Fr: Lapin Radio 1300 - 1400 UTC: 9630 kHz in Schwedisch Mo: Radio Aboland Di: Radio Österbotten Mi: Radio Västnyland Do: Radio Mellannyland Fr: Radio Östnyland 1310 - 1400 UTC: 11755, 6120, 9705, 963 kHz in Finnisch Mo: Turun Radio Di: Radio Savo Mi: Kainuun Radio Do: Oulu Radio Fr: Pohjanmaan Radio 1400 - 1430 UTC: 11755, 6120, 9705, 963 kHz in Finnisch Mo-Fr: Ylen aikainen 73, (Patrick Robic, March 17, A-DX list, via Olaf Haenssler, Germany, MW Circle list via Mike Barraclough, DXLD) ** GERMANY. From March 31, all European English transmissions from Deutsche Welle will be broadcast on the frequency of 6140 kHz, including the evening one which had been previously been aired from various frequencies from Sines in Portugal (e.g. 6180 kHz until March 30). Complete schedule is 0600/1900 and 2000/2045 gmt. 73, (Stefano Valianti, Bologna, Italy, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDONESIA. Been intending to check out the alleged VOI live stream mentioned in DXLD 2-030 as http://www.wrrionline.com/streaming/voi.asx which of course has a typo in it, an extra w, but even when fixed to http://www.rrionline.com/streaming/voi.asx the connexion I got at 1945 UT March 18 brought nothing but noise, like an open FM channel input - -- after all, RRI is on 89.1 --- and no French modulation; nor English as I was hoping for at 2000 when others manage to get it on 15150 direct (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INTERNATIONAL VACUUM. WorldLink, the satellite channel bringing lots of foreign TV, including Mid East, excluding Al Jazeera, to Americans, was the subject of a report on NPR Weekend Edition Sunday, March 17, available on demand... Mosaic TV NPR's John McChesney reports that a new satellite television offering, Mosaic, culls reports from a variety of Middle Eastern news broadcasts and makes them available to American audiences. (5:35) http://www.npr.org/ramfiles/wesun/20020317.wesun.04.ram BTW, new host of WESUN is Lynn Neary, replacing Liane Hansen, who has moved over to weekday work on ATC, but is expected back in July. We hardly ever listen to the latter, but wonder if her effusive style will be toned down for the afternoon. She was practically synonymous with WESUN all the years we have listened to it as a weekend staple (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRELAND. Anybody know this European pirate on 6310 tonight (Saturday)? I listened to it between 1935-2015 UT before it was drowned in QRM. No audible ID was heard. Some program details; Song by The Supremes, Otis Reading (?) "War", Anita Ward (?) "Never say goodbye", T-Rex "Get it on" and what sounded like audio-clips of 70- ies pirate stations. SINPO 24442 (Gisle Vanem, Norway, March 16, Hard- core-dx via DXLD) R. Valleri special, as already reported in DXLD [non]. Nothing heard from Radio Valleri at this location either on 6310. Just the weak het a little off frequency; I also heard the RCI mixing product. Alfa Lima International was heard on 6265 kHz, SIO 242 at 0039 Mar 17 // 15069.7 KHz. UK Radio on 6295, Zambia on 6265 was a little stronger than usual at 0300 UT and the presumed Laser Hot Hits was down on 6219v. So Valleri was probably very very low power or had other problems (Wade Smith, New Brunswick, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ISRAEL. The Summer 2002 Kol Israel schedule has been placed on http://www.israelradio.org : http://www.israelradio.org/summer02.htm It clarifies some of the unclear timings of the graphical schedule. Here's a text version of the English/Hebrew schedule (copy/pasted from the website). March 31 to October 6, 2002 English 0400-0415 UTC (midnight EDT) Reshet Alef Relay: Europe/N. America 9435 15640 Australasia/S. America 17535 1030-1035 UTC (6:30 AM EDT) Reka Relay Europe/N. America 15640 17545 1600-1630 UTC (noon EDT) Reshet Alef Relay Europe/N. America 15615 17545 1900-1925 UTC (3 PM EDT) Reshet Hei (Israel Radio International Network) Europe/N. America 9435 11605 15615 17545 Africa 15640 According to the PowerPoint schedule, Israel changes its clock on March 28th. This is the first day of Passover. When I first followed up, I was told that the clock is changing March 28th, 11 PM Israel Time (after the first day holiday has finished). Looking at timeanddate.com, it tells me that the clock changes March 29th at 1 AM Israel Time (two hours later). I do not know who is correct. Anyhow, I just wanted to clarify that it's not happening the night of the 27th, morning of the 28th, as one may have assumed. http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/city.html?n=110 Reshet Bet / Hebrew - all times UTC - subtract 4 hours for EDT. Europe/North America 0600-1900 15760 1900-0600# 15760 1900-0600~ 9345 0500-0100 17535 0100-0500 13850 1700-0430 11585 0430-0600 11590 S. Europe/S.America 1800-1850 15640 2000-2115 15640 ---- ~ In use March 31 – April 30 and September 1 – October 6 # In use May 1- August 31 --------- (Daniel Rosenzweig, NY, March 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Kol Israel Schedule retyped from website at http://www.israelradio.org/summer02.htm Schedule effective 31 March to 6 October 2002 Arabic 0300-2210 ME 5915 12150 Bukharian 1200-1215 cAS 15640 17545 English 0400-0415 EU/AM/AU 9435 15640 17535 1030-1035 EU/NAM 15640 17545 1600-1630 EU/NAM 15615 17545 1900-1925 EU/NAM/AF 9435 11605 15615 15640 17545 French 0500-0515 EU/NAM 15640 17545 1000-1030 EU/NAM 15640 17545 1530-1555 EU/NAM 11605 15640 17545 1930-1945 EU/AM 11605 15615 15640 17545 Georgian 1215-1230 Georgia 15640 17545 Hebrew (Reshet Bet) 0100-0500 EU/NAM 13850 0430-0600 EU/NAM 11590 0500-0100 EU/NAM 17535 0600-1900 EU/NAM 15760 1700-0430 EU/NAM 11585 1800-1850 EU/SAM 15640 2000-2115 EU/SAM 15640 1900-0600 EU/NAM 9345 (31 Mar-30 Apr + 1 Sep-6 Oct) 15760 (1 May - 31 Aug) Hungarian 1645-1700 EU 9435 15650 Ladino 1645-1700 Medit. 15640 Moghrabi 1625-1635 nAF 15640 Persian (1400-1500 on Fri/Sat/holidays) 1400-1525 EU/ME/NAM 13850 15640 17545 Romanian 1625-1645 Romania 9435 15640 Russian 1730-1900 Russia 9435 11605 Spanish 1635-1645 Spain/LAM 15640 1945-2000 EU/AM 11605 15615 15640 17545 Spanish & Ladino (sat only) 15000-1525 EU/AM 15640 17425 17565 Yiddish 1600-1625 EU 9435 15640 15650 1700-1725 EU 9435 15650 (via Alan Roe, Teddington, UK, March 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ITALY. Santa Palomba 846 is off and silent since March 9, 6 AM, according a decision of the TAR Lazio court. "Notturno Italiano" is now carried on the remaining 1332 outlet and in addition on Napoli 657, too. Monte Ciocci 1107 now carries RAI Radiodue instead of Radiotre to substitute for 846 in Rome area. --- summary of http://www.raiway.rai.it/news.htm This report also confirms that the recently reported power cut to a quarter actually refers to the reduction from 1200 to 300 kW reflected in WRTH 2002 and done some time ago, I think in 2000. Now 846 is indeed clear, instead Noginsk can be heard, noted here after 1900 with Radio Radonezh (Kai Ludwig, Germany, March 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** KOREA NORTH. Ed, P5/4L4FN, is reportedly back in Pyongyang. He received good news that his contact has been extended until June 2003. This means Ed will have a chance to work more stations than expected. However, according to the KK5DO's Web site, Ed's current work load is heavy right now. This means he will not be able to be back on the air until March 23rd. There is still much to do in the outlying field stations, so he will be out of town during the week (KB8NW/OPDX March 18/BARF-80 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** KOREA SOUTH. RKI MWF was back to usual time on webcast March 18, after 0430 UT Monday, instead of Korean as heard the past two weeks. This month`s guest was Erik Køie, Denmark (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MADAGASCAR. We finally heard a report in some depth on the situation here, on American media --- One of the early segments on NPR Weekend Edition Sunday, March 17, available on demand: Madagascar's Strange Stand-off The island nation of Madagascar is in the unique position of sorting out which of their two presidents is actually leading the country. One man is their constitutionally-elected president, but he's been banished from the capital. The other leads by popular demand, but has yet to win an election. NPR's Julie McCarthy reports. (5:15) http://www.npr.org/ramfiles/wesun/20020317.wesun.03.ram (via Glenn Hauser, DXLD) ** MADAGASCAR. (tentative) heard today March 17 on 5010 and weak parallel 3287.5 until sign-off about 1701. Unfortunately no clear ID heard, only "Antananarivo" in the closing announcement. 1700 national anthem, then interval signal several times, short test tone and off. Closing ann. was in Malagasy. 73 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MEXICO [and non]. We are wondering if and when Mexico City will adopt DST of UT minus 5 this year, as it was late starting and early ending (compared to USA) last year amid controversy and legal challenges. Here`s a handy reference, which does not show any time change for Mexico, and then only certain other cities, until May 5 at the bottom of the list! http://www.timeanddate.com/time/dst2002a.html (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PALAU. KHBN A-02: 9955.0 KHBN PALAU 0800-1700 SASIA 50.0 280 9955.0 KHBN PALAU 2200-2400 SEASIA 50.0 280 9965.0 KHBN PALAU 0700-1700 CHINA 80.0 318 9965.0 KHBN PALAU 2200-2400 CHINA 80.0 318 9985.0 KHBN PALAU 0700-1600 KOR/JAP 50.0 345 9985.0 KHBN PALAU 2100-2400 KOR/JAP 50.0 345 12160.0 KHBN PALAU 1000-1600 S.ASIA 50.0 270 13840.0 KHBN PALAU 1100-1600 S.ASIA 50.0 270 15725.0 KHBN PALAU 0700-1100 S.ASIA 50.0 270 (George Jacobs and Associates website via DXLD) Split personality: this station still referred to by US calls, which supposedly were changed years ago to Palauan call (gh, DXLD) ** PARAGUAY. El amigo y colega Thord Knutsson, de Suecia, nos sigue enterando de las novedades que le va adelantando el Asesor Técnico de Radio América, en Asunción, sobre las anunciadas trasmsiones de prueba que el mes próximo habrá de iniciar en 41m. Pero me entero via Tony Jones por Cumbre DX y gracias al amigo y colega argentino Nicolás Éramo que todo esto es una mentira, una broma o engaño ("hoax") !!! (Horacio Nigro, Uruguay, Conexión Digital via DXLD) "He recibido otro mensaje de Don Mur sobre las emisiones en la banda de 41 metros de Radio América. Creo que este mensaje es de interés y por esto les envío el mensaje. Cordiales saludos de Suecia, Thord Traducción del mensaje en inglés, más abajo: --Estimado amigo Thord Knutsson: Muchas gracias por su amable nota. Estoy agradecido por la difusión a la Comunidad DXista sobre la trasmisión de prueba (prevista). Esperamos empezar a probar con 5 KW a principios de abril. Dependiendo de los resultados de estas pruebas, comenzaríamos la construcción de un segundo sistema de antena direccional, orientado hacia los 310 grados (tomados desde el Norte Magnético), con el fin de servir el Norte de Argentina, Norte de Chile, Bolivia, Perú y el resto de la Región Andina. Debido a las características geográficas y propagacionales, estas señales entrarían también en América Central y la parte occidental de Norte América. En cuanto a la antena preparada para 184 grados, ya todo está pronto! Es un sistema Corner Reflector ("Reflector de esquina"), con un haz de irradiación horizontal que posee un ángulo de 22.5 grados, y un ángulo de elevación de entre 3 y 27 grados. Posee, aproximadamente, 25 dBi de ganancia. Calculo que no sólo será posible la recepción en el Cono Sur (de América) sino también habra propagación transpolar hacia Oceania y las regiones del Océano Índico. ¡Veremos qué pasará! Con los mejores saludos. Dom Mur, Technical Advisor, Radiodifusión América, Asunción, Paraguay La carta original en inglés: --Dear Friend Thord Knutsson: Many thanks for your kind note. I am grateful for the forwarding of the test transmission information to the DX Community. We hope to begin testing, at the 5 kW level, in early April. Depending upon the results of these tests, we may begin construction of a second directional antenna system, targeted on 310 degrees (from Magnetic North), in order to serve Northern Argentina, Northern Chile, Bolivia, Peru and the rest of the Andean Region. Owing to the geographical and propagational characteristics, these signals would also enter into Central America and the western part of North America. As for the antenna prepared for 184 degrees, all is now ready! It is a Corner Reflector system, with a Horizontal Beamwidth of 22,5 degrees, a Vertical Take-Off Angle of between 3 and 27 degrees, and has, approximately, 25 dBi of gain. I calculate that not only the Southern Cone Region will have reception, but also that there will be trans-polar propagation into Oceania and into the Indian Ocean regions. We shall see! With best regards. Dom Mur, Technical Advisor, Radiodifusión América, Asunción, Paraguay (Conexión Digital March 17 via DXLD) Voy a probar a averiguarlo... De vez en cuando suelo pasar las instalaciones (planta transmisora) de Radio América, ya que mi cuñada vive en Ñemby. Lo que me extraña es la frecuencia..... ¿Alguien tiene el n'umero de teléfono de la radio? Las guías telefónicas aquí son un desastre. Si es un hoax o no, no sé, pero también me parece extraño, ya que si era por mí, invertiría a mejorar el servicio de onda media que no es "tanto". Pero eso sí, es una radio religiosa (evangélica), y a estas muchas veces le gustan la onda corta ¿no? 73 de (Levi P. Iversen, Paraguay, March 17, Conexión Digital via DXLD) Sobre Radio América: Claro, no sé si las informaciones de Dom Mur están verdad o no. Pero según Dom Mur la potencia durante las emisiones anteriores era solamente algunos vatios. Dom Mur dice que van a utilizar 5 vatios en el futuro. Sería muy sorprendido si las informaciones han sido correctos o falsos [sic]. El futuro va a mostrar!! Saludos (Thord Knutsson, Conexión Digital March 18 via DXLD) ** PERU. Radio Satélite from Santa Cruz, is back again. The station disappeared for several years from the SW bands and returned now on its old frequency 6725.7v. Until 1996 R Satélite was to be heard almost every night, usually with quite good signal. Even if no other station of the out-of-band-Peruvians came through, R Satélite almost always was audible somehow. In those times I enjoyed the program very much. The typical mixture of Peruvian music and the so called mensajes produced the relevant "LA-DX-feeling". Unfortunately the present reception quality cannot be compared to the good signal some years ago. Obviously the transmitting power has been decreased drastically. The next disappointment: the program! Nothing of nice Peruvian music, only religious stuff. On that reason it isn't tragic furthermore that the modulation of the transmitter is poor only. It remains to say that here in Europe the frequency 6725 is occupied often by utility services. Due to that fact the reception of this Peruvian is not easy. For all, who want to try it, here the logging in detail: PERÚ 6725.7v R Satélite, Santa Cruz, 17th of March 2002, 0015-0110, Spanish, religious program, announcements of Christian events in the region, IDs; SINPO 23322. The station was drifting from 6725.65 to 6725.82 kHz (Michael Schnitzer, Receiver: JRC NRD-525. Antennas: 25m longwire, DX-One Professional, EWE to South America, EWE to Asia/Pacific; Location: Hassfurt, Germany, hard-core-dx via DXLD) But there is some contradiction about identity of 6726 station: (gh) ** PERU. 6726v Radio Unión, Lima, Mar/16-1200 Mar/18-0148 S-4 Latin Music non stop ID "Union la Radio" (Rogildo F. Aragão, Cochabamba - Bolivia, LOWE HF-225E Longwire 25m, hard-core-dx via DXLD) and: ** PERU. 6775.8v, Radio Unión, Lima. 0823-0835 March 15. Songs non stop ("salsa"). ID by male in Spanish as: "Unión... estás aquí, en el 880 de amplitud modulada". Then, more music. 34333 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentine, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. 5009v Radio Panamericana, ? Mar/17 2240 S-3 Salsa Music ID "Radio Panamericana con todo..." (Rogildo F. Aragão, Cochabamba - Bolivia, LOWE HF-225E Longwire 25m, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** SAINT LUCIA. 660, ST. LUCIA, R. St. Lucia, Castries, MAR 16 0900 - Definitely the highlight of the night. I believe this was the station carrying VOA Music Mix program over night. Local program signed on with time pips, 5 short 1 long, then announcement by low-voiced man, then St. Lucia National Anthem. Man returned to give AM and FM transmitter locations and concluded with " ... our beloved nation of St. Lucia." Heard next night, but very faint, with BBC News. New country that I never expected to hear [Rick Kenneally, CT, NRC-AM via DXLD] ** THAILAND. Radio Thailand, World Service Broadcast Schedule For listeners in all parts of the world, on short-wave, relayed over transmitters in Ban Dung, Udon Thani, Northeastern Thailand, on frequencies shared with the Voice of America, as stated below: (effective March 31, 2002 as per A-02 seasonal change) GMT BKK Time Language Direction Frequency 0000-0030 0700-0730 English Europe-Africa 09690 0030-0100 0730-0800 English US-East 15395 0100-0200 0800-0900 Thai US-East 15395 0300-0330 1000-1030 English US-West 15395 0330-0430 1030-1130 Thai US-West 15395 0530-0600 1230-1300 English Europe 21795 1000-1100 1700-1800 Thai Asia-Pacific 11805 1100-1115 1800-1815 Vietnamese Asia-Pacific 07260 1115-1130 1815-1830 Khmer Asia-Pacific 07260 1130-1145 1830-1845 Lao Asia-Pacific 06030 1145-1200 1845-1900 Burmese Asia-Pacific 06030 1200-1215 1900-1915 Malaysian Asia-Pacific 11805 1215-1230 1915-1930 Indonesian Asia-Pacific 11805 1230-1300 1930-2000 English Asia-Pacific 09885 1300-1315 2000-2015 Japanese Asia-Pacific 11850 1315-1330 2015-2030 Mandarin Asia-Pacific 11850 1330-1400 2030-2100 Thai Asia-Pacific 11955 1400-1430 2100-2130 English Asia-Pacific 09830 1800-1900 0100-0200 Thai Asia-Pacific 09690 1900-2000 0200-0300 English Europe 07155 2000-2015 0300-0315 German Europe 09680 2015-2030 0315-0330 French Europe 09680 2030-2045 0330-0345 English Europe 09680 2045-2115 0345-0415 Thai Europe 09680 Radio Thailand, World Service, Public Relations Department, Royal Thai Government, 236 Vibhavadi Rangsit Road, Din Daeng, Bangkok 10400. Tel(662)277-1814, 277-6139, 274-9098-9 website http://www.prd.go.th email address: amporns@mozart.inet.co.th (via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, Mar 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** UKRAINE. Glenn, The RUI audio stream is always a sesqui-minute behind. The connection also has a tendency to switch between a 16 and 8.5 kbit/s connections. But even at 8.5, it's a lot better than what we in North America have been accustomed to from RUI on SW. Still no sign of English at 1200. 73, (Ivan Grishin, Ont., March 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I heard the DX program final repeat at 0425 UT Sun; webcast helps a lot to understand the heavy accent of the speaker. This has been entered into MONITORING REMINDERS (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Glenn, You can add this to Monitoring Reminders: Ukrainian Parliamentary Elections on Sunday March 31. "Music from Ukraine" on Sundays, heard 2222-2255 March 17. 73, (Ivan Grishin, Ont., March 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. March 18, 2002 RADIO CASTAWAYS CELEBRATE ISLAND'S 60 YEARS OF MUSIC By Adam Sherwin, Media Reporter BEETHOVEN`S Ode to Joy is the piece of music most often chosen by castaways to take to their desert island in the BBC radio programme whose 60th anniversary is being celebrated this week. Almost 2,000 guests, from prime ministers to royalty, sportsmen and actors, have accepted the invitation to choose eight pieces of music, a luxury and a book to take with them to the tropics since the late Roy Plomley, the first presenter, came up with the idea of Desert Island Discs as he was getting ready for bed one night. His first guest was the comedian Vic Oliver in 1942, and the series was billed for eight weeks. The programme became a fixture, however, and its popularity remains undimmed, with three million listeners tuning in to Radio 4 each week for the familiar strains of its theme, Sleepy Lagoon, composed by Eric Coates. The diamond jubilee of the series will be celebrated by a concert at the Royal Festival Hall on Wednesday which will feature the most popular choices of castaways, played by the BBC Concert Orchestra. Full article at http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/0,,2-239781,00.html Roy Plomley started his broadcasting career as an announcer on Radio Normandy and I can recommend his autobiography ``Days Seemed Longer`` which deals with that period, ISBN 0-413-39730-0. Out of print so you need to do a book search but putting it in Google came straight up with a copy at 3 pounds plus post and packing from a bookdealer in Ramsgate: http://books2000.future.easyspace.com/AGEZZ05.htm I also found an article: Radio For Sale: Sponsored Programming in British Radio during the 1930's I had not seen before, by Sean Street, Media Professor at Bournemouth University http://www.ukc.ac.uk/sdfva/sound-journal/Street19991.html (Mike Barraclough, England, March 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. FEEDERS: 11195, BBC de Londres, 0212, Feeder en inglés de la programación, transmisión en SSB, buena señal, 44434, (Héctor Frías, Chile en "El Mundo está en sus manos", Conexión Digital March 17 via DXLD) ?? Thought BBC had not used SSB feeders for years and years. Incidentally, 11195 is where a receiver-produced image from 12095 would fall, minus 900 (2 x IF 450) kHz, but that does not explain it being in SSB (gh, DXLD) ** U K. Pirate, UK Radio International, Poor signal on 6295 kHz 0156 - 0245 UT Mar. 17. Gave 105 FM and 6266 KHz "..to the whole of western Europe" as the frequencies. Maybe a relay of a previous transmission (Wade Smith, New Brunswick, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. A visitor to the WWRB transmitter site stopped without trespassing, and quotes the sign on the gate: ``WARNING THIS FACILITY IS USED IN AIR TRAFFIC COMMUNICATIONS. LOSS OF HUMAN LIFE MAY RESULT FROM SERVICE INTERRUPTION. ANY PERSON WHO INTERFERES WITH AIR TRAFFIC COMMUNICATIONS OR DAMAGES OR TRESPASSES ON THIS PROPERTY WILL BE PROSECUTED UNDER FEDERAL LAW.`` But the sign doesn't cite any statute, ordinance, or anything else. The sign is obviously a lie, no doubt inspired by Dave Frantz`s alleged former career in the FAA. It`s an international SW broadcasting station, with the towers holding up the rhombic visible, nothing to do with ATC. So can we believe anything WWRB tells us? Furthermore, aren`t citizens entitled at least to inspect during normal business hours the Public File all FCC licensees are required to maintain? (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [and non]. George Jacobs sendeplaene/schedules http://www.gjainc.com/a02bystn.txt (via Dr. Hansjoerg Biener, BC-DX Mar 14 via DXLD) GJA clients keep shrinking, now covering only: KHBN, KTBN, KVOH, WBCQ, WRNO, WSHB --- of which the only ones of interest here are KHBN above under PALAU; KVOH for its specified overseas relay sites; WBCQ for a new 11 MHz frequency; and WSHB only for some `Merlin` unspecified relays; when there are two WBCQ entries one hour apart, that covers standard and DST periods both; viz.: 5975.0 KVOH JUELICH 0700-0900 EUR 100.0 290 6025.0 KVOH UAE 2330-0130 INDIA 250.0 85 6175.0 KVOH JUELICH 2000-2100 EUR 100.0 -0 7485.0 KVOH NOVOSIBIRSK 1200-1600 CHINA 100.0 111 9495.0 KVOH JUELICH 1700-1900 M.E. 100.0 80 9615.0 KVOH UAE 0200-0230 INDIA 250.0 85 9975.0 KVOH RANCHO SIMI, CA. 0100-0800 NAM/CARIB 50.0 100 9975.0 KVOH RANCHO SIMI, CA. 1300-1500 NAM/CARIB 50.0 100 11705.0 KVOH UAE 1600-1630 INDIA 250.0 85 13810.0 KVOH JUELICH 1600-1700 E.AF 100.0 130 15715.0 KVOH JUELICH 1200-2100 M.E. 100.0 115 15775.0 KVOH JUELICH 1330-1430 SEAS 100.0 70 17550.0 KVOH JUELICH 1330-1630 INDIA 100.0 90 17775.0 KVOH RANCHO SIMI, CA. 1500-0100 NAM/CARIB 50.0 100 17795.0 KVOH UAE 1230-1330 SEAS 250.0 85 21590.0 KVOH JUELICH 0700-1200 M.E. 100.0 115 7415.0 WBCQ KENNEBUNK, ME 1400-1600 SNA 50.0 245 7415.0 WBCQ KENNEBUNK, ME 1500-1700 SNA 50.0 245 7415.0 WBCQ KENNEBUNK, ME 2000-1200 SNA 50.0 245 7415.0 WBCQ KENNEBUNK, ME 2100-1300 SNA 50.0 245 9335.0 WBCQ KENNEBUNK, ME 1200-0500 SNA 50.0 245 9335.0 WBCQ KENNEBUNK, ME 1300-0600 SNA 50.0 245 11660.0 WBCQ KENNEBUNK, ME 1300-0500 SNA 50.0 245 11660.0 WBCQ KENNEBUNK, ME 1300-0600 SNA 50.0 245 17495.0 WBCQ KENNEBUNK, ME 1400-2100 SNA 50.0 245 17495.0 WBCQ KENNEBUNK, ME 1500-2200 SNA 50.0 245 9875.0 WSHB MERLIN 1200-1300 S CHINA 9940.0 WSHB MERLIN 1300-1400 India 11780.0 WSHB MERLIN 1000-1100 N China 17635.0 WSHB MERLIN 1200-1300 Indonesia (George Jacobs and Associates via Biener, BC-DX via DXLD) We extracted only some items of interest. Note that power and azimuth of the WSHB relays, not to mention the sites, are still being kept secret! Also, this page says ``Printed 86 of the 93 records,`` presumably meaning that seven entire entries are being kept secret (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. KRCL, 90.9, Salt Lake City, touts itself as a voice from ``Behind the Zion Curtain``. It is a community radio station, not an NPR, corporate sponsored affiliate. One weekly half-hour public affairs program on KRCL is ``Building a Good Society``, Tuesdays 12:30 pm MT since January 2000. It`s hosted by Unitarian Universalist Rev. Dr. Steven Epperson, where ``social justice outreach is an essential part of our ministry.`` (The Call, January 2002, UU for a Just Econonic Community, via Howard Box, TN, DXLD) We looked up http://www.krcl.org and found that they suspended webcasts in Dec due to the DMCA, but several shows including this one are available ondemand from archive at: http://www.krcl.org/PublicAffairs/ondemand.htm (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Copyright 2002 The Omaha World-Herald Company March 9, 2002, Saturday SUNRISE EDITION SECTION: LIVING; Pg. 3e; SARPY COUNTY NEWS STATION SCHEDULED TO DEBUT IN APRIL By Kristi Wright, WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER Sarpy County residents are getting a radio station of their own. In April, Waitt Radio of Omaha will launch KKSC-AM at 1020 on the radio dial, said George Pelletier, vice president of operations for the company. The station will feature agricultural news for eastern Nebraska and sports, news and other information of interest to Sarpy County residents. Mike Hansen will lead the station. Its studio is located between Bellevue and Papillion, and it will have a news department. KKSC is not an entirely new radio station, but rather an old station with a signal boost and a call-letter change. Waitt Radio changed Plattsmouth station KOTD-AM to KKSC-AM and requested a signal boost from 1,000 watts to 50,000 watts. Pelletier says the extra power - which is only in the daytime - allows KKSC to reach many farmers and agricultural suppliers it seeks as its audience. Pelletier says Sarpy County residents crave news and information specific to their area. Disc jockeys will play music - the format has yet to be decided - but only as a filler between programs (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A [and non]. There was a nice piece on NPR (National Public Radio) about the numbers stations. Go here to hear it on the web. http://search1.npr.org/opt/collections/torched/atc/data_atc/seg_74687.htm I work at NPR and I am about to get my DX 398 in the mail early next week. I look forward to sharing my experiences and most often reading the stories of others. Enjoy (Bob Boilen, director, NPR's All Things Considered, DX-398 Users yahoogroup via DXLD) ** U S A. DECADES AFTER ITS HEYDEY, YIDDISH RADIO RETURNING TO AIRWAVES By KATHERINE ROTH, Associated Press Writer NEW YORK (AP) - Ask Seymour Rexite to sing your favorite song and the 91-year-old will gladly oblige, in Yiddish. "Yiddish radio was very big," Rexite says, and so was he for 40 years on the air. "Name just about any song and we'd sing it in Yiddish." Then he breaks into a heartfelt Yiddish rendition of Cole Porter's "Night and Day," followed by a bilingual plug for the shaving cream "Bar-ba-soooool!" After a half-century on the shelf, recordings of Rexite in his prime and other gems of Yiddish radio history are returning to the airwaves - this time on National Public Radio, in a 10-part series starting Tuesday. The longest series ever to air on NPR, "The Yiddish Radio Project" is the product of 17 years of digging through archives for the fragile aluminum discs recorded during Yiddish radio's heydey, from the 1930s to the 1950s. Ranging from funny to heartbreaking, the broadcasts bring listeners into the everyday lives of an immigrant community at its peak, before its members - Jews from Central and Eastern Europe - assimilated more fully into mainstream American culture. More than 100 stations nationwide had Yiddish programming, and nearly 5,000 records were produced for the nation's 2 million Yiddish speakers. "This is really the story of every ethnic group in America that has ever tried to retain its cultural identity," said Henry Sapoznik, who produced the series with David Isay and Yair Reiser. "It doesn't matter that this is Yiddish or that it took place in the Lower East Side of New York. This is the story of Spanish- speaking communities, of Greek-speaking communities, of every community that's had to find a way to reconcile the seemingly irreconcilable. There's a history waiting to be uncovered of these tiny, low-powered stations attempting to reach their own communities in their own language." Rexite performed with his wife, the late Miriam Kressyn. His silken voice and delicious translations earned him the title "the Yiddish Perry Como," and won him four Goldies, the Oscars of the Yiddish theater. The short bespectacled statuettes still line the mantle in his Greenwich Village apartment. On the walls hang pictures of Frank Sinatra, Fiorello LaGuardia and Albert Einstein - all fans, he says, of Yiddish performance. Segments of the NPR series include "Yiddish Melodies in Swing," which is also being released on CD. Inspired by a 1938-'55 show that mixed Yiddish music with American swing, the segment includes Yiddish versions of tunes such as "The Surrey with the Fringe on Top" and ads touting "gefilte fish in glass jars." Then there's "Levine Mit Zayn Flying Machine," by Sam Coslow, who went on to write "My Old Flame." His lesser-known hit celebrates Charles Levine, a self-made millionaire who, two weeks after Charles Lindbergh's famous trans-Atlantic flight, became the first passenger on a trans-Atlantic flight, the show's producers said. Unlike mainstream American radio of the time, "there was no Yiddish Lone Ranger, there was no Yiddish Flash Gordon," Sapoznik said. "They didn't want stuff that took them out of their world. They wanted stuff that reinforced a world they understood and made the entry into mainstream culture easier." The NPR series, to run on Tuesday afternoons, explores Yiddish dramas, news programs, advice and game shows, and includes some early man-on-the-street interviews. A heart-rending segment features the program "Reunion," which brought together people who hadn't seen each other in years. On one 1947 broadcast, a man is suddenly reunited with a son he thought had been killed in the Holocaust. "There's a moment where father and son are reunited and there's a scream, a cry. ... It's the father when he sees his son. Nothing compares to this moment when this man is reunited with his son, who he thought had been murdered with the rest of his family in the camps," Sapoznik says. The segment will be narrated by the son - Seigbert Freiberg, now in his 70s and living in Queens. By the end of the 1950s, the golden age of Yiddish radio came to a close. Television overtook radio. Yiddish culture in Europe nearly vanished because of the Holocaust. In America, "The melting pot was bubbling and no one wanted to encourage people to stay within their culture," Sapoznik said. "These people who did the Yiddish radio shows were swimming against the current." --- On the Net: http://www.YiddishRadioProject.org AP 03-17-02 1026 EST (via David R. Alpert, CA, DXLD) ** U S A [non]. New York silent on 660 and 880. Glad I checked DXLD just before heading off to bed. On 660, CFFR Calgary heard with oldies music at 0535 UT, ads for Calgary. "La Mexicana" jingles heard various times between 0802 and 0848 UT; can't believe they are only 1 kW. There were definitely two Spanish stations on this frequency early on, but no IDs. Checked 880 with Yacht Boy 400 and internal antenna at 0605 UT Mar 17. CKLQ was booming in from Brandon at that time with western lottery numbers, country music. Switched to Icom IC 735 with large inverted V; CKLQ Faded out to unID Spanish station, then English ads heard way down with "Good Times Great Oldies" at 0618, probably Edmonton. Radio Progreso, Cuba, ID at 0736 UT (Wade Smith, New Brunswick, DX LISTENING DIGEST) There was no third silent period UT Monday March 18 (NRCers) See also SAINT LUCIA ** U S A. From the WABC web site: Stephen Battaglio wrote a very nice article on WABC's run as a top 40 music station in the March 10th 2002 edition of the Arts and Leisure Section of The New York Times. You can read it online by clicking: http://www.nytimes.com (You must register to read the article--it's free) (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A [and non]. Anyone know the location of a downloadable/ printable up to date list of North American MW stations? Going on a 9 night bush trip soon, well out of range of computer connections! (Richard Jary, NSW, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Richard, You may wish to check this out, it contains all US and Canadian stations between 540 and 1700 kHz and is usually kept very much up-to-date. http://www.geocities.com/amlogbook/amlog.htm (Graham Powell, Webmaster for the Online DX Logbook and 21 MHz.Com Full details available at: http://www.shortwave.org.uk ibid.) ** VENEZUELA [non]. Quick check shortly after 1400 UT Sunday March 17 of 9820 confirmed Aló, Presidente via Habana is still active (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Glenn, Unión Radio is relaying this anniversary show [#100] right now. http://www.unionradio.com.ve/audio/ Rgds., (Henrik Klemetz, Sweden, 1434 UT March 17 via DXLD) ** VIETNAM [and non]. VOV English Program Schedule (as from March 31) Areas of coverage UTC Frequencies South East Asia 1000 9840 - 12020 South Asia 1100 1242 - 7285 Central Asia 1400 1242 South West Asia 1500 1242 Central Asia 1630 1242 Europe 1800 5970 - 9730 - 7145 [some of these Eu relays?] Europe 1900 9730 - 7145 Europe 2030 9730 - 7145 Europe 2330 9840 - 12020 South East Asia 1230 9840 - 12020 Europe 1330 9730 - 7145 Europe 1600 9730 - 7145 NE America 0100 6175 [these via Canada] NE America 0230 6175 Central America 0330 6175 (via GRDXC via DXLD) ** ZIMBABWE [non]. V. of the People: Hi Glenn, Their official Web site has launched. More details in our Zimbabwe dossier later today. For those interested in hearing what Voice of the People sounds like, there's an audio file of the March 9th edition of their broadcast at http://zimbabwe.syntac.net/uploads/vop.mp3 The quality of the audio is excellent. 73, (Andy Sennitt, RN, March 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Andy, At the beginning of this audio file, he says that `yesterday` they meant to be on at 6-6:55 am, but really were on at 5:30-6:30 am...! Did I miss something about a morning broadcast? Is it still on? Is he talking about Madagascar or some other transmitter??? 73, Glenn Hi Glenn, I haven't listened to the whole thing, so I'll have to check. There's no morning broadcast as far as I know - their Web site only shows the 90 minute evening broadcast. But I have seen other reports that they're on "two and a half hours a day". If there is another transmission, it isn't via us (Andy Sennitt, RN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. Sunday, March 17 I had some time to check this 6715 unID Korean language station. They signed on at 1844 with male religious songs until 1858. Some dead air, female voice at 1859 and after a while songs and preaching. Around 2000 a female voice again for a while. Program continued till 2018 and they signed off after some piano/chorus music. No announcement heard at that time. Rather weak signal and some qrm from the ute couple of kHz down. Deep slow fading. Too weak for any decent recording. So it seems they are regurlar on Sundays during this time slot. Heard also last Sunday. The Korean HLAZ on 1566 was also audible at this time with similar preaching, but not in parallel. Will wait and see if someone at last finds out who this is. 73 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hello, I`m eagerly following the items posted about the unID religious transmissions (late Friday nights here in Sweden) on 6715 kHz. The language is said to be Korean (although I could have guessed Japanese), it`s clearly evangelical, but it doesn`t seem like the transmissions are heard at all in the Far East (as e.g. Japan), from what I`ve read. We listened to it a week ago (March 8) at our shack in Fredriksfors, where we have Beverage antennas in different directions. The conditions were disturbed that night, and that could explain signals not coming in as supposed in the antennas, but we noticed that signals were much better on antennas directed towards South America, than on directions towards the Far East (that is a back lobe for us). On antennas towards e.g. North America it wasn´t heard at all. The fading and the ``sound`` on the transmission made us pretty sure that its origin was far away. Could it by any chance be that the transmissions originate from Latin America (although I don`t see why)? Best regards (Jan Edh, Hudiksvall, Sweden, (DX-ing from Fredriksfors) hard-core-dx via DXLD) Well, we already had a report of an Argentine pirate later in the evening on 6716. Maybe it`s the same transmitter? Is there a Christian Korean community down there? OTOH, when heard in Europe Sundays at 1844, that would be a bit early for Argentina on 6.7 MHz (gh, DXLD) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ WHY BOTHER? Concerning the correspondent who criticized stations for merely reading from a script, I think he misses the point. What matters is not whether someone is reading from a script but whether he or she is doing it properly, i.e. non-monotonously in a conversational tone. I can listen without a trace of boredom seeping in to Alistair Cook's Letter from America on the BBC and, so it would seem, can millions of other listeners. I could also, come to think of it, manage to listen perfectly happily to a nine-minute World Service bulletin, read by a competent announcer, if the BBC still deigned to offer such bulletins, which unfortunately they don't. Whilst I enjoy listening to American radio, I would not like American production values to become universal. Cultural imperialism is a real problem: national radio stations should strive to preserve the uniqueness of their culture and style. The greater the variety of styles on the radio the better. As for interviews, they don't always work well if the station is difficult to hear. When reception is mediocre, scripted stuff is easier to understand. If the scripts are badly read, train the announcers to read them better rather than adding a lot of other stuff that may not necessarily enhance the message. Or am I just old-fashioned? (Roger Tidy, England, March 18, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 2-044, March 16, 2002 edited by Glenn Hauser, wghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted afterwards at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd02.html For restrixions and searchable 2002 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn WORLD OF RADIO #1122: (STREAM) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1122.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1122.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1122.html NEXT AIRINGS ON WWCR: Sun 0730, Mon 0100, and 0600 on 3210 NEXT AIRINGS ON RFPI: Sun 0600, 1200, 1830?, 2430?... on some of: 7445-AM/USB, 15039, 21815-USB MUNDO RADIAL: Nueva emisión de marzo-abril ahora disponible: (CORRIENTE) http://www.worldofradio.com/mr0203.ram (BAJABLE) http://www.worldofradio.com/mr0203.rm (GUIÓN) http://www.worldofradio.com/mr0203.html (EN EL AIRE) Todos los viernes a las 2215-2230 TU por WWCR 9475 [aunque el 15 de marzo a las 2213...] UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIALS Hi Glen[n]: It has been awhile, how have you been? Not much new here this DX season, DX logging wise. New tower and antennas otherwise. Just wanted to drop a quick note and let you know Glen that your DXLD has been absolutely great, very nice Glen! Thanks Glen. 73's (Joe Talbot, Alberta, March 16) Dear Glenn: As you know, I've been an active DX'er since 1976, and as such, I`ve experienced a great deal of changes in the ways we get our information. I`ve kept up with the times by upgrading to newer equipment each time it becomes available and more affordable. I also got to hear lots of interesting and unusual things since I began in the hobby with an old upright stereo in 1975. I want to thank you for agreeing to do "World Of Radio" and "COM" over the past few years. I`m pleased to share this with you in knowing that you will always better inform us hobbyists about new stations and skeds. Thanks for being there! Your faithful listener, (Noble West, TN) ** AFGHANISTAN. 1269 MW. In DX-Window no. 185 the Danish lead initiative to establish an independent public service radio broadcast in Afghanistan was described. The project was subsidized with 235,000 Euros from the European Union department for conflict prevention. On Feb 25, the new, daily morning programme ``Good Morning Afghanistan`` went on the air at 0200-0300 from Kabul on Radio Afghanistan. The inaugural broadcast, featuring male and female presenters, was divided equally between reports in Dari and Pashto, Afghanistan`s main two languages. ``It will provide news, practical information, interviews with actors, reports from rural areas information on emergency aid and travel routes in the country. In short, a mixture of what you listen to without thinking much about it, and hard, straightforward news,`` Mr. Bent Noerby Bonde, Director of the Baltic Media Centre on Bornholm said to the Danish Newspaper, Berlingske Tidende. The Scottish R Tay and R Denmark donated six tonnes of outdated equipment to R Afghanistan to produce ``Good Morning Afghanistan``. The equipment arrived on a U.N. flight just two days before the launch of the programme. Details on the implemention phase can be found on http://www.bmc.dk (Anker Petersen, DSWCI DX Window March 13 via DXLD) ** ALBANIA. 15/3/02 RADIO TIRANA, ALBANIA A'02 For the period 31/03/02 to 26/10/02 -------------------------------------------------------------------- FREQ STRT STOP CIRAF LOC POWR AZI SLW ANT DAYS LANGUAGE ADM BRC -------------------------------------------------------------------- 5985 1400 1700 28SW CER 50 0 0 925 1234567 ALBANIAN ALB ALR 6090 2300 0330 7,8 SHI 100 300 0 217 1234567 ALBANIAN ALB ALR 6100 0300 0800 28 CER 100 0 0 925 1234567 ALBANIAN ALB ALR 7110 0800 0900 28 CER 100 0 0 925 1234567 ALBANIAN ALB ALR 7270 1400 1700 28 CER 50 0 0 925 1234567 ALBANIAN ALB ALR 7270 2300 0330 7,8 CER 100 305 0 217 1234567 ALBANIAN ALB ALR 7295 2030 2200 28 CER 100 350 0 141 1234567 ALBANIAN ALB ALR 9575 2030 2200 27,28 CER 100 310 0 146 1234567 ALBANIAN ALB ALR 6100 1800 1830 28SW SHI 100 0 0 925 234567 ITALIAN ALB ALR 6115 0145 0200 7,8 CER 100 305 0 216 134567 ENGLISH ALB ALR 6115 0230 0300 7,8 CER 100 305 0 216 134567 ENGLISH ALB ALR 6135 2115 2130 28SE SHI 100 0 0 925 234567 SER/CRO ALB ALR 7110 2115 2130 28 CER 100 0 0 925 234567 SER/CRO ALB ALR 7130 2130 2200 27 SHI 100 310 0 146 234567 ENGLISH ALB ALR 7160 0145 0200 7,8 CER 100 305 0 218 134567 ENGLISH ALB ALR 7160 0230 0300 7,8 CER 100 305 0 218 134567 ENGLISH ALB ALR 7210 1845 1900 27 SHI 100 310 0 146 234567 ENGLISH ALB ALR 7210 1900 1930 27 SHI 100 310 0 146 234567 FRENCH ALB ALR 7240 1800 1830 28SW CER 100 0 0 925 234567 ITALIAN ALB ALR 9520 1845 1900 27 CER 100 305 0 217 234567 ENGLISH ALB ALR 9520 1900 1930 27 CER 100 310 0 146 234567 FRENCH ALB ALR 9540 2130 2200 27 CER 100 305 0 216 234567 ENGLISH ALB ALR 9570 1730 1800 28 CER 100 350 0 141 234567 GERMAN ALB ALR 6130 1700 CER 100 0 0 925 234567 TURKISH ALB ALR 6130 1715 1730 28S CER 100 0 0 925 234567 GREEK ALB ALR 7135 1715 1730 28SE CER 50 0 0 925 234567 GREEK ALB ALR 7140 1700 1715 39NW CER 50 0 0 925 234567 TURKISH ALB ALR Regards, (Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ARGENTINA. An Argentine station on 15820 kHz using LSB must be R CONTINENTAL from Buenos Aires heard here in Finland around 07 UT. 73´s (Jouko Huuskonen, Turku FINLAND, March 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Usually so reported, but I thought that as with all the Argentine ISB feeder frequencies, one could never depend on a certain station being carried, and indeed the stations may not even be aware of the relays (gh, DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. 15 Mar '02. Starting from A'02 season Voice International has introduced a new broadcast in Hindi language towards South Asia via its Darwin relay. 1100-1700 UT on 13635 (Daily) - To India/SE Asia. Regds (Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BELGIUM [and non]. Here is the A02 schedule of Radio Vlaanderen Internationaal in a more handy style, retyped from the large .xls file: 0400-0500 E/D 15565 BON 250/320 NAm 0500-0530 D 9925 MEY 250/355 Af 0500-0700 D 13685 JUL 100/115 Eu 0500-0800 D 15195 ARM 200/284 Eu 0700-0730 E 5985 JUL 100/ND Eu 0700-0800 D 13685 RMP 250/168 Eu 1100-1130 D 15195 RMP 250/168 Eu 17670 ARM 200/284 Eu 21630 MEY 250/355 Af 1130-1230 E/D 9865 P/K 250/244 As 1200-1230 D 9865 P/K 250/244 As 17690 TAS 100/131 As 1300-1600 D 17670 ARM 200/284 Eu 1700-1800 D 15195 ARM 100/284 Eu 1700-2100 D/F/G/E 9925 ARM 100/284 Eu 1730-1900 E/D 13690 SKN 250/180 Eu 13710 JUL 100/115 Eu 1800-1900 D 7195 MDG 50/245 Af 15325 DHA 250/230 Af 1930-2100 E/D 13690 SKN 250/180 Eu 2230-2330 E/D 15565 BON 250/350 NAm Saturdays only: 1800-2000 D 5910 JUL 100/ND Eu Sundays only: 1000-1130 D 21630 MEY 250/355 Af 1300-1600 D 15275 SKN 250/175 Eu I understand these are the prices per kWh in EUR: Jülich 0.72 (100 kW, so 72 EUR per hour), Meyerton and Al-Dhabbaya 0.56 (250 kW, so 140 EUR), Skelton and Rampisham 0.30 (250 kW, so 75 EUR), all CIS sites (Tbilisskaya/Armavir, Tashkent and Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky) 0.62, no matter which power (so 155, 124 and 62 EUR, respectively, for 250, 200 and 100 kW). Wolvertem 1512 kHz: 0500-0600 RNW 300 kW 0600-0700 D 25 kW 0700-0730 E 25 kW //5985 0730-0800 DAB 25 kW 0800-1100 R1 25 kW 1100-1130 D 25 kW //9865 for As 1130-1200 E 25 kW 1200-1400 D 25 kW 1400-1600 DW 25 kW 1600-1700 R1 25 kW 1700-1715 F 25 kW //9925 1715-1730 G 25 kW //9925 1730-1800 E 25 kW //9925 1800-1900 D 25 kW //9925 1900-1915 G 300 kW //9925 1915-1930 F 300 kW //9925 1930-2000 E 300 kW //9925 2000-2030 D 300 kW //9925 2030-2230 RNW 300 kW D = RVi Dutch, E = RVi English, F = RVi French, G = RVi German, R1 = VRT Radio 1, DAB = VRT DAB Klassiek (???), DW = Deutsche Welle relay, RNW = Radio Nederland Wereldomroep relay (via Kai Ludwig, Germany, March 16, DXLD) ** BRAZIL. 4915.0, R Difusora, Macapá, Amapá, Mar 10, 0500-0540, Portuguese, clear ID: ``Rádio Difusora de Macapá``, frequency announcement, light music, talk, songs, fading out. This indicates that the PWBR 2002 is right in stating that it broadcasts 24 hours a day. Other sources say 0800-0300. 35333 (Anker Petersen, Denmark, DSWCI DX Window via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. R. Aparecida, 5035.1, March 3 0010, Portuguese talk by man and woman. Good, irregular, \\ 6135, 9630.17 (Brian Alexander, PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. From http://www.cyberpresse.ca/reseau/arts/0203/art_102030076504.html [Liberal translation of first few graphs follows:] Fifteen hundred employees and support staff at the CBC`s newsrooms in the province of Quebec and Moncton, N.B., will vote Saturday on a walk-out that could come as early as March 21. The assembly was called after CBC management made a final offer and ended negotiations. Daniel Roney, president of the mobilization committee, hoped for a meeting of all permanent, temporary and contract workers who earn more than $30,000 annually from the French and English networks (journalists, assistant producers, researchers, documentary makers, online reporters, etc.) from Québec, notably Montréal, Québec, Chicoutimi, Sept-Îles, as well as those from Moncton. [...] (via Ricky Leong, QU, DXLD) ** CANADA [non]. UUMM Yes, 5850 Canada from Sweden 'Ken Fletcher Likes'!!! Not so sure that I am going to like this frequency; it`s got a nasty Utility Noise on it --- May have to try to persuade them to move up or down a bit, but I think best to wait and see what happens, as they can be quickly E-Mailed!! As for 'Ken Fletcher Likes' I suppose I 'asked for' that one with regard to 'Mount Arafat', last year, though indeed the situation has become serious over there, perhaps I should jest not, on this subject. Anyhow, keep up the good work. Best 73 (Ken Fletcher, Prenton, BIRKENHEAD, Merseyside, 1939 UT 15th March 2002, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. RCI Montreal relay via Hörby, Sweden: 0230-0300 5840 130 degr Ar to ME/EaAF 1915-1945 17630 130 degr Ar to ME/EaAF 2000-2100 5850 220 degr Fr to WeEUR/SoWeEUR 2100-2200 5850 220 degr En to WeEUR/SoWeEUR (.XLS file via ADDX Andreas Volk-D, BC-DX Mar 14 via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. 2200.12, HJMK, Emisora Ideal (2 x 1100 harmonic) 1003 Mar 13, Presumed sign-on with anthems into brass band "carnival" music. 1010 announcer with "Emisora Ideal" ID. Good signal (Mark Mohrmann, Coventry VT, NRD 535D, V-Beam 140m @180 deg.; "VT-DX" http://www.sover.net/~hackmohr/ DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. 2580.00, CMHW, Rancho Veloz (2 X 1290 harmonic) 1027 Mar 14, Spanish vocal, //840 CMHW, very good signal (Mark Mohrmann, Coventry VT, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. 4970.00, Radio Rebelde (7 x 710 harmonic) 1037 Mar 13, Spanish talk, time check and ID, //3600. No sign of recently reported Radio Rumbos (Mark Mohrmann, Coventry VT, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. CUBANET. INDEPENDIENTE 15 de marzo, 2002 LA MALDICIÓN DEL PANDA, por Juan Carlos Cárdenas, APLO SANTIAGO DE CUBA, marzo http://www.cubanet.org - Panda es la marca de los nuevos televisores que el gobierno de Fidel Castro adquirió en China y cuya manera de venta ha exaltado valores negativos en la sociedad cubana, como sentimientos impuros y quebrantamiento del respeto debido entre conciudadanos. Los Panda se distribuyen en asambleas populares que se realizan en la zona donde residen los aspirantes a la compra de estos aparatos o en sus centros laborales. Este procedimiento se adoptó por indicación estricta del gobierno de Castro, y para comprar uno de estos Pandas se requiere que el solicitante esté afiliado a la Central de Trabajadores de Cuba (o sea al único sindicato permitido en el país), ser buen trabajador, lo que significa ser incondicional a la política del Partido Comunista, así como mantener una activa y correcta postura política-ideológica. Estos son los principales requisitos para obtener uno de esos equipos. No importa que un cubano tenga 20 ó 30 años de trabajo ni que sea un empleado competente: si no está integrado a la fila de los dóciles no podrá comprarle un televisor a su familia. Sobre este asunto nos dio su testimonio Bárbara Fábregas, empleada del hospital pediátrico de Palma Soriano. Ella nos reveló cómo dos trabajadoras de esa instalación del Ministerio de Salud Pública se agredieron con palabras obscenas, pues tanto la una como la otra sostenía que tenían más méritos para adquirir el televisor Panda. En la fábrica de tabacos ubicada en esta misma localidad, algunos trabajadores revivieron extintos desacuerdos en la asamblea donde se discutía el derecho de compra de los Panda. "No vale la pena perder amistades de años por comprar uno de esos Panda que, dicho sea de paso, se han convertido en las manzana de las discordia" -sentenció la señora Fábregas. La generalidad de los consultados sobre este asunto de los Panda coincidieron en que habrá nuevos y desagradables altercados en las próximas asambleas de asignación de estos televisores, tanto en los centros de trabajo como en las diferentes barriadas. Y este vaticinio es acertado si se tiene en cuenta que la mayoría de las familias de Palma Soriano no tienen televisor debido a la pobreza y a las pocas opciones de desarrollo real existentes en Cuba. Esta información ha sido transmitida por teléfono, ya que el gobierno de Cuba no permite al ciudadano cubano acceso privado a Internet. CubaNet no reclama exclusividad de sus colaboradores, Cordiales 73's (via Oscar, DXLD) ** ECUADOR [and non]. ECUADORIAN GOVT TELECOMMUNICATIONS WEBSITE SHOWS DRAMATIC CHANGES IN RADIO BROADCASTING Quito (CRU) --- Thanks to one of the several DX publications that I visit or read regularly, I have discovered the official website of the government telecommunications authority in Ecuador, Supertel http://www.supertel.gov.ec/concesionarios.htm A careful study of the AM, FM, and shortwave lists shows some dramatic changes in radio broadcasting there. By comparing my records of Ecuadorian Catholic stations and those listed on the website, I was able to track some recent and not so recent changes. These probably are paralleled in other Latin American countries, too. The most surprising and, for some, disturbing trend is the collapse of shortwave broadcasting. There are only two operating Catholic shortwave operations left in the country– Radio Luz y Vida in Loja, which operates one shortwave transmitter on 4850 kHz in the tropical band, and La Voz del Upano in Macas, which operates five transmitters. Interestingly, only one, 5965 kHz, is described by the Ecuadorian government as ``nivel nacional``— ``national level,`` that is, coverage. Closed are Radio Jesús del Gran Poder in Quito, which ran a 5,000-watt transmitter on 5050 kHz; Radio Católica Nacional in Quito, which ran a 10,000-watt transmitter on 5030 kHz; Radio Católica Nacional in Santo Domingo, which ran a 10,000-watt transmitter on 3395 kHz; and La Voz del Napo on 3280 kHz in Tena. Including commercial and Protestant stations, I counted only 30 authorized shortwave frequencies assigned to 23 stations. The 1983 World Radio-Television Handbook, in comparison, showed 65 authorized frequencies assigned to 50 stations. I got the impression, in looking over the list casually, that many of those shortwave stations in 1983 no longer exist on AM or FM, but I could be mistaken; I did not make detailed comparisons among the several webpages. In any event, in less than 20 years, both the number of stations and the number of frequencies used by those stations have been cut in half. Shortwave has been in serious decline around the world since the end of the cold war. Those high-power international operations that require a large staff competent in various languages of the world are expensive to operate. Almost all those that survive have cut their staffs, languages, and service areas greatly. The excuse has been that it is much cheaper to offer programs via the Internet. But this is to ignore the fact that most people in the world do not have a computer, let alone the Internet, and the thought of having either is so remote as to be fantasy. Computers are not portable, either. In Latin America, there have always been only a few shortwave stations that are genuinely international in scope, and fewer have survived. To my knowledge, the only truly international operations left are RAE in Argentina and Radio Mexico Internacional, and both are small. Other stations call themselves international because shortwave signals do cross national frontiers, and the language is almost always Spanish and can be understood by people in most all Latin American countries, Brasil being the notable exception. There are many high-power shortwave transmitters in Brasil, but its Portuguese language makes anything broadcast in that language pretty much a national matter. The dozens of Catholic stations that once proliferated up and down the shortwave bands have, apart from Brasil, largely disappeared; they were never international in scope or intent, although some labeled themselves as such. Powers rarely exceeded what was necessary to cover the intended target area. That was precisely what they were intended to do: cover the national territory economically and efficiently in an era when FM was unknown and rugged terrain in the Andean countries and enormous expanses of sparsely inhabited territory in Brasil and in the jungles of Colombia and Venezuela, not to speak of the great amount of noise on the AM band resulting from endless tropical thunderstorms, limited what AM stations could do. Those shortwave stations have been replaced by proliferating local stations operated by parishes, missions, religious orders, and dioceses. In Ecuador, the national network Radio Católica Nacional relies now on a network of FM transmitters that covers most provinces. I count 13 transmitters, most of which are probably but not necessarily repeaters. At least one certainly is not, but more like the network affiliates in the glory days of U.S. network radio. Radio Manabí of the Archdiocese of Portoviejo produces local programs for 80% of its broadcast day, taking only 20% from RCN (see below). The fairly recent Radio María Ecuador, based in Quito, the capital, has an expanding network of repeaters across the country, Olon 105.3 FM in Guayas province, Ibarrra 101.5 FM in Imbabura province; Macas 98.9 FM in Morona Santiago province; Nueva Loja 104.1 FM in Sucumbios province. There are minor networks, too, for Sucumbios FM in Nueva Loja and Radio Paz y Bien FM in Ambato in Tongurahua province. I have found existing Catholic stations of which I was not aware: Radio Matovelle 720 AM in El Cisne, La Voz de Galápagos 530 AM on those fabled islands, Radio Sucumbios 1300 AM and the Sucumbios FM network in Nueva Loja; and Radio IRFEYAL 1090 AM in Quito, part of the famous Fe y Alegría movement that started in Venezuela and is spreading its educational, cultural, and cooperative programs among the poor of northern South America. A revised database of Ecuador's Catholic stations appears below. Database: The Revised Catholic Radios of Ecuador New entries were in red [gh extracted only those currently or formerly on SW as mentioned] [continental Ecuador local time shown equals UT minus 5] [see also GALÁPAGOS, separately below in DXLD] Government Telecommunications agency website (Supertel): http://www.supertel.gov.ec/concesionarios.htm Ambato: HCRT6 Radio Paz y Bien 1340 (4,000 w) & 104.5 FM. Repitidoras: FM 92.9, 104.5, Cañar 106.9 FM. Los Franciscanos. Calles Francisco Flor 1452 y Cevalles. Apartado 18-01-115. Padre Luís Florencio León E., dtr. 0430-2030 horas. HCRT6 4820 kHz onda corta está cerrado. Loja: HCAV3 Radio Luz y Vida 1150 AM (10,000 w) y 4850 onda corta (3,000 w) and FM 88.3. Misioneras Sociales de la Iglesia. Originating station. Calles Rocafuerte 1143 y Olivedo. Casilla 11-01-222. Hermana Ana Maza Reyes, dtr. 0500-2230 horas. Macas: HCVB7 La Voz del Upano 1540 AM, and 90.5 FM, & HCSK7 en 3360 kHz, (potencia desconocida), 4870 & HCVB7 on 5040 kHz (10,000 w), y 6000 kHz. Nationwide service on 5965 kHz. Repitidoras: Gral. Leonidas Plaza, Limón 90.5 FM; Santiago de Méndez 90.5 FM; Gualaquiza 90.5 FM. El Vicariato de Méndez. Misión Salesiana. Calle 10 de Agosto s/n/ Padre Domingo Barrueco. Casilla 692, Quito. Teléfonos: (593 7) 70- 0356, 70-0259, fax (593 7) 70-0574. 0545-2200 horas. Habían dos servicios distintos, pero se parece que uno, quizás el comercial, está cerrado. Programas en Shuar. Quito: HCFF1, Radio Jesús del Gran Poder 670 AM (12,000 w). La onda corta en 5050 kHz (5,000 w) está cerrada. La Catedral de San Francisco. Casilla 17-01-133. 0445-2000 horas. Padre Jorge Enríquez Silva, dtr. 24 hras. Quito: HCRP1, Radio Católica Nacional 880 AM (50,000 w por los días, 40,000 w por las noches) y 94.1 FM. La onda corta en 5030 kHz (10,000 w) está cerrada. La Conferencia Episcopal del Ecuador. Fundación Juan Pablo II. Calles América 1830 y Mercadilo. Flagship. Casilla 17-03- 540. 0500-2100 horas. E-mail: buenanoticia@radiocatolica.org.ec René Torres, dtr., Padre Antonio Arreguí Y., el gerente. Quito: Radio María Ecuador 100.1 FM. Fundación Radio María. Calles Baquerizo Moreno 281 y Leonidas Plaza. Tels.: (593-2) 564714, 564719, and 558702. Fax (593-2) 237630. Control room: 239800. Fr. Francisco Palacios, director. E-mail: radiomaria@andina.net. Website: http://www.radiomariaecuador.org Repitidoras: Olon 105.3 FM, Ibarra 101.5 FM, Macas 98.9 FM, Nueva Loja: 104.1 FM [not mentioned here, but apparently taking over the 3280 facility below -- -gh] Tena: HCVN7, La Voz del Napo, 3280 kHz (2,500 watts). This station has been closed/Esta radio está cerrada. Misión Josefina, Tena. Señor Ramiro Cabrera, director (from Catholic Radio Update Mar 18 via DXLD) ** FRANCE. See TAIWAN ** GALÁPAGOS ISLANDS. From Catholic Radios in Ecuador [q.v.] listing: Galápagos , Puerto Baquerizo: HC--- La Voz de Galápagos 530 AM (unk. wats) y Galápagos Stéreo 97.1 FM. Prefetura Apostólica de Galápagos. Galápagos Isla San Cristóbal: HCVG8 La Voz de San Cristóbal 1320 AM (5,000 w). Misión Franciscana, Puerto Baquerizo Moreno. Padre Manuel Valarezo, dtr. 0700-2000 horas. [local time UT minus 6 ``en nuestro archipiélago de Colón`` -- Note: HCVG8 used to be on SW as La Voz de Galápagos --gh] Galápagos Isla Santa Cruz: HCSC8 Radio Santa Cruz 88.7 FM (1,000 w). Prefetura Apostólica de Galápagos. Puerto Ayora, Isla de Santa Cruz. Padre Jesús Guerrera, dtr. 0700-1900 horas (Catholic Radio Update Mar 18 via DXLD) ** GIBRALTAR. Narrator: THE RADIO SCENE IN GIBRALTAR by Wavescanner Dieter Kraus in Germany It was back in the year 1973, that Wavescanner Dieter Kraus, who lives in Neumunster in Germany, made a visit to the area. He was on vacation in Morocco in North Africa and he took a ferry across the Straits of Gibraltar into southern Spain, and then a bus into Gibraltar. Here is what he says, as translated into English and adapted for broadcast. The Rock of Gibraltar is a large limestone outcrop on the western edge of the Mediterranean. The entire Gibraltar peninsula occupies less than 6 square kilometers with a neutral zone separating it from the Spanish mainland. The Rock of Gibraltar and Mt Abyle in Ceuta, the Spanish enclave in North Africa, form what was known in ancient times as the Pillars of Hercules, named in honor of an ancient Greek hero. The Straits of Gibraltar, separating Europe and Africa, are just 12 kilometers wide at the narrowest point. The total population of Gibraltar is something over 30,000 with one of the highest population densities in the world, nearly 5,000 people to the square kilometer. Not only is the Rock home to a dense people population, but it is also home to the Barbary Ape, the only place in Europe that has native simians. The Rock of Gibraltar is composed mainly of limestone and it stands 426 metres high. The Rock is honeycombed with 16 kilometers of tunnels and one of the main tunnels, named in honor of St Michael, has an entrance that is 335 metres above sea level. A large cemented area on the windward side of the Rock acts as a catchment area for the rainfall which runs into a storage reservoir and provides the people of Gibraltar with their water supply. The climate in Gibraltar is quite mild with an average in winter at 6 degrees C and in summer at 21 degrees. English is the official language in the colony, though the people come from many ethnic backgrounds, notably Portuguese, Italian, Maltese and English, with many having also a Spanish descent. The Rock of Gibraltar occupies a strategic location at the entrance to the Mediterranean and the British navy has established a large naval base here. The governor of Gibraltar is appointed by the Queen, and local government is accomplished by an elected House of Assembly. It was on a Friday around midday that Dieter Kraus was granted an appointment to visit the Gibraltar Broadcasting Corporation in Barrack Street. At the time, the station was on the air using four different transmitters, 1458 mediumwave and three different FM channels. Programming is in English and Spanish. Historically, this first radio station in Gibraltar went on the air on February 16, 1958, nearly half a century ago, with two transmitters at 1 kW. The original channel was 560 kHz, though this was changed a year later to 1484 kHz, and later again to 1458. These days, Radio Gibraltar is on the air with 2 kW on that same mediumwave channel, 1458 kHz, and an additional three FM channels. In addition to Radio Gibraltar, BFBS the British Forces Broadcasting Service also operates an entertainment radio station in Gibraltar and this is heard locally with two program channels on four FM frequencies. In addition to the two local radio stations in Gibraltar, the Royal Navy also operates a communication station under the callsign GYU. This 5 kW station will verify reception reports with a QSL letter or card. Our thanks to Dieter Kraus in Germany for the story of his visit to the radio station Radio Gibraltar in Gibraltar (AWR Wavescan 377 for March 17, 2002 via Adrian Michael Peterson, DXLD) ** GUATEMALA. Noticed some Guatemalans on later than usual March 10: Radio K`ekchí, 4845, 0310-0451*, religious programming in K`ekchí. Church service with preacher and church music. Mostly continuous preaching. ID at 0402. Many R. K`ekchí IDs at 0442-0443. Abrupt sign- off. Nice good clean strong signal but some announcements very muffled. Irregular. Not heard often and not usually on this late. La Voz de Nahualá, 3360, 0345-0433*, nice local marimba music, local pops. Very little talk, but some Spanish announcements. Sign-off announcements at 0432 and off. Fair-good. Radio Verdad, 4052.57, 0330-0505*, Spanish religious talk, but mostly continuous religious music. YL announcer with ID at 0444. Sign-off with long choral anthem. Fair-good (Brian Alexander, PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRELAND. I'm getting things set up here to listen to Radio Valleri`s test on 6310, but at 2335 Mar 16 I`m hearing RCI on the frequency. Is this perhaps a mixing product from RCI`s transmitters? I'm trying to look at all the frequencies to figure out how that might work out (Steve Lare, Holland, MI, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Yes, 6040 Spanish and 6175 English at 135 kHz separation. Fortunately they won`t both be on all night. In fact, 6040 went off at 2358, so that put an end to the mixing product on 6310 --- until 6040 came back on, late, in French at 2401. I just looked up RCI`s current tech schedule, and see that 6040 is in use at 2300-0059 and 0200-0259 (tho there was a 3-minute break at 2358). 6175 takes the Vietnam relay from 0100. Let me know if you do hear Valleri (gh, DXLD) No luck with Radio Valleri so far, just a very weak het on 6309.8 or so. It doesn't look to good here! I'm afraid it's not going to make it tonight. In retrospect I should have driven north to Don Hosmer's cabin in the woods where we have some Beverage's already set up. If I recall, there is about 400' set up to Europe. Here in Holland I have one 70' and one 100' wires (Steve Lare, Holland, MI, 0322 UT March 17, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ITALY. From March 13, Notturno Italiano is broadcast from Roma 1 on 1332, Naples 1 on 657, Milan 1 on 900 kHz. No longer from Roma 2 on 846. Also SW 6060. 73, (Stefano Valianti, Italy, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ITALY. R. Europe, pirate, 7306-USB, March 10 0519-0530+, pop music, Euro-pops. English ID announcements with address. Talk in Italian. Surprisingly good signal. Heard quite often lately; also Feb 3, 17, 23 (Brian Alexander, PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ITALY. Nexus BC Association - IRRS- SW, Milan was heard 0755 UT with religious programme in English on 7120 kHz. Best reception in USB-mode. Closing down 0805 UT asking for reception reports. 73`s (Jouko Huuskonen, Turku, FINLAND, March 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Is this unusual? ** NETHERLANDS. Alfa Lima is *booming* in here, S9+20dB. Great props from Europe tonight, folks (Chris Smolinski, location unknown, ACE Pirate topica list, UT March 17 0031 via DXLD) {15070, of course} ** PAPUA NEW GUINEA. 3260.00, Radio Madang, 1049-1111 Mar 14, Preacher giving a sermon with lots of "Hallelujah's". 1100 Announcer in Tok Pisin followed by anthem which continued to be repeated as if they weren't quite ready to start the news. Finally at 1104 "Radio Madang... Garamut" ID into news. Very good signal, the best of the 5 that were in this morning [others being 3204.96, 3235.0, 3245.00, 3275.00] (Mark Mohrmann, Coventry VT, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. 2257.2, Radio La Mejor, Tumbes (2 x 1130 harmonic) 1021 Mar 14, Andean vocal, 1023 ID "...en La Mejor mil ciento treinta..." Good sustained signal (Mark Mohrmann, Coventry VT, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. R. Perú, 5637.21, March 9 0030-0130+, irregular, not heard very often; Spanish talk, brief music breaks, ID. Some OA folk music; weak (Brian Alexander, PA, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. Señor Gabriel Gómez of Uruguay has sent readers of the Montevideo DX Club Bulletin the website and e-mail address of Radio Marañón, featured in the last Catholic Radio Update: Dr. Andy Spiegl, Radio Marañón, Jaén, Perú; E-Mail: Andy@spiegl.de, Andy@radiomaranon.org.pe URL: http://spiegl.de and http://radiomaranon.org.pe (Catholic Radio Update March 18 via DXLD) ** RUSSIA. 11840-USB, GTRK-Sakhalin. If the Russian station here is them, then it appears that they have their own programming at 0900- 1000 on Saturday, as Mar 2 is the 2d time I have noted non-R. Rossii programming here at that time, with Rossii relay both before and after (// 13705, 7345, 7200). Program at 0900-1000 consists of pop vocals, mostly in Russian, occasional English, with studio talk by two men, one of whom is often on the telephone with someone, usually a woman, with the announcer rather than the caller doing most of the talking. Reception mediocre on Mar 2, tho improved some at 0945-1000. No ID noted, and would require better reception to pick that out (if there is one). (Jerry Berg, MA, DSWCI DX Window Mar 13 via DXLD) ** SAINT LUCIA [non]. US/CANADA/MEXICO/ST. LUCIA: This morning, March 16, 0600-1000z, WCBS 880 and WFAN 660 were off the air for transmitter maintenance. Since I often listen to WCBS for news while in the car, I heard an announcement mentioning that the station would be during this time. As in the past, when WCBS is off, so is WFAN. With the dominant stations gone, there was a lot of activity noted, some of which I need some help with. Observed on 660 was La Candela, Mexico City, at 0640 with a full ID mentioning the station address and the IMER network. At 0744, thanks to a tip from Dave Hochfelder of New Jersey, I went back to this frequency and heard CFFR. Calgary, with oldies, a mention of Calgary, and a "66-CFR" slogan, for a new one. At 0842 I heard a station identifying itself as "Fox Sports Radio", which is most likely WBHR Minnesota (according to the NRC Log), a station I've previously logged. At 0928 I heard CFFR again with the slogan "Good times, Great Oldies. WFAN came back on around 0945. Observed on 880 was CKLQ Manitoba with country music at 0658, and a Mexican National Anthem heard weakly beneath it. I have heard previously La Superestación, Los Mochis with anthem and sign-off at this time so perhaps this was it again. At 0704 things got interesting with an oldies station rising up, playing "Hooked on a Feeling", then a religious music station, identifying itself as Moody Broadcasting Network at t 0737 with "Music Through the Night" program. This Moody program was heard off an on all the way to 1000z, and apparently had news at xx:55, but never an ID I could hear. The oldies station was heard off an on as well, and I may have heard "Good times, great oldies" on this one at 0933. Dave reports hearing "Cool" slogan here twice, so most likely Edmonton, Alberta. By the way, my two phased longwires are oriented SWW and NWW. Also, Rich Kenneally [CT] reported that St Lucia 660 signed on at 0900, but I didn't hear this at all (I've heard this before). Tape replay of the previous report reveals a new one, time uncertain, around 0850 I think: "R. Formula, 970 AM, Cadena Nacional". Not bad for 250 watts! IRCA log says the antenna is directional, wonder which direction. Probably one of my best Mexican stations (Jim Renfrew, Byron NY, March 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) WCBS back with regular programming at 0459 EST. Just before that through the open carrier I heard "Aquí ocho-ochenta..." WCBS explained being off the air after network news, but said nothing about future periods off the air. WFAN did mention going off again on Saturday and Sunday night (Bruce Conti, Nashua NH, NRC-AM via DXLD) I`ve talked to the engineer there before. He doesn't decide until the last minute when they're going to do this kind of work. They are doing work on the antenna system, which is shared between WCBS and WFAN. The engineer waits to see if (a) the weather is OK if there is any outside work and (b) that it is a slow news night. If there is a big news story, they don't want to take WCBS off the air. Also, even though it is the middle of the night, he says they lose quite a bit of ad revenue when off the air. If you have an instant messaging service, subscribe it to the dxtip@nrcdxas.org list. I've got messages from that list directed to my pager/cellphone, so when Dave Marthouse and Barry McLarnon sent their messages, I knew immediately. Note, it looks like they'll be off again tonight. Try going to bed early and getting up after 1:00 am. That's what I did last night, and had a great time (Rick Kenneally, CT, NRC-AM via DXLD) This from the boston-radio-interest list: "WCBS 880 will be off the air from 1 to 5 AM Sunday for transmitter maintenance. Or so they said tonight. News Anchor Wayne Cabot quickly chimed in: "So, all you DXers can go listen to Chicago, or Cleveland...or whatever comes in." (via ~Adam Rivers, ibid.) I stayed up till just after 4 AM [0900 UT] last night, trying to dig out IDs on what I presume were the Calgary and Edmonton on 660 and 880. Here's what I heard: On 660: XEDTL, Mexico, DF, very strong and ID'd as "La Candela" at 0245 ET. Thanks to Jim Renfrew for his posting, which helped me to pick out the slogan with my non-existent Spanish. This is actually my first confirmed Mexican; I have a couple others logged as tentatives. With that nulled, an oldies station; at 0126 a local ad for a business at 1107 33rd St., and at 0330 "more of the music you love..." then into "96 Tears." On 880: Pinar del Rio, Cuba, a relog from the last time WCBS left the air in October 2001. ID'd as Havana, Cuba at tops of hours. With that nulled, an oldies station: at 0156 ad for DVD player giveway; at 0231 "Yellow Submarine;" at 0300 two mentions of "Cool" and into CCR's "Have You Ever Seen the Rain." All in all, a great night, with three new ones: Mexico and two Albertas. No St. Lucia, though. Nice catch, Rick! Wish I would've stayed up, but I was getting punchy and I'm paying for it anyway today (Dave Hochfelder, New Brunswick, NJ, Sony ICF-2010, Kiwa Pocket Loop and Quantum Loop, NRC-AM via DXLD) See also USA ** SAINT PIERRE ET MIQUELON. RFO Television is available on the Canadian ExpressVu home-satellite system, offering a wealth of domestic French TV programming as well as RFO Sat programming overnight, which draws from France's overseas departments and carries local newscasts from Tahiti, Madagascar, French Guyana, etc. There is a window of an hour or two in mid-morning when RFO-TV is off the air and RFO SPM can be heard while the day's TV and radio programming scrolls on screen. RFO SPM Radio is mostly local programming, but joins domestic networks France Inter and France Info for newscasts most hours. France Inter also airs overnight live from France, but, alas, the audio from RFO Radio is only available for this hour or two window mid- to late-morning (Mike Cooper, Mar 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SWEDEN. For English at 1730, the Radio Sweden website at http://www.sr.se/rs/red/ind_eng.html states the following: "17:30 1179 and 6065 kHz (Sundays on 13580 kHz instead)" I guess this means 13580 instead of 6065 (with 1179 continuing daily), but maybe not? (Alan Roe, Teddington, UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** TAIWAN / FRANCE. Suite à l'information donnée sur les ondes de Radio Taipei Internationale, concernant un échange d'émeteurs entre Taiwan et la France, voici une information émanant de TDF : "Cet accord est avant tout un accord d'échange entre RFI et RTI. En ce qui concerne les diffusions ondes courtes pour RTI, RFI a effectivement fait une demande à TDF pour assurer ces diffusions à partir d'Issoudun. TDF a donc fait une proposition à RFI (pour le compte de RTI) mais à ce jour rien n'est finalisé entre TDF et RFI. à suivre..." (Alain Meunier, TDF - 05 mars 2002, via les informations de Jean-Michel Aubier via DXLD) I meant to point out before that France already has a swap deal with the PRC involving French Guiana, so how can they possibly do the same with Taiwan? Would CRI pull out if the RTI deal goes through? (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** TAJIKISTAN. 5775, Tajik R, Yangi-Yul, Mar 05, *1600-2000* still testing here with nonstop Central Asian folkmusic and songs. May replace 5950 which was active until May 2000, but it is not in parallel with TR 1 on 4635 or TR Foreign Service on 7245, both also heard. 34444 (Anker Petersen, Denmark, DSWCI DX Window via DXLD) ** UKRAINE. The new RUI audio stream had after 0000 German, about 90 seconds behind 5905 but also English at 0100 started one and a half minute late, so this is no doubt live encoding of circuit outputs. First I only got a poor 8.5 kbit/s connection but after a couple of seconds the stream switched to quite listenable 16 kbit/s and worked stable afterwards, no any rebuffering occurred. Not bad (Kai Ludwig, Germany, March 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Glenn, Ukraine's English DX program heard online 2224-2233 (with probable repeats 3 and 6 hours later) March 16. Followed by the mailbag "Hello From Kyiv", filled with Ukrainian folk music and arias from some of Verdi's operas. Now that they are easily heard again, they should soon have many more letters to fill the time. 73, (Ivan Grishin, Ont., DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. England GUEST COMMENTARY: `YELLOW CARD` PUZZLE by Father Kit Cunningham, England Editor`s Note— This commentary was sent to me as a newspaper clipping by a reader in England. Unfortunately, he does not remember what Catholic newspaper it appeared in; it was not The Tablet, and the websites of two other Catholics papers are unfortunately down. Clearly, from the subject matter, it is a newspaper centered in London. I tried asking another reader to find out the diocese that the writer, Father Kit Cunningham, is assigned so that I may contact him, but received no response. I am taking the liberty of printing this without authorization because it says much about the times, and not just about London`s Christian radio station, Premier Radio. [Mike Dorner, CRU ed.] Many people have been puzzled that Premier Radio has been given a ``yellow card`` by the Radio Authority. This means that if the radio does not mend its ways, it could lose its licence. But what possible foul could a Christian radio station have committed to merit such a booking? asks Dr Colin Nicholl in an article in The Spectator. To find out, he got hold of the Radio Authority`s quarterly complaints bulletin. We all of us at times feel like protesting about material we hear on radio or see on television, but generally inertia and lack of time prevent us from pursuing a complaint. It is interesting that in the case of Premier Radio, there were 14 programming complaints and one advertising complaint lodged against it, far more than any other radio station listed. But as Dr Nicholl says, what stunned him was that every single complaint against Premier Radio was from the ``Mysticism and Occultism Federation.`` Clearly, he says, this was not a case of ad hoc complainers, but rather of blatant professional complainers. The Federation, it appears, is manned by five unpaid volunteers, who monitor particularly the Christian media such as Premier Radio, looking for ``unfair and offensive`` comments which are intolerant of other ``spiritualities,`` such as satanism, occultism, new age, magic, astrology and divination. Their website uncovers particular disdain for what they brand ``fundamentalists,`` in which category they place Premier Radio. ``Christian fundamentalists,`` we learn belong in the same camp as Marxists, Maoists, and Nazis – they are all ``fanatics`` and ``scripture cultists.`` It seems that this group are determined to remove Premier Radio from the airwaves in the name of pluralism. It is pretty clear that a Christian evangelical station is under attack. But what is now interesting in the light of the exposure of the activities of this group, the MOF, my researcher has discovered that their website is at present ``closed down for updating.`` I wonder why. Where does the Radio Authority come in all this? It seems that between July and September 2001, the Radio Authority received 64 complaints, of which 17 were upheld. Of the 17, it is striking that eight relate to Premier Radio, six having been ``upheld`` and two having been ``partially upheld.`` Premier Radio has been subjected, then, to politically correct judgements, which makes a nonsense of the reality of life, that people do have different opinions. One well known evangelical preacher, Dr Charles Swindoll, has warned Christians of the dangers of dabbling in the occult. In doing this, he was following the counsel of the Acts of the Apostles, chapter 19, verse 19. However, the Radio Authority asserted that ``divination`` was a part of some religious belief systems, and that Swindoll`s homily was tantamount to denigration of others` belief. There are many conclusions to be drawn from an attitude of mind like this, but one thing that can be stated is, as Dr Nicholl says, ``the Authority is making an ass of the broadcasting legislation with its P.C. judgements, which fundamentally undermine the freedom of expression for Christians. It is disturbing how much mischief can be accomplished by one group of occultists, and religious chauvinists acting in the name of religious pluralism, who conspire to look for trouble, and report every statement which is capable of being construed as exclusivistic.`` The future for Premier Radio would have been grim if the religious hatred clause had been passed in the Home Secretary`s anti-terrorist legislation. We can thank the House of Lords for its maturity and good sense. Perhaps the Radio Authority should look at its own legislation. One worries about the individuals who adjudicate in these matters, and who must have known that all the complaints came from the MOF. We Catholics cannot stand by and allow a Christian organisation to be hounded and banned from the airwaves. This will only happen if good people do nothing (Catholic Radio Update March 16 via DXLD) ** U K [non]. BULGARIA [sic]. 12110, Radio Ezra verified with QSL Letter to the second series of transmission. They say transmitter power is 100 kW, transmitter location is Vladivostok, Russia, Type is HR 2/2/0.5, Global coordinates are 131.51E 43.12N. For more information visit http://radioezra.members.easyspace.com Radio Ezra is planning to start a third series of transmission in March/April 2002, targeting North America or Europe and Africa. v/s: John D. Hill, Station Owner. QTH: P.O.Box 16, Stockton on Tees, TS18 3GN, United Kingdom (Ishii, DSWCI DX Window March 13 via DXLD) ** U K [non]. Radio Ezra A'02 Effective from 6th April'02: 2330-0000 UT on 17665 kHz - To North America (Sat Only) (John D. Hill -Water Into Wine Ministry via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, March 15, DXLD) Site??? ** U S A. ANDERSON AMONG `MOST WANTED` SOMERSET, BY JEFF NEAL Television producer Cindy Anderson remembers the fall of 1996 well. In August of that year, FOX-TV opted to cancel ``America`s Most Wanted.`` ``The day they told us was one of the saddest of my life,`` said Anderson, one of 10 producers for the program. ``We did that last show, and a lot of people left for other jobs.`` The pulsating final program marked the first time that host John Walsh profiled the tragic 1981 murder of his 6-year-old son, Adam. The next day, Anderson was called back to work. ``There was an outpouring from people all over the nation,`` Anderson said. ``The network listened, and we were back in the lineup.`` Fans of the show, governors from across the country and law enforcement officials on every level let FOX know that ``America`s Most Wanted`` does make a difference. After 12 years on the air, the show has led directly to nearly 700 arrests. ``The apprehension rate is outstanding,`` said Pulaski County Sheriff Sam Catron. ``I think the show is an asset to law enforcement. It links us to other agencies in a way that we wouldn`t be capable of without it.`` A crew from ``America`s Most Wanted`` was in Pulaski County this week, working on a piece featuring local fugitive Steve Anderson. Anderson, the Kentucky Militia reject who harassed minorities with his hateful short-wave radio tirades, has been on the run since Oct. 14 of last year, when he shot at a Bell County deputy who had pulled him over on a routine traffic stop. The hope is that ``America`s Most Wanted`` can help bring Anderson to justice. ``People all over Kentucky might know about Steve Anderson,`` said ATF agent Don York. ``But folks across the border in Tennessee have probably never heard of him. It`s possible that a segment on ``America`s Most Wanted`` could flush out some information.`` Catron was interviewed by AMW reporter John Turchin, who went up in the sheriff`s helicopter and viewed first-hand the heavily-fortified Anderson property on Elrod-Martin Road (Story created Thursday, March 07, 2002 at 9:42 AM. Somerset KY Commonwealth-Journal via DXLD) COFFEY`S GRIND SOMERSET BY CAROL COFFEY It`s strange being on the other side of the questions and frankly, I`m not good at it. I found myself on the other side of the fence Tuesday when a crew from ``America`s Most Wanted`` landed in our newsroom. I won`t bore you with the mundane — like how I was nervous and gave a poor interview. But some of the questions I was asked really made me think. And for that reason, I wanted to give readers a more detailed answer. One of the questions I was asked is how the community responded when we began covering the Steve Anderson saga. Truthfully, we had a mixed reaction. Some people in the community said we shouldn`t have given Anderson any press attention because it simply gave him more credence. Others said they were glad to know that such a person was in our community — forewarned is forearmed (Story created Thursday, March 07, 2002 at 9:46 AM. Somerset KY Commonwealth-Journal via DXLD) I am not in the habit of watching this show, and had to search the listings for it. Turns out I just missed this week`s, as it is Saturday 8 pm Central on Fox. But checking the site http://www.americasmostwanted.com for the March 16 subjects, did not find Anderson, nor on March 9, so evidently the Anderson segment is yet to air. Keep an eye on it upcoming weeks (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. RADIO DRAMAS ON THE VOA From VOA: Written by Keming Kuo, Washington, 12 Mar 2002 2250 UT A VOA Snapshot - Part of the continuing coverage in this, VOA's 60th Anniversary Year. In VOA's early years - during the 1940s - radio dramas were a regular part of our programming, along with news of World War II. But as the years went by, changing priorities left the dramas off VOA's schedule for decades. Six years ago, radio plays came back to VOA. Each year, VOA produces several radio plays with the Los Angeles Theater Works and the Smithsonian Institution, in VOA's Washington auditorium. The VOA radio dramas feature such renowned film and TV stars as Laura Linney, who speak their roles to microphones on stage before an audience of several hundred people. But one of the most important cast members doesn't have a speaking role. He is VOA producer Gary Spizler and he does the sound effects. Gary Spizler says the source of sound effects may be as common as scrap paper or simply something in his pocket. "Somebody needs change, so some change goes from one hand to the next," he explains. "There are times I have to tear a piece of paper. Sometimes, they need to toss somebody the keys, so I toss my keys." When Mr. Spizler's sound magic is mixed with the voices of the cast of the radio dramas, the result is theater of the mind - as in a recent production of playwright Neil Simon's "Barefoot in the Park," from VOA's new radio drama series (via Mike Terry, UK, DXLD) So what and when is the next drama, to pre-empt News Now on a weekend? THE FOUNDING OF SPECIAL ENGLISH PROGRAM From VOA: Sarah Long, Washington, 5 Mar 2002 0033 UT A VOA Snapshot - Part of VOA's 60th Anniversary Year Coverage In the 1950s some VOA managers became concerned that our English broadcasts were not as understandable as they could be. Many listeners didn't know English well enough to understand a newscast or talk show, and poor shortwave reception made the problem even worse. So VOA came up with a solution. Special English went on the air in 1959. It used a limited vocabulary of 1500 words, and a slow delivery. But its programs covered the news and other sophisticated subjects. Special English became one of VOA's most popular services. But it nearly never happened. Richard Borden, who helped create Special English, says VOA asked several leading U.S. universities to study whether a limited vocabulary broadcast would work. "Those universities came back with a unanimous finding that it was impossible," Richard Borden said. But VOA managers trusted their instincts instead of the experts, and they put Special English on the air. "With our hearts in our mouths, we ventured into a VOA studio, and on the air we went with the words, 'This is the Voice of America, broadcasting in Special English," Mr. Borden recalled. Reaction to the broadcast was immediate. The U.S. Embassy in Manila, for example, said, 'Your programs would be demeaning, an insult!' But listeners disagreed. VOA still broadcasts three hours a day in Special English, and it's also on television and the Internet. Many listeners use Special English as a bridge between English lessons and listening to standard English broadcasts, like this one. To write to us about our anniversary, send an email to anniversary@voanews.com Or, send regular mail to Anniversary, VOA News Now, Washington, D.C. 20237, USA (via Mike Terry, UK, DXLD) ** U S A. The Article he listed was misleading by implying that the WRAL-5 tower was toppled but only the WKFT-40 was on that tower. Not WRAL-5 Tower which holds (about) 3 radio stations 3 TV stations and a repeater sharing that one tower which was toppled 13 years ago during a Ice storm (Ernest Gates, North Carolina, amfmtvdx via DXLD) ** U S A. As posted ahead of time on our MONITORING REMINDERS page, tnx to tips on the NRC-AM list, WCBS-880 and WFAN-660 NYC were off for maintenance early Saturday March 16, nominally 0600-1000 UT. A number of DXers in the East reported unusual DX on the open frequencies, such as Alberta and on 660, St. Lucia [q.v. for more], and: (gh) Both WCBS and WFAN were back with open carriers at 0443 EST. Then at 0450, WFAN returned to regular programming with the show host saying that they might be off again on Saturday and Sunday night! At 0455 WCBS still has an open carrier, and I'm getting some deafening bursts of lightning noise but I don't see or hear anything outdoors (Bruce Conti - Nashua NH, March 16, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. MEDIAMAZING TURNS OFF FREE RADIO STREAMS From http://www.internetnews.com March 15, 2002 | By Ryan Naraine A recent ruling from the Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panel (CARP) that mandates Webcasters to pay sound recording performance royalties has forced Internet-only Webcaster MediAmazing to turn off its free streams and implement a subscription-based model. The CARP recommendation, which is likely to be accepted by the Library of Congress Copyright Office, calls for Webcasters and commercial broadcasters to pay royalty fees on broadcasts. It will undoubtedly force a dramatic shift for streaming media companies offering free Webcasts. The Nazareth, Pa.-based MediAmazing, a top-rated Webcaster which depended on advertising to subsidize its free service, quietly reacted to the ruling by shutting off the free service and asking subscribers to pony up $3.95 a month ($35.55 per year) to listen to a commercial- free version. MediAmazing officials could not be reached at press time but Kurt Hanson, publisher of the Radio And Internet Newsletter that tracks the Webcasting industry, said that by switching to a paid subscription model, MediAmazing would be subjected to the royalty rate, which is yet to be determined. "However, that will not eliminate MediAmazing's obligation for retroactive royalties which would be, $16,000 for January 2002 alone and overall could be a quarter million dollars or more -- probably more than 100 percent of the company's total gross revenues to date," Hanson said on his Web site. According to Measurecast and Arbitron ratings, MediAmazing was among the most listened to audio streams on the Internet but a combination of the depressed online advertising market and the latest copyright ruling has caused some worry among company executives. The news of MediAmazing's paid subscription shift comes as a new a new audience measurement survey has painted a rosy picture of the streaming media sector, suggesting that a lucrative market is ripe for the picking. The joint study by Arbitron Inc. and Edison Media Research said approximately nine million consumers would be willing to pay a small fee to listen their favorite audio channel (via Mike Terry, UK, DXLD) MediAmazing? Never heard of it; never knowingly listened to anything via it; what of any worth is there? (gh, DXLD) ** U S A [non]. Re High Adventure`s unconfirmed A-02 use of 7485 *1200-1600 111 deg to China, 100 kW 4X4X1 Curtain Antenna: The CIS relay parameters are typical of Novosibirsk (the old site). Will they really stay on this low frequency during the summer? Other stations via Novosibirsk to China usually move up to 22 and 19 meters. They have a strong 2nd harmonic on 14970, typical of old CIS sites like Novosibirsk, Kurovskaya, Tashkent, etc. with 100 kW rigs (Olle Alm, Sweden, March 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ZIMBABWE [non]. Hi Glenn, Re 'the reported extention [sic] of the programme to 1830 has not happened yet': Voice of the People booked the additional airtime as stated, but on the first day they informed us that they were having production problems and that the programme might not be a full 90 minutes. I checked the audio files in our system (the programme is played out from Hilversum) and found that some are indeed just under 60 minutes, and some run up to 88 minutes. So it appears that on some days, at least, they have been using the additional airtime. Communication with the programme producers is difficult at the best of times, and has especially been so in recent weeks. 73, (Andy Sennitt, RN, March 16, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UNIDENTIFIED. I have been listening to 11.530 (local mornings) here in Portland from around 1430 GMT until signoff around 1700 GMT to this mystery station. I've never heard a positive ID, but it sounds a lot like Kurdish. The signal is enormous, almost armchair reception lately! Can you shed any light on this for me? If it's not Radio Mesopotamia, I don't know what else it could be. I suppose the xmtrs are somewhere in Uzbekistan or Kyrgyzstan, no? Thanx, (Bruce Lindner in Portland OR, March 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I had a look thru the DXLD 2002 yeartodate archive at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd02.html --- searching on 11530, and found: issue 2-023: V. of the Strait(s), China, at 1525 in Chaozhou/Amoy issue 2-022: Denge Mezopotamia, 11530 at 1105-1700, more in 2-020. issue 2-018: Same station scheduled on 11530 for A-02 upcoming season from `Kishinov` (Moldova). And there are some further entries further back, including one giving the site as Yerevan at 1500-1700. There is a lot of uncertainty about the site. But I suppose the station is pretty definite, if you are sure it is Kurdish rather than a Chinese dialect. Any relation to Bruce MacGibbon in Portland? (gh to MacBruce) No relation, but I know Bruce pretty well. He's a pretty big radio buff, lives east of here in Gresham. I see him every year at the local radio shindig. Do you know him? He's quite a character! BL ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 2-043, March 15, 2002 edited by Glenn Hauser, wghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted afterwards at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd02.html For restrixions and searchable 2002 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn WORLD OF RADIO #1122: (STREAM) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1122.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1122.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1122.html NEXT AIRINGS ON WWCR: Sat 0600, Sun 0330 on 5070, 0730 3210 FIRST AIRINGS ON RFPI: Fri 1930, Sat 0130, 0730, 1330, 1800, 2400 on some of: 7445-AM/USB, 15039, 21815-USB [however, WOR 1121 ran Fri at 1930...] AIRINGS ON WORLD RADIO NETWORK: Sat 0900 rest of world; 1500 to NAm MONITORING REMINDERS --- you should never be at a loss for something enjoyable or stimulating to listen to, especially from noncommercial stations via internet, if you frequently consult this site. We have several specials for St Patrick`s Day imminent: http://www.worldofradio.com/calendar.html ** AFGHANISTAN [non]. 9950, Radio Voice of Afghanistan now has a website with audio archives, http://www.afghanbroadcasting.com/ (Hans Johnson, Mar 14, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** ALASKA. Hi all, Trond Jacobsen posted this info on the WUN list, and I thought I'd share it here. The HAARP project in Alaska will be performing their VLF injection campaign March 15-28th. Transmissions will be on frequencies around 3200, 3300, and 5800 kHz. Transmissions will start at 1900 Alaska time (0400 UT) and last about 10 hours. What kind of signals to look out for: 3.2 MHz: 12.5 Hz on/off keying 50 % duty cycle 3.3 MHZ and 5.8 MHz: sinusoidal modulation with the following frequencies; 1225 Hz, 1875 Hz, 2125 Hz, 2375 Hz, 3365 Hz. At these two frequencies, there will also be chirp transmissions. The HAARP website is: http://server5550.itd.nrl.navy.mil/projects/haarp/ The HAARP project has QSL'ed reception reports in the past, so put on your aluminum foil hat and tune in some mind control signals! (Tom Sevart, rec.radio.shortwave March 14 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ALBANIA. A-02 schedule for Radio Tirana: Albanian to Eu - Daily 0300-0800 6100 CER 100 kW / non-dir 0800-0900 7110 CER 100 kW / non-dir 1400-1700 5985 CER 050 kW / non-dir 7270 CER 050 kW / non-dir 2030-2200 7295 CER 100 kW / 305 deg 9575 CER 100 kW / 310 deg Albanian to NoAm - Daily 2300-0330 6090 SHI 100 kW / 300 deg 7270 CER 100 kW / 305 deg English to Eu - Mon to Sat 1845-1900 7210 SHI 100 kW / 310 deg 9520 CER 100 kW / 305 deg 2130-2200 7130 SHI 100 kW / 310 deg 9540 CER 100 kW / 305 deg English to NAm - Tue to Sun 0145-0200 6115 CER 100 kW / 305 deg 7160 CER 100 kW / 305 deg 0230-0300 6115 CER 100 kW / 305 deg 7160 CER 100 kW / 305 deg German to Eu - Mon to Sat 1730-1800 7185 CER 100 kW / 350 deg 9570 CER 100 kW / 350 deg Greek to Eu - Mon to Sat 1715-1730 6130 CER 100 kW / non-dir 7135 CER 050 kW / non-dir French to Eu - Mon to Sat 1900-1930 7210 SHI 100 kW / 310 deg 9520 CER 100 kW / 310 deg Italian to Eu - Mon to Sat 1800-1830 6100 SHI 100 kW / non-dir 7240 CER 100 kW / non-dir Serbian to Eu - Mon to Sat 2115-2130 6135 SHI 100 kW / non-dir 7110 CER 100 kW / non-dir Turkish to ME - Mon to Sat 1700-1715 6130 CER 100 kW / non-dir 7140 CER 050 kW / non-dir (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 15 via DXLD) Taking Sundays off is something new, at least admitting to it (gh, DXLD) ** ANTARCTICA. I probably heard Antarctica on 15475.495 on 3/3 [Sunday!] with a soccer till a late close at about 2245 (KA2HPU - Bud, NY/NJ?, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 15475.6, R. Nac. Arcángel San Gabriel, Mar 11 2020-2100*, 25332, Spanish, Talk and Music. ID at 2023 and 2056 and 2100 (Kouji Hashimoto, Japan Premium via DXLD) ** ARGENTINA. A different fútbol continental game was heard on 15820 LSB from 22 to about 01 UT when they continued with music. UNID. Also hearing Spanish Latin on 29810 LSB often, incl. 3/10 at 1445z (KA2HPU - Bud, NY/NJ?, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BIAFRA [non]. 12125, V. of Biafra Int., Mar 9 *1900-1910 35333 English, 1900 s/on with ID and frequency announce. Song. 1904 ID. Music. Talk (Kouji Hashimoto, Japan Premium via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. Following covered earlier in DXLD in Portuguese (gh): 2470 kHz - Radio Cacique, Sorocaba (SP). This is just to let you know that this station is back on the air operating 24/7 with 250 Watts. Until a few days ago there was a controversy among some Brazilian DX'ers if this station was really back on shortwave or not. I decided to call the station and spoke to a technician called "Toninho". He was very friendly and told me that the station is back to shortwave since about 2 months ago. The schedule is: From 0730 to 0300 UT - in parallel with Medium Wave (1160 kHz). From 0300 to 0730 UT - in parallel with FM (96.5 MHz) - only music I haven't tried Radio Cacique yet but keep in your mind to check it out every day. We never know when the propagation would be open for Brazil and this would be a great DX. Reception reports should be sent to Toninho (Departamento Técnico) at: comercial@radiocacique.com.br I suggest you to write your reception reports in Portuguese language (Marcelo Toníolo, NY, Mar 14, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Not reported since June 1987! (Anker Petersen, DSWCI DX Window via DXLD) Olá amigos da Lista Radioescutas. Estou enviando à vocês esta mensagem, com o objetivo de fazer alguns esclarecimentos, e me posicionar à respeito do "efeito" causado por uma dira "simples" escuta que realizei. A dias atrás, meu amigo Samuel colocou nesta lista, uma informação à respeito da escuta que fiz de uma emissora de Sorocaba, que fica à cerca de 80 quilômetros do local onde resido. Confesso que fiquei surpreso ao saber da reação de algumas pessoas, que além de duvidarem da veracidade de minhas informações, parecem ter tratado o assunto de maneira pouco elegante. Nem mesmo a informação prestada pelo Marcelo, que, sendo conceituado e experinte dexista que é, e que teve a idéia de entrar em contato com a emissora, confirmado que a mesma estava no ar na faixa de Ondas Tropicais, foi suficiente para cessarem as dúvidas e comentários nada construtivos de alguns. Nem mesmo as explicações técnicas prestadas pelo Marcelo, nem mesmo as alegações feitas pelo Samuel, foram suficientes para cessarem uma certa onda de "subestima" ou até diria um certo menosprezo expressado por alguns. Com base nisto, eu gostaria de relatar aqui, o processo no qual resultou da escuta dos sinais da Rádio Cacique em 120 metros, feita por mim, na noite do dia 06/03/2002, precisamente entre às 02:00 e 03:00 UTC. Como de costume, sempre escolho, entre os dias da semana, alguns horários para explorar determinadas faixas. Neste caso, eu havia escolhido a faixa de Ondas Tropicais. Para a escuta, tenho a minha disposição, diversos tipos de receptores. Como sou um aficcionado pelos receptores antigos, desenvolvi, ao longo dos anos, o hobby de restaurar e colecionar rádios antigos. Em minha modesta coleção, os receptores multibanda, como ex, National RF-5000, Zenith Trans-Oceanic, Philips Passeport, Nordmende Globetrotter, modelos da marca alemã Grundig, são os que mais utilizo em minhas escutas. Também restauro e coleciono receptores valvulados, como o Hallicrafters S-85 e outros de marcas brasileiras, americanas e européias. São receptores de grande confiabilidade, os quais, restaurei e calibrei utilizando métodos que nem sequer as fábricas que os produziram puderam fazer, devido ao fato de que na época em que foram fabricados não haviam os modernos equipamentos de teste e aferição que eu possuo para ajustar meus receptores. Voltando ao método da escuta, escolhi para fazer a varredura na faixa um Philips R-27 T, portátil da linha Philips Passeport, o qual restaurei à poucos dias, e introduzi algumas modificações técnicas com o intuito de melhorar seu desempenho, que normalmente já é bom. Este receptor é dotado, de fábrica, de uma antena de ferrite para a faixa de Ondas Tropicais, resultando num interessante experimento, já que o mesmo permite o uso de uma antena Loop de Quadro, feita nos mesmos moldes da conhecida loop de quadro para Ondas Médias, com excessão do número de espiras, que são de menor número, calculadas justamente para a faixa de Ondas Tropicais. Este conjunto que relatei, permite um efeito na faixa de Ondas Tropicais, tal como ocorre com a loop e os receptores comuns de Ondas Médias, ou seja, é possível aumentar o ganho de recepção com a simples aproximação entre a antena loop e a parte do receptor onde se localiza a antena de ferrite. Orientando-se corretamente a Loop, é possível otimizar a recepção, através do aumento do ganho e diminuição do ruído, bem como a separação dos sinais de duas emissoras na mesma frequência, desde que seus sinais sejam provenientes de regiões diferentes, tal como ocorre com a faixa de Ondas Médias, a qual, tenho certeza, muitos de vocês já fizeram experiências com as conhecidas antena Loop de quadro e RGP3. O processo em Ondas Tropicais é o mesmo, com a ressalva de que só é possível executar a experiência se o receptor for dotado de antena de ferrite para OT. Este é o caso do Philips que usei na escuta. Ao fazer uma busca pela faixa de 90 metros, a qual estava com um alto ídice de ruído, decidi, como faço de costume, descer até a faixa de 120 metros, ao passo que me deparei com o sinal de uma emissora que transmitia música. A primeira medida que tomei foi a de ajustar corretamente a antena Loop, para a frequência sintonizada. Vale ressaltar que, com o uso da loop nestes termos, é facilmente identificado qualquer imagem que o receptor venha a converter, devido ao fato que que a loop realça exatamente a frequência sintonizada pelo circuito oscilador local do receptor. Se o receptor produz uma imagem de uma emissora de Ondas Médias, por exemplo, na faixa de Ondas Tropicais, a ressonância provocada pela loop na etapa osciladora local do receptor irá por fim atenuar o sinal da possível imagem, e o resultado na prática seria o aumento do ruído "fundo de faixa" sobre o som da emissora que estivesse na condição de "imagem", denunciando, portanto, a presença da mesma. Ou seja, o sistema "entrega" as imagens, a não ser que sejam "harmônicos" gerados pela emissora. Portanto, uma possível falha do receptor seria facilmente constatada. Ao sintonizar a Rádio Cacique, verifiquei que o sinal captado era de fato um sinal em 120 metros, devido ao correto ajuste realçado pela antena loop. Após orientar a antena loop para a melhor posição de escuta, providenciei a sintonia desta frequência em um segundo receptor, moderno, dotado de mostrador digital, no caso um Sony ICF- SW7600 G, o qual fica costumeiramente em minha bancada, apostos para qualquer consulta, funcionando como se fosse um instrumento de apoio. Este receptor está conectado à uma de minhas três antenas long Wire, e que está orientada no sentido Leste-Oeste, possuido esta antena em questão o comprimento de dez metros, conectada ao receptor através de um capacitor variável, utilizado como atenuador. Ao localizar a emissora no Sony, constatei que a frequência sintonizada era a de 2470 kHz. O próximo passo, foi a possível identificação da emissora, através das listas que tenho à minha disposição, e que seriam as literaturas PWBR, WRTH e o sistema eletrônico ILG. Ao fazer a consulta às listas, constatei que a emissora que ouvia, possivelmente seria a Rádio Cacique de Sorocaba, SP. Ao me deparar com esta informação, e tendo em vista que as emissões da mesma estavam irregulares, bem como tem estado as emissões de outras emissoras em 120 metros, procedi atentando à programação, no intuito de identificar definitivamente a emissora. De posse de um gravador cassete, comecei a fazer pequenas gravações da programação, gravações estas que ficaram relativamente com boa qualidade, devido, primeiramente à boa qualidade de áudio do Philips R-27 T, e posteriormente ao fato da transmissão estar com bom sinal, e também com boa qualidade. Foram gravadas diversas informações, as quais destaco as seguintes: após música instrumental brasileira antiga "tico tico no fubá", o slogam: Todas as noites você viaja no tempo através da música... e você participa desta viagem através do telefone da saudade... Na miquelucci colchões tem toda linha probel em exposição... Três lojas em SOROCABA... Avenida São Paulo, 807, próximo à Santa Casa... ligue 231-7405... Vinheta IDENTIFICAÇÃO: ZYK 537, Ondas Médias, 1160 kHz, ZYG 851, Ondas Curtas-Tropicais, 2470 kHz, Faixa de 120 metros. Emissoras brasileiras da RÁDIO CACIQUE DE SOROCABA - Estado de São Paulo - Brasil. Volta o programa de músicas antigas, Locutor: meia noite e cinco, já é novo dia... e o telefone da saudade eu falo com quem? Bom dia, Orlando, bom dia Bezerra? como vai? como tá a vitória régia? ouvinte: tá bem. Então tá ótimo, se preparando para a madrugada... e nós vamos tocar o que pra você? Resposta: Eu queria escutar Demônios da Garoa, o Trem das Onze. Locutor: e você quer mandar pra quem? (microfonia) Sueli, Izabel e prá todos vocês aí... Segue então a música "O Trem das Onze". Bem senhores creio que desta forma, fica difícil dizer que não seja a Rádio Cacique de Sorocaba, a emissora que eu ouvi, não é mesmo? Até mesmo se eu estivesse com umas cervejas, eu certamente identificaria esta emissora. Gostaria de encerrar dizendo que passei a informação da escuta ao Samuel tendo a plena convicção de que eu estava certo quanto a identificação da emissora. Vou entrar em contato com a mesma para solicitar, através de um relatório de recepção uma possível confirmação da escuta por meio de um cartão QSL. A gravação será com certeza preservada. No mais quero me despedir dos amigos que leram esta nota, desejando à todos boas escutas, sorte em escutar a Rádio Cacique, que por sinal neste momento não está sendo escutada por aqui, e que o respeito mútuo seja uma das qualidades entre os radioescutas e dexistas. Um abraço à todos e muito obrigado pela a atenção. Do amigo de todos (Michel Viani - Osasco - SP, radioescutas, Mar 13 via DXLD) [He goes into great detail on how he restores antique radios, how he made sure 2470 was not an image from MW, etc., and is unhappy that some doubts were expressed about his discovery; in the last paragraph he says the signal was not being heard at the moment] ** BRAZIL. Radio Bandeirantes, fair reception on 11925 after 0300 when VOA in Chinese and its jamming leave the frequency. 60 m propagation from Brazil opened in March as I received presumably Radio Difusora on 4815, unidentified station on 4865, Radio Anganguera on 4915 and Radio Brasil Central on 4985 (Vladimir Kovalenko, Tomsk, Russia via Signal, March 15, for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BURKINA FASO. Hi Glenn, According to the January 2002 edition of "Africa on Shortwave" from the British DX Club, "In August 2000, it had been reported that Radio Burkina was to install a new 100 kW shortwave transmitter." Perhaps that's a clue as to the source of the transmission on 5030. 73, (Andy Sennitt, Netherlands, March 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) [non?] Hi Glenn, re DXLD 2-042 Burkina Faso. About suspects that this is not coming from Burkina Faso but instead via a relay station. I remember some time ago there was some info about a new transmitter to be used by Radio Burkina. The QIP web pages had info under Burkina Faso. Oct 1999 Maroti/Cumbre DX reports a QSL from R Burkina and the v/s says that in coming months they will have a 500 kW transmitter. Maybe this refers to the plans to use Africa 1/Gabon relay site. Hard to believe they would buy such an expensive transmitter by themselves. Unless the v/s means 50 kW.... 73 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski, Finland, March 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Could Radio Burkina's appearance on 5030 KHz have anything to do with National Culture Week in that country. I'm not sure when it's taking place this year, but I did hear a mention of it on the broadcast Saturday night. (Wade Smith, New Brunswick) 5030, R. Burkina , 12-3 1959 man talking in VN with refs to Rwanda, M2wanda and continuous talks. 2015 tune in with folk songs (Afro pop). Underneath CNR but quite low to QRM Burkina. ON 14-3 at 1835 with Afro pops, news in French at 1855 and "Journal" (news and reports) at 1900. Sudden s /off at 1910 but on tune in at 1920 is back with FF program. Signal S9+10 on both dates and great audio quality (Zacharias Liangas, 12+ 14 March, Thessaloniki, Greece, DX LISTENING DIGEST) This makes 3 nights in a row that Radio Burkina has made it here [on 5030]. Maybe it's here to stay? (Mark Coady, Ont., March 13, ODXA via DXLD) ** CANADA. I know there's been a lot of talk recently about the FCC's laissez-faire attitude towards the enforcement of power cuts, pattern shifts, etc. on US stations, but has anyone commented on Canadian stations' observance (or non-observance) of stated operating parameters? I bring up this question because it seems that certain Canadian stations have directional patterns that don't afford much interference protection to US stations less than 500 miles away. Case #1: 1310 kHz Worcester, MA; Portland, ME; and Norwich, CT have stations on this frequency. Their night patterns throw very little interference at each other. On the other hand, CIWW in Ottawa, ON slams each of these three New England stations into the ground within 15 or so miles of each one's home base. Does this make sense ? Case #2: 1320 kHz CKEC in New Glasgow, NS usually clobbers Attleborough, MA and Derry, NH co-channel stations almost to within sight of these US stations' towers. If I thought about it a little longer, I could come up with a few more examples. Just wondering ... (Mark Connelly, MA, NRC-AM via DXLD) CIWW's nite pattern is (supposed to be) directed at 347 degrees, well away from the States. The day pattern throws quite a bit of power Massachusetts' way (> 20 kW). CKEC's nite pattern is (supposed to be) directed at 080 degrees, out into the North Atlantic. Non-DA days. Could be these guys are 'throwing fate to the wind' and staying on day pattern 24 hours??? (Bill Hale, TX, ibid.) Another cross-border QRM example: CKHJ-1260 in Fredericton, NB totally slams WMKI Boston in most of the western suburbs (Acton, Carlisle, Billerica, etc.) most nights. Somebody definitely messed up the math calculations on that one. WMKI would have perfectly good coverage there if it weren't for this one particular station. (Mark Connelly, WA1ION - Billerica, MA, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** CANADA. CBC FINDS WINDFALL IN TORONTO From the Toronto Star: CBC to lease space to school The cash-strapped CBC is going to receive millions of dollars by leasing an entire upper floor and part of the main floor of its Toronto headquarters to a design and technology school. "The deal to lease the space for 15 years is worth approximately $75 million to the CBC," a source told The Star yesterday. The agreement with the International Academy of Design and technology, now based in three downtown buildings, will see the private school consolidate its operations on the 100,000-square-foot 8th floor of the Front St. W. building. Included in the lease is the full use of four state-of-the-art digital studios, a separate signed entrance at the corner of Wellington St. W. and John St., and the private use of two elevators for the academy's 200 students and staff. <snip> The deal has been met with stiff criticism by many CBC staff who have been forced to give up offices, relocate to smaller and more cramped workspaces and face a lot more reorganization and headaches in the months to come. "People are frustrated and morale is down," one producer said. "This is one of the most contentious issues, besides layoffs, in the past 10 years." Rest at http://www.thestar.com - click on Entertainment and scroll down about ten stories [maybe not any more –gh] (Toronto Star via Eric Geringas Mar 13 via CAJ via Ricky Leong, DXLD) ** CANADA. Please note point #4 in the following CBC press release. (Ricky Leong) ========== In calling for a renewed commitment to the nation's public broadcaster, the CBC recommends: Effective and predictable multi-year funding; Continuous and equitable access to the Canadian Television Fund (CTF); A re-balancing of public policies in support of distinctive Canadian television; Access to the necessary broadcast spectrum to extend the reach of CBC's radio services; and, Amendments to the Broadcasting Act that: Will reinstate the CBC's place in the broadcasting system, and Provide the CBC with the necessary flexibility so it can leverage its assets in order to re-invest in programming, and establish alliances and partnerships (via Ricky Leong, QE, DXLD) ** CANADA. Following is a news item posted on CBC NEWS ONLINE at http://cbc.ca/news ____________________________________________________ CBC ASKS OTTAWA FOR MORE MONEY FOR LOCAL SHOWS WebPosted Thu Mar 14 18:10:27 2002 OTTAWA --- The CBC called on Parliament Thursday to come up with increased funding for public broadcasting in the country. CBC President Robert Rabinovitch told the House of Commons Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage that the corporation wants to offer regional television audiences more. But he said Canada Now, the network's new blend of national and regional supper-hour news, hasn't caught on with the public, and the CBC will need extra cash to compete for an audience. "I must be very frank, it's not working," Rabinovitch said. "I am willing to concede that the private sector does local news extremely well, and it's going to be very difficult for us unless we have a lot more money." Carole Taylor, chair of the CBC's Board of Directors, argued that the country needs the corporation to maintain its role as the cornerstone of Canada's broadcasting system. "Without the CBC, market fragmentation and the economics of Canadian programs will further erode viewership," she said. "Today there is a greater than ever need for a distinctive Canadian voice." Canadian content rules needs review Rabinovitch said that current Canadian content regulations encourage quantity rather than quality, and that it might be better to have broadcasters spend a certain percentage of their revenues on homegrown productions rather than demand a specific "tonnage" of air time. He also argued that the CBC's contribution to broadcasting must not be taken lightly. "We are able to take the risks, devote the resources and create the programs that the private sector simply cannot afford to do," he said. "While it is unrealistic or wrong to think the CBC or any other single broadcaster can convince Canadians to turn their backs on American programs, we can say that a strong and vibrant national broadcaster is the most effective way of ensuring Canadians have a high-quality Canadian choice." To help preserve high-quality public broadcasting, the CBC wants MPs not only to come up with more money but to make sure that the funding is stable over several years. The Commons committee is reviewing Canada's broadcasting industry and is hearing mixed views about the CBC. Earlier this month, CanWest Global called on the corporation to get out of regional television. FROM MARCH 1, 2002: ASPER WANTS CBC TV OUT OF SPORTS, LOCAL NEWS One member of the committee, NDP MP Wendy Lill, said Thursday that she's not convinced the CBC reflects the regions. "We're being asked to trust them, that in fact they are committed to regional programming," Lill said. "I keep hearing them, though, going back to their national focus, and they are still missing the boat in terms of public affairs at the community level." Copyright © 2000 CBC All Rights Reserved (via Ivan Grishin, ON, and Ricky Leong, QB, DXLD) ** CANADA. Final Schedule for Foreign Relays via RCI Sackville, A-02, shows, valid from April 7, with any differences the preceding week in parentheses, with azimuths; all powers are 250 kW: RTE: 1830-1859 13640 277 English to USA VOV: 0100-0500 all on 6175 includes: 0100-0130 English, 0130-0230 Viet, 0230-0259 English 212 USA; 0300-0330 Spanish, 0330-0400 English, 0400-0459 Vietnamese 268 USA. (Last summer they were on 9 MHz; do they really expect 6 MHz to be ideal with T-storms and late sunsets??) CRI: 0100-0159 9790 277 English USA; 0300-0359 9560 189 Spanish LAm; 0400-0459 9560 277 English USA; 1200-1259 11855 240 Cantonese USA; 2300-2359 13680 285 English USA. DW: 0100-0145 6040 253 English USA; 0300-0345 9535 277 English USA; 0400-0600 9640 268 German USA; 1400-1700 15515 272 German USA. KBS: 0200-0259 9560 277 English USA; 1000-1059 11715 176 Spanish LAm; 1100-1130 9650 240 Korean LAm [sic --- same beam to USA as in next entry]; 1130-1229 9650 240 English USA. NHK: 0000-0059 6145 240 English USA; 0200-0359 5960 240 Japanese USA; 0500-0559 6110 253 English USA; 1100-1159 6120 240 English USA; 1300- 1459 11705 240 Japanese USA; 2200-2259 6110 240 Japanese USA. RMC: 0300-0320 5960 and 9755 240 Arabic USA [still 0400-0420 during previous Week of Confusion] RNW: 1027-1225 5965 240 English USA; 1427-1625 15220 253 English USA; 0130-0225 6020 240 Dutch USA. [Note the 5965 broadcast has been 1127- 1325 during winter, but shifts according to European, not NAm DST] ROI: 1500-1559 17865 272 German USA [has been 1600 winter; NO English] RSI: all on 9490: 0000-0029 176 Swedish LAm; 0100-0129 189 Swedish LAm; 0200-0229 268 Swedish USA; 0229:30-0259:30 268 English USA; 0300- 0329:30 277 Swedish USA; 0329:30-0359 277 English USA [RSI is the only client timed to the half-minute; why?] (CBC Transmissions 28.02, RCI Operations 04.03.2002, fax via Bill Westenhaver, QB, reworked here by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CHILE. Since Mar 10 Chile uses UT minus 4 (Nicolás Eramo, Argentina, DSWCI DX Window via DXLD) ** CHINA. New kind of Chinese jamming is using not only one program but both CNR1 and CNR2 on the same frequency. I noted this at 0445 on 15350 (jamming CBS?) and at 0545 on 15150 (RFA in Mandarin). (Vladimir Kovalenko, Tomsk, Russia via Signal, March 15, for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CHINA [non]. CUBA. CRI in Spanish via Cuba noted at 0000 on new 15120 instead of 15210 (Vladimir Kovalenko, Tomsk, Russia via Signal, March 15 for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** COSTA RICA. RFPI is regularly heard quite good at around 0200-0400 on what my receiver frequency indicator says is 15038, not 15040. Is it correct? (Vladimir Kovalenko, Tomsk, Russia via Signal, March 15, for DX LISTENING DIGEST) Closer to 15039, like 15038.8 or .9, I think. James Latham says 7445 was off the air for a few days, apologies to distant listeners, and is now back with somewhat reduced power; capacitor is a bit too small. Hope to have antenna finally raised to 200 foot level within two weeks, improving reception in northern North America, Europe, South America, South Pacific (RFPI Mailbag first airing 2000 UT March 15, notes by gh for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CUBA. CUBAN HAM RADIO OPERATOR KEEPS IN TOUCH; Island`s isolation hasn`t stopped him for [sic] making friends around world. By Tracey Eaton, Cuba Bureau, Dallas Morning News --- yes, a story about Arnie Coro in the DMN, Feb 24, page 10A, apparently not online, but faxed to us by Ted Gurley. He is ``the guru of ham radio operators in Cuba, where amateur radio is booming, even in the age of the Internet and cell-phones... Among Mr. Coro`s specialties is the making of low-tech radios from pieces of broken-down VCRs, Soviet-era TV sets and fax machines...`` No doubt ``enhanced`` by the fax process, a shot of Arnie makes him look a lot like Fidel, minus the beard! (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CYPRUS GREEK. On the radio scene there are a lot of new FM stations. Here today I noticed a new FM Russian station operating on 106.20 FM for the local Russians in Limassol Cyprus, HQ in Moscow called "In your Car". I will try and find more info on this station. Also new is Radio Love on FM out of Limassol. Last week mention was made about the plans of the VOA on Cyprus. But things are still on hold as things look like having the site at Cape Greco or Linopetra. A bit of secrecy around to prevent any problems (Costa Constantinides, Cyprus, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CYPRUS TURKISH. NORTHERN. 6150, R. Bayrak, 2220 March 2 [Sat], SIO- 233, sports broadcast in language between Lefkosa and Nikosia. (Karl Racenis, MI, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Interesting, I thought they signed off at 2200. On late for sports? (Cumbre Ed. Hans Johnson via DXLD) ** DENMARK. Drastic cuts will take place in the staff of R Denmark on Mar 23 as the Shortwave Staff will be reduced from four employees to Zero! This means that even if the hourly 25-minute shortwave broadcasts continue at a reduced number of transmitters, and partly depending on the Norwegian transmitting company ``Norkring``, the Danish programmes will no longer be specially edited for the audience abroad, but a repeat of the main domestic newscasts (Erik Køie, Denmark, DSWCI DX Window March 13 via DXLD) See also NORWAY! ** ECUADOR. HCJB WORLD RADIO A02 BROADCAST SCHEDULE (31 March 2002 - 26 October 2002; Revised 7 March 2002) [excerpts] UTC Freq. kW Az. Target SMTWTFS ENGLISH 0100 0400 9745 100 351 N. Amer. (E) 1111111 0100 0330 11960 50 330 N. America 1111111 0100 0600 21455 303 5/225 Eur./S. Pac. 1111111 0200 0330 21470 100 40 India 1111111 [DIRECT! No relay] 0330 0400 11960 100 330 N. America 1111111 0400 0600 11960 100 327 N. America 1111111 0400 0600 9745 100 324 N Amer. (W) 1111111 0600 0800 11680 250 36 Europe 1111111 0630 1430 21455 30 35/225 Eur./S. Pac. 1111111 0700 1100 11755 100 228 S. Pacific 1111111 1100 1430 12005 50 43 Caribbean 1111111 1100 1430 15115 250 352/128 N/S America 1111111 2000 2200 17660 100 41 Europe 1111111 2030 2200 21455 30 35/225 Eur./S. Pac. 1111111 GERMAN (High) 0500 0530 11875 100 42 Europe 1111111 0930 1000 6125 100 155 S. America 1111111 2000 2030 17795 350 40 Europe 1111111 2000 2030 21455 30 35/225 Eur./S. Pac. 1111111 2000 2030 21470 50 41 Europe 1111111 2300 2400 11980 100 131 S. America 1111111 GERMAN (Low) 0530 0600 11875 100 42 Europe 1111111 1000 1030 6125 100 155 S. America 1111111 1030 1100 9745 100 324 N. America 1111111 0000 0030 11980 100 330/150 N/S America 1111111 SPANISH 0100 0500 15140 100 339 Mexico 1111111 0600 0630 11875 100 42 Europe 1111111 0600 0630 21455 30 35/225 Eur./S. Pac. 1111111 1030 0500 690 50 000/180 Ecuador 1111111 1100 0500 6050 50 18/172 S. America 1111111 1100 1300 11960 100 355 Cuba 1111111 1100 1500 15140 100 150 S. America 1111111 1300 1500 17690 100 341 Mexico 1111111 1430 1530 21455 30 35/225 Eur./S. Pac. 1111111 2030 2130 15205 100 42 Europe 1111111 2030 2130 17795 350 50 Europe 1111111 2100 2300 15140 100 150 S. America 1111111 2200 0100 21455 30 35/225 Eur./S. Pac. 1111111 2300 0100 15140 100 160/330 N/S America 1111111 [non] Note: HCJB`s shortwave broadcast schedule also includes these programs transmitted from the United Kingdom. SMTWTFS Tatar 1600 1615 11760 500 62 Central Asia 1000010 Georgian 1600 1615 11760 500 62 Central Asia 0100000 Uzbek 1600 1615 11760 500 62 Central Asia 0010100 Tajik 1600 1615 11760 500 62 Central Asia 0001000 Russian 1600 1615 11760 500 62 Central Asia 0000001 Russian 1615 1700 11760 500 62 Central Asia 1000111 Russian 1615 1645 11760 500 62 Central Asia 0111000 Ukrainian 1645 1700 11760 500 62 Central Asia 0111000 Arabic 2100 2230 12025 250 165 N. Africa 1111111 ______________________________________________________________________ Mailing Address: HCJB World Radio Frequency Manager: Douglas Weber 17-17-691 E-Mail: dweber@hcjb.org.ec Quito, Ecuador S.A. FAX: +593 2 226 7263 (via Volker Willschrey, Saar, DXLD) ** ETHIOPIA. 6210, R. Fana, Mar 12 1610-1619, 24222, Amharic, Talk and Music. //6940 kHz (Kouji Hashimoto) 9561.7, R. Ethiopia, Mar 10 1606-1628, 33443, Music. // 7165kHz (22332). (Kouji Hashimoto) 9704.3, R. Ethiopia, Mar 12 *1459-1504, 32332-33333, Amharic, 1459 s/on with IS. ID. Talk (Kouji Hashimoto, Japan Premium via DXLD) ** FINLAND. Re DXLD 2-042: Scandinavian Weekend Radio is not a pirate. Please see: http://www.swradio.net/eng/faq.htm (David Hodgson, TN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GUATEMALA. 4698, Radio Amistad is back up and running at 500 watts after I rebuilt the power supply (someone decided to install a "voltage regulator" to protect the rig from line voltage spikes and sags. Trouble was they configured the output of the regulator for 220 volts instead of 115 and when they turned on the transmitter - ZAP ! Took out all the diodes in the high-voltage bridge rectifier, welded the switch contacts closed, and finally blew the line fuse! (Larry Baysinger, KY, Mar 14, Cumbre DX via DXLD) 4845, Radio Kekchi; Fray Bartolomé/Casas, 0204-0226 Mar 10; They seem to be back on higher power, and exactly on 4845 kHz. (used to be 4844.8 in the recent past). Songs with organ and male vocals; one song ending with "Amen", with short announcements in between. At 0214 talk by male in Kekchi, with ID at 0216. Open carrier for almost 1 minute at 0217, followed by more talk and another ID at 0221 UT. 34344 (Mark Veldhuis, Netherlands, Cumbre DX via DXLD) 0143-0155, mx, ID as "...la Voz de las Casas..." and "...Radio K'ekchí...", very good signal, SIO 343 (Daniele Canonica, Switzerland, Cumbre DX via DXLD) The old Gates transmitter at R. K' still needs some work on the modulator to remove distortion (they like too much bass which the old rig has trouble reproducing cleanly) but that will have to wait until I can find some parts. It is running 2.8 kW now - but we tested it at the full 5 kW and it looks like it will run OK at that level! (Larry Baysinger, K, Mar 14, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Hi, some activity at Trollhättan, Sweden: 4845 14 Mar, 0230 unID, but definitely Guatemala, as their anthem was sung at closedown 0245. Good signal, just background noise and a few CW bursts. Orchestral music, and five minutes of religious talk by male in local language, one that had a number of Spanish words in it. No ID, just Amén and the anthem. But here's Radio K'ekchi, San Bartolomé de las Casas, if I may guess. [Mny tnx to Tore B. Vik, SWB, for this hint!] 73 and Good DX (Johan Berglund, Trollhättan, Sweden AOR AR7030 K9AY, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** HAWAII. Dale Park in HI explains more about the HPR move/sale: Hawaii Public Radio's MW outlet, KIFO, moved from 1380 to 1370 kHz, noted March 2. For years KIFO, and its predecessor KLNI, had been plagued by the very strong second harmonic of KQMQ-690. KIFO also wanted to upgrade to 10 kW but was unable to do so due to its close proximity to the FCC monitoring station on Waipio Peninsula in Pearl City. KIFO did move to 1370, in advance of being taken over by the owners of the license for 1170! HPR sold the station in Feb. 2002 for some much-needed cash, which will help in its future plans to add more FM relays. No word on the new plans for 1370, which is still relaying KIPO-FM 89.3. Also, the freq. shift allows "a station in Washington state" (per Honolulu Star-Bulletin) to increase its power. That refers to KRKO. -- RT (Rich Toebe?, IRCA DX Monitor March 13 via DXLD) ** HONDURAS. HRMI: I spoke with Jim Planck, head of IMF and who has just returned from a visit to Honduras. 3340 he says is back on after being off. It runs 1 kW in AM mode. 5010 is on USB+carrier 150 watts. Both are on at 1200-0500v. He claimed that they are getting tons of reception reports (via Johnson Mar 13) I have never heard 3340 and I don't recall a single log of it. A look at LA-DX doesn't show any logs either. 5010 is irregular at best and I didn't hear it during a check last night. Decent reception when it is on (Hans Johnson, FL, Mar 13/14, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** HONDURAS. On Mar 02 & 03 we had R Litoral, La Ceiba on both 4830.28 (weak) and 4832.19 (powerful) at once at 1240. Looks like they must be bouncing back and forth. (Kuhl & Wilkner in Dxplorer). Heard on 4832.0 on Mar 06, 07, 09, 10 & 12 at 0100-0500v* with powerful signals. Nothing on 4830. Mostly Spanish religious talks, prayer and hymns, but "Litoral" was also mentioned. R Tachira was not heard. 35333 (Berg, Petersen & Wilkner...) They are usually listed with 500 watts. However, I see this on an undated Litoral-related website http://www.applegatefellowship.org/missions/honduras.asp "The station is still waiting for the permission of Honduras' equivalent of the FCC to go to 1000 watts, but we continue daily our broadcasting with good response from the Mosquito Coast and occasional letters from Europe and the United States. We are also in the process of moving our recording studio, so there is plenty of construction work as well." Maybe now at 1 kw? (Berg, DSWCI DX Window Mar 13 via DXLD) ** ICELAND. AFRTS - 3903 USB heard often // all the other transmitters (KA2HPU - Bud, NY/NJ?, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) You mean, since it was supposedly closed down? (gh, DXLD) ** INDONESIA. VOI in English is back on 15150, ex-11785, at 2025 check UT March 14. Can you hear it? (Chris Hambly, Victoria, DX LISTENING DIGEST) No (gh, OK, DXLD) ** IRAQ/KUWAIT? Hi Glenn, Thanks to Mauno Ritola and Ydun M. Ritz for their info on the 1575 kHz Arabic broadcast. I didn't get much after reviewing the tapes, low key talk by man around 2358 03/08/02. The only word I think I could make out was something like Liban, I was thinking of Lebanon in French. If the sound recorder on this computer worked I would try sending an audio file to the British e-mail address (Wade Smith, New Brunswick, DX LISTENING DIGST) ** IRAQ [or non]. Re: ``Today I have received this log in an email from Robertas Petraitis: 1575.0 2100-2240 09/03 KWT al-Mustaqbal (Radio the Future), clandestine, A, s/on, Holy Qur`an, patriotic songs, radio drama, 33433 RPe. The same station??`` Hi Glenn, the answer is no: the clandestine from Kuwait (The Future/ Twin Rivers Radio etc.) is on 1575 kHz sharp (or 1566 or 1584). Iraq has been drifting between 1575.2-1575.4 and also heard on 1570.5 kHz. Probably these transmitters are there just for jamming the Kuwaiti transmitter. But now I note that in the original message it was NOT said that the station on 1575.3 kHz was Arabic at all. Sorry! 73, (Mauno Ritola, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRELAND. My best morning yet for church stations. Heard at 1131- 1143, 27681, 27205.3, 27244.8, 27575.7, 27.755, 27.871, 27.891.2, and 27.881. Now I'll start sitting on some of them and get some details (Hans Johnson, FL, Sunday Mar 10, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** ISRAEL. In reference to my note of the other day regarding Israel not being in English at 1700 on 17545: Tuned in today at 1700 and for the first 30 seconds or so they were in presumed Hebrew, then switched to English which was already in progress. I'm assuming my report of the other day was simply a switching error much like today, except that the other day it was going on for at least 10 minutes as I had tuned in then at 1710 (Steve Lare, Holland, MI, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ISRAEL. Kol Israel SW schedule Summer 2002 The Summer 2002 Kol Israel shortwave schedule March 31 2002 - October 27 2002, is now available on Bezeq's website http://www.bezeq.co.il The full URL to both PDF and PowerPoint versions of the schedule is at: http://www.bezeq.co.il/english/default.asp?maincat=2&catid=102&pageid=743 I would think that it'll be posted on http://www.israelradio.org Don't take this new schedule to mean that the broadcasts will continue. The latest I've heard was that letters were sent out which said that the broadcasts will cease once the budget is ratified. When I get a chance I'll type in the English/Hebrew frequencies and send them out, for those who don't have web access. Also, Joel Rubin said on today's broadcast they said that the Rabbi/Psychologist call in show is cancelled (Daniel Rosenzweig, NY, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Kol Yisrael decides NOT to go ahead with 14 March program with rabbi/psychologist on topic of stress according to an announcement made on the Wednesday English news on Reshet Aleph at about 1728 GMT (Joel Rubin, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) So here is the new IBA schedule in English, effective March 31 to October 27. However, the timeshift takes place three days earlier on March 28! The times below are during DST in Israel starting that date; until then, one UT hour later, and still on winter frequencies. 0400-0415 Eu/NAm 15640 9435; SAm/Au 17600 1030-1035 Eu/NAm 15640 17545 1600-1630 Eu/NAm 15615 17545 1900-1920 Eu/NAm 15615 11605 17545; SAf 15640 From PDF graphical display the three language segments in the 1900- 2000 hour look about equal, thus English ending at 1920; but I suppose it`s really -1930 or -1925 (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ISRAEL. New schedule for Kol Israel Reshet Dalet in Hebrew from March 10: 0500-1900 15760 050 kW / 315 deg 1900-0500 9345 050 kW / 315 deg 2100-2215 15640 250 kW / 264 deg DELETED FREQ: 0430-0600 11590 100 kW / 318 deg 0600-1900 17535 250 kW / 330 deg 1900-2300 9390 250 kW / 330 deg 1700-0430 11585 100 kW / 318 deg 2300-0600 7545 250 kW / 330 deg (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 15 via DXLD) ** ITALY. The Santa Palomba (Rome) transmitter site of RAI on 846 and 1332 kHz is to reduce its power to less than a quarter due to a decision of an administrative court in Rome following the row on e.m. pollution. Notturno Italiano is to be affected very heavily by this decision (Luigi Cobisi, Mar 10, Italy, DSWCI DX Window via DXLD) ** JAPAN [non]. More on JSWC special on VOA: see U S A ** KOREA NORTH. Second North Korea DXpedition attempt abandoned: Efforts by noted DXer Hrane Milosevic, YT1AD, to operate from North Korea (P5) apparently have failed. YT1AD reported that the team had a license with the call sign P5A and had started to set up a station, but the military intervened and informed the team that transmitting from P5 was forbidden. The Daily DX cites information from Harry, RA3AUU, who reported receiving a telephone call from YT1AD, who stated that they were unable to get a license to transmit. YT1AD "was obviously very disappointed and leaving North Korea," the report said. Meanwhile, Ed Giorgadze, P5/4L4FN, continues to operate from North Korea as his schedule permits. He has obtained oral permission to operate, but his operation has not yet been approved for DXCC credit. More information on P5/4L4FN is on the AMSAT Net Web http://www.amsatnet.com/p5.html site operated by Bruce Paige, KK5DO.-- thanks to The Daily DX and Doug Waller, NX4D for this information (ARRL March 13 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) YT1AD SAYS ``NEVER AGAIN!`` TO FUTURE P5 DXPEDITION ATTEMPTS NEWINGTON, CT, Mar 14, 2002 --- The Daily DX today reported additional details about the recent aborted effort by noted DXer Hrane Miloshevich, YT1AD, to operate from North Korea. Miloshevich described his visit there as ``a thrill,`` but said the DXpedition was thwarted when military personnel intervened. He indicated that he would not make any further attempts to operate from North Korea--now the second most-wanted DXCC entity after the soon-to-be-activated Ducie Island. Accompanied by Voja Kapun, YU7AV, Miloshevich said he arrived in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang March 5 and was welcomed by representatives of the Ministry of Telecommunications and Foreign Affairs. ``We were stationed in Yangakdo Hotel, on the bank of the river with the same name,`` he said, according to a translation of e-mail communications provided Nenad Stevanovich, VE3EXY, provided to The Daily DX. ``The hotel has 47 floors, and we were on the 40th floor, with almost ideal conditions for work. All our equipment was put together, and we were about to start our operation with the previously assigned call sign, P5A.`` The P5A team reportedly had the nod to operate from civilian authorities in North Korea, but Miloshevich said a uniformed official appeared unexpectedly and imposed a ban on the operation until the team got permission from military authorities as well. That permission was supposed to arrive March 8, ``but nobody showed up, possibly because of a holiday,`` Miloshevich speculated, adding that he and YU7AV did not want to risk starting up an unauthorized operation. ``Meanwhile,`` he added, ``we had fun listening to all the pirates pretending to be us, when we did not make a single contact.`` When a military official finally showed up last Sunday, March 10, he simply said, ``No transmission until further notice.`` At that point, Miloshevich said, he and Kapun had no other choice but to leave North Korea. ``After landing in Beijing, our only comment was, never again!!!`` Miloshevich said. North Korea is not out of reach for DXers, but DXCC credit remains elusive. Ed Giorgadze, P5/4L4FN, of the Republic of Georgia continues to operate from there as his schedule permits. Giorgadze --- who is with the UN World Food Program --- has obtained oral permission to operate, but his operation has not yet been approved for DXCC credit. More information on P5/4L4FN is on the http://www.amsatnet.com/p5.html AMSAT Net Web site operated by Bruce Paige, KK5DO (ARRL via John Norfolk, OCKOK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** LESOTHO. 4800 has been inactive now for several months (Vashek Korinek, South Africa, Mar 5, DSWCI DX Window via DXLD) ** LIBYA. 15435, signal was 10 dB over S9 in English from 2030Z until 2045. My location northern Illinois. 73 Glenn, I have enjoyed your programs for years! (Rick Gunderman, N9CXA, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** LIBYA [non]: New A-02 schedule for LJB in Arabic [via FRANCE]: 11635 2000-2130 15205 1800-2000 15315 1900-2030 15660 1600-1900 17635 1700-1900 17695 1100-1130 17695 1500-1900 17880 1700-1800 21675 1100-1500 21695 1000-1400 21810 1100-1130 21810 1500-1600 73 from (Ivo and Angel! Observer, Bulgaria, March 15 via DXLD) ** MADAGASCAR STATE RADIO, TV NOW FIRMLY UNDER CONTROL OF RAVALOMANANA Since 6 March - when state radio and television in Antananarivo (Malagasy National Radio and Television Malagasy respectively) resumed broadcasting after a 10-day absence - both stations have been observed to be under the control of the "information minister" appointed by the country's self-declared president, Marc Ravalomanana. Both stations refer to him as "President Ravalomanana" and to his cabinet appointees as "ministers". Source: BBC Monitoring research 6-15 Mar 02 (via DXLD) Well, Vaghjee was reporting recently that each faction had a set of SW frequencies, tho this may have changed (gh, DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND [and non]. I have not heard Douglas Lilburn`s music very often. CBC Radio 2 sometimes plays his music as part of requests – but not very often. RNZI may play his music via NZ National Radio`s Concert Network programmes --- but again, not very often. It would be nice if RNZI were to make some of his music part of their signature tune sequences. It seems he is probably the last of the era of English (Commonwealth) composers in the realm of the `music of the future`. Please note his obituary appeared in The Times, UK, June 9, 2001, but the URL is now expired. Born in Wanganui, Nov. 2, 1915, died in Wellington June 6, 2001 (Max Power, area code 425, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** NORWAY. Since the closure of the international staff of R Norway at last New Year, and now also at R Denmark [q.v.], the company which owns the four transmitters at Kvitsoy and Sveio, Norkring, has been negotiating with foreign companies like the U.K. company Merlin to hire transmitting time on these rather new and modern transmitters, says Mr Christian Skottun from Norkring. All four transmitters can easily be updated for Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM). Merlin seems interested, and did conduct some tests in January for HCJB. Furthermore, most of the Merlin transmitters in the U.K. are old and have to be taken out for possible refurbishment to DRM. In the meantime the Norwegian transmitters could handily come in as provisional replacement (Bernt Erfjord in DX-News no. 1, 2002, via DSWCI DX Window March 13 via DXLD) ** OMAN. BBCWS relay, verification letter received in 126 days for 9790, no return postage, verie signer Mohammed Saeed al-Farsi, Training Engineering Technician, BERS (Mark Humenyk, Weston, Ont., Canada, March World DX Club Contact QSL Report via DXLD) BBC Eastern Relay Station ** PAPUA NEW GUINEA. 3205 kHz - Radio Sandaun, Vanimo. Received Letter QSL that is also a personal letter from the V/S Celina Korei in 40 days. Celina said that the station has been receiving reception reports from around the world in places as far as Sweden, Canada and Alaska. She also said that she is basically the ONLY person at the station who verifies reception reports and she enjoys doing that. Celina is a journalist (she will be 32 years old on April 1st), married and has 5 kids. She also sent me a photo of herself and a friend taken in Port Moresby on November 2001. I sent her an audio tape, US$ 2 + 1 IRC and a post card of New York (Marcelo Toníolo, Greenvale, NY (USA), March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PARAGUAY. Radio América (Cumbre DX follow up). Per Tony Jones in Paraguay, the reports of this station testing on shortwave are a hoax (Nicolás Éramo, Argentina, Mar 12, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Really? Well, the hoax proceeds: (gh) Traducida de un mensaje de Thord Knutsson, Suecia, enviado a mi, la info relevante queda así: -comienzo de traduccion de la carta-- "Hoy he recibido este mail de Don Mur sobre futuros tests desde (R.) America. .. Thord -----Ursprungligt meddelande----- Fran: Dom Mur [mailto:radioamerica@l...] Skickat: den 12 mars 2002 10:41 Till: thord.knutsson@t... Amne: (No Subject) Mr Thord Knutsson, Editor, WRTH, Sweden Estimado amigo Thord Knutsson: Espero que estes bien alli en Suecia. Aquí todo bien con las temperaturas del verano moderandose lentamente. Le aviso que esperamos comenzar trasmisiones de prueba, en abril, dirigidas a un azimuth de 184 grados (medidos desde el Polo Norte Magnético), con destino principal hacia Buenos Aires, en la frequency de 7,300 kHz, 41 metros. Si todo sale bien, el transmisor tendrá una potencia de salida de 5 kW. La potencia efectiva radiada será de aprox. 1,58 MW [sic]. La fecha pensada para el inicio de estas pruebas es 7 de Abril. El horario completo, las 24h, de la programación de Radiodifusión América será emitida, la mayoría en español, con algo de Guaraní. Es fácil de identificar la programación de Radio América, ya que es de formato cultural y educacional, con mucha música clásica. Agradeceremos informes de recepción que serán rápidamente verificados. QSL E-Mail Address: ramerica@r... [truncated by yahoogroups] FAX: 595 21 963 149 Postal: Radiodifusión América, Casilla 2220, Asunción, Paraguay .... Dom Mur, Technical Advisor, Radiodifusión América, Asunción, Paraguay" --fin de la traducción de la carta-- Traducida por Horacio Nigro (mar 13). Gracias Thord por la info!! (Horacio Nigro, Conexión Digital list via DXLD) ** PERU. 4835 kHz - Radio Marañón, Jaen. Received QSL card full data signed by Francisco Muguiro Ibarra (S.J.), Director, and personal letter from Marco Rumiche Purizaca in 14 days. I sent a reception report in Spanish by email with an audio clip in Real Audio to correo@radiomaranon.org.pe (Marcelo Toníolo, Greenvale, NY, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PHILLIPINES. 15190, R. Pilipinas, 1808-1930 March 10. Good signal with Filipino talk and many references to "Phillipine Nat'l Police," "PNP," and "Metro Manila"; other English words appeared from time to time, as well. ID at 1826 as "...R. Pilipinas, the Overseas Service of Phillipine Broadcast Service from Metro Manila...," then 20-minute phone talk program. Other features followed up to 1928 s/off, with sked announced as follows: EG 0200-0330 on 15120, 15270, and 12015. Filipino 1730-1930 on 15190, 11730, and 17730. Transmission end at exactly 1930. This station has a nice "homey" sound to it (John Wilkins, CO, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** ST. PIERRE ET MIQUELON. To me, this is probably the most exotic location in North America: St. Pierre et Miquelon. A small archipelago, just off the southwestern coast of Newfoundland and over 3,000 miles from "Metropolitan" France (France no longer has colonies, they are overseas "departments", like Alaska and Hawaii are to the USA), they are the remainder of France's once vast holdings that were relinquished after the French and Indian (or Seven Years) War in 1763. The French were allowed by the British to keep it as a fishing station. Today, many East Coast DXers hear their AM outlet on 1375, the only split frequency in North America. You can check out RFO's (Réseau France Outre-mer) website at http://www.rfo.fr/st_pierre_et_miquelon_ie15m.php --- click on "Qui Sommes Nous?" for information about the station. Clicking on "Notre Radio" brings up "Journal" webcasts for all of the RFO stations. The site is in French, and if you can decipher it, there's a wealth of information, with pictures, about the islands, their history, and the AM, FM and TV stations. At RFO's home page, there's a world map; roll your mouse over the territory's name, and see the dots on the map, showing their locations, change to yellow. A free geography lesson, courtesy of http://www.rfo.fr/index_ie15m.php (author unknown, IRCA DX Monitor March 13 via DXLD) ** SPAIN. A new update of Spanish MW Stations List was uploaded at: http://www.aer-dx.org/listas/eaenom.htm The list is compiled by Martín Estévez, ee@aer-dx.org, and edited by Pedro Sedano, editor@aer-dx.org both are members of AER Asociación Española de Radioescucha (= Spanish Radiolistening Association) http://www.aer-dx.org The data of every station are: QRG, Name, Location, Network, Kw, Observations, Tx Location, QSL, Address, Tel. and Fax. Next: web and e-mail. There are 3 PDF files sorted by frequency, by location and by network. Changes inside this update: - New data: -- New tx of RNE-R5 in Algeciras (Cádiz) on 1503 kHz. -- New tel. of R. Asturias Cadena SER: 985236823 and fax: 985272924. - Observations: more info about RNE-R5 local broadcast - New design of every sort. Till next one! (Pedro Sedano, Madrid, Spain PSEDANOR@coitt.es editor@aer-dx.org AER http://www.aer-dx.org info@aer-dx.org hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** SURINAME. 4990.95, R Apintie, Paramaribo, 14th of March, 0415-0515, Dutch, soft pop, advertisement, song "Island in the Sun" from Harry Belafonte, tentative ID; bad modulation. SINPO 24322; nice pictures of the station can be seen here: http://www.apintie.sr/ vy 73 (Michael Schnitzer - michael_schnitzer@web.de Receiver: JRC NRD-525 Antennas: 25m longwire DX-One Professional EWE to South America EWE to Asia/Pacific Location: Hassfurt, Germany / Alemania, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** SWEDEN. RADIO SWEDEN --- Coming up on Radio Sweden: Thursday: In "GreenScan": What is the future of wind power in Sweden? Why are some groups opposed to what many believe is one of the most environmentally-friendly source of energy? Why hasn't the trendy "green consumption pattern" proved to be as environmentally-friendly as it is claimed to be? Friday: Our weekly review Saturday: "Spectrum" visits the Stockholm Art Fair Sunday: In "Sounds Nordic" the Swedish finals for the Eurovision Song Contest and we meet singer Jenny Löfgren (George Wood, SCDX/MediaScan Mar 12 via DXLD) ** TURKS and CAICOS ISLANDS. I haven`t done much medium-wave listening in the past few months, but as far as of Thursday March 5, Caribbean/ South American reception conditions were rather weakish, fair at best. The strangest thing was the total absence of RVC-530 at all the times I checked this week and the past week-end. Did Radio Visión Cristiana Internacíonal deactivate their Turks and Caicos 530 kHz transmitter, or maybe they run very low power; they used to be a powerhouse here? They were not audible at all, not even detectable as a het: 530 kHz TURKS & CAICOS Radio Vision Cristiana - NO SIGN OF THEM DURING THE WHOLE WEEK !!!! (Bogdan Chiochiu (QTH: Pierrefonds, Quebec, Canada, Rx: Sanyo MCD-S830 portable with internal ferrite bar antenna, hard- core-dx via DXLD) Radio Vision Cristiana, 530 kHz, from Turks & Caicos Islands is ACTIVE. I just heard the station between 0155 and 0205 UT broadcasting a Christian program (actually, rebroadcasting WWRV, 1330 kHz, New York) and identification at 0200 UT (Marcelo Toníolo, Greenvale, NY (USA), hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** UKRAINE. Glenn, Right now, I'm listening to RUI from their website. They continue to webcast in Ukrainian after 1200. I'll stick around until after 1300 to see if they switch to English. Check out the program descriptions from the RUI webpage. Most of their shows deal with "problems" in Ukrainian life. Later: As I monitor the RUI webcast, they have been in Ukrainian 1100-1800, German 1800-1900, now back to Ukrainian at 1900. I'll plan to check at 2200, 0100 & 0400 for English. 73, (Ivan Grishin, Ont., March 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Yes, English, checked quickly at 0455 UT March 15 introducing Nel Blu di Pinto di Blu; direct link is rtsp://real.nrcu.gov.ua:7554/encoder/rui.rm (gh) Glenn, I've confirmed that the RUI webcast is in English 2200-2300 and 0100-0200 (I didn't check at 0400). They also had German hours at 1800, 2100 & 0000. They have a new direct link to the webcast on the left of their home page at: http://router.nrcu.gov.ua/eng/frame.html You can also get there directly at: rtsp://real.nrcu.gov.ua:7554/encoder/rui.rm 73, (Ivan Grishin, Ont., March 15, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. CONTROVERSY: IS THE BBC IMPARTIAL? The BBC's domestic service has been criticised over its coverage of Zimbabwe. This raises the wider issue of whether the BBC, which is obliged by its charter to be unbiased, is genuinely impartial. In my experience it is not, especially in its international coverage. The language used says it all. Countries currently in favour are ruled by "governments" or "administrations" while others languish under "regimes". Thus BBC presenters speak about the "Bush administration" and the "Castro regime" instead of using the same nomenclature for both. Worse still, propagandistic phrases such as "rogue states" are bandied around as though they represent an unquestionable truth rather than one side's position in a controversy. Such controversies represent for the BBC a struggle between "the international community" and evil. The war involving NATO and Yugoslavia was, for example, presented as a fight between Miloshevich and the rest of the world even though the world was split, with two of the largest powers and many Third World nations opposing NATO's actions. In Britain the broadcast media is now being used to prepare public opinion for more interventions, notably against Iraq. The stock justification for such interventions is "human rights violations" and the absence of democracy. The alternative view, that the fundamental principle of international law is non-intervention in the affairs of sovereign states and that democracy as practised in the West may not be appropriate at all times and in all places, are virtually ignored. The BBC, far from being impartial, accepts without question a whole range of debatable assumptions. It will remain a hypocritical organisation so long as it continues to violate its own sworn principles of impartiality (Roger Tidy, England, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. "Why has the Beeb's new boss got it in for the middle classes?" Following is the slightly abridged text of an article, by Lesley Garner, in the London Evening Standard of March 13. When a BBC executive wants to make headlines, he or she attacks the middle classes. So Gavyn Davies, the BBC chairman, knew he would create a stir by berating anyone who criticises the corporation for being "southern, white, middle-class, middle-aged and well-educated". This seem to be BBC-speak for any licence-payer who believes in the oot BBC values of educational aspiration, objectivity, free inquiry and self-improvement. Lord Reith, were he alive, would be the first in the firing-line, followed by the vast majority of the BBC's board and programme makers. I assume that Gavyn Davies is white, middle-class, middle-aged and well-educated himself, so it is ironic that he feels under attack from a group who must be the bulk of his audience: 92.7 per cent of us are white, after all, and according to Mori, 68 per cent of us are middle- class. Who would he rather be talking to - the poor, black, young and uneducated? These are the very people, like the working-class of past generation, who have most to gain from the free education and open door that the BBC has always provided, the very values that its middle-class viewers and listeners try to defend. I suspect Gavyn Davies resents the middle classes because they are the vocal last-ditch vigilante force that stands between him and the charge towards an open ratings battle with his rivals. Is it because what he sees as building up audiences they see as dumbing-down? Is it because this is the group that still carries the standard for a Reithian vision of the BBC as a force for good, for aspiration, for the improvement of mind and society, for the opening of doors onto the outside world? It must be irksome for a chairman of a BBC which wants to shake off the restraining hand of the past to have to deal with a group which expects to be stimulated and changed each time they turn on the television or radio. This is a group, ironically, which has been raised, educated and formed by a lifelong relationship with the BBC. No white, middle-class middle-aged, educated person would be the same if they hadn't been brought up on Listen with Mother and Children's Hour. They are relics of a time when people made appointments with their television sets for Tonight and Z Cars and Shakespeare's The Age of Kings. .... I can imagine BBC executives groaning as they read the list, flinching from the restraining hand of the past, but where is it they want to take the BBC? Do they want to chuck out the values of inquiry and investigation, talent-spotting and mind-broadening in order to have endless series of Changing Rooms and Ground Force? The point of the BBC is to take us out of the confines of our houses and plunge us into the jaw-dropping mysteries of the Blue Planet. David Attenborough is southern, white, middle-class, beyond middle-aged and very well educated, the epitome of the lure of the BBC. Is he for the chop then? Nobody and nothing is safe in a BBC which yanks Panorama from a prime- time weekday slot and loses it on a Sunday night, which has relegated all arts programmes to late-night slots and denied young audiences the chance to discover drama, opera, music and ballet in mainstream scheduling. The magic of a broadcasting system which leads, rather than follows, is the sense of sudden revelation that comes from stumbling across a play, a reading, an argument, a piece of music that you would never otherwise have heard. This revelation should be open to everyone but it is middle-class, well-educated people who will argue for it. It is one of the ironies of the BBC's recurrent self-flagellation for being the bearer of middle-class values that its programme makers and board members are, likewise, middle-class and well educated. But they aren't all white. In the World Service the BBC has one of the great colleges of multicultural broadcasting. From Romania to Rajasthan, people of every background, tribe and colour turn to the BBC for news and entertainment. The unique expertise of World Service staff means that the radio is a lifeline in troublespots and in times of conflict, the antidote to dictatorship and propaganda. I remember crouching under bombardment at home in Kabul, listening to a tank battle rage outside the window and waiting, in perfect confidence, for the World Service to tell me what was happening and who was responsible. Of course the BBC should broaden its appeal. Of course it should reflect the demographic mix of its audience. It is great that Radio Three sponsors world music and that BBC Talent reaches out for the young stars and broadcasters of the future. Regional radio should reflect the ethnic, social mix of a changing Britain, but this doesn't mean throwing out middle-class, educated values. These values are universal. Those black, uneducated, working-class audiences that Gavyn Davies, by implication, seems to want are the very people to whom the BBC could be a revelation and a lifeline, as it was for the aspirational working class of the past, our parents and grand-parents. As for us middle-aged, middle-class, devoted BBC audiences, Gavyn Davies had better make his peace with us. Time and demographics are on our side and we won't shut up (via Roger Tidy, UK, DXLD) ** U K. Where are on-line schedules for April? The BBC website has not had on-line programme schedules for April for at least a week now. The one for the last full week of March (23-29 March 02) has had the Friday listings incomplete for that same time. Why is this? Surely you know what you'll be broadcasting in April by now! It is insulting to the site visitor to let them choose the week to bring up a schedule and then just display a message saying that no data is available! Also, I heard when tuning in the Greenfield Collection late last night that it will be cancelled after the end of March. Sad to see him go. Is it being terminated because Mr. Greenfield wants to stop? If so, then my best wishes to him. If it is being cut out by the BBC management, though, I protest strongly (William Martin, Saint Louis, Missouri USA, March 15 to BBC Write On, cc to DXLD ** U K. Greenfield Collection: If you enjoy this program of classical music requests, you have only two more weeks to hear it! It was announced tonight on the BBCWS that "The Greenfield Collection" has only two more programs left in its "long run" on the World Service. Greenfield himself first referred to the next program as being his "penultimate" edition. Then the announcer after the program confirmed that it was indeed near the end and offered that a new monthly special edition of "Concert Hall" would pick up the task of providing listeners with a classical music request program. All this monitored on March 14 at 0430 UT or thereabouts. PS: What will be next to get the ax: "From Our Own Correspondent"? Sheesh! Just received the April edition of "BBC On-Air". Curiously, no frequency chart was included as has been the case in transition months (Oct. and Apr.) I've e-mailed them to inquire as to why. On a positive side, the guide now includes an alphabetical guide on the last inside page which leads the reader to the proper page for each program. This is a noteworthy improvement that makes it much easier to refer between the program charts and the main magazine (John Figliozzi, March 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) About time ** U S A. Hi Glenn; Even though this isn't a logging, just thought it might interest you. In the current rotation on Classic Arts Showcase, they are running a 1936 animation clip entitled "The Ship of the Ether." It seems to be a promo for Philips table radios, where at the end of the clip they have a banner proclaiming "The World Under Every Roof." I remember you mentioning that your local cable system offers Arts on its lineup. Otherwise it`s on Galaxy 1, 133W, transponder 5 horizontal. Nice how it romanticizes international broadcasting; very fun to watch (Steven Zimmerman, Milwaukee, WI, March 10, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Tnx for the tip! I ran across this in progress months ago, but would like to get it on tape. CAS is not helpful with exact scheduling; did you notice what came immediately before it? (gh to Steven) Hi Glenn; Well I managed to catch that clip again on CAS. It came during a small group of animations, and immediately after a Peter Pan animation entitled: "Peter Pan rescues ??? from Captain Hook." Was just glancing at screen so didn't remember who he rescued... Hope this helps. 73; (Steven Zimmerman, March 12, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I watched, and watched, but didn`t run across it until 1510 UT Thursday March 14, and again, it was already in progress. It`s part of ``The Puppetoon Movie``, directed by George Pal. Folk music samples by tuning to Beromünster, Hilversum, etc. as marked on old radio dials. Refers to http://www.scifistation.com for videos, etc., altho a quick check there did not find this particular Pal item. If you see Cecilia Bartoli with a video of beach scenes (!) you`ve just missed it --- assuming the clips always play in the same order. As I recall, CAS makes one reel per week which runs over and over, several hours long. Later: here it comes again at 1635-1543 UT Friday March 15. But I didn`t have tape ready to roll! Anyhow, saw it almost from beginning. No, this time it was followed by Mozart: In an XVIIIth Century Drawing Room, so they jumble the play order (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. WGH: I've been hearing weak harmonic #?? of WWV on 30.000 kHz often. 3/12, 3/10 1439, 3/9 1330, 3/3 1908, 2/10 1903, 1/26 1415z. Often only the tones, esp. at 00seconds. Sometimes voice and ticks also are heard. My good receiver tunes to 30000 but I've heard it on my old Sony-2001 by tuning to 29999 kHz (KA2HPU - Bud, NY/NJ?, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. 26450/FM, KTRK-TV (presumed) Houston TX; 2145-2230+, 13-Mar; Promo for Houston athletes", Fran Tarkenton car and local lawyer ad. 2200 "News at 4"; 2205 Houston amd Texas weather; said look at the map, so must be TV. Possible ABC spot. Web search finds KTRK, Ch. 13 is the Houston ABC outlet and "News at 4" is their program. Poor, in/out and scratchy; Fair when not being stepped-on by CB outbander? 2247, 14-Mar, presume them again w/Rosie O'Donnell Show. I would have missed this completely if I hadn't been in FM mode; zilch signal in AM/SSB (Harold Frodge, MI, MARE Tipsheet via DXLD) ** U S A. K???: Jim Planck of IMF tells Cumbre DX that he has an unofficial construction permit, but doesn't want to announce anything just yet (via Johnson Mar 13) This one is going very slow, this is essentially where they were a year ago (Hans Johnson, Mar 14, Cumbre DX via DXLD) That would be the one planned for Piñón, New Mexico. Unofficial CP?? (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Please visit WMLK Radio's new web page at http://www.wmlkradio.com You will find some interesting things here to report about WMLK radio (via Gary A. McAvin, Station Manager Mar 12, Cumbre DX via DXLD) Worth a look; has pictures of old/new transmitters and antennas. (Hans Johnson, Mar 12, ibid.) ** U S A. WINB A-02 Authorized. In practice station signs off earlier in the evenings than authorized sked. Largest change is that 9320 will be in use for part of the evening during some of the spring and fall. Mar 31-Apr 6: 9320 1100-1300, 13570 1300-2300, 12160 2300-0200, 9320 0200-0600 Apr 6-30 and Sep 1 to Oct 26: 9320 1000-1200, 13570 1200-2300, 12160 2300-0100, 9320 0100-0500; May 1-Aug 31 13570 1000-0000, 12160 0000-0500 (via Hans Johnson, Mar 13, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ** U S A. NOTICE - Last chances to log VOA [Greenville feeders] 6873 and 18275 are near! (KA2HPU - Bud, NY/NJ?, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Hi Glenn: The long-unused Delano sideband feed transmitter will be on Saturday [March 16] 0900-1400 on 9350, LSB or USB, i.e. DSB. It will be beamed to Japan and will include the SPITTSFOBCW saluting the Japan SW Club at 0933 and 1333. Japan SW Club will issue a special QSL for reception of any SPITTSFOBCW this weekend (Kim Elliott, VOA, DC, DX LISTENING DIGEST) [We mentioned this in Cumbre DX 390, but Kim has added some critical information on additional transmissions via Delano- Cumbre Ed.] VOA's "Special Program in the Time Slot Formerly Occupied by Communications World" will, this Saturday March 16, salute the Japan Short Wave Club on their fiftieth anniversary. This will include a transmission of VOA News Now on the long-unused sideband feed transmitter at Delano, 0900-1400, on 9350, LSB or USB (i.e., double sideband). JSWC will issue a special QSL for the reception of this program (at any time, on any frequency). To East Asia, South Asia, Pacific 0133-0158 UTC 7200 7255 9850 11705 11820 15250 15300 17740 17820 0933-0958 UTC 11995 13615 15150 plus special 9350 LSB USB via Delano 1333-1358 UTC 6110 9645 9760 11705 15480 plus special 9350 LSB USB via Delano 1733-1758 UTC 6110 7125 9645 15395 2133-2158 UTC 9670 11870 15185 17735 17820 To Europe, Middle East and North Africa 0133-0158 UTC 1548 0533-0558 UTC 7170 9700 11825 15205 0933-0958 UTC 1197 1733-1758 UTC 6040 9760 15205 2133-2158 UTC 1197 1260 6040 6095 9595 9760 To Africa 0533-0558 UTC 909 5970 6035 6080 7295 11835 13710 1733-1758 UTC 13710 15240 15445 17895 2133-2158 UTC 909 1530 6035 7415 11975 13710 15240 15580 17895 To the Americas 0133-0158 UTC 5995 6130 9455 0300-0328 UTC SUNDAY 5070 [WWCR] (Elliott Mar 15, Cumbre DX Special via DXLD) ** U S A. Rep. Henry Hyde has introduced legislation for another reorganization of U.S. international broadcasting. See.. http://www.house.gov/international_relations/news0314.htm and http://quote.bloomberg.com/fgcgi.cgi?mnu=news&ptitle=Technology%20UK&tp=ad_uknews&T=news_storypage99.ht&ad=uktechnology&s=APJE75RXpVS5TLiBM 73 (Kim Andrew Elliott, VOA, March 15, DXLD) Viz.: NEWS Henry J. Hyde (R-IL), Chairman House International Relations Committee Contact: Sam Stratman (202) 226-7875 (Hyde) Matt Gobush (202) 226-6832 (Lantos) March 14, 2002 For IMMEDIATE Release HYDE INTRODUCES REFORM OF U.S. PUBLIC DIPLOMACY; WILL IMPROVE AMERICA'S OUTREACH TO INTERNATIONAL MASS AUDIENCES Legislation Expected to be Reported by Committee on March 20 (WASHINGTON) - The U.S. Government must do more to counter misinformation overseas about American policies and culture or risk undermining its influence in the world, the Chairman of the House International Relations Committee warned today. On Thursday, U.S. Reps. Henry J. Hyde (R-IL) introduced the Freedom Promotion Act of 2002 to begin rebuilding a mass communications infrastructure to explain American policies and culture to the world. "Public diplomacy - which consists of systematic efforts to communicate not with foreign governments but with the people themselves - has a central role to play in the task of making the world safer for the just interests of the United States, its citizens, and its allies," said Hyde. "If we are to be successful in our broader foreign policy goals, America's effort to engage the peoples of the world must assume a more prominent place in the planning and execution of our foreign policy," Hyde said, adding, "The task of countering misinformation and propaganda regarding the United States is a never-ending one, but we must go about this task more aggressively and more systematically, rather than simply reacting to crises as they occur." The legislation reshapes critical elements of the State Department, including new authority to the Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy, new requirements for the development of a comprehensive strategy for official communications overseas, and new requirements that hiring and promotions within the department be based in part on public diplomacy experience. It also reorganizes U.S. international broadcast services, including establishment of the International Broadcasting Agency to oversee the Voice of America. PROPOSED LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVES: Specific authorizing language. The State Department already possesses the authority to conduct public diplomacy. This legislation gives shape to the direction and manner in which public diplomacy is carried out by defining the statutory authorization more specifically in terms of standards, technologies, and target audiences. The legislation also creates a firewall around the budget for public diplomacy ($497 million annually not including U.S. broadcasting) and authorizes an additional $70 million for exchange and cultural programs and $40 million for other public diplomacy programs over two years. Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy - Created in 1999 with the consolidation of the Department of State and the United States Information Agency (USIA), the Under Secretary is given new authority over the Department's public diplomacy programs and personnel and an enhanced role in coordinating its public diplomacy activities. Establishment of the International Broadcasting Agency - The legislation reorganizes U.S. international broadcasting programs, now headed by a part-time Board of Broadcasting Governors, into an agency headed by a director. The reorganization is designed to ensure accountability by an identified decision maker while preserving the strengths of the Board. This reorganization will be accomplished with minimal disruption to existing broadcasting operations. The director will be appointed by the President - with the concurrence of the Senate - for a term of five years, similar to that of the chairman of the Federal Reserve System, with safeguards to preserve journalistic integrity from political influence. The present board of governors will be reconstituted as the Board of International Broadcasting (BIB) which will retain operational control of grants to entities including Radio Free Europe, Radio Liberty, and Radio Free Asia. The BIB will function in an advisory role to the International Broadcasting Agency. Mandates development of an annual strategic communications plan by the Department of State to advance U.S. foreign policy goals including a tactical communications plan for implementation worldwide. The development of this plan is to be coordinated with the many federal agencies active in international programs. Although the State Department is not given operational control over programs and activities conducted by other agencies, it is designated as the lead agency. Establishment of the Public Diplomacy Reserve Corps - Includes a database of eligible experts in foreign policy and mass communication for temporary assignments to augment the Department during "emergency and critical circumstances worldwide." Development of satellite television services. The legislation provides an initial amount of $7.5 million annually to the Office of Broadcast Services at the Department of State to accelerate its outreach to the world. In addition to other provisions, the legislation mandates the development of a long-range plan for the use of satellite television and other new media, such as the Internet. It also authorizes funds for discretionary use by the State Department to lease air-time on satellites and to develop other media channels serving key regions, such as the Middle East and East Asia, in order to dramatically expand unfiltered access to mass audiences. A key objective is to equip the State Department with the requisite facilities, including studios and satellite capability, to enable it to act as a command center for a public diplomacy operations globally and in real time. Enhanced training in media and advocacy skills for the Foreign Service and Ambassadors. The Foreign Service is encouraged to recruit individuals with experience in public diplomacy and to emphasize to all incoming officers the importance of their role in public diplomacy. As part of the overall effort to raise its importance throughout the State Department, public diplomacy should be included in the entrance examination and the performance review process. In particular, training for ambassadors will be amended to include public diplomacy, including the press, cultural and educational components. Ambassadors will be given a prominent role in the formulation of public diplomacy strategies for the country and regions to which they are assigned and be formally held accountable for the operation and success of the public diplomacy efforts at their posts. Development of programming. The State Department is authorized to develop programming for foreign audiences separate and apart from the renamed International Broadcasting Agency and specifically authorizes the use of the private sector. State is encouraged to work with foreign television broadcasters and other media to produce and distribute programming. Budget authority to undertake in-depth research on public and media attitudes in regions chosen at the discretion of the Department of State. This includes a requirement that analyses of the comparative effectiveness of the various efforts undertaken in the area of public diplomacy be provided annually, including the use of the private sector in the U.S. and overseas. Translation services. To assist Public Affairs Officers in embassies worldwide, the legislation adds an additional $4 million annually for document translation services. Alumni program. A database of international alumni of U.S. exchange programs will be created in order to expand and utilize the connections that have been established through exchange programs. Library initiative. A demonstration program will examine the most effective way to augment resources in local public library systems overseas in order to "familiarize participants with American values and society, particularly the importance of freedom and democracy." Language education for Americans. An authorization of funds for early learning language training in difficult languages, such as Arabic, Mandarin, and others, in targeted regions. Reform of the U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy. Mandates a comprehensive biennial study by the Commission of the State Department's public diplomacy efforts. This study will be conducted in conjunction with the General Accounting Office. The legislation requires that at least four of the seven Commission members have "substantial experience in the conduct of public diplomacy or comparable activities in the private sector." Initiatives Aimed at the Muslim World: Youth Ambassadors - Authorizes a summer youth exchange program for young individuals from countries with a predominantly Muslim population. (Short- term exchanges of 3-4 weeks in length). Journalism program - Authorizes an initiative to work with foreign journalists to enhance international standards of quality and objectivity. This program will be established and operated in cooperation with private sector sponsors, including universities and exchange programs. English language training. Creates a pilot program to send Americans to middle schools in the Muslim world to provide English language instruction. Sister Cities Initiative: Authorizes funds for an expanded "sister cities" program to increase the number of US-sister city partnerships in countries with a predominantly Muslim population. (Currently there are 42 such partnerships). These partnerships are aimed at community level development and volunteer action and include non-federal support. [end of HYDE release] U.S. LAWMAKER FAULTS OVERSEAS PROPAGANDA, SEEK CHANGE By Paul Basken Washington, March 14 (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. should overhaul the way its image is promoted overseas by creating a new agency to take over Voice of America and its other international broadcast outlets, a House Republican leader said. ``America's effort to engage the peoples of the world must assume a more prominent place in the planning and execution of our foreign policy,'' House International Affairs Committee Chairman Henry Hyde said in a statement. The proposal follows criticisms by lawmakers that the support the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks generated in the Arab and Islamic world showed that the U.S. is failing to take advantage of its media expertise to improve world opinion of the U.S. Hyde proposed legislation to replace VOA's governing board with a federal agency too improve accountability by creating a single responsible decision-maker. Hyde's plan includes developing satellite television and expanding media training for U.S. ambassadors. The Bush administration, citing similar concerns with U.S. image- making overseas last year, named former J. Walter Thompson Co. Chairwoman Charlotte Beers as undersecretary of State for public diplomacy, and asked her to improve the U.S. image in the Muslim world. Hyde said in a statement issued by his office that his legislation was being sponsored jointly by his committee's top- ranking Democrat, Representative Tom Lantos of California. Lantos' chief of staff, Robert King, later called the Hyde announcement premature. Not Fully Endorsed Lantos supports much of the bill, though he had not fully endorsed the proposal for the VOA board of governors, King said. ``It's not a minor issue,'' he said. Bush administration officials said they had not seen the proposal and had no comment on it. The legislation would create a federal International Broadcasting Agency that would replace the nine-member part-time Broadcasting Board of Governors in overseeing the VOA and government's other non-military international broadcasting outlets. Those outlets include Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Radio and TV Martí, WORLDNET Television, and Radio Free Asia. They broadcast to more than 100 million listeners in 67 languages, with an annual budget of about $450 million. The present board of governors would remain in an advisory role, with authority to issue grants, Hyde said. Hyde also proposed making greater use of foreign policy and communications experts to help in ``emergency'' circumstances worldwide, emphasizing public diplomacy skills in hiring and promotion decisions, and spending more to encourage Americans to learn difficult languages including Arabic and Mandarin. Television Service The plan includes an initial allocation of $7.5 million annually to develop a satellite television service and to let the State Department develop media channels in the Middle East, East Asia and other regions. The State Department would be encouraged to work with foreign television broadcasters to produce and distribute new programming, said Hyde, an Illinois Republican. His Senate counterpart, Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Joseph Biden, a Democrat of Delaware, and the panel's top-ranking Republican, Senator Jesse Helms of North Carolina, proposed in December the establishment of a ``Radio Free Afghanistan'' service broadcasting in local languages. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld last month abandoned a new Pentagon effort, the Office of Strategic Influence, after it was described in news reports as planning to spread deliberately deceptive information in the media. Secretary of State Colin Powell has praised Beers as ``somebody who can market our value system, somebody who can get out there and mix it up in the kind of world we're living in.'' Along with the $450 million broadcasting budget, the Bush administration has asked Congress for $567 million in other ``public diplomacy'' funds in next year's budget, an increase of 6.8 percent over the current year, allowing Beers to hire 55 new staff positions. Public Diplomacy The Hyde plan would authorize an additional $70 million for exchange and cultural programs and $40 million for other public diplomacy programs over two years. The proposal takes the U.S. in the wrong direction, since it should be working to build and strengthen local broadcast outlets around the world rather than pursuing increased censorship, said David Hoffman, president of Internews Network, a non-profit supporter of independent media worldwide. ``The Voice of America, which used to have quite a bit of credibility, has lost most of it since then,'' he said. ``Because people who listen to it realize that it has much more of a political agenda and is much less credible as a news source.'' (Bloomberg UK linked as above, DXLD) A summary of what's planned appears on our Media Newsdesk page at http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/html/medianews.html It's a mystery to me why the US government believes it needs to produce its own programming 'separate and apart from the International Broadcasting Agency'. I can't help but be reminded of Radio Moscow and Radio Station Peace and Progress back in the Cold War era. Surely that can't be the kind of thing now being proposed by the Bush administration? We'll be watching closely as things unfold. This news makes all the more appropriate the second part of our feature 'Mediate the Conflict'. Canadian writer and journalist Ross Howard argues that conventional journalism is still enormously important in reducing conflicts and bringing about stability within war-torn states. http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/features/html/mediate020315.html (Andy Sennitt, Media Network Newsletter Mar 15 via John Norfolk, DXLD) ** U S A. CONTROVERSY AMID VOA ANNIVERSARY From: http://www.msnbc.com/news/ March 13: March 8 - The U.S. war on terrorism is entering its sixth month and America's voice can be heard louder than ever on radio airwaves across the globe. But as the United States-sponsored Voice of America celebrates its 60th anniversary after expanding its service to Afghanistan and the Middle East, it has undergone changes that could prevent its journalists from covering the biggest story of our time. As U.S.- led forces pummeled enemy fighters in eastern Afghanistan this week, a notable absence from VOA's Pashtun-language broadcasts, serving Afghanistan's largest ethnic group, was its best-known reporter on Afghanistan. Spozhmai Maiwandi, a 20-year veteran of VOA, is rarely on the air nowadays since she was shifted in early November from her duty as supervisor of the Pashtu service. "Practically, I do nothing," Maiwandi said of her new role as coordinator of Afghan programs. "I attend conferences here and there and if there's something on Afghanistan, I put it on air," she said. "But other than that I 'm sitting behind the desk, but without any real responsibilities." In a statement issued last month, VOA said Maiwanda's assignment was part of a reorganization and represented a promotion in responsibility and salary. It noted that she still originates and airs reports and was sent to cover the conference on the reconstruction of Afghanistan held in Tokyo in January. Maiwandi told MSNBC she'd prefer to be still broadcasting on a daily basis. Her fate may offer an insight into the new approach adopted by VOA since the outbreak of hostilities. Prior to Sept. 11, Maiwandi was on the air 3-4 times a day, leading VOA's effort to provide what she viewed as balanced news coverage for an isolated and information-starved Afghan population. After the United States was rocked by terrorists on Sept. 11, her daily beat became the world's obsession as reporters rushed to offer an insight into the nation that harbored Osama bin Laden, accused of masterminding the attacks on America. Maiwandi had a significant edge, through her extensive contacts with Taliban officials. But, as she soon learned, it was an advantage not necessarily appreciated as the United States began to reassess all that had been taken for granted - including the role of Voice of America - in the dawn of the war on terrorism. HEARTS AND MINDS Since Sept. 11, the Bush Administration has approached the battle to win the hearts and minds of the world with the same determination as war to root out terrorist groups. The recent debacle over the Office of Strategic Influence demonstrated the length to which the government will go to sway global opinion. Only the media outcry after details of the proposal that would involve leaking false news to foreign media forced the Pentagon to ditch the plan. Established in 1942, shortly after the United States entered World War II, VOA is overseen by the Board of Governors, a panel of media-savvy presidential appointees that act as a firewall between the news- gathering operations and political interests. The organization's charter, signed into law in 1976, calls on the network to be a consistently reliable and authoritative source of news that should be accurate, objective and comprehensive while clearly presenting U.S. policies. The service, with more than 1,200 employees broadcasting in 53 languages, costs around $147 million annually. But the political dimension couldn't be ignored after Sept. 11. VOA director Robert R. Reilly, appointed in October by President Bush, referred to the battle in Afghanistan as a "war of ideas," with VOA "on one side in that war." President Bush, speaking at VOA's headquarters on Feb. 25 to mark the service's 60th anniversary, is applauded by Director Robert R. Reilly at right. One of the most prominent critics of the service was New York Times columnist William Safire, who opined in September that the service was the "wrong voice" for the United States in Afghanistan. "In the climate of today's undeclared war, private media in democracies are free to take either or neither side, but U.S. taxpayer-supported broadcasting is supposed to be on our side," he wrote. Even reporters within the Pashtu service were concerned about the coverage. Dr. Habibullah Tegey, a 19-year veteran, said he felt the service was giving too much airtime to the Taliban officials. The new views from America Nowadays, he said the service has more hours, more reporters and still provides balanced news coverage for its Afghan listeners. 12-MINUTE INTERVIEW Caught in the swirling controversy was Maiwandi, who scooped the competition with an interview that would have been the envy of most other news organizations: an exclusive with the Taliban's supreme leader Mullah Mohammed Omar. "My feeling was if anyone else had done this exclusive interview that person would have been rewarded because I had accomplished something," Maiwandi said. "I did my job; It's sad." The 12-minute interview on Sept 21 with the reclusive one-eye Taliban leader wasn't especially provocative. She asked Omar about the terrorist attack on the United States and whether he was would expel bin Laden. The Taliban leader repeated the Taliban's refusal to hand over the Saudi exile and blamed the United States for creating the "evil that is attacking it." But the scoop, with America still reeling from the terrorist attacks, was too much for the State Department, which got wind of the story and urged the Voice of America board of governors to can it. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher told the Washington Post: "We told members of the board of broadcast governors that we didn't think it was appropriate for the Voice of America to be broadcasting the voice of the Taliban into Afghanistan and we didn't think it was consistent with their charter." Maiwandi's fellow reporters responded with outrage at what they viewed as blatant censorship. After holding the tape a few days, VOA English reporter Ed Warner packaged 40 seconds of the Omar interview into a Sept. 25 broadcast (in English) that also quoted President Bush, a Northern Alliance leader and a Georgetown University professor. The report was broadcast in Pashtu a few days alter. "I do understand that it's a wartime, but I think war or no war the job should not change," Maiwandi said this week. "As far as I know there was nothing that would harm national interest. it's the right of the people to know what the man was thinking." A FUTURE ROLE Omar is now on the run, but the repercussions from Sept. 11 can still be felt at VOA. In December, director Reilly issued a directive prohibiting the network from airing interviews with "any official from nations that sponsor terror." According to VOA chief of staff Horace Cooper, the service was merely fulfilling the requirements of Congress. Under an appropriations bill that became law on Nov. 28, 2001, the VOA was told not to "air interviews with any official from nations that sponsor terrorism or any representative or member of terrorist organizations." Cooper said that the directive was in keeping with its longstanding policy of not allowing the airwaves to be turned over to non- democratic points of view. He also took exception to the focus on VOA's editorial independence, which he felt was clouding a celebration of the hard work the journalists were doing. Post Sept. 11, Cooper said VOA has increased the esteem in which its news gathering staff is held as well as the recognition it receives from the federal government. But in a letter to Reilly in January, the Committee to Protect Journalists asserted VOA was doing a disservice to its millions of listeners. "Maiwandi's reassignment, coupled with VOA's misguided new policy, suggests that VOA is sacrificing its hard-earned reputation as reliable and independent news source to short-term political considerations," CPJ executive director Ann Cooper said. Still President Bush, who kicked off the 60th anniversary celebrations with a visit to the Washington headquarters in late February, paid tribute to the VOA, saying the network has added to the momentum of freedom. He said VOA tells the truth about U.S. policies, but added: "The Voice of America is not neutral between America and America's enemies." With a contribution from special correspondent Heather Maher in Prague (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** USA/MIDDLE EAST. BBG SIGNS AGREEMENTS FOR NEW RADIO SERVICE TO MIDDLE EAST | Text of press release by the US Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) dated 11 March Washington, DC, 11 March 2002: The Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) has signed agreements in Bahrain and Qatar for FM radio transmission of the Middle East Radio Network (MERN), paving the way for broad distribution of the new service, Governor Norman J. Pattiz said Monday [11 March]. Pattiz, who led a BBG delegation to the Middle East, also said the group received commitments for additional FM frequencies in Abu Dhabi and Dubai, part of the United Arab Emirates. "These agreements - along with others reached earlier in the region - will ensure listeners in the Middle East will have a chance to hear our programmes on the most popular medium around - FM radio," Pattiz said from Los Angeles. "We're committed to making sure people can hear America's voice and better understand our country and what it stands for," he added. Other FM stations committed to carrying MERN are in Amman, Jordan and Kuwait. MERN, a pilot project of the Voice of America, is a new 24-hour, seven-day-a-week, Arabic-language service aimed at listeners under 30. This service, which is set to start soon, will be phased in over a number of months. It will broadcast news, analysis, interviews, opinion pieces, sports, weather, music and features on a variety of political and social issues. The network, distributed on AM, FM, digital audio satellite and Internet, will operate from Washington and the Middle East broadcast centre in Dubai, where the BBG delegation visited last week. The BBG delegation that accompanied Pattiz to the Middle East included MERN Project Manager Gary Thatcher, News Director Mouafac Harb and the VOA's Sheila Gandji. For more information, contact Joan Mower at 202.260.0167, jmower@ibb.gov or Joe O'Connell at (202) 619-2538, jdoconne@ibb.gov Source: US Broadcasting Board of Governors press release, Washington, in English 11 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** U S A. For Sale: Herald's SW Station The second largest privately owned shortwave radio station in the United States is on the block. The Herald Broadcasting Syndicate owns the station, WSHB, in South Carolina. WSHB has two 500-kilowatt transmitters, operating independently into high-gain curtain antennas that serve audiences worldwide. Station Manager Ed Evans said Herald has decided to shift its focus to program production rather than owning and operating program delivery facilities. The station cost $19 million to construct, but the asking price is $6.5 million. Most recently, Herald Broadcasting has used WSHB to broadcast religious programs of The Christian Science Publishing Society. Radio World News - March 13, 2002 http://www.rwonline.com/dailynews/one.php?id=1340 (via Benn Kobb; and Brian Smith, ODXA via DXLD) Please let the buyer be something other than a broadcaster of extremist religious and political propaganda... (Amen. <g>) (John Figliozzi, NY, ODXA via DXLD) ** U S A. WOR TRANSMITTER SITE RELOCATION. My son emailed WOR [710 New York] about the upcoming transmitter move. This is the response he received. John: Good News, the new site which we will be constructing will be similar to the old site. The new array will actually only be several thousand feet north of our existing site. It will utilize a three tower dog-leg array, with towers almost identical in height and efficiency. The layout will be somewhat altered. As far as you are concerned from a DX standpoint, we will have an all new antenna and ground system, which will certainly help the signal. As far as the parameters of the actual array, it will be slightly different and we will lose a small amount towards the west. This is caused by the new design in regards to the current FCC regulations. When testing starts, on the new array, we will most likely be running at 10 kw Non directional, it will be interesting to see how our new signal behaves in this mode as well. Stay tuned, and watch our website, we will have all the details as they become available. As far as our great signal up and down the east coast, I was recently in Washington DC, and could pick up WOR during the daytime without trouble. I attribute this to our superior audio processing, which we have maximized for the best possible coverage. Quite frankly, our current site, although over thirty years old is still quite efficient and well behaved. Do not hesitate to email if you have any other questions. Kerry Richards, Chief Engineer, WOR-AM, Buckley Broadcasting Corporation (via Allan Dunn, K1UCY, NRC-AM March 14 via DXLD) ** U S A. The old WKXY 930 Sarasota [FL] changed calls to WLSS and went talk. WLS has a had a court order that makes them cease calling themselves "WLS-Sarasota" and "WLS Radio". It seems ABC/Disney has registered WLS as a service mark. The 930 owners admit they wanted to attract people who moved from the Midwest. Next up, they are going to try, get this, WGNF "WGN-Sarasota (Brock Whaley, GA, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Here's a link to a Roanoke Times article saying that the land the WLVA-590 towers are on is worth more than the station itself, and that they are off indefinitely (estimated 18 months) until they can find a new site. http://www.roanoke.com/roatimes/news/story127094.html Interesting note from the article, so much for "NIMBY" - several listeners offered space in their own yard for the displaced towers, if it would mean the "soft oldies" (my term) would be returned to the air sooner (Paul Mount, Morganville NJ, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. SMALL PLANE HITS TV TOWER IN LEE COUNTY A small plane has crashed into a television transmission tower in Lee County. [NORTH CAROLINA] Reports said that the WRAL-TV tower, which also serves WKFT-TV channel 40, has collapsed in Lee County near Broadway. WKFT-TV is currently off the air. They hope to be back on the air by 6:30 to 7 p.m. "Roman Bunn, who saw the plane hit the tower, claims it looked like a "fireball" hitting the tower. Harnett County Maj. Steve West said he received reports at 4:50 p.m. that a plane hit the tower. The tower is not close to any residential areas. Authorities said that they have found a piece of the plane 300 yards northwest of the tower building. The tower itself was 2,000 feet. Authorities and emergency crews are on the scene. There are no reports on what type of plane hit the tower or where the plane is from. After an ice storm on Dec. 10, 1989, warm temperatures caused uneven thawing of the estimated 40,000 pounds of ice that accumulated on the WRAL-TV5 transmitting tower's supporting wires. The tower fractured and fell. Three hours later, WRAL-TV5 was back on the air, thanks to Capitol Satellite, a sister company, and to WKFT. WXII ThePiedmontChannel.com Thursday March 14 06:05 PM EST (via Sergei Sosedkin, DXLD) From bnet: A small plane apparently hit a guy wire on the WRAL TV tower in North Carolina today, killing the pilot and collapsing the tower. http://www.wral.com/news/1304816/detail.html (Bill Frahm - C.E. Citadel Boise KBOI KKGL KIZN KQFC KZMG, AMFMTVDX mailing list March 15 via DXLD) The stories are not very explicit; apparently the tower is owned by WRAL-5, but not used to transmit that station; instead, WKFT channel 40 (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. From Radio Ink: (3/14/02) U.S. REP. HOWARD BERMAN URGES MEMBERS OF LEGISLATIVE PANEL TO INVESTIGATE CLEAR CHANNEL. Rep. Howard Berman, a California Democrat and ranking member of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, is urging members of a legislative panel on intellectual property to hold hearings on claims that the nation's top radio broadcaster, Clear Channel Communications Inc. (CCU), has abused its market position to shut out competitors. "We've been talking to the majority representatives of the committee and are encouraging them to hold hearings about these issues," a spokeswoman for Berman said on Wednesday. In a January letter to the Department of Justice and the Federal Communications Commission, Berman called for a probe into Clear Channel after allegations by competitors that the broadcaster and concert promoter had limited airplay of stars, such as Britney Spears, who do not use its concert services. In recent filings with the FCC, Washington, D.C.-based attorney Arthur Belendiuk claimed Clear Channel had exceeded its ownership limit in several markets by taking control of stations and warehousing them in front companies. "Clear Channel's conduct demonstrates a clear intent to conceal material information from the FCC. In this case, and presumably in others, Clear Channel provided engineering services for front companies and then attempts to conceal its involvement," said Belendiuk in petitions opposing Clear Channel's proposed purchases of two stations (via Dennis Gibson, IRCA via DXLD) ** U S A [non]. HIGH ADVENTURE A'02 13/03/2002 High Adventure Global Network Frequency Schedule for March 31 to October 27, 2002 UT kHz Band Antenna Target --------------------------------------------------------------- Relay Transmitters-Europe [all Germany?] ------------------------- 0700-0800 5975 49 m Omni Western Europe 2000-2100 6175 49 m Omni Western Europe 1330-1635 17550 16 m 90 deg SAs-India 0700-1200 21590 13 m 115 deg Middle East 1200-2100 15715 19 m 115 deg Middle East 1600-1700 13810 19 m 130 deg EAF-Ethiopia 1700-1900 9495 31 m 80 deg Eastern Europe 1330-1430 15775 19 m 70 deg SEAS, Vietnam Relay Facilities from CIS ------------------------- *1200-1600 7485 41 m 111 deg China NOTE Not confirmed. 100 Kw 4X4X1 Curtain Antenna Relay from Middle East [UAE?] ---------------------- 2330-0130 6025 49 m 85 deg India 0200-0230 9615 31 m 85 deg India 1230-1330 17795 16 m 85 deg India 1600-1630 11705 25 m 85 deg India 250 Kw Transmitters, 4 X 4 X 1 Curtain Antenna Revised: 03/06/02 ------------------------------------ (via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A [and non]. REAL ONE'S PLAYER IS A DUPE! [Lost Remote.com Opinion] Steve Safran 3/04/02 DOES REAL NETWORKS deliberately want to fool consumers? That's my only guess, after using RealOne for the last couple of months. The company's new media player is intrusive, obnoxious and downright confusing for most people. This is their answer to Microsoft bundling Windows Media Player even tighter into XP?Just trying to download the free version of RealOne is a baffling ordeal. Go ahead - I defy anyone without a compass and GPS to find the free player. And then, when you finally discover the link in the dark, hidden recesses of the site, it STILL tries to trick you into paying for the "premium" version. I'm not against folks paying for content on the web. On the contrary, I've written before that we should all join together, pick a date, and start charging ever after. But you convince people to pay for content by giving them quality stuff, not by tricking them. Once you've figured out how to download it, RealOne then tries to become your pseudo-browser. It's worse, actually. Real has built in a "Message Center" that pops up glorified ads under the disguise of important messages from the company. Absurd. Microsoft has worked Windows Media Player into its OS even closer now, thanks to XP. People don't think of it as a "plugin" any more - it's just part of the program. In Microsoft Internet Explorer 6.0, WMP acts as a sort of "preview window" in streaming media sites. It's a clever addition, and one that makes it even harder for newbies to understand why they should bother to download any other streaming video player. Real should have given people a compelling reason to use their product. Instead, they're just trying to confuse. Real's business model seems to be developed from the porn industry. "Come here! It's free! Really! OK, maybe it's not! Give us a credit card! If you don't like it, cancel at any time!" Sheesh. My site has RealVideo. And since Real has switched to RealOne, I have had one complaint after another from people who insist Real doesn't offer a free player. Real Networks makes money off me - I have to pay for my license to stream from them. That's as it should be. But don't charge me a license fee and then confuse my customers into thinking they have to pay you, too.That's just a Real pain. STEVE SAFRAN is Managing Editor of NECN.com, the streaming video website of NECN: New England Cable News in Boston (via Chet Copeland, DXLD) ** URUGUAY. Hi Glenn, Re.: DX LISTENING DIGEST 2-041, March 11, 2002, URUGUAY entry: Info reporter Malm guessed wrong: They do not relay any TV/UHF channel 42. When they say "aquí en (la) 42", they are identifying themselves, since CX42 is their MW callsign, which is simulcasted on SW. The late evening and next day morning (UT) extended broadcasts are in the final days. Heard as late as 0500 during weekdays -whenever local weather favor live broadcasts from an open theater as Teatro de Verano is! Ditto: nothing heard from Chile for several weeks, over here (Horacio A. Nigro, Uruguay, Mar 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** UZBEKISTAN. Another R. Tashkent 3rd harmonic noted at 1400 on 15120. Fundamental frequency is 5040. Seems every Uzbek transmitter radiates harmonics at least up to 3rd. Did someone receive QSL for R. Tashkent harmonics? (Vladimir Kovalenko, Tomsk, Russia via Signal, March 15, for DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VATICAN [non]. Glenn, I did not quote the time on my item on BBC R Four Archive Hour's feature on Vatcian Radio. It is 2000-2100 Saturday March 16th (Mike Barraclough, March 14, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** VIETNAM [non]. CLANDESTINE from USA to VIETNAM. Radio Free Vietnam now only on Sat at 1500. Que Huong now just 1230-1300 Mon-Sat. All on 9930. Both stations have reduced their schedules (Hans Johnson, Mar 14, Cumbre DX via DXLD) via KWHR Hawaii, of course ** VIRGIN ISLANDS US. 1620 kHz - WRRA (The Reef). Received "standard" verification letter made in Microsoft Word signed by Beverly Meyers (Operations Manager) in 1 day. I sent an email with an audio clip in Real Audio attached to wrra@islands.vi (Marcelo Toníolo, Greenvale, NY (USA), March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ZIMBABWE. ZBC heard on reactivated 5975 around from 2145 until 2200 fade UT March 13. No sign of Antigua. On Mar 14 still heard past 2200 (Chris Hambly, Vic., WORLD OF RADIO 1122, DX LISTENING DIGEST) I suppose different program than on 6045 you previously heard at 2000+ (gh, DXLD) ZBC is booming on 5975 at 2030 with African music, 2055 ID and News in Vernacular by man at 2100 then back with music at 2112 (Mahendra Vaghjee. Mauritius, 13 March 2002, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Well, they were on 6045 when I was in South Africa in October, so ZBC has been on shortwave. 5975 is a reactivation, though (Hans Johnson, FL, Mar 14, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ZBC has upgraded its SW transmitters with new spares and will again be operating at full capacity, having been on reduced power. Since Mar 05 R Zimbabwe (ex Radio Two) again has been broadcasting on 6045 in Shona and Ndebele for a predominantly rural listenership, and since Mar 06 National FM (ex Radio Four) has been on 5975 in English, Shona, Ndebele and 12 other languages. Up to and during the elections, both were on 24 hours a day with the usual-sounding programme of local pops and occasional vernacular announcements, except EVERY song extolled either Comrade Mugabe or ZANU Party (apparently requests). Rather pathetic. Nothing on the elections in progress (Vashek Korinek, South Africa, Mar 10 & BBCM, DSWCI DX Window via DXLD) ** ZIMBABWE [non]. Two stations are active and both of them are powerhouses here and are tops technically. Apparently the reception in Zimbabwe is excellent and they enjoy a wide audience: 6145, SW R Africa is regular daily *1600-1900* and has added *1100- 1200* transmission on 11670 which has been noted regularly from Feb 25. The characteristics of both transmissions are very consistent with Meyerton site. SADEC (Southern African Development Corporation), of which South Africa is a member, has condemned the external broadcasts to Zimbabwe. 7120, Voice of the People is regular *1700-1800*, i.e. the reported extention of the programme to 1830 has not happened yet (Vashek Korinek, South Africa, DSWCI DX Window Mar 14 via DXLD) The election is just over, but these stations continue to be needed! (DSWCI Ed) UNIDENTIFIED. Hans Johnson mailed me about unknown station used Korean. It is heard 6715 usb 2200-2330 Friday only. I checked it, but no audio here. Any idea? (Gaku Iwata, Japan Premium Mar 15 via DXLD) UNID. 6715U: I had a Korean-speaker listen to an audio file Johnson sent. It is a Christian program in Korea[n?]. The station is not heard here in Japan (Gaku Iwata, Mar 9) Ditto (Richard Lam, Singapore, Mar 9) Fridays only around 2300 (Hans Johnson, Cumbre DX via DXLD) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ WHY DO THEY BOTHER? I spend 90% of my radio time listening to six stations: BBC, R. Netherlands, Deustche Welle, R. Netherlands, R. Australia, and RCI/CBC. To broaden my horizons a bit, I spent the last week tuning into stations I don't usually listen to: R. Romania International, Bulgaria, V. of Greece, Tirana, Voice of Indonesia, and several others. It was excruciating. I don't mean reception conditions. Maybe it's not fair to base an opinion on a week's worth of listening, but it seems like a lot of these stations haven't changed much since I first heard them back in the early '70s. The rhetoric may be mostly gone, but the style, delivery, and content remains pretty much the same. News: the Bulgarian Agriculture Minister visits Poland; a sketchy report about joint Greek-Turkish military training; a two-sentence story about lower than expected rice harvests in Indonesia. All read straight from a script - no interviews, no recorded inserts, no background information, nothing. Five minutes of news, two minute editorial, maybe a press review. A "cultural program" or music selections. Finish with the broadcast schedule and mailing address. This has been the English Service of Radio Ennui. Repeat in Spanish or French. I'm amazed how so many broadcasters who purport to broadcast to the west still have no clue as to how to do it. Now, I realize I'm a media-saturated American who can't pay attention to anything unless there's an explosion or a reference to sex, but you would think the RAIs and R. Romanias of the world would have figured out by now that simply reading from a script is not going to communicate much of anything to anyone. Does anyone actually listen to these stations in English? Would anyone notice if they went off the air tomorrow? (Jim Tedford, Bothell, Washington USA, March 13, swprograms via DXLD) Nicely done! My only rejoinder -- playing Devil's advocate somewhat -- is that even if Radio Ennui doesn't craft programming to the standards of the six stations you cited, the programming may still be of interest to expatriates looking for a little touch o'Bucharest. These stations get potentially interesting when things happen in the neighborhood -- Albania was interesting when Yugoslavia was being bellicose. It's tough for some of these stations to do much in English when it's rarely spoken in the country. It's tougher to do English language man-on-the-street (sorry ladies) interviews in Tirana than it is in Tasmania. Every once in a while, for the sake of vicarious travel, I like to pay a visit to the class of stations you mention. Fans of a particular program type might wish to schedule those visits for a day when they air a program of their favorite type. John Figliozzi's programming counsel (available via MT, NASWA, ODXA, and the NASWA website), can be a valuable aid here. I agree with you that my motivation for listening to Radio Tirana is different from my motivation for listening to the "big six". There's a happy medium out there as well -- the Voice of Russia, Radio Prague, Radio Taipei International, and Radio Austria International all come to mind as examples of broadcasters that don't have the breadth of your Big Six but still craft some quality and spice into their programming. Thoughful comments -- muchly appreciated (Richard Cuff, Allentown, PA, ibid.) Actually, Radio Vilnius does do interviews with people in the street. Most of Radio Vilnius' features are translations of reports from the domestic service, largely because the English service is so small (down to four people), and because of the lack of people in Lithuania who speak English well. The street interviews are usually on Thursdays (local time), and rebroadcast over the weekend. Radio Vilnius airs to North America at 2330 UTC on 9875 kHz, and airs a repeat of this broadcast at 0030 on 7325 kHz. If memory serves, the schedule to Europe is at 1900 UTC on 666 kHz medium wave, with a repeat at 0930 the next day on 9710 kHz. And when (not if!) you listen, please let Vladas Dobilas know. From his emails, he gets very worried every March and October when they change frequencies that they're about to lose most of their listeners. :-) As for Radio Prague and Radio Austria, it should be noted that there seems to be a *large* number of English speakers in both the Czech Republic and Austria, especially amongst the chattering classes who tend to be the largest part of the people interviewed in any broadcaster's features. The point, of course, is that it's much easier to do a good mix of current events and features when you've got a larger stock of people available to interview in English. -- (Ted Schuerzinger, swprograms via DXLD) Bart Simpson, interviewing his father: What religion are you? Homer: You know, the one with all the well-meaning rules that don't work out in real life. Uh, Christianity. [Ted`s tagline] WHY INDEED? I suppose it depends what you want. Personally I prefer straight news to a programme with interviews and recorded inserts, whilst these may add to the entertainment value of the show, it is my opinion that they don't really help with understanding what is going on. And would you have needed background information if you had been listening for 6 months instead of one week? For instance, and I've no idea whether this is right, does Voice of Indonesia run stories about rice most nights? I'm completely ignorant about Indonesia - how significant is the rice harvest? I suspect if we listened for a few months we would know. And then we'd get hacked off if the same stuff was reported over and again as "background information". If you are actually interested in finding about a country then I don't think a few nightly broadcasts will sort you out. Is it the content or the way it is presented that is important? Joint Greek-Turkish military training is hugely significant - but it hasn't been reported here (England) whereas David Letterman has. In what sense is Letterman more newsworthy than moves towards a rapprochement between Greece and Turkey? In the sense that he is more entertaining. What is really happening in Zimbabwe? Listening to the BBC and VoA the impression given, by the comment made by reporters, and by government spokesmen is that Mugabe has stolen the election. The few facts hidden within the rafts of hot air don't seem to support that view, and the Africans don't agree. Why is that? And wouldn't it be nice if the BBC, for example, were to point out that it is perhaps a little rich for the administration of Jeb Bush's brother to criticise the way other countries run their elections? And in case you think I'm US bashing, I don't think that a lot of the elections in this country would bear close scrutiny either. This is not to say that I don't recognise that Voice of Turkey, Radio Bulgaria and the rest are propaganda merchants like the broadcasters you mention, but they are at least coming from a different angle. The broadcasters you listen to, and I add in VoA to which I listen a lot, are essentially singing from the same hymn sheet. The best way to find out about Greece and Turkey is to listen to Greece and Turkey and draw your own conclusions (Nicholas Mead, UK, March 14, swprograms via DXLD) I listen to shortwave primarily for news and information. I don't care if news is entertaining, but I do expect it to be informative. What we get from most of these stations is basically one-sentence headlines. I shouldn't have to listen for six months to know what the implications of a bad rice harvest is for the Indonesian economy. While I don't expect a complete social and cultural history of Indonesia in every half-hour program, I do expect more in the way of context, implications, and analysis of news stories. Content and presentation are equally important. The Greek-Turkish military training report is a hugely important story. It warranted two sentences. A BBC or Netherlands would likely supply a little more in the way of details of the story, something about the motivation for this thaw in relations. I expect that the two-sentence report was all Voice of Greece will say on the subject, at least in English. Well, perhaps in a week we'll hear: "Military exercises with the Turkish have ended." When I criticize content, I'm not talking so much about what they report so much as how they do it. "How" in the sense that there are usually few details given, and no attempt to put a story in context. A good example of this, from a station I do listen to frequently, is Radio Japan. Japan has gone through profound social changes in the last decade, thanks to their persistent economic slump. Radio Japan's coverage of the ten-year-long recession is program after program where an economics professor from some university talks about interest rates. Sure, interests rates are an important part of the story. But it's not the only part. I want to hear about the human effects of the what's happened in Japan. Young people there have very different expectations and attitudes than their parents. I've heard very, very little about this from Radio Japan. What I have heard has come from BBC programs. I think you are far more likely to get this kind of perspective on the BBC than you would on, say, Voice of Zimbabwe. The big western broadcasters are far from perfect. They certainly have their biases, and some, like the BBC, are mimicking the deplorable tendency of North American broadcasters to mix entertainment and news. (The David Letterman story hardly rates a mention on any international station, let alone be included in a World Service Newscast). But if I want any chance of understanding what's going on in many countries, the BBC, Netherlands, etc. are far better than what the actual country in question puts out. I disagree. I think the best way is to go on the web and read newspapers from those and surrounding countries. And listen to the BBC, R. Netherlands, et. al. (James Tedford, ibid.) Great discussion. I wrote a column for Monitoring Times a few months back about using shortwave as one tool to seek out "the truth behind the news", mentioning international newspapers available on-line as one fundamental resource. Much of that column tracks the discussion here. The bottom line is that all perspectives are valuable, but one needs to start somewhere. It's much more useful if that starting point is as objectively informed and intellectually honest as possible. (i.e.: This what I think I know; this is what I think I don't know.) Effective listening (and reading, for that matter) should provide challenges to those assumptions that end up either confirming or reinforcing assumptions or altering them in some fashion. It's a continuous re-evaluation process (hopefully) taking one closer to the essential truths, while realizing that one can only approach the truth, but never actually and ultimately arrive there. Fun stuff, if one is always intellectually curious. One can also construct a hierarchy of generally trustworthy sources over time. That, too, needs to be continuously re-evaluated. That list will also change somewhat with the issue, the geographic location, the ideological perspective that generates the issue, and other factors. What should be less important is the style of the presentation. Obviously, Radio Netherlands is easier to listen to than, say, Radio Romania International. But the extent to which one can discount fully the "entertainment value" of the content will have a direct bearing on how effective one's listening is. That is not to say that broadcasters have no responsibility for making their programs as listenable as possible. I'm just pointing out that the extent to which the listener is willing to accept full responsibility for his or her listening has a direct bearing on his or her ability to perceive value in what is being broadcast. One might say that a heavily accented newsreader mars the experience. But if one is ultimately after the information content, that newsreader will not be the ultimate impediment to gaining the information sought, if the information is there. I love these kind of discussions. Carry on! (John Figliozzi, ibid.) The whole reason I listen to shortwave is that I'm curious about how the rest of the world thinks and considers things. And, challenging my assumptions is always an interesting exercise. Unfortunately, lots of shortwave programming doesn't really do that. When I say "style of presentation" I don't so much mean how they read it than what information they present. Too many stations just tell us that this or that happened. That's fine, but I'm equally interested in why something is important, and what the effect is going to be on that region and the world as a whole. Analysis, reaction (official and otherwise) and context is what distinguishes journalism from news reading. I realize that asking this from some stations and countries is a pretty tall order, since many places don't have a tradition of free and honest journalism. What I'm waiting for is the day when listening to international radio via PC is more of a commonplace occurrence amongst internet users. I know many people who listen to radio on the their PCs but it's mostly local music stations or sports. They download MP3 files, rip CDs and the like, so they're comfortable with the technology of it all. I do have a hard time believing many of them would be willing to fiddle with an actual shortwave radio, putting up an antenna, etc. Most of these people are surprised when they find out there's all this international programming being streamed. One co-worker of mine, a pretty savvy computer person, was astounded when I pointed him to the WRN site. He had no idea. Being a U.S. public radio junkie, he was delighted. However, I have to admit that most of my internet-familiar acquaintances aren't all that impressed or interested in 24-hour access to BBC or VOA. Despite what you might hear about Americans being more interested in news and current affairs after September 11, I've seen precious little evidence of it. (I do wish I could figure out who those people are who buy those 1 million plus Grundigs every year.) I'm likely waiting for a day that will never actually come. Maybe the best I can hope for is that delivery systems (radio, internet, whatever) continue to make international radio reasonably available to those of us who want it (Jim Tedford, Bothell, Washington USA, ibid.) ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ CODAR == THE SWISHER Josh, I have read, with great interest the letter you have sent to some others on this subject of your study. I understand that the radars are only 50w and polarized to be groundwave. Given those aspects the layman would normally be led to think that these would be non-obtrusive to other forms of communication. I can say that I have clearly logged CODAR mid-day from here in Central Virginia (some 400- 500 miles away) on the following frequency ranges: 4370-4402 4522-4552 4634-4660 4773-4802 4802-4831 4894-4920 In your letter, you state that only five bands are being used. Therefore some of these ranges as stated may be yours, and some may be from someone else's tests. Nevertheless, I was easily able to determine the ranges of 50w transmitters at a time of day that would tend to have the greatest adverse impact on long range transmissions. The first range is directly within that allocated for Mobile Maritime use and potentially interferes with Coastal channels 406 through 416. Luckily these do not overlap with any critical distress frequencies on that band. Also, the overlap is with voice communications rather than digital. The one-second bursts would most definitely hinder any ship- to-shore digital message traffic if that were the case. Since your application is maritime in nature, this seems the best fit provided there are no complaints from the US Coast Guard. The second two ranges potentially interfere with a frequency band that is allocated for aeronautical navigation. They are primarily used for air-to-ground communications for long distance flights. However your frequency choices seem to be below the most common of these frequencies (4666, 4669, 4675, 4678) in that range. The ranges you've selected here seem the safest to use, if any at all in this band. However, again, you might want to check with the ARINC and FAA to make sure that this is on a non-interfering basis and that no complaints have been filed. The last three ranges overlap and severely disrupt the 60 Meter Broadcasting band. Normally, these are used by so-called Tropical broadcasters, mainly in South/Central America and Africa. These bands are used to cover long distances because of the widespread populace as well as irregular terrain. What we typically know as the AM broadcast band (530-1710 kHz) cannot adequately cover a sufficient range in those regions. I understand it is virtually impossible to poll all of the broadcasters (if they even understand English) to see if there are any interference issues. However, I have been in contact with people from South America (Brazil in particular) and they have found the CODARs to be a nuisance. Although the systems emit only 50w they have been propagating via skywave extremely well and have been interfering with the reception of stations not only in South America, but in Europe and Africa. It is for this reason I strongly urge that more research on frequency selection is done. Poor frequency selection in this area (as noted) has the potential to be dangerous not only for Maritime and Aeronautical safety reasons, but have been known to cause international incidents if it is perceived as intentional jamming. In light of the latter, I strongly recommend that any transmissions between 4700 and 5100 kHz be avoided at all costs. If you need any clarification or additional help in this matter, please feel free to contact me. I will do my best to help you succeed in your mission. Thank you, (Mark J. Fine / mark.fine@fineware-swl.com Remington, Virginia, USA, March 13, to Josh Kohut, Rutgers, via DXLD) Mark: Thanks for your quick and informative reply. We are certainly very open to your suggestions. Based on your analysis we will begin to focus on our lower FCC approved frequency ranges (4.66 and 4.55). We have been operating within these bands for about a year continuously and have not received any interference complaints from the FAA, ARINC or the U.S. Coast Guard. In fact, the Coast Guard is exploring ways to use the surface current information from these sites to improve their SAR (Search and Rescue) and environmental protection activities in the coastal ocean. We are currently in the process of upgrading all of our systems with the GPS synchronization hardware that I discussed in my previous letter. This will allow us to collapse all of our systems to the same frequency. In the meantime, I am going to try and move the two sites operating at 4.9 and 4.8 MHz to lower frequencies. It is important that we maintain the operational status of these sites for the demonstration studies we are currently conducting with the Coast Guard. Thank you again for your advice and please let me know if you have any more questions or comments. Josh _________________________________________ Josh T. Kohut Rutgers University Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences 71 Dudley Rd. New Brunswick, NJ 08901 Phone: (732) 932-6555 ext. 542 Fax: (732) 932-1821 E-mail: kohut@arctic.rutgers.edu (via Mark Fine, DXLD) +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Unsolicited, ironic and nothing to care about GUDAR?? Dear Glenn, I read the list and like it a lot. I saw your remark GUDAR, and I well understood it's some abbr. of yours, I never saw it before. Tell us what it means. That "word", especially with an exclamation mark GUDAR ! means Gods ! in Swedish. It's plural. According to the ceremonials of all the different faiths we hear about on the radio, there is just one, they all say. Can you sort that out ? Mein Gott - meine Götter - Götterdämmerung. Sri, just doodling. (Johan Berglund, Trollhättan, Sweden, DX LISTENING DIGEST) A coincidence, OR IS IT? GUDAR means DO NOT BELIEVE, of course, tho I hesitate to mitigate its exoticism (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ### |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 2-042, March 13, 2002 edited by Glenn Hauser, wghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted afterwards at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd02.html For restrixions and searchable 2002 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn WORLD OF RADIO #1122 available early UT March 14: (STREAM) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1122.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1122.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1122.html FIRST AIRINGS ON WBCQ: UT Thu 0030 and 0600 on 7415 FIRST AIRINGS ON WWCR: Thu 2130 on 15685, Sat 0600 on 5070 FIRST AIRINGS ON RFPI: Fri 1930, Sat 0130, 0730, 1330, 1800, 2400 on some of: 7445-AM/USB, 15039, 21815-USB UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIAL I just wanted to publicly thank Glen[n] Hauser for World Of Radio. Your site is very accessible. As a blind person I'm now able to hear the shows and it's great. Keep up the good work (John Faircloth, J. F. Productions, swprograms) ** AFGHANISTAN. AFGHAN BALKH RADIO TESTS NEW FREQUENCY | Text of report by Afghan Balkh radio on 13 March We want to inform our dear compatriots and honourable listeners that after 1800 [local time = 1330 gmt] we will start broadcasting on 909 kHz frequency, that is the 330 metre band, through our new transmitter for a test. We hope that our dear listeners will contact us with regard to broadcast quality by telephone, using the following Radio [Balkh] numbers: 3131, 3276 and 2296, and keep us informed. Your cooperation will be appreciated very much, and we thank you in advance cordially. Source: Balkh Radio, Mazar-e Sharif, in Dari 1327 gmt 13 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** ARMENIA. Re: ...Unfortunately, TWR does not officially indicate the exact country of location of this MW transmitter. On QSL and in schedule it is reflected as "Central Asia"... (Signal No.48 - Dmitri Mezin, Kazan, Russia) It's according to the law of Republic of Armenia. It does not permit to officially reveal transmitter locations. This law was adopted for security reasons, when RFA relays began (Vasily Gulyaev, Astrakhan, Russia, Signal March 13 via DXLD) ** AUSTRALIA. UT Fri. 2305 and Sat. 0530: LINGUA FRANCA - about language. "NewZealspeak". On not understanding Maori: George Seddon on his discovery of NewZealspeak. With the Maori language being taught in many New Zealand schools, more and more Pakeha are becoming familiar with Maori and more and more Maori words are entering everyday speech and writing. As a result, readers on this side of the Tasman can find themselves 'up the creek' without a glossary. George Seddon of the Centre for Studies in Australian Literature at the University of Western Australia reflects on the implications of the emerging sub- language he calls 'NewZealspeak'. [Transcript available] (RA Previews for Mar 15-16 via John Figliozzi, swprograms via DXLD) ** BELGIUM [non]. Summer A-02 Schedule for VRT/RVI in English: 0700-0725* 5985 JUL 100 kW / non-dir to Europe 1130-1155* 9865 P.K 250 kW / 244 deg to EaAsia 1730-1755* 9925 ARM 100 kW / 284 deg to NoSoEu 13690 SKN 250 kW / 175 deg to SoWeEu 13710 JUL 100 kW / 133 deg to SoEaEu 1930-1955* 9925 ARM 100 kW / 284 deg to NoSoEu 13690 SKN 250 kW / 175 deg to SoWeEu 2230-2255 15565 BON 200 kW / 320 deg to NoAmEa 0400-0425 15565 BON 200 kW / 350 deg to NoAmWe * also on MW 1512 to Eu 73 from (Ivo and Angel!, Observer, Bulgaria, Mar 12 via DXLD) ** BRAZIL. Re DXLD 2-038, 18815 for R. Brasil Central was obviously a typo for 11815 (Anker Petersen, DSWCI) Unfortunately not obvious enough to me (gh, DXLD) ** BURKINA FASO. This whole Burkina thing has me wondering. I haven't heard them in a few years on 4815. Yet, they come in like gangbusters periodically on 5030. I don't think they have the money for a new transmitter let alone the money for the proper antenna to deliver that type of signal. Perhaps my surmise on the ODXA group is right, perhaps they are using Africa No. 1. After all, they have been known to put in a blow torch signal on 9580 in our afternoons. It would be interesting for someone visiting the country, or someone who has the shekels to call them, so that we can clear this up (Mark Coady, Ontario, March 11, DX LISTENING DIGEST) For the 2nd night in a row, Burkina Faso has made a nice trip into Bridgenorth on 5030. I sent Glen Hauser an e-mail mentioning that I suspect that this must be via another country, perhaps Gabon's Africa No. 1, as the blow torch signal was never heard on 4815. After looking at an atlas, I notice that Burkina Faso is next door to Togo. Togo on 5047 has been missing for a while. Their signal quality on that frequency was similar to what we are getting from Burkina now. Perhaps they are relaying Burkina. Who knows? (Mark Coady, Ont., March 12, ODXA via DXLD) Re Karel Honzik`s tentative on 5030: Yes, Radio Burkina. Heard here March 10th 1830 onwards and several solid R Burkina IDs. 73 (Jari Savolainen, Kuusankoski Finland, March 11, hard-core-dx via DXLD) Yes, it's Burkina Faso, with many ID, music, talk in French, from two or three evenings this week. Here the best time to listening it is 2200-2300 UT. 73 (Salvo Micciché, Sicily, EU, ibid.) ** CAMBODIA. 11940.0, Tent. National Voice of Cambodia *0000-0102 Mar 12, Asian language. Sign-on with brief anthem by chorus, announcements. Talk show - interviews, much laughter. Rock music at 0052. Heard "National" at 0100 but no definite ID. No English heard. SINPO 43443, splatter from China, 11945, but no RRI on freq. Peaked S9. Incredible (Bill Flynn, OR, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CANADA. SCIENCE SHOW STAYS IN RADIO REVAMP Sid Adilman, Toronto Star FOR ALL the fans who have written me, hoping it will not be cancelled, and for its other regular listeners, there is good news about Quirks And Quarks, the 25-year-old weekly science show on CBC Radio One. It not only will survive in Radio One's first major programming revamp in 30 years, but starting in September it will get a better time spot plus a night-time repeat. Unlike TV, prime time on Radio One is Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Quirks And Quarks, currently broadcast after the noon newscast on Saturdays, will be moved to 9 a.m. that day, replacing The House, a program that recaps the week's doings of Parliament and the national political scene. The House's future has not been decided. There is some feeling at CBC Radio that national politics are well covered by other programs and will be, too, by a new daily morning show to run from 8:30 to 10, likely hosted by Ralph Benmergui. Quirks And Quarks will also be repeated during the week at 8:05 p.m., on a spot yet to be chosen.... http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1015887708147&call_page=TS_News_Columnists&call_pageid=970599109774&call_pagepath=Columnists (via Ivan Grishin, Ont., DXLD) ** CHINA. 6185, China Huayi Broadcast Corporation, Fuzhou, Fujian, relay program of 99.6 and 107.1 MHz FM. Jingle ID "CFBC [sic— you mean CHBC? --gh] radio", "This is FM 99.6 and 107.1, China Huayi Broadcast Corporation", English ID, most of the time Chinese pop music. At 0800 UT S=9+20-30dB. At 0100 UT Feb 24th, only Chinese ID's on air. Usually the regular program starts around 2330 UT (Roland Schulze, Philippines, Feb 10-24, BC-DX Mar 11 via DXLD) 6185, China Huayi Broadcasting Corp., 1259 Mar 4, Mandarin Chinese, announcement for program tomorrow evening from 7 to 9 (1100-1300 UT) about medical wine (wine with herbs), pips (5 long, 1 short), Ch ID, En jingle "CHBC, CHBC, CHBC Radiooooo," ID: "This is FM 996 1071" (99.6 and 107.1), China Huayi Broadcasting Corp.," call-in program in Ch from 9-10 (1300-1400 UT) with two doctors from Tongren Hospital answering medical questions, phone numbers given to call in and bus numbers given to get to the hospital. Fair. (Per PWBR-2002, the station says "Corporation," but a better translation is "Company." For myself, I will go with the translation made by the station itself. The jingle when I first heard it sounded somewhat like CFBC, but the more I listened to the tape I think it is CHBC. Thanks to my wife, Jiaying, for the translation.) (Ron Howard, CA, DXplorer Mar 7 via BC-DX via DXLD) ** CONGO DR. Kinshasa, 9555. Hoere gerade auf 9550 sehr schwach eine Station mit einem Programm in English. Kinshasa wurde erwaehnt, daneben die Weltbank. Ansonsten ist das Programm kaum aufnehmbar. Um 1832 kam so etwas wie eine ID (unverstaendlich) gesprochen von einer Frau sowie afrikanische Trommeln. Koennte R Okapi aus dem Congo sein, aber ich wusste nicht, dass die auf Englisch senden (Enzio Gehrig, Spain, A-DX Mar 6 via BC-DX via DXLD) Some RealAudio at http://www.hirondelle.org/hirondelle.nsf/ Contact info shown there: R. Okapi, QG Monuc, 12, Av des Aviateurs, Kinshasa Gombe, RDC, tel: +1-212-963-01-03, ext. 56384, 56397 (Jerry Berg, MA, DXplorer Mar 10 via BC-DX via DXLD) I have checked 9550 last night 1830-1900, there is a weakish Bangla Desh signal until 1900 s-off, thereafter a completely free channel, no trace of any signal whatsoever. 9555 is occupied by Saudi Arabia, no trace of anything else either. If indeed R Okapi is active on SW, I doubt it is on these two frequencies. Will keep checking from time to time (Vashek Korinek, RSA, DXplorer Mar 10 via BC-DX via DXLD) There is some audio from R Okapi at http://www.hirondelle.org Click on "R. Okapi" and scroll down to the audio. Has anyone heard them on SW yet? (Jerry Berg, DXplorer Mar 10 via BC-DX via DXLD) ** CZECH REPUBLIC. SPIDLA: WE WANT RFE TO CONTINUE BROADCASTING FROM PRAGUE. Copyright (c) 2002 Radio Prague (Vysilani do zahranici CRo) News MARCH 11th, 2002 By: Rob Cameron The deputy Prime Minister Vladimir Spidla said on Monday he had reassured the United States that his government wants the U.S.-funded Radio Free Europe to continue broadcasting from the Czech Republic, but was concerned about the station's present location in centre of Prague. Speaking after his return from an official visit to the U.S., Mr Spidla told reporters that the station's current headquarters at the top of Prague's Wenceslas Square were "completely unsuitable." The Radio Free Europe (RFE/RL) building has been surrounded by armed personal carriers and soldiers since the September 11th attacks on the United States. Earlier Radio Free Europe said it had turned down an offer from the mayor of Budapest to move the station's headquarters to the Hungarian capital (via Chris Brand, UK, DXLD) ** ECUADOR. This time my wife will take the scan on a diskette to my IT-café where the owner hopefully sends it to SWB. I hope it works. With the exception of a 4-month period when I for medical reasons was in Sweden, all my bandscans have been coming out without any break! I have been in bed for some time due to a persistent throat infection. So if somebody has written without getting an answer, there will for sure be an e-mail reply within due time! That is also why the bands have been checked less intensely during the last 14 days. After a very long and serious period of dry weather, "finally" it has now started to rain a little every day - it also means that the "grip"-epidemics begin to show up. In my old home country, Sweden, the doctors are very restrictive to prescribe antibiotics. Here in Quito you just visit the nearest pharmacy when catching the smallest cold symptoms. At first an injection with antibiotics in your "back" and then a 3-day cure with antibiotic pills. Everything without any medical control, whatsoever. This is nothing I like, I prefer entering the bed instead. Despite this I have managed to start up my radio a few times -but hearing heavy protests from my wife.. Recently the whole family was invited to a 65-year celebration at Sr. Guido Garcés, brother to my father-in-law. He lives together with his wife a couple of hours away by car from in the valley "el valle de Tumbaco" - maybe you are familiar with the local station of the valley on 1360 kHz: "Oyambaro AM". 5 years ago he was, next to the President, the second most important person in Ecuador. Somewhat astonished I got a warm reception from a man dressed in a checked woodman skirt and baggy blue jeans. I was not less surprised when the gathered forces of the big farm went to attack - two very big ducks and a tiny and friendly Labrador she-dog. In Quito all windows are covered by iron bars, our own house is equipped with alarm system, but here there was nothing to protect the big window areas - Guido Garcés has nowadays a high rank in the Ecuadorian judicial system and perhaps he thinks this is defence enough. This has nothing to do with DX, so I will finish up in a hurry. I left the farm happy and cheerful after getting my favourite dish "hornado", pig meat with vegetables. A few hours later the house was surprisingly attacked by a band - yes, I mean a "mariachi band" dressed up in their typical costumes with wide brimmed hats. Two guitars, two trumpets and two violins. My favourite music here in LA is just the "mariachi" so one or two tears fell down my cheek by pure happiness ...... (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin March 10, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DXLD) ** FINLAND. YLE Radio Finland Summer 2002 SW schedule All transmissions from Pori (21E35' 61N28') kHz UT azimuth kW target 6120 0200-0400 130 250 East Europe 6120 0400-2200 240 100 Northern Europe 6120 1900-2200 220 250 Northern Europe 6140 1900-2000 130 250 East Europe 6180 0700-0800 *80 250 East Europe 9560 0530-0700 225 250 Central&West Europe 9605 1600-1700 130 250 East Europe 9630 1300-1900 225 250 Central&West Europe 9655 0400-0530 130 250 East Europe 9705 1300-1500 130 500 East Europe 11755 0400-0500 175 250/500 SE Europe/Middle East 11755 0500-2000 220 250 Central&West Europe 11755 1100-1200 175 250/500 SE Europe/Middle East 11755 1400-1600 175 250/500 SE Europe/Middle East 11770 2330-2345 90 500 Asia/Australia 11990 0000-0100 **310 500 North America 11990 0100-0200 310 500 North America 11990 0100-0200 240 500 South America 13665 2330-2345 90 500 Asia/Australia 13730 0000-0100 **325 500 North America 13730 0100-0200 325 500 North America 13770 0430-0500 325 500 North America 15135 0600-0800 240 500 Europe/Australia 15400 1200-1300 310 500 North America 15445 0400-0530 175 500 Middle East/E.Africa 15530 0930-1000 225 500 Central, West Europe 15530 1000-1200 *225 500 Central, West Europe 17615 0800-0900 75 500 Russia 17625 1300-1330 130 250 India/Near East 17670 1200-1300 295 500 North America 17670 1530-1600 295 500 North America 17670 1600-1800 *295 500 North America 21520 1000-1100 **90 500 Asia/Australia 21670 0600-0700 *75 500 Asia/Australia 21670 0700-0800 75 500 Asia/Australia 21670 0800-0830 75 500 Asia/Australia 21800 0900-1100 90 500 Asia/Australia 21800 1100-1200 240 500 South America 21810 1700-1800 175 250 Middle East/E.Africa ** = Saturday only * = Saturday and Sunday only (Arto Mujunen, Finland, World DX Club email group via Mike Barraclough, DXLD) ** FINLAND. 6170 +5990 2.3 1045 After 1105 on 5990. The funniest pirate I heard for a long time. Scandinavian Weekend Radio. I don`t want to act or be like the schoolmaster, but in fact it is wrong to say that Jyväskylä is situated in Scandinavia, even if you wish it was a fact. Scandinavia is Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Iceland, and you have to say Nordic, the Nordic countries, if you include Finland. Unfortunately. I have never dreamed of investigating this if it has not been because of my work. There is a difference in air freight charges between places in Scandinavia and the rest of the Nordic countries, i.e. Finland. If a circuit board (50 g) is sent to Pajala via Arlanda-Helsinki and Oulo including delivery, it is bloody more expensive than via Arlanda and Luleå. I am speaking of door-to-door delivery the same day. After a dozen years in the business I am familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of Jetpak. The cost when an industry in Pajala stands still can reach several thousand Swedish crowns per minute, so that is not the problem, the circuit board must be delivered. It is very difficult to explain to the customer that there is an additional cost of SEK 6000 if you guarantee delivery 1700 via Helsingfors than 1745 via Luleå. But that depends on the fact that the dear computer does not recognize via Finland as an inter-scandinavian freight area, and neither due to ev. different land transports. Hard facts of Life in Jyväskylä, I am sorry, but those are the facts. The freight-example is hypothetical, but I have been involved in much worse cases. But in any case don´t bother with this, pretend I never wrote it, continue with SWR!! You are very funny (JB = Johan Berglund, SW Bulletin Mar 10, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DXLD) ** GEORGIA. R. Georgia in English 1830-1900 on 11910 (Mar 2, not on Mar 7). On 4540: 1515-1545 in Abkhaz(?); 1600-1630 in Azeri (Mar 7). R Hara 1700-1730 4875 (Mar 7), 0500-0530 4540, 4875 [via Dusheti]. (Mar 8). (Rumen Pankov, Bulgaria, BC-DX Mar 7-8 via DXLD) ** HONDURAS. Re DXLD 2-036, HRMI`s plans to activate 3340 as well as 5010: perhaps we should point out that the two frequencies are sesquiharmonically related, no accident, I am sure (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** INDONESIA. 2960, The last couples of days I was able to hear the s- off announcements clear (100%) as "RPDT2 Manggarai", s-off time is varying 1250 ... 1314 UT*. The other ID is "Radio Ruteng", or "Radioprogram Ruteng", or "Radio Manggarai". Fade-in time is about 1100 UT in the Philippines (Roland Schulze, BC-DX Feb 10-24) 300 watt in WRTH 2002 (via DXLD) ** IRAN [non]. I remembered to try 7480 today March 6, but there were no clues that I could hear as to where it was coming from. I tuned at 1655 and found an 'open' carrier - a very faint hum in the background. Freq so far as I could measure was 7480.00. Drumming music started at c1659, then program at 1700:05. There was a clear ID for Barabari. Audio quality sounded good - signal strength was averaging 7, with occasional peaks to 9. There was splatter from Sveio-Norway 7490 180 deg to EUR averaging 30dB over 9 before and after the hour. The program finished c1729:35 and transmitter dropped carrier 1730 - and that was it (Noel R. Green, UK, BC-DX via DXLD) I took another listen to R. Barabari today (07/02) and found the station on at 1657 with music extract and ID over and over. Program started at 1700 and finished c1731. The signal today was peaking 40dB over 9 and dropping back to 20 over 9 - so obviously another site - or another more powerful transmitter. Audio quality was very good and frequency exact, so far as I could tell. There were no identifying signs at close down - transmission just stopped. I could hear voice and music very weak in the background at 1657 - I thought it might have been bleed through on tape. It was also audible when program started, too weak to obtain any details. So - is that the tests completed??? (Noel R. Green, UK, BC-DX via DXLD) ** IRAQ [non]. KUWAIT, 1575: I picked "Radio Future" "Idhaat al mostaqbaal" on 1575; around 2200 March 10 the program was in Kurdish, followed by an Arabic song around 2215 and then back to the Arabic program. ID followed by radio drama against Saddam Hussein. I wonder why would they transmit around this time; it's very late for anyone in Iraq to hear this?? (Tarek Zeidan, Egypt, SU1TZ, BC-DX via DXLD) Hi Glenn, Referring to DXLD 2-041-item concerning IRAQ: ``Re DXLD 2-040 GERMANY non: ``No Megaradio heard on 1575 kHz; did hear Spanish talk fading out to Middle East music and Arabic talk and another station off frequency at 1575.3 kHz.`` Hi Glenn, I have heard Iraq regularly on 1575.2 kHz. Maybe that was Wade's station. 73, (Mauno Ritola, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST)`` Today I have received this log in an email from Robertas Petraitis: 1575.0 2100-2240 09/03 KWT al-Mustaqbal (Radio the Future), clandestine, A, s/on, Holy Qur`an, patriotic songs, radio drama, 33433 RPe. The same station?? Best 73s, (Ydun M. Ritz, Denmark, March 13, DX LISTENING DIGEST) http://www.ydunritz.com/y-news.htm mostly from DXLD ** ITALY. I've got some info about RAI sports program, which goes out every Sunday at 1350-1730. Frequencies are 17820 (but they still announce 17780), 9670, 9515 (belongs to RAI Due), 21520, 21535, 21710 kHz. QRM on 17820 kHz: 1400-1430 R. Liberty in Kyrgyz, 1500-1600 RCI in English, after 1700 RCI in French. Unfortunately, my rx (Ishim-003) does not have 13 meter band. Monitored 9670 kHz on 3 March: at 1400 S=2, at 1600 S=4 (Sergei Alekseichik, Hrodna, Belarus, Signal Mar 13 via DXLD) ** JAPAN. 5428.00, 2030 JKM 21, Mihara can be heard almost every evening with USB-transmission. With 300 watt in the antenna relaying NHK Osaka. Starts on the second after bell ringing. Extremely dull programmes with classical music if they are not talking. Usually heard a lasting hour forwards. Seldom (never) strong. 2 (SA = Stig Adolfsson, Sweden, SW Bulletin Mar 10 via Thomas Nilsson, DXLD) ** JAPAN [non]. Dear Mr. Glenn Hauser, I am Nobuya Kato, a member of Japan Short Wave Club (JSWC). This year, JSWC celebrates 50th anniversary since its foundation, and has a plan to broadcast its special programs on shortwave. According to Toshimichi Ohtake, a senior member of my club, the first special program will be on the air on 16 March from Voice of America. As you may know, Dr. Andrew Kim Elliott, the former host of Communications World, still has a program related to the 60th anniversary of VOA on the same times and frequencies as CW was broadcast until 23 February. So you can hear the special program of JSWC during his program on 16 March, together with the segment looking backs on the VOA Japanese service which went off the air in 1970. A special QSL card from JSWC will be issued for correct reception reports sent to: Japan Short Wave Club (JSWC), 50th Anniversary Committee, P.O.Box 138, Yokohama Port, 231-8691 Japan. Here is a part of the broadcast schedule of the former Communications World: To Pacific/East Asia/South Asia (All times in UTC) 0133: 7115 7200 9850 11705 11820 15250 15300 17740 17820 0533: 15205 0933: 11995 13615 15150 1333: 6110 9645 9760 11705 15425 1733: 6110 7125 9645 9760 15205 15395 2133: 6095 6160 9595 9670 11870 15185 17735 17820 Those who are living outside of above area may receive the program at the same time on the frequencies directed to their area. With kind regards, (Nobuya Kato, March 12, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** LATVIA. LATVIA SHUTS DOWN RUSSIAN RADIO By J. Michael Lyons, The Associated Press RIGA, Latvia -- Latvian officials have canceled the broadcast license of a popular Russian-language radio station that they accuse of violating laws requiring that substantial on-air programming be in Latvian. Many Russian speakers, who make up nearly 40 percent of the Baltic republic's 2.4 million population, say the move to close down Radio Bizness and Baltic is discriminatory and a violation of free speech. Full story at: http://www.themoscowtimes.com/stories/2002/03/11/044.html (via Fred Waterer, Mar 12, DXLD) ** MADAGASCAR. It seems clear that Madagascar has 2 Radio Stations now (1) The official Station RTM which is on 5010, 6138 and 7155. 3287 was off and has been heard to-day. It signed on at 0300 and for the moment [due to the unrest] it went off at 1702 instead of 1900 after usual ID, NA and IS. (2) The station backed by Marc Ravalomanana, the mayor of Antananarivo and self appointed president is on 9685 from 0300 to 2000 and 5000 which has moved to 4990 is from 1700 to 0300 (Mahendra Vaghjee, Mauritius, 11 March 2002, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** MAURITIUS. RADIO ONE, FIRST PRIVATE STATION, GOES ON AIR Radio One, the first independent radio station in Mauritius, began broadcasting on 12 March, the Mauritian newspaper L'Express reported. Radio One belongs to the Sentinelle media group, the owner of L'Express. It aims to be a mass market station, carrying news bulletins every 30 minutes and entertainment programmes. Radio One is one of three private stations to be issued a licence as part of the liberalization of the sector. Prime Minister Anerood Jugnauth said on 12 March that independent television networks would also be set up. "The advent of private radio, which is to be followed by the arrival of independent television, is not just a commercial operation. It is a considerable advance in democracy," Sentinelle's managing director, Jean-Claude de l'Esctrac, wrote in an editorial in L'Express on 10 March. Two other private licence holders, Radio Plus and Sunrise Radio, have yet to announce their launch dates. Source: L'Express web site, Port Louis (Mauritius), in French, 10 and 12 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) Webcast??? ** NAMIBIA. NAMIBIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION IN "FINANCIAL CRISIS" | Excerpt from report by Namibian newspaper The Namibian web site on 11 March A serious financial crisis has compelled the Namibian Broadcasting Corporation (NBC) to scale down its operations. Journalists' wings have been clipped after they were told that international and domestic trips will not be sanctioned due to the lack of funds. The NBC has an annual overdraft facility of 10m Namibia dollars [878,000 US dollars] on which it has been paying interest of 2m dollars... The financial crisis has been blamed on "uncontrolled expenditure" within the NBC. Insiders cite mismanagement, extensive foreign travel by staff, abuse of overtime claims and fuel card fraud as among the causes. Approached for comment, chairman of the NBC Board, Uazuva Kaumbi, said the NBC's financial crisis "is not anything new", but he acknowledged that the causes of the uncontrolled spending are being investigated. The NBC's deficit ballooned to 18m dollars last year [1.5m US dollars] - up from 600,000 in 1991, says a source close to the unfolding crisis. Financial cutbacks have already affected newsroom operations. The broadcaster was only able to send one journalist to the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in Australia. The reporter had to double up as a cameraman while there. For the Zimbabwean elections the sole journalist sent there had to perform a variety of duties. In an internal directive last week, the NBC ordered staff members to assist the corporation to lower its annual telephone bill of 3m dollars [263,000 US dollars] by reducing the number and the duration of local and international telephone calls... Another senior NBC staffer attributed the crisis to the fact that some top employees "have been travelling extensively and expensively. They know themselves what led to this. They must cut down on extensive travel and on petrol cards." Board Chairman Kaumbi said yesterday: "The financial crisis is not anything new. Last year we appointed an internal auditor. We were worried about uncontrolled expenditure." "Because the company has an overdraft facility of 10m dollars, the overdraft is always used up and exceeded. We must move towards a situation where we control cash flow," he said... [In July 2000 sweeping management changes were announced by NBC, in line with new cost-saving mechanisms.] Source: The Namibian web site, Windhoek, in English 11 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** NETHERLANDS. A gunman shot himself after a seven-hour siege in Amsterdam's tallest building. The man held people hostage at the Rembrandt Tower in protest at the quality of wide screen television http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_541734.html?menu=news.latestheadlines (via Jeff Kadet, WTFDA via DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. See AUSTRALIA ** OKLAHOMA. More notes on Enid`s only live local TV station, KXOK, channel 32: on the 10 pm news, March 12, a story about Bill Clinton helping somebody fundraise, was illustrated by a still of Bill instantly recognizable as ``I did not have sex with that woman`` with him wagging his finger at us. A minute later, an impressive official portrait of a beaming Gov. Frank Keating (Republican) appeared. Looks like KXOK is playing politics in its news, and not very subtly. All kinds of technical problems do not prevent them from going ahead with live news broadcasting, leaving unfortunate anchors with egg on the face (Glenn Hauser, Enid, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PALESTINE. VOICE OF PALESTINE REPORTEDLY STOPS BROADCASTING AFTER RAMALLAH ATTACKS Israel radio on the morning of 12 March quoted its correspondent in the Palestinian territories as saying that the Voice of Palestine "has stopped broadcasting owing to power cuts in several sections of Ramallah". A Palestinian policeman and an 18-year-old youth were killed by Israeli troops during attacks in Ramallah, the radio said. It quoted Palestinian sources as saying that the IDF "demolished the home of Wafa Idris, the female terrorist in the Al-Am'ari refugee camp..., and of the terrorist who staged the attack on the Seafood Market restaurant in Tel Aviv last week". The radio said IDF soldiers had also killed "four terrorists in the Netzarim area in the northern Gaza Strip overnight". Source: Voice of Israel, Jerusalem, in Hebrew 0600 gmt 12 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) VOICE OF PALESTINE RADIO HEARD RESUMING BROADCASTS Voice of Palestine (VOP), the official radio station of the Palestinian National Authority led by Yasir Arafat, was observed to resume transmission on its FM frequency of 90.7 MHz at 0647 gmt on 12 March. The station, broadcasting from Ramallah, gave no reason for the interruption in its transmission earlier that morning. Earlier on 12 March an Israeli radio station in Hebrew had been heard with good reception on the VOP frequency. Voice of Israel at 0600 gmt on 12 March reported that "Voice of Palestine has stopped broadcasting owing to power cuts in several sections of Ramallah" (following Israeli attacks on the town). Voice of Palestine broadcast only patriotic songs since 0647 gmt. The daily news feature "A New Day" and the first major news bulletin were not carried. Palestine Satellite Channel TV from Gaza, in its 0700 gmt news bulletin on 12 March, showed pictures of the Palestinians killed in the Israeli incursion into the Jabaliya refugee camps at dawn on the 12th and gave the names of those killed. Source: BBC Monitoring research 12 Mar 02 (via DXLD) ** PAPUA NEW GUINEA. At 1145 UT the following eleven channels are active: 2410 3205 3235 3245 3275 3303 3315 3325 3375 3905 and 4890. 3220 is silent for at least a month now. Only Korean stn and some Russian Ham[?] radio operators in ssb mode on that channel. 2410 irregular active. 3205 active, but suffers tx problems. Not every day on air: 3245, 3275, 3315, 3375. 3305 low modulation level. 3325 suffers few tx problems. 4890 regular on air, but sometimes suffering modulation problem. From about 1000 UT in Pidgin, and seldom English. From 1100 UT music request show, 1200 nx, then mx request show again til s-off 1402* UT. On weekends mostly religious program and Gospel Singers (Roland Schulze, Philippines, Jan 1 - Feb 24, BC-DX March 11 via DXLD) ** PERU. 6780.5, Radio Unión, Lima (Tentative). 1006-1020 March 11. Short commentary read by male about the economy in Piura Department. After, farmer short news. Ann.: "..seguimos en breve con más información". Song ("cumbia"). Then, interview. 24332 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentine, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** POLAND. LESZCZYNKA`S UNCERTAIN FUTURE [SW site used by R. Polonia]: http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/features/html/poland020312.html (Bernd Trutenau, Media Network March 12 via DXLD) ** PUERTO RICO. Re ``The AFRTS Radio Station Roosevelt Roads, PR listing is wrong in the WRTH. 1200 AFRTS Roosevelt Roads, PR is 250 Watts, not 50w.`` Well, the info in the WRTH 2002 is correct, 0.25 kW. 73's (Tore Larsson, Sweden, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ROMANIA. RRI QUIZ "DOWN THE ARGES RIVER - 2002" QUIZ Radio Romania International invites you to participate in yet another prize-winning contest, titled "Down the Arges River - 2002". As usual, you will only have to send your answers to a thematic quiz. So tune to RRI, follow our features, come up with the correct answer and you can become the big winner. The quiz will be regularly broadcast in our programmes and you can send your answers by April 30, 2002, the post date, at the latest. Don't forget: as part of what has already become a tradition with RRI, the winners will be awarded a series of prizes by the sponsors of our contest which are: the Prefect's Office of Arges County, the Arges County Council, the Arges Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the Pitesti City Hall, the Curtea de Arges City Hall, the Arges County Culture Department and the Brasov City Hall. The grand prize is a 7 day trip for two between July 1st and the 10th to Arges County, granted by Posada Ltd Curtea de Arges. And now, the quiz - here are the questions: In what part of Romania is Arges county situated? What is the name of the main city of Arges County? Who were Romania's first kings, who are buried in the Episcopal Church in Curtea de Arges? Which are Romania's highest mountains, stretching in the north of Arges County? The first car-making plant in Romania was inaugurated in Pitesti on August 20, 1968. What is the name of the car make manufactured by that plant? We would also like to know what determined you to participate in this latest RRI contest. You can send your answers by letter, by fax or by e-mail. We'll be looking forward to your answers. Don't forget, the deadline is April 30, 2002, the post date. The winners are to be announced at the end of May. Good luck and don't miss out on your opportunity to visit Arges County! (From RRI's Site) Note: according to an announcement of RRI's Russian Service, the trip for two to Arges County does NOT include the travel expenses from your home country to Romania (Sergei Sosedkin, March 12, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Non-disclosed is no doubt an important fact about this contest, and it ought to be illegal to withhold this info: merely answering all the questions correctly (not that difficult, with a little research, even without listening), will NOT win the contest. In all probability the correct entries will be eligible for a drawing. But since they don`t say, it could be merely at the whim of station officials who gets the prize! The ultimate random nature of the winners is usually the case with seemingly easy contests (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ST. HELENA. Hello! Back from Ghana and in the harness again. On SW nothing unusual or new was heard when I tested from various QTH in Ghana. MW gave a lot of stations in West Africa. On 1548 a weak English speaking station was heard every evening when I stayed in Kumasi, circa 300 km northwest of Accra. It might have been St. Helena. Portable receivers like Sony 7600D ought to be forbidden. You rather give up listening to avoid hearing all that intermodulation, distortion and all the other peculiarities that this junk radio shows (Stig Adolfsson, Ghana, SW Bulletin Mar 10 via Thomas Nilsson, DXLD) ** SARAWAK. RTM Sarawak seems to work on old reports. Although a report for a reception on 4895 kHz from Feb. 11, 2000 had been verified by letter after 4 weeks, I now received 2 (!) detailed QSL cards showing the broadcasting house. This card is still the same as one I got in 1986. The name of the V/s is not readable. vy 73, (Willi Passmann, Germany, dx_india via DXLD) ** SAUDI ARABIA. Frequency change for BSKSA Holy Kor`an service in Arabic: 1800-2100 NF 11915 (55444), ex 11935 \\ 11820 and 15230 73 from (Ivo and Angel!, Observer, Bulgaria, Mar 12 via DXLD) ** SAUDI ARABIA. SA`UDI RADIO TO START PASHTO PROGRAMMES TO AFGHANISTAN | Text of report in English by Saudi news agency SPA web site Riyad, 13 March: The radio of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia will begin Friday [15 March] transmission of a radio programme in Pashto directed at Pashto-speaking people in Afghanistan and Pakistan for one hour daily starting at 07:00 pm Saudi local time [1600 gmt] using a 31- meter, 9695 kHz short wave. The minister of information Dr Fu'ad Bin-Abd-al-Salam al-Farsi, said the transmission was approved in line with directives by the Saudi leaders to broaden radio transmission using various bands and languages to make the voice of the kingdom heard all over the world. Source: SPA news agency web site, Riyad, in English 1535 gmt 13 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** SIERRA LEONE. 3316, The SLBS, Goderich, - by far Africa`s best 90 mb signal noted at same time, 2nd best being Ghana`s outlet on 3366 - heard today 6th Mar 1943-2009, 55433 in Vernacular, with talks, ads, then ID and national newscast in English 2000 Mar 6 after jingle (Carlos Gonçalves, Portugal, BC-DX via DXLD) ** SINGAPORE. 3915, BBC SNG always a strong signal at night. This outlet is not given prominence in BBC scheduling due to the fact that it is a high powered outlet in what is supposed to be a local SW band (Adrian Peterson, Kuala Lumpur?, DXplorer Mar 8 via BC-DX via DXLD) Local SW band? How do you mean that? I thought 75m was for international broadcasting, not even tropical (gh, DXLD) ** SOMALILAND. BBC TO TRAIN RADIO HARGEYSA JOURNALISTS | Text of report by Somaliland's Radio Hargeysa on 12 March A two-week course attended by Radio Hargeysa journalists was today opened at the Ministry of Information in Hargeysa. The training course was opened by the minister of information, Hon Abdullahi Muhammad Du'ale. Speaking at the function, the minister said it was gratifying to note that Radio Hargeysa staff had been selected for the course. He said this kind of knowledge transfer was made possible by the prevailing peace in Somaliland. The director-general of the Ministry of Information, Mr Hasan Umar Hori, spoke at the function and welcomed the participants. He said the current course was aimed at improving the country's journalistic skills, and specifically tailored for Radio Hargeysa. The course was based on a recent accord between the BBC and Radio Hargeysa . The director-general said that more courses would be conducted in May. Mr Yunis Ali Nur from BBC Training, who will conduct the course for the Radio Hargeysa staff, also spoke at the function, detailing how the course would be conducted. The director of Radio Hargeysa, Muhammad Sa'id Muhumed, told the officials about the importance of this course for the journalists, the need for the participants to benefit from the course and the need to keep time. Source: Radio Hargeysa in Somali 1700 gmt 12 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) Not to be outdone... ** SWAZILAND/USA. VOA TO TRAIN JOURNALISTS FOR STATE BROADCASTER | Text of report by Radio Swaziland on 11 March The deputy director of the Swaziland Broadcasting and Information Services, SBIS, Timothy Shongwe, says the Voice of America radio station, VOA, can play a vital role in the training of SBIS staff in engineering, communications, and production. Addressing visiting VOA media personality Rita Rochelle when she called on him this morning, Shongwe said both SBIS and VOA stand to benefit from the exchange of personnel and programmes between the two sister stations. Shongwe and Rochelle recommended that SBIS staff members should attend courses in America and at the same time American media experts should come to SBIS to conduct courses. Rochelle is in Swaziland to speak with local journalists, university students of mass communications at Kwaluseni, and Women in Business. Source: Radio Swaziland, Mbabane, in English 1600 gmt 11 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** SWEDEN. R. Sweden A'02 12 March '2002 Radio Sweden Frequency Schedule A'02 - English Language -------------------------------------------- To Europe/Africa/Middle East: 1330-1400 - 17505 khz 1730-1800 - 6065, 1179 (Except Sun) 1730-1800 - 13580 (Sun Only) 1930-2000 - 6065, 1179 2130-2200 - 6065, 1179 To East Asia & New Zealand: 1230-1300 - 17505 To Australia & South East Asia: 1130-1200 - 17505 1230-1300 - 21530 1330-1400 - 17505 2130-2200 - 15255 To South Asia: 0130-0200 - 13625 To North America: 0230-0300 - 9490 [via Canada, presumably] 0330-0400 - 9490 [via Canada, presumably] 1130-1200 - 18960 1230-1300 - 18960 1330-1400 - 18960 (All times in UT, freq's in kHz) Regds, (via Alokesh Gupta, New Delhi, India, DX LISTENING DIGEST) [another version:] R Sweden in English from 1 April to 27 October 2002 0130-0200 sAS 13625 0230-0300 NAM 9490 (via Canada) 0330-0400 NAM 9490 (via Canada) 1130-1200 AU/seAS 17505 NAM 18960 1230-1300 eAS/NZ 17505 AU/seAS 21530 NAM 18960 1330-1400 EU/AF 17505 AU/seAS 17505 NAM 18960 1730-1800 (ex sun) EU/AF 1179 6065 1730-1800 (sun) EU/AF 13580 1930-2000 EU/AF 1179 6065 2130-2200 EU/AF 1179 6065 AU/seAS 15255 (Printed sked via Michael Beesley, Hampshire, UK, World DX Club via Alan Roe and Mike Barraclough, DXLD) Glenn, Further to this just sent. The spreadsheet is somewhat confusing, but indicates that both 1179 and 6065 at 1730 will be daily, contrary to what the printed sked shows. My guess is that both are wrong, and that 6065 will be Monday to Saturday, with 13580 on Sundays only and 1179 daily (Alan Roe, Teddington, UK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** SWITZERLAND. SRI remaining English for A-02: English 0730-0800 15445 JUELICH 100 160 nAF English 0730-0800 17685 JUELICH 100 200 wAF English 0730-0800 21750 SOTTENS 500 165 AF English 0830-0900 21770 SOTTENS 500 165 AF English 1730-1800 15220 JUELICH 100 115 EU/AF/M English 1730-1800 17735 JUELICH 100 115 neAF/ME English 1730-1800 21720 SOTTENS 500 140 neAF/ME English 1930-2030 13645 SOTTENS 500 140 AF English 1930-2030 15220 JUELICH 100 160 AF English 1930-2030 17580 JUELICH 100 200 wAF English 1930-2030 17735 MONTSINERY 500 115 sAF English 2330-2400 9885 SOTTENS 500 230 SA English 2330-2400 11905 MONTSINERY 500 175 SA (Swissinfo A-02 via Andreas Volk via Wolfgang Büschel, DXLD) ** TAIWAN. Radio Taipei International in Spanish to Europe noted on March 1: 2100-2200 again on 9955.1, ex 7130 73 from (Ivo and Angel!, Observer, Bulgaria, Mar 12 via DXLD) ** TAIWAN [and non]. 11940, Clandestine channel of "Voice of China" via Taiwan. On Feb 23rd 0803-0900*, two stations appeared, a stronger Beijing station and a very poor signal, not IDed. At 0900* five short / one long time pips, China ID from Beijing. From 0900 UT BBC English s-on on 11945, S=8-9. On Feb 24th, from 0730 UT onwards: QRG free. At 0752 UT carrier on, into Chinese language modulation S=9+20 dB, switched-on suddenly during the program, only a single signal on the 11940 channel. At 0755 Chinese instrumental music started, large orchestra, 0759 female announcer, into international music at 0759. In the background noted the Chinese ID "Zhongguo zhiyin", and male announcer talks in Chinese. Latter signal was covered by the Beijing signal, which is in use as a jamming station usual. On Feb 24th another - second - China mainland program joined the jamming service. At 0818 and at 0830 UT ID by male Chinese announcer "Zhongguo zhiyin", at 0845 UT three Chinese stations active, two covering talks, and the third with music jamming. 0900 UT s-off, only a single Beijing time announcement heard, then channel is free, V of China and the two Beijing stations off the air! All observation with R8, 30 m sloper antenna North/South, 1.8 kHz filter (Roland Schulze, Philippines, Feb 23-24, BC-DX March 11 via DXLD) ** TAJIKISTAN [and non]. A DXer in the north of Tajikistan reports that the mysterious nonstop music station on 5775 kHz which is suggested being from Tajikistan is not audible in his region at all. As for R Tajikistan, the English program is currently aired 1645- 1700 and 0345-0400 (repeat) on 7245 & 972/1143 kHz. The English department can be reached in the person of Nasrullo Ramazov by email at davr@cada.tajik.net (Bernd Trutenau, Lithuania, March 6, BC-DX via DXLD) ** TIBET [non]. UZBEKISTAN: Frequency change for Voice of Tibet in Tibetan and Chinese: 1215-1300 NF 21555 TAC 100 kW / 131 deg, ex 15670 [Tashkent site] \\ 15645 DB 100 kW / 115 deg (alt. 15655) [Dushanbe site] 73 from (Ivo and Angel!, Observer, Bulgaria, Mar 12 via DXLD) ** TUNISIA. New schedule for RTT via Sfax 500 kW as of March 7: 7110 / 265 deg to NoAf 0400-0700 7110 / 265 deg to NoAf 1700-2300 (ex 1900-2300) 7225 / 340 deg to WeEu 1600-2300 (ex 1800-2300) 7275 / 340 deg to WeEu 0400-0800 9720 / 100 deg to ME 0200-0500 9720 / 100 deg to ME 1600-2100 (ex 1700-2100) 11655 / 265 deg to NoAf 1400-1700 (ex 1400-1900) 11730 / 340 deg to WeEu 1400-1600 (ex 1500-1800) 12005 / 100 deg to ME 0200-0500 12005 / 100 deg to ME 1600-2300 (ex 1700-2300) 15450 / 100 deg to ME 1200-1600 (ex 1200-1700) 17735 / 100 deg to ME 1200-1600 (ex 1200-1700) 73 from (Ivo and Angel!, Observer, Bulgaria, Mar 12 via DXLD) ** UKRAINE. Radio Ukraine International has added Real Audio to its website with a live webcast of RUI programs. RUI's website indicates that English programs should be available at 2200, 0100, 0400, and 1200 UT. Getting there is somewhat complicated because the site uses frames extensively. Your best bet is to visit: http://router.nrcu.gov.ua/eng/frame.html and select "Channels" and a menu of options will appear at the top of the screen. Select RUI and then a Real Audio link will be made available (Phillip M. Dampier, President, Rochester Free-Net, Inc./The Genesee Gateway, Rochester, New York, March 12, DX LISTENING DIGEST) That`s a station which certainly needed webcasting! (gh, DXLD) ** U K. The Greenfield Collexion will be coming to the end of its long run on BBC WS at the end of March (BBCWS to Australia announcement at 1729 UT March 13 via 2NUR via gh, DXLD) However, Edward Greenfield is presenting the current Composer of the Month: William Walton; so maybe he will still be heard on that series, if it not canceled too? (gh, DXLD) ** U K. BBC ZIMBABWE LINE COLONIAL, SAY STAFF; CONCERN IN WORLD SERVICE AT RISK TO IMPARTIALITY Matt Wells, media correspondent, Tuesday March 12, 2002, The Guardian Senior figures at the BBC World Service have expressed concern to the domestic news division that coverage of the Zimbabwe elections has been driven by a "colonial" agenda, potentially causing damage to the corporation's reputation for impartiality. Particular anxieties have been expressed about the tone of coverage on Radio 4's Today programme and about a Correspondent documentary in which the former Observer journalist John Sweeney smuggled himself into Zimbabwe in the boot of a car. There has also been concern about the frequent BBC claim that it is banned from Zimbabwe. While it is true to say that BBC correspondents have been refused entry, a number of African World Service reporters are working legitimately there. After one of the reporters appeared on Radio 5 Live yesterday, the BBC changed its policy. Radio news will now use terms such as "severely restricted", while TV bulletins will say either that "BBC television is banned from Zimbabwe" or "BBC correspondents are banned". Sources at the World Service, who did not wish to be named, told the Guardian that concerns had been expressed by senior executives at Bush House in London to Adrian van Klaveren, the head of BBC newsgathering, and to Steve Mitchell, the head of radio news. There were worries about the tone of coverage on the Today programme, which, according to some at the World Service, has made a conscious attempt to "illegitimise" the Robert Mugabe administration with the use of pejorative terms such as "regime" and adjectives such as tough, fierce and brutal. While these were acceptable when used by correspondents on the scene, they were being used by Today presenters in the introduction to reports, and during news bulletins. The sources did not attempt to suggest that Mr Mugabe was without fault, but they pointed to worse abuses committed by governments in Liberia and Congo. Elections in Congo were held last weekend amid allegations of huge electoral fraud, yet did not feature prominently on the domestic news agenda. It is suggested that the interest in the Zimbabwe elections is being driven by the "residual British interest and the presence of white farmers", according to one Bush House source. Another said the agenda was characterised by "latent and unwitting colonialism". There has also been concern about the prominence being given to the Zimbabwe elections on the World Service's main news programmes, the World Today, World Update and Newshour, which are broadcast to tens of millions of listeners around the world. Several sources suggested the agenda was more "foreign" than "international": that the story was being seen from a London-based rather than a global perspective. The Correspondent documentary, broadcast on the World Service as well as BBC2, caused upset because Sweeney appeared to suggest it was necessary to hide in a car to interview the opposition leader, Morgan Tsvangirai. In fact, Mr Tsvangirai has been interviewed many times by different BBC outlets, even appearing in person at Bush House. The BBC said it was committed to reporting extensively from Zimbabwe. A spokesman said: "Clearly the Zimbabwe elections are one of the biggest international stories at the moment, and of course we are going to cover it extensively. In terms of the tone, we are wedded to being impartial and careful, but clearly when there is such huge worldwide concern about allegations of intimidation and violence, that will be reflected in coverage. "The BBC has three bureaux and many correspondents in Africa and we probably cover more on African affairs than anyone else. We have done Congo, Malawi, Liberia and Nigeria, all on mainstream BBC1 bulletins." Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2002 (via Daniel Say, DXLD) ** U K. This shows the attitudes now at the top of the BBC for those on the list interested in the wider picture and the debate in general on the role of public service broadcasting. Coincidentally I booked yesterday for Sir John Mortimer's latest play, and I am northern! (Mike Barraclough) March 13, 2002 WE'RE BEING HIJACKED BY THE MIDDLE CLASSES, SAYS BBC CHIEF By Adam Sherwin, Media Reporter and Laura Peek GAVYN DAVIES, the chairman of the BBC, last night accused a white, middle England elite of trying to hijack the BBC and force it to produce only the programmes they wanted. Mr Davies stunned an audience of ministers and media executives when he dismissed the BBC¹s critics as a group of southern, white, middle-class, middle-aged and well- educated people.... Full article at http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/0,,2-234558,00.html (via Mike Barraclough, England, March 13, DXLD) ** U K. MUSIC STATION SEEKS TO GIVE DIGITAL RADIO A GENTLE PUSH Matt Wells, media correspondent, Tuesday March 12, 2002, The Guardian The BBC yesterday launched its first new national music radio station since the start of Radio 3 in 1970. But when 6 Music opened at 7am with a fiery track by the Irish pop-punk band Ash, it was to a private audience of little more than a few hundred listeners. At the moment, only 14,000 digital radio sets are in circulation: 6 Music, aimed at "serious" rock and pop fans aged between 25 and 44, is one of five new BBC digital stations that form part of a strategy to boost take-up. Despite the low potential audience, the BBC and its commercial rivals believe digital is the future and is worth the investment. "When the BBC started 80 years ago, very few people were listening. But you have to dare," said Jenny Abramsky, the BBC's director of radio. Part of the problem is the cost of digital radios: the cheapest model for home use costs £249, with prices starting at £199 for in-car radios. But the cost is falling: £99 sets will soon be available, and car manufacturers will begin to fit them as standard. In anticipation of the digital future, the first of the BBC's five new digital radio services, 5 Live Sports Extra, a part-time station which broadcasts uninterrupted sports coverage when there is no room for it on the main network, is already on air. 1Xtra, a station for fans of black and urban music, launches this summer; the Asian Network, available conventionally in the Midlands and North, will be available to a national audience on digital later this year; and the as yet unnamed Network Z, a speech station broadcasting archive comedy, drama and children's programmes, is also due for launch this year. All the stations will be broadcast on the internet and on digital satellite television; most will be on digital cable. 6 Music is on Sky Digital channel 911 and Telewest channel 909. It will be available to NTL customers in the next few weeks, the company said. The BBC defended its £4m annual investment in 6 Music, compared with the £40m spent annually on Radio 2, the station to which it is "attached". The first voice on air yesterday was the breakfast presenter, comic Phill Jupitus; his first track, Ash's Burn Baby Burn, was chosen by internet vote from a shortlist that also included Led Zeppelin, Ian Dury and the Specials. 6 Music aims to play about 14 tracks an hour. Of these, two will be live session tracks from the BBC archive, three will be from the station's contemporary playlist, two will be hits from the past year, and the rest will be hits from the past four decades. John Sugar, programme editor, said bands had to have "credibility, influence and longevity" to be played (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** UNITED NATIONS [non]. U S A/U.K./SOUTH AFRICA. B-01 / A-02 Schedule for United Nations Radio: 1700-1715 Mon to Fri French 6125 / 6125 MEY 100 kW / 076 deg 17595 / 17705 SKN 300 kW / 180 deg 21490 / 21490 MEY 500 kW / 342 deg 1730-1745 Mon to Fri English 6125 / 6125 MEY 100 kW / 005 deg 15495 / 17710 SKN 300 kW / 125 deg 17580 / 15105 ASC 250 kW / 065 deg 1830-1845 Mon to Fri Arabic 9885 / 15315 RMP 500 kW / 115 deg 13770 / 17565 SKN 300 kW / 180 deg 73 from (Ivo and Angel!, Observer, Bulgaria, Mar 12 via DXLD) No more Portuguese?? ** U S A. A SEPT. 11 CASUALTY: 'RADIO MAN' JAILED FOR A MONTH, THEN FREED EGYPTIAN STUDENT PERPLEXED BY MISTAKEN ARREST By Christine Haughney, Washington Post Staff Writer Monday, March 11, 2002; Page A03 NEW YORK -- "Radio man." That's what the guard called Abdallah Higazy when he rapped on his cell window. It was better than "Taliban" or "fly the unfriendly skies" -- taunts the guard used on other suspected terrorists locked up nearby in the Metropolitan Corrections Center. But "Radio Man" was bad enough, for an innocent man. Higazy spent 31 days there, all but a few hours in solitary confinement. He was accused of lying about a hand-held pilot's radio found in his hotel room across from the World Trade Center on Sept. 11 -- a radio that, prosecutors said, could have been used to communicate with the terrorist pilots who attacked the twin towers.... http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A5553-2002Mar10.html (via Mike Terry, DXLD) ** U S A. Latest on VOA Shopping Center at Bethany... http://enquirer.com/editions/2002/03/07/loc_big_retailers_could.html Thursday, March 07, 2002 BIG RETAILERS COULD JOIN DEVELOPMENT PLANS INDICATE TARGET, BIGG'S LIKELY TENANTS By Jennifer Edwards, The Cincinnati Enquirer WEST CHESTER TWP. — Retail giant Target and grocery store chain Bigg's are planning stores at the northeast corner of Cox and Tylersville Roads, according to development plans filed with the township this week. Borders, Pier 1 Imports, Bed Bath & Beyond, Famous Footwear and T.J. Maxx also are shown on proposed plans for Voice of America Centre, which will face Cox Road. Sit-down restaurants, a bank and perhaps a convenience store are also expected, said John Silverman, project manager with Midland Atlantic, which is developing the site. The final development plan for the 75-acre shopping center will be heard at the township's March 18 zoning commission meeting at 6:30 p.m. Officials of the stores in the plans declined Wednesday to say whether they are coming. ``We don't like to confirm actual tenants until we have our groundbreaking event, and that will happen in another month or so with an expected opening in Spring 2003,`` Mr. Silverman said. The shopping center will rise next to the 325-acre Voice of America Park across Cox Road from University Pointe, a medical office center expected to open this fall. just off I-75 between Cincinnati and Dayton. A representative of Bigg's, which opened a store at the corner of Ohio 747 and Union Centre Boulevard last August, said the company wants to expand locally because of its success there and the fast-growing area's strong demographics. ``I don't know that it would be accurate to say we are 100 percent committed to that site, but I also wouldn't say we are not pursuing that site,`` said Mike Brooks, Bigg's director of operations. Target would join three other outlets along or near Tylersville Road: Home Depot, Meijer and Wal-Mart. It will sit across Tylersville Road from a Kroger shopping plaza. An adjacent Kohl's department store is expanding by 20,000 square feet on the side closer to Kroger. Construction is expected to begin soon, a Kohl's employee said Wednesday. The 125,000-square foot Target store would be the latest one to pop up in the Tristate. A new Milford store is expected to open in July. The Minneapolis-based retailer has locations in Deerfield Township, Middletown, and Tri-County and 1,053 nationally. The coming stores mark more development along Tylersville Road off Interstate 75, which already is packed with restaurants, gas stations, video stores and shopping plazas. Its location is expected to lure shoppers from Butler and Warren counties and beyond, including from the Dayton area, said Joe Hinson, president and chief executive officer of the Southeastern Butler County Chamber of Commerce. The extra customers the shopping center is expected to draw will benefit existing businesses, he noted. But some residents are concerned about the increase in cars the center would bring, especially on five-lane Tylersville Road, which already is jammed during rush hours and weekends. Some 51,000 cars travel Tylersville Road daily, with at least 33,000 cars using the intersection, according to the engineer's office. That is expected to jump with the coming development by 15 percent at the intersection and 40 percent on Tylersville. ``You can't get up and down the road now,`` complained Phyllis Whiteford, 57, a 25-year resident who lives about three blocks from the planned center. ````But I'll probably shop there because it's close to home and the prices are very reasonable.`` Cox Road is scheduled to be widened from two to five lanes from Tylersville to Hamilton-Mason Road starting next month, according to the Butler County Engineer's Office. The $5.5 million project, expected to be complete this fall, is being paid for with tax increment financing from the county, said Chris Petroci, spokesman for the engineer's office. Turn lanes also will be added at entrances to new businesses. (via Kim Elliott, DC, DXLD) ** U S A. VOA BUILDING MIGHT BECOME HISTORIC SITE VETERANS GROUP SEEKING PUBLIC HELP WITH PROJECT By Mary Lolli, Cox News Service http://www.activedayton.com/ddn/local/0309voa.html HAMILTON | For decades, the Voice of America radio towers in West Chester Twp. beamed messages around the world. Now a local veterans organization wants the VOA building turned into a museum and national historic site. The Butler County Commission on Thursday gave its blessing to the idea. Fred Carroll, commander of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7696, West Chester Twp., proposed the idea, and with the assistance of township Trustee Catherine Stoker is seeking public support for the endeavor. "We will be soliciting private donations, nationally and internationally, for the project," Carroll said. "I don't think we will have any problem getting contributions. I think people recognize the important role the site played in our history." The original 600-acre VOA site contained a network of radio towers, an outdoor switching station and the broadcast building, which transmitted and received radio broadcasts worldwide during World War II. The first broadcast in February 1942 went out from what was then called the Bethany Relay Station. "Winston Churchill literally defended Western civilization with his words, which were broadcast to the world through the Voice of America site," Commissioner Mike Fox said. Stoker, who is a member of the VFW Auxiliary and secretary of the Veterans Voice of America Committee, said West Chester Twp., which owns 200 acres of the site, including the building, already has given support for the project. In addition, Butler MetroParks, which owns 300 acres of the site, is working with the township to make their respective uses of the property compatible. Miami University owns 25 acres of the site. The U.S. General Services Administration earlier sold 75 acres in the southwest corner of the site to Midland Atlantic, a Cincinnati-based company planning a retail development on the site. Although the towers have since been dismantled and removed, Carroll said the Ham Radio Operators Association is considering erecting a working tower on what will become part of the restored site. Carroll said organizers have no estimates yet on the cost. "We're relying on donations of money, time and talent to do this," Carroll said. [From the Dayton Daily News: 03.09.2002] (via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. JAZZ FANS OUTRAGED BY CHANGES AT WYSO STATION MANAGER DEFENDS DECISION By Bob Batz, Dayton Daily News YELLOW SPRINGS | Last week's announcement that WYSO-FM (91.3) will dump its locally produced jazz shows and some other programming has brought a flood of criticism from programmers, musicians and listeners of the National Public Radio station. By Tuesday dozens of people had contacted the Dayton Daily News to protest station manager Steve Spencer's plan, which will eliminate weeknight jazz shows, the long-running Women in Music program on Sunday afternoons and the eclectic Sound Canvas show hosted Sunday afternoons by Ken Hanes. Ten volunteer DJs will lose their slots.... http://www.activedayton.com/ddn/go/0306wyso.html (Dayton Daily News March 6 via Artie Bigley, DXLD) [...you are reading OHIO BROADCASTING NEWS... gh] WYSO-FM CUTS PROMPT CALL FOR LISTENER PROTESTS; GROUP WANTS PLEDGES WITHHELD, PRESSURE ON STATION By Bob Batz and Carol Simmons, Dayton Daily News YELLOW SPRINGS | Anger over the impending cuts of jazz and other local, volunteer-hosted programs at WYSO-FM (91.3) is prompting supporters of the canceled shows to ask listeners to withhold financial pledges from the public radio station. http://www.activedayton.com/ddn/local/0312wyso.html (Dayton Daily News March 12 via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. Editorial. Radio Waves Tuesday, March 12, 2002 PUBLIC STATIONS' CONSOLIDATION WORTH A LOOK With public radio facing funding challenges, it should surprise no one that the community's three public-broadcasting stations might require some consolidation. The Columbus Board of Education voted last week to allow negotiations for shifting management of its station, WCBE (90.5 FM), to another entity; WOSU (820 AM and 89.7 FM) is the front- runner. Allowing such negotiations makes sense on several fronts... http://libpub.dispatch.com/cgi-bin/documentv1?DBLIST=cd02&DOCNUM=10952&TERMV=5502:4:15779:4:15814:4:21109:4:26324:4:26367:4:31609:4:36679:4: (Columbus Dispatch via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. Risto Kotalampi`s photos of Kulpsville 2002 are now at: http://www.kotalampi.com/cgi-bin/photo/index.cgi?album=Kulpsville_2002&mode=view (gh, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. Hello All: Earlier today, I spoke with a Station Engineer at Entercom Radio regarding outstanding reception reports for KFXX. Over the winter we have been attempting to get, at least a few QSLs from the station. This much like the situation at WFLA last DX season. He tells me today, he has selected a "small pile" that will be QSLed. At the top of that pile is our friend Ewald Glantschnig of Switzerland, no one has tried harder to QSL KFXX than Ewald has, hi, hi. I hope at the very least this helps some of you. And I also hope in the future, more reception reports will be verified by this helpful and concerned Station Engineer. Good luck and good DXing, 73's Joe Talbot, Alberta, March 11, hard-core-dx via DXLD) 25910 ** U S A. LETTERMAN WILL STAY AT CBS, ENDING FLIRTATION WITH ABC March 11, 2002 By BILL CARTER David Letterman will keep his late-night talk show at CBS, the star announced tonight, spurning a strong bid from ABC that would have displaced the network's highly regarded news program ``Nightline.'' Mr. Letterman made his decision official in a statement he delivered during the taping of his ``Late Show'' this evening in Manhattan after he finished his opening comedy monologue. On the show, which will be broadcast tonight at 11:35 Eastern time, Mr. Letterman told his audience that he appreciated the offer from ABC but that he was not comfortable with replacing a journalist of the quality of Ted Koppel, the respected anchor of ``Nightline.'' The decision brings to an end more than a week of intense speculation in the television industry about Mr. Letterman's future and how it would affect Mr. Koppel. Executives close to Mr. Letterman said today that he returned from a weeklong vacation eager to resolve the issue without any further delay, at least partly because he was concerned about how the news of ABC's offer was affecting Mr. Koppel and his program. With Mr. Letterman's choice of CBS, ABC executives will be thrust into an uncertain position about Mr. Koppel and ``Nightline,'' having assured Mr. Letterman's representatives during the negotiations that ABC intended to make a change with ``Nightline'' in the near future, regardless of Mr. Letterman's decision. The terms of Mr. Letterman's new contract with CBS were not immediately disclosed, but each of the two networks had been offering him deals with a salary in the range of $31.5 million a year, up only 5 percent from the $30 million he had been making. Mr. Letterman has long been reported to be unhappy with CBS. He has complained that inadequate network promotion of the ``Late Show'' and weak ratings for the local newscasts that lead into his show have made it difficult for him to overtake Jay Leno's ``Tonight Show'' on NBC. Mr. Letterman has also had a troubled relationship with Leslie Moonves, the president of CBS Television. http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/11/business/11CND-TUBE.html?ex=1016889304&ei=1&en=f4ad0be5d13f9406 (via Tom Roche, DXLD) WHAT DAVE SAID: TV Barn has been furnished with David Letterman's remarks, made on the "Late Show" telecast taped this afternoon in New York: You folks came on a good night - I'm still here. I woke up this morning and had to check New York Times to see where I was working today. This is a very interesting time right in the middle of a very tricky contract negotiation. CBS all of a sudden they can't kiss up to me enough -- it's crazy. I finally got a get-well card for my bypass surgery - two years ago - crazy. I figured out what I'm going to do. I'm going to get a face-lift then I'm going to FOX News. That is exactly what I am going to do. Can you believe there are two networks fighting over this crap - crazy, ain't it? This is how strange my life has been last week and a half - earlier today I got a call from NBC offering me the Tonight Show. I recognize that what I am going to talk about is ridiculous when you consider what happened on this day six months ago when New York and Washington DC were attacked. Compared to that this is all trivial, pointless and downright silly. Paul and I came over in 1993. We'd been fired from NBC. CBS was nothing. Who ever watched CBS - nobody. From 11:30-on, the rest of the night there was nothing but Gunsmoke all night long. So we had nothing to do and this beautiful theatre used to be a K- Mart and we were able to build something. We made it our own and we've had a lot of wonderful things happen. We have had some highlights. A couple of months ago - my contract is going to be finished in August -- I get a call from the boys. They say we have to negotiate. I say fine -- negotiate. 9 years - it's like a family. There's been good times and we've had fistfights. I'm not speaking figuratively, I'm speaking literally -- I actually punched some executives. I'm getting confused, we get a call from another network and apparently the guy had been drinking. He says come on over, come on over, and I'm thinking he is nuts. This is not like Everybody Loves Raymond - we do alright but... Turns out it's ABC and they are serious and they wanted you too Paul. The more I talked the more I realize they are serious and they have all the damn money in the world. I get a call from Regis saying he would be available for sex. Isn't that odd? And then it got crazier and crazier and it was...when I drop dead there won't be this much press. I just need to say a word about Ted Koppel. He has been on this show 3 or 4 times and to me he has always been a gentleman, a great guest and very funny, really funny. He might be actually too funny for a newsman. Back in '79 he began on Nightline, started out doing nightly reports on American hostages in '79 I had my first job running errands for Jim Nabors. The point is Ted -- what he has done and his contributions to American culture -- speak for themselves. He is one of a very small group that represents the highest echelon of broadcast achievement, without question. I've never been in a situation like this in my life the whole thing has made me dizzy. The one thing I know for a fact: Ted Koppel, at the very least -- because of his contributions and the kind of guy he is and what he has done for this country and the world of broadcasting - he, at very least deserves the right to determine his own professional future. Absolutely no less than that. So what I have decided to do, I've decided to -- and this has not been a very easy decision for me -- I have decided to stay here at CBS and I'd like to thank... [APPLAUSE] I know it sounds pretty good to you folks, but there goes the vacation to Disney World. I was talking to Al earlier in the make-up room and he says "I was talking to the crew and most of them would like you to stay." Most. Most of them would like you to stay. The morons running this network think there won't be fistfights, by god there will be fistfights and that's too bad. It's my hope - I would like to finish my career - a week from Tuesday - at CBS. I just want to say a word about the folks at ABC. I would rather ride naked on the subway than go through what these people had to go through with the last couple of weeks. To me they were gracious and generous and very very patient. Whatever you decide to do at 11:30, I wish you the very best. And my personal hope is that it will continue to be occupied by Ted Koppel and Nightline for as long as that guy would like to have that job - that is just the way it ought to be. Aaron B. 7:54 PM ET. (via TV Barn via Tom Roche, DXLD) Loses a little in the text; you should have seen it (gh, DXLD) ** U S A. March 12, 2002 Clear Channel Drawing Static. Radio: NO. 1 BROADCASTER DISPUTES CRITICS WHO SAY IT CONCEALS STATIONS TO EVADE FCC OWNERSHIP CAPS. By JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER How many radio stations does Clear Channel Communications Inc. really own? Some advertisers and competing broadcasters have petitioned the Federal Communications Commission, alleging that the media giant has evaded federal law and misled regulators by taking control of radio stations above the ownership limit in various markets by warehousing them in front companies.... http://www.latimes.com/business/la-000018129mar12.story?coll=la%2Dheadlines%2Dbusinessor http://www.latimes.com/la-000018129mar12.story (Los Angeles Times March 12 via Bill Westenhaver, DXLD) ** U S A. Boston's a tough town for DXers to the west, since most of the AMs (except WBZ) have sites west of town and are highly directional to the east. WEZE-590, WRKO-680, WEEI-850 and WWZN-1510 are all nulled to the west to some extent. That said, I've heard 680, 850 and 1510 in Rochester multiple times, generally just before Boston sunset. I suppose if I could stand to get up earlier, a good time would be just after Boston sunrise, when the stations have gone to their less-restrictive day patterns but there's still darkness 'twixt them and the west. A few other potentials: 560 - WHYN Springfield - some nulling to the west, but not impossible 580 - WTAG Worcester - should be better heard to the west than it generally is 640 - WNNZ Westfield - listen before local sunset or just after local sunrise, when they're at 50kw and beaming west 730 - WACE Chicopee - 5kw ND daytimer, so another potential SRS/SSS catch 740 - WJIB Cambridge - NRC'er Bob Bittner, who owns the station, does DX tests here occasionally (better when CBL was silent and CHWO not yet on) 760 - WVNE Leicester - another potential SRS/SSS catch if you can get rid of Detroit and ColOmbia 830 - WCRN Worcester - now with 50kW day, should be a decent SRS catch for someone, though the pattern does not favor the west very well 860 - WSBS Great Barrington - 2500 watts day ND, another potential SRS opportunity under Toronto 1060 - WBIX Natick - has been reported at SRS, and has been known to cheat at night with its 40kw day signal 1200 - WKOX Framingham - has a CP for 50kw if it can overcome neighborhood objections in Newton to new towers at the existing WUNR-1600 site; we shall see... 1420 - WBSM New Bedford - a relatively old allocation on a not-terribly-crowded regional channel 1440 - WVEI Worcester - a VERY old allocation on this regional channel; should be possible for someone, somewhere. It's simulcasting WEEI-850 most of the time 1480 - WSAR Fall River - another old allocation with a decent pattern 1600 - WUNR Brookline - has a CP for 20kw day and night, still nulled to the west, as part of the project to move WKOX and WRCA 1330 Waltham to its Newton transmitter site. Hope that helps! -s, ex-Bostonian (Scott Fybush, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. I got a mail from Cris Alexander from Crawford Broadcasting http://www.crawfordbroadcasting.com/home and it`s dealing with their upcoming IBOC changeover in Chicago in May. Cris has given me permission to post parts of the message. I think you will find this interesting. From Cris... [a.k.a. W. C. Alexander in Radio World --- gh] This spring's NAB show in Las Vegas begins the terrestrial digital rollout. FM, which stands to gain the least from hybrid digital, is nevertheless the medium that is ready to deploy now. iBiquity is kicking off a six-market "push" at the spring show. Our Chicago market (four FMs) will be part of this push and we will be purchasing digital transmitters, exciters and combiners. At the fall CES show the receivers will be rolled out. By that time, it is hoped that in the top six markets all the FM stations will be transmitting in the digital hybrid mode. AM, which stands to gain the most from hybrid digital, is probably a couple of years behind FM. Because in AM we must do more with less bandwidth, it has taken longer to develop a working system. That system has been developed and tested, however. Much of this year's NAB Boradcast Engineering Conference will be devoted to preparing AM transmission systems (and antennas in particular) for digital. We are told by the iBiquity folks that we have to meet a 1.4:1 or better SWR at carrier +/- 15 kHz. That's a tall order for a lot of AM systems, particularly directional antennas and diplexed/multiplexed systems. It's going to be interesting. Still, there is so much to be gained that I hope station owners will bite the bullet and make the investment. AM stereo as we now know it will go the way of FMX and so many other interim technologies as we move into the hybrid digital mode. Stay in touch and peek at the website from time to time. We will post facility photos as they become available or as things change. If you haven't already, take a peek at the station page for KCMN/KCBR in Colorado Springs. There is a facility photo page for that state-of-the-art transmission facility. We had a professional photographer come take those shots. Anyway, you can look at the engineering newsletter on the engineering page. [end Alexander] ...from me now: So we see IBOC is real, its happening and we need to get ready for it. DXing is about to change as we know it (Kevin Redding, Mesa, Arizona, WTFDA via DXLD) ** VATICAN [non]. BBC Radio Four The Archive Hour on Saturday 16th March is entitled "Listen for Heaven's Sake." Almost as old as the BBC, Vatican Radio was set up by Marconi in 1931 for Pope Pius XI to address the world in Latin. Now it broadcasts programmes in 40 languages- but how do its journalists deal with sensitive issues? The Latin may have gone but has the message changed? Radio Times has the programme as one of its choices for the day and Peter Barnard reviews it: This splendid staple of the Radio 4 diet is a weekly testament to the value of diligent research and tonight`s programme, presented by Gerry Anderson, is yet another example. In 1931 Marconi established Vatican Radio, at that point a modest experiment designed to transmit Pope Pius XI's pronouncements in Latin. There was great excitement among Catholics worldwide, including those in London, many of whom queued to hear the first broadcast relayed to Westminster Cathedral. But few could have predicted the network's growth to its present size, transmitting around the world in 40 languages with a programme schedule that includes music and arts programming as well as religious broadcasting. There is even an English monk who flies out to Rome from his monastery each week to answer listeners questions in Ask the Abbot (via Mike Barraclough, England, DXLD) UNIDENTIFIED. Does anyone know if there would be a station relaying "China Radio" and "Swiss Radio International" between 2100 and 2200 on 1700 kHz. No ID heard at 2130, but it sounded like there was some kind of promo at 2129:20 for thirty seconds, then it went into a fade. Does not seem to be an image unless a shortwave station somewhere is relaying these two stations back to back, which would be odd IMHO. Goodnight from (Lima, Fred Vobbe, W8HDU, OH, NRC-AM via DXLD) Later: I can't seem to find anyone that relays these programs back to back. However, more investigation shows that WRN-1 runs these programs, so is someone on 1700 programming the World Radio Network as a format or as filler to a format change? I've not seen anything in the list, and with the X-band X-perts we have, I would have thought someone would reported it. BTW, signal strength was very weak, under the usual 1700 stuff. Heard on a Sony ICF-2010 with no external antenna (Fred, ibid.) ### ||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| DX LISTENING DIGEST 2-041, March 11, 2002 edited by Glenn Hauser, wghauser@hotmail.com Items from DXLD may be reproduced and re-reproduced only if full credit be maintained at all stages and we be provided exchange copies. DXLD may not be reposted in its entirety without permission. Materials taken from Arctic or originating from Olle Alm and not having a commercial copyright are exempt from all restrictions of noncommercial, noncopyrighted reusage except for full credits HTML version of this issue will be posted afterwards at http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldtd02.html For restrixions and searchable 2002 contents archive see http://www.worldofradio.com/dxldmid.html NOTE: If you are a regular reader of DXLD, and a source of DX news but have not been sending it directly to us, please consider yourself obligated to do so. Thanks, Glenn WORLD OF RADIO #1121: (STREAM) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1121.ram (DOWNLOAD) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1121.rm (SUMMARY) http://www.worldofradio.com/wor1121.html NEXT AIRINGS ON RFPI: Tue 1900, Wed 0100, 0700, 1300 on some of: 7445-AM/USB, 15039, 21815-USB UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIAL Hi Glenn, The site is WONDERFUL! It always was and now it is better. You know that I have held you in highest regard for what you provide for all of us. I just thought I'd remind you and say "Thank You So Much". (Michael C. McCarty, Plain City, Ohio, WDX8IAH, N8EYE) ** AFGHANISTAN (YA5T Update). Robert, S53R/YA5T, reports the following dated March 7th: "YA5T has not been much on the air during the past week due to work commitments. It really is hard to get on the radio after working for 18 hours and you have to be up at 7 o'clock in the morning - day after day. However, since our last report we have hit over 17,000 QSOs. First U.S. contact on 80 meters also came through. I bet you know who that was! Bob, W6RJ - and it was on SSB long path. Bob serves as a beacon every day, hi! In following days N7UA and W6KW were also worked CW with very good sigs. Don't forget we are using 100 W and a piece of wire. 160 meters is going well with some 400 Qs, but no U.S. so far. ICOM America is sponsoring a PW1 kilowatt amplifier, so I hope we are getting closer and closer to YA - North America contact! Mark, ON4WW, left Kabul today and will do some ground work for WFP in the next weeks in northern part of the country. Peter, ON6TT, was here for 2 days, but just too busy to do any radio. I stay for another 3 weeks and promise to be on bands as much as possible. So, CU in the next days from 160-10..... 73 Robert, S53R / YA5T" (KB8NW/OPDX March 11/BARF-80 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** BOLIVIA. 4716.7, Radio Yura, Yura. 0105-0111 March 10. Music program conduced by female in Spanish. ID as: "para todos ustedes que están en la sintonía de la Radio Yura". 24332 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentine) 5952.5, Radio Pio XII, Siglo XX. 0038-0045 March 10. Music program conduced in Aymará by male and female. Very nice Andean music. 32432 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentine) 6085.2, Radio San Gabriel, La Paz. 0115-0120 March 10. Romantic music in Spanish. Ann. in Aymará by male. 22432 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentine) 6155, Radio Fides, La Paz. 0050-0100 March 10. Music program. Ann. and ID as: "Y seguimos, seguimos, seguimos aquí, en Fides". Greetings for the Women International Day. 24332 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentine, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** BURKINA FASO. R. Burkina back on 5030 again. Time is 1846, 10th March; I am hearing RDTV Burkina Faso IDing as Radio Burkina in French, good signal and with good modulation. Hope this is useful (Stuart Austin, Blackpool, England, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Hi, a very strong signal (S9+20) found this morning (MAR 11, 0540 UT) on 5030.0 kHz. Burkina Faso has been reported here some time ago with irregular operation. Program: political comment in unknown language (parties, programs...), an announcement mentioning Burkina Faso at 0554, one commercial in French, more commercials in vernacular language. No ID at 0600, just commercials followed by "African pop". Sporadic announcements. Quite good signal still at 0620, but getting worse rapidly and quite poor at 0630 (= 7:30 am local time)... No real Burkina Faso ID heard. GOOD DX, (Karel Honzik, the Czech Republic (Czechia), AOR AR-7030 30 m Long Wire, hard-core-dx via DXLD) ** CANADA. A goldmine of radio articles in Globe DON'T TOUCH THAT DIAL? Plans to shake up CBC Radio have been met with concern by staff and protests by loyal listeners. GAYLE MacDONALD takes a behind-the-scenes look at what's at stake Late one afternoon last December, Adrian Mills, the newly appointed executive director of programming at CBC English Radio, sent a beaming memo to staff. The fall BBM radio survey had just been released, and management was ecstatic: CBC Radio had notched its highest audience reach ever, with 3.9-million Canadians tuning in on an average week. FULL STORY: Go to http://www.globeandmail.com/thearts ========== Jeffrey Simpson DON'T WRITE OFF CBC RADIO'S AGING FANS, Page A17 FULL STORY: Go to http://www.globeandmail.com/columnists and look under National ========== Russell Smith WHAT YOUNG PEOPLE WANT IS NOT RADIO LITE, Page R3 FULL STORY: Go to http://www.globeandmail.com/columnists and look under The Arts (via Ricky Leong, QE, and Mike Cooper, DXLD) ** CANADA [non]. On 5020, RCI at 1524 Feb 4. Frequency not listed by ILG or RCI, Relay from Honiara, perhaps? Quirks and Quarks program at excellent levels, co-channel QRM. BBCWS found here again unscheduled a 1512 Feb 16 at good strength (Edwin Lowe, Culburra NSW DXpedition, March Australian DX News via DXLD) Best guess, barring receiver image, would be Solomons got the wrong satellite feed (gh, DXLD) ** CHECHNYA [non]. From CDI Russia Weekly: March 4, 2002 US POSTPONES CHECHEN BROADCASTS IN GOODWILL GESTURE TOWARDS RUSSIA By Ariel Cohen There will be no Radio Free Chechnya, at least not in the near future. Less than 48 hours before the Chechen service of Radio Liberty was supposed to go on the air in late February, the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG), the governing body which supervises Radio Free Europe-Radio Liberty, decided to postpone the North Caucasus broadcasts indefinitely. The broadcasting body acted after US diplomats expressed concern that the Chechen-language broadcasts might be counter-productive in waging the campaign against terrorism. The postponement reflects the complexity of US-Russian relations, as well as the pressures of the war on terrorism. Officials and non- governmental organization representatives in the United States remain concerned about Russia's conduct of the Chechen war. However, the Bush Administration does not want to put Russia's support for the global anti-terrorism campaign in jeopardy. Russia's foreign policy élite reportedly seethed over the US decision to launch a north Caucasus service at the Radios. Broadcasting in Chechen was seen as particularly offensive to Kremlin officials, who portray Chechen separatists as Islamic terrorists with links to the al Qaeda network. Moscow insiders also saw beginning of the North Caucasus broadcasts as a strong signal that the United States supports the cause of the Chechen independence, a perception that is not necessarily true, especially after September 11. Some officials in Moscow viewed the broadcasting plan as a move to undermine US-Russian relations. Since September 11, President Vladimir Putin has been consistent in his support for the US-led anti-terrorism campaign. [For more information, see the Eurasia Insight archives]. Broadcasts in the languages of the Northern Caucasus, such as Chechen, Avar and Cirkassian, were mandated by the US Congress in 2000. But according to a memo by Thomas A. Dine, Radio Free Europe-Radio Liberty's president, full-time broadcasters and stringers will now provide coverage of the region through Radio Liberty's Russian service. In informal conversations, conducted over the last several months, Russian officials complained that influential "Russophobes" in the US government had influenced Sen. Jesse Helms (R-NC), the then-Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to support legislation to fund the broadcasts. To counter the US plans, the Russian officials embarked on a campaign of pressure to link the Chechen broadcasts to the ability of Radio Liberty Russian service to broadcast on AM and FM frequencies, which the Prague-based Radio Liberty leases from dozens of independent Russian radio stations. Russian legislation requires less than 50 percent of foreign ownership for stations operating in Russia, a requirement that may jeopardize Radio Liberty medium wave broadcasting. Some Russian officials even requested that the United States provide "reciprocity," under which Washington would allow Russian broadcasts on similar popular AM/FM frequencies in the United States. The latter project is highly unlikely to materialize, as such broadcasts will cost millions of dollars that the Russian budget simply does not have. Sergei Yastrzhembsky, a top Putin aide, claimed February 28 that the US decision to postpone the Chechen-language broadcasts had "not aroused any particular emotions among Moscow officials." However, the semi-official RIA news agency reported that the Chechen broadcasts would have aggravated the conflict and complicated efforts to find a political solution to the crisis. Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov reportedly intervened with Secretary of State Colin Powell, requesting that broadcasts be postponed. Meanwhile, some offcials in the Bush Administration also pointed to an apparent contradiction in authorizing the deployment of military advisors to Georgia, ostensibly to help contain a building terrorist threat in the Transcaucasus republic, while also turning the switch on the Chechen broadcasting. At a regular press briefing, State Department spokesman Richard Boucher explained that the decision to postpone the broadcasts began with a letter written by Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage to the BBG, on which the Secretary of State sits ex officio, asking to postpone the broadcasts. The State Department asserted that the broadcasts were ill-timed, given the post September 11 geopolitical environment. At the same time, Boucher said the US government was eager to see the Chechnya peace process make progress. "We believe that the only way is to solve the problems there is a political solution. We want to make sure that everything we do contributes to that goal and doesn't detract from it," Boucher said. Despite the decision on Chechen broadcasts, human rights groups and US officials continue to exert pressure on Russia to seek a negotiated solution. For example, a bipartisan initiative launched in late February in the Senate, - spearheaded by Paul Wellstone (D-Minnesota), and Senator Sam Brownback (R-Missouri) - seeks the adoption of a resolution on Chechnya requiring President Bush to pressure Russia into a negotiated political settlement. Whether the Bush Administration is willing to take action that complicates its relatively cordial relationship with Putin, at a time when the campaign against terrorism may expand, remains to be seen. Many administration officials are wary of doing anything that creates an appearance of support for the Chechens, who have allied themselves with a variety of radical Islamic elements. Editor's Note: Ariel Cohen, Ph.D., is a Research Fellow at the Heritage Foundation, and author of "Russian Imperialism: Development and Crisis" (Praeger/Greenwood, 1998). (via Mike Terry, March 10, DXLD) Since when has any country had the right to control the output of another country`s international broadcasts? This is a dangerous precedent. If the US is not to promote a `free` Chechnya (perhaps an unfortunate name for the proposed service), then broadcasts in the languages concerned should go forth under the banner of the Voice of America. The Russians need a heavy dose of reality, and quit blaming the US for their own problems, e.g. also the Olympics. And again, I challenge them to broadcast to the US in any minority Indian language, and see if we care (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** CHILE. La dirección correcta de la página con las frecuencias de las emisoras chilenas de música es.... http://www.ham-radio.com/n6ca/50MHz/CE_musicfreq.html en lugar de... http://www.ham-radio.com/n6ca/50MHz/CE_musicafreq.html Aprovecho la ocasión para felicitar a Glenn por sus clásicos informes y a Jaime y Alfonso por el excelente trabajo en Radio Nederland (Gustavo F. Durán, Argentina, March 10, DX LISTENING DIGEST) It was OK in 2-031, but not on the Radio Enlace page ** CHINA: INTERNAL REVIEW OF MEDIA GROUPS "TO PREVENT SABOTAGE" | Excerpt from report by Hong Kong newspaper South China Morning Post on 11 March The Communist Party's Central Publicity Department has ordered the heads of all media organizations to conduct thorough "self-inspection" of employees to prevent sabotage. The order came after Falun Gong members interrupted scheduled broadcasting at a mainland cable television network in Changchun, Jilin province, on Tuesday [5 March] and managed to broadcast a programme about the banned sect to viewers for 50 minutes. The Central Publicity Department called an emergency meeting on Wednesday [6 March] and instructed heads of main broadcasting organizations and newspapers as well as provincial officials in charge of the media to "learn a lesson" from the incident. The media organizations were asked to review workers' backgrounds and especially to make inquiries about their family members to ensure their relatives were not Falun Gong members, a Beijing source said. The bosses were told to review staff rosters and ensure senior editors were present late at night to prevent sabotage. They were told at the meeting that no similar incidents would be tolerated and that they would be held responsible for further "political incidents". The bosses were also reminded to review their daily routines and to plug any loopholes. The meeting was followed by a circular issued by the Central Publicity Department to all provincial media organizations to strengthen security... The cable station has about 300,000 subscribers, but it was not clear how many saw the Falun Gong programme... Official media earlier said only one Falun Gong follower and three witnesses had been detained since Tuesday's incident. A government official at Changchun confirmed that three were under arrest. Source: South China Morning Post, Hong Kong, in English 11 Mar 02 p 8 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. A single report of R. Auténtica being heard on 5875.2 has been quoted in various DX bulletins. Since none of the other editors have questioned it, and the reporter has not corrected it either, I point out that the station is normally heard on 5975.2, causing that het against BBC Antigua. Surely this is a typo. If not, the reporter and editors should have remarked that it was not on its usual frequency. It also had `adjacent channel splatter`, surely pointing to 5975 rather than 5875. GUDAR! (gh, DXLD) ** COLOMBIA. 3120.06 (Harmonic?) Colmundo Radio, unknown QTH. Feb 2002 - 1050 UT. Probably a harmonic, in that case from the fundamental of 1560 kHz. Only listed "Colmundo" there according to WRTH is: HJXZ, Emisoras El Poblado in Medellín (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin March 10, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DXLD) ** CUBA. Going back a few years, I did the Congressionally mandated annual evaluation of Radio Martí. As part of that, there was a comparison of the way news was reported to Cuba via Martí and the main Cuban radio outlets. At that time, it was very common to hear criticism of the American lifestyle, the "inherent racism" of Americans, and the support of Americans of a corrupt, brutal, etc., form of capitalist government. While most barbs were directed at government policy, there was every intent to paint the (white) population as a whole as uncaring and unsympathetic to the Cuban cause ("La Causa Cubana") and to the plight of the working man world wide. This confirmed what I heard while managing stations in Miami; back in the 80's at least, stations paid someone to listen to Progreso, Rebelde, etc., and give regular résumés of the broadcasts. Of course, the most attacked people are the vile Cuban refugees, the "worms," who betrayed their country and their people for a corrupt life in the USA (David Gleason, CA, March 10, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** CZECH REPUBLIC. Today R Prague announced in their "Mailbox" program release of long awaited R Prague history book. The same will be started distributing from next week free of cost (Swopan Chakroborty, Kolkata, India, March 11, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** DUCIE ISLAND. There were no press releases over the past week to report on. The VP6/D team should be leaving Mangareva, French Polynesia, (March 12th) to head to Pitcairn Island by the time you read this. They will pickup supplies and operators, and then head to Ducie Island (two day trip). Activity should take place by the weekend. Keep watching the following Web page for updated details at: http://www.qsl.net/wd4ngb/ducie.htm (KB8NW/OPDX March 11/BARF-80 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** FRANCE. One of the TIS outlets on 25926 was heard the best yet at the late hour of 1941 UT March 10, and would expect it to stay in another hour or more (David Hodgson, TN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** GERMANY. "Deutsche Welle World DX Meeting" noted in S Asia, Sats at 2335-2345 in DX English Mailbag program. "World DX Meeting" ask OM's and SWL for help as support inquiry, to establish a 10 minute DX Meeting program on *all* English program targets. DX Meeting help support comments by letter, postcard or e-mail to Deutsche Welle Radio, English Service, D-50588 Cologne, Germany. fax +49 221 389 3000 thorsten.karg@dw-world.de or kristin.zeier@dw-world.de (Roland Schulze, Philippines, Feb 10-24, BC-DX via Wolfgang Büschel, March 10, DXLD) see also MONGOLIA non ** GERMANY. Hi Glenn, re. the German TV debate: German TV is on air since March 1st; see http://www.germantv.info/en_empfangtechnik.php for technical details and http://dw-world.de/english/0,3367,3294_A_464752_1_A,00.html for PR stuff on the launch of German TV (Kai Ludwig, Germany, March 9, DX LISTENING DIGEST) 1575 kHz: High power is not (permanently) in use yet (Kai Ludwig, Germany, March 9, DX LISTENING DIGEST) see also IRAQ ** INDONESIA. JEMBATAN DX 129, March 10, 2002 edited by Juichi Yamada: 3264.6, RRI Gorontalo. At 1240 talk by male and female, sometimes EG pops. Suddenly signed off at 1259 without announcement. Fair to poor. Mar 9, 2002 (Juichi Yamada, JAPAN) 3344.8, RRI Ternate. At 1313 local pops and male talk. The program was enjoyable for me. Fair Mar 9, 2002, (Juichi Yamada, JAPAN) 4874.57, RRI Sorong. 0956 Talk by man and Music. Very strong and clear audio. Local ID at 1004 Mar 1, 2002 (Nobuo Takeno, JAPAN) 6153.7, RRI Biak. At 0908 reading of Holy Koran, lagu Qasidah, then local pops. Not heard local news at 0930. Fair to poor Mar 9, 2002 (Juichi Yamada, JAPAN) 7171.2, RRI Serui. At 0948 male long talk only. Not interesting but best signal at this time. Fair Mar 9, 2002 (Juichi Yamada, JAPAN) RRI Manado on 3214.8 kHz is not found in the beginning of March. (Juichi Yamada, JAPAN) RRI Merauke on 3905.0 kHz is not found in the beginning of March. (Juichi Yamada, JAPAN) END OF (JEMBATAN DX March 10 via DXLD) ** INTERNATIONAL WATERS. HF Distress Frequencies. As a result of changes agreed internationally at the World Radiocommunication Conference 2000, use of carrier frequencies 12290 kHz and 16420 kHz for calling purposes is being phased out. These channels are to be reserved for distress and safety communications. The alternative carrier frequencies 12359 kHz and 16537 kHz may be used by ship stations and coast stations for calling on a simplex basis, provided that the peak envelope power does not exceed 1 kW. (sourced from a posting from VK5ZWI via WIA Q-News March 10 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** IRAQ. Re DXLD 2-040 GERMANY non: ``No Megaradio heard on 1575 kHz; did hear Spanish talk fading out to Middle East music and Arabic talk and another station off frequency at 1575.3 kHz.`` Hi Glenn, I have heard Iraq regularly on 1575.2 kHz. Maybe that was Wade's station. 73, (Mauno Ritola, Finland, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** IRELAND. The legendary Irish SW pirate R. Valleri will be returning to the air on St Patrick`s weekend for a special one-off broadcast. The station will use 6310 kHz with 40 watts from the evening of Sat 16 Mar, continuing until the following night. This will give North American listeners the chance to hear the station. Original presenters Derek Jones and Mike Anderson will host a nostalgic show to celebrate two sesquidecades since R. Valleri`s first broadcast. Last heard in the mid 80s, the station will announce contact details for reception reports over the air (Ian Biggar, Harrogate, Yorkshire, March BDXC=UK Communication via DXLD) But cf DXLD 2-040 ** IRELAND. 6295 - R. Reflections Europe, Donegal - 9 dias. Recebido cartão QSL full data (usando o mesmo QSL da antiga emissora inglesa Radio Fax) e schedule de programas e horários. Enviado relatório de recepção por email com arquivo de som em Real Audio e posteriormente um relatório de recepção impresso acompanhado de US$ 1. V/S: Trevor Brook. QTH: Radio Reflections Europe; The Forge; Cranleigh, England GU6 7BG Obs: Transmitem sòmente aos Domingos (Marcelo Toníolo dos Anjos, Greenvale, NY, EUA, @tividade DX Mar 11 via DXLD) see also UK ** ISRAEL. Beginning this Thursday during the 1700 English newscast on Reshet Aleph, Israel Radio will have a program (weekly?) with a Psychologist/Rabbi answering questions about dealing with stress and with children exposed to trauma. Questions can be phoned or faxed to the IBA or emailed to: englis-@iba.org.il I don't know if this will be on the 2000 broadcast. The 1700 broadcast is available on demand or for download around 1742 from wrn.org. It is not on the Reshet Heh live webcast (which has Yiddish at 1700) but the 2000 broadcast is (Joel Rubin, NY, March 10, swprograms via DXLD) I went to listen to Israel's English broadcast at 1700 on 17545 and it was not there, instead had another language on (possibly Hebrew). Have they dropped English, or simply gone on summer time, changing the scheduled time? (Steve {Lare}, Holland, MI, March 11, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Surely no DST yet; they usually wait at least until after Passover (gh, DXLD) ** ISRAEL [non]. Re the previous item about a WPBR Florida talkshow holding a mock war-crimes tribunal against Ariel Sharon, as immediately posted on MONITORING REMINDERS, it was a no-show; some other local program, about entertainment, aired Thursday after 1900 UT. Looking through the WPBR site, apparently the host in question is actually on at 1700-1900, contrary to their own press release. Anyhow, it was obviously a publicity stunt by the host who, BTW, is a Republican running for U.S. Senate (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** ITALY. 7306 USB, R Europe, Pioltello (500 watts), Mar 9, 0405-0420, Italian and English special program to the NASWA Winter SWL Festival at Kulpsville. Dario Monferini and the producer read and commented reports on its recent special broadcasts to the Convention of the New Zealand Radio DX League. Covered by Vatican R 0030-0400, but then 24233. The programme will be repeated from Mar 9, 2300 till Mar 10, 0600 UT (Anker Petersen, Denmark, hard-core-dx via DXLD) 7306 USB, Radio Europe (pirate), Special broadcast for SWL Winterfest 2002 heard weak to fair at 0430-0600 March 9. Best just before and after 0500. In Italian and English (Lee Silvi, OH, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** JAPAN [non]. QSL fever seem to have halted at least as we reached 160 reports from over 30 countries including China and Iran, after our Special Marconi Broadcast was aired by WRMI, Lesea stations and by AWR. I see also other international clubs organising special broadcasts as radio amateurs used to do with their special stations. It's something we can develop and ideas are very welcome from all of you. So I thank Mr Nobuya Kato of the Japan SW Club, celebrating its 50th anniversary with a special program on the air on 16 March in the former Communications World slot from Voice of America, together with the segment looking back on the VOA Japanese service which went off the air in 1970. A special QSL card from JSWC will be issued for correct reception reports sent to: Japan Short Wave Club (JSWC), 50th Anniversary Committee, P.O.Box 138, Yokohama Port, 231-8691 Japan (Luigi Cobisi, European DX Council email list via Mike Barraclough, DXLD) ** KOREA NORTH. This one is currently up in the air. All we can say is wait and listen. During last week there was conflicting info about Hrane's, YT1AD, location (was he at the airport in Rome, presumably heading back to Belgrade or in Pyongyang, North Korea). It is believed he is in Pyongyang with Voja, YU7AV, the docs/ permits and is awaiting the "OK" to begin Amateur Radio transmissions (which they hope will happen March 11th). All activity so far (P5/YT1AD) has been the work of a pirate (KB8NW/OPDX March 11/ BARF-80 via John Norfolk, OKCOK, DXLD) ** KOREA SOUTH. This week I checked RKI webcast again UT Monday, March 11 at 0415 to see if English were back, since last week at 0445 check they were in Korean contrary to posted schedule, which still this week shows English 0400-0500 (but no simul SW at that hour). Guess what: Murtiwave Feedback was already in progress at 0415, and they were already in the mailbag segment, so I missed Paul Ormandy. Fortunately, I had already weblistened at 0235 and heard the entire program as usual. But this MWF repeat must have started close to 0400, and/or the English hour actually started at 0330. Since they do have half-hour versions of English, like we used to get via Canada in the mornings, this webcast could really be only half an hour at 0400. They were wrapping up by 0425, and into Korean! at 0426, accounting for that language being heard last week in the second half of the 0400 hour. But why doesn`t RKI make clear in their schedule what they are really doing?? (Glenn Hauser, OK, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** MADAGASCAR. 9685 [station] is also being heard on 5000 right now mentioning twice Radio Madagascar at 1800. The reception is much better on this frequency. Now it remain to know if it will be on the air until 0000 as on Saturday RTM went off around that time (Mahendra Vaghjee, Mauritius, 09 March 02, hard-core-dx via DXLD) There are now TWO "R. Madagascars": (1) The official one, which is neutral, is on 5010, 6135 and 7155. 5010 went off earlier Mar 9 (due to the unrest), 1702* with the usual ID and IS. (2) 5000 [moved up to 5003 around 2340] and 9685, backing the self-appointed government; on Mar 9 9685 went off at 2000, while 5000 was still on the air at 0100 with anmts in Malagasy, sometimes mentions R. Madagascar, sometimes Malagasy Radio. It was also strange that no French words or songs have been heard, but many English songs (Mahendra Vaghjee, Mauritius, DX- plorer via DXLD) ** MALAWI. After first reappearing on 7130 in Jan, MBC switched to using another of its former frequencies, 3380. At the time of writing [when??], I only hear Malawi on 3380 in the early morning and again from the late afternoon onwards. It`s not clear whether there are no SW transmissions during the middle of the day, or (as I suspect) if they are on 3380 which is not propagating as far as Kenya (Chris Greenway, Nairobi, March BDXC-UK Communication via DXLD) ** MALTA. RADJU RTK: ONE HECKUVA PROFESSIONAL RADIO Blata-l-Bajda (CRU) --- It`s got one of the busiest, brightest websites that I have seen for a Catholic radio station and it programs international rock for its young, classical for adults, country and western for the adventurous, and educational, social, cultural, and religious programming for everyone. This station`s website works well and is interesting, and the station itself commands almost 20% of the audience in the Maltese Republic. It is Radju RTK, operated by the dioceses of Malta. Malta: the land of the Phoenicians, the Greeks, the Romans, the Crusaders, the Arabs, the French, the Italians, the English, and since 1964, an independent nation. Malta is the island on which St Paul shipwrecked and found impressively warm hospitality. Say Malta and you go go all the way back to the mists of European prehistory. You can get to know Malta well through Radju RTK. Visit its website at http://www.rtk.org.mt/ and note the interesting Maltese language. Click on the audiostreaming button and hear it. If you say it sounds like Arabic, you are right. Maltese is a west Arabic dialect with many Italian words. On this small, extremely densely populated nation 60 miles south of Sicily in the middle of the Mediterranean, Maltese and English are the official languages. The website is entirely in Maltese from what I can see, with a good number of English words sprinkled in. Almost 400,000 people live on three islands, the largest of which is 90 square miles; 96% are Catholic. There are two dioceses, the Archdiocese of Malta, see in the capital, Valletta, and the diocese of Gozo on Ghawdex, the second largest island. The two dioceses founded the station, ``Radju RTK`` in Maltese, with a license grant in 1991. It went on March 14, 1992, with its main transmitter on 103.0 FM and relay transmitters on 97.6 FM for Malta Island and 97.8 FM on Ghawdex Island. If I get the sense of the brief history correctly, it was Malta`s first private station, and it has done very well. The home page identifies Real Player as the system (a download button for a free Player), but in fact the system is Windows Media. When you first come onto the home page, you hear the neat little station jingle-- ``RTK`` – in English. The weather is upper right, major programs highlighted on the right, and the various page buttons stacked on left. ``Skeda`` is the schedule, as you might guess; ``Taghrif fuq il-programmi`` when clicked offers an interesting array of buttons for the various programs Radju RTK offers. These include programs on finances, on culture and education, on family life, and on religion. The music button reveals a range of programs from rock to country and western to classical. Clearly, Radju RTK offers something for everyone. What is fascinating about this station, and I am impressed, is the thorough professional sound it has. Radju RTK takes a back seat in professionalism to nobody. Radju RTK, as are many European Catholic stations geared to the general public, is commercially supported. As I write this, I am hearing a professionally done ad complete with jingles for JB Carpets, followed by the ID jingle, ``RTK.`` This is one professionally done radio station, and it is much more lively and professional than a similar station I heard over a year ago, RFM, operated in Lisbon by the Portuguese Bishops for young people. You can see the rate card by clicking on ``Reklamar.`` The national money is the Lira, which is worth about US$3. This being the case, a 60- second spot is about $30, with discounts for packages of over 50 spots, and surcharges for special placement in the 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. slots and a surcharge of about $30 for voice production. Insertion into weather forecasts and at time checks carries special rates. ``Kuntatti`` is exactly as it sounds, ``Contacts,`` a full range of officials and their phones, faxes, and e-mail addresses; many terms here are in English. ``RTK Rating`` is entirely in Maltese and the graph showing an 18.2% rating is self-explanatory. ``Dwar i-RTK`` is the station history. The ``Ghanjuna`` button is blank; ``Media Centre`` is not a photo page, but the list of contacts again. While Radju RTK is commercial, it simultaneously relies on listener donations. Click on ``Membri`` (Members) and ``Beneficcji`` (Benefits) to see that members get a newsletter, are eligible to take part in special programs and contests. ``Radju RTK — I-istazzjon li jaghmel differenza!`` Database Blata-l-Badja: Radju RTK 103.0 FM, Malta 97.6 FM, Ghawdex 97.8 FM. Archdiocese of Malta and Diocese of Ghawdex. Triq Nazzjonali, Blata- l-Bajda HMR 02. Tel.: 2569 9100, 2569 9158, fax 2569 9151 and 9160. Website: http://www.rtk.org.mt Executive chairman: Fr Nicholas Cachia; managing director Jeffrey Calafato. Program director Tonio Bonello, Technical director George Pollacco, marketing mgr Sylvana Magro. E-mail: info@rtk.org.met, engineering: gpollacco@rtk.org.mt managing director: jcalafato@mediacentre.org.mt Format: news, educational programming, entertainment programming. Bilingual. Founded March 14, 1992. Audiostreams using Windows Media (Michael Dorner, editor, Catholic Radio Update #165, March 11, via DXLD) ** MONGOLIA [non]. Deutsche Welle preview for Mon Mar 11: INSIGHT: Ten years ago, Mongolia adopted a democratic constitution following decades of Communist rule. During the early 1990s, the ex-Communist Mongolian People's Revolutionary Party gradually yielded its monopoly on power. In 1996, the Democratic Union Coalition defeated the former Communists in national elections. Over the next four years, the Coalition implemented a number of key reforms to modernize the economy and institutionalize democratic reforms. But the former Communists posed a strong opposition that stalled additional reforms and made implementation difficult. Then in 2000, the Revolutionary Party came back into power and completely reshuffled the government. This edition of Insight takes a closer look at where Mongolia has gone and where it is heading. For more information please turn to our internet website at http://dw-world.de/english (DW Previews via John Norfolk, swprograms via DXLD) ** NEW ZEALAND. Per an announcement on Mailbox, New Zealand will revert from GMT +13 to GMT +12. RNZI on 17 March (mostly for domestic relay time changes) 1650 - 6095 kHz 1750 - 11980 1850 - 15160 2050 - 17675 0459 - 15340 0759 - 11675 1105-1305 15175 The main change to RNZI will be on European summer time day, on the last Sunday in March. (My note--there is a good chance, as usual, for North Americans to be confused during the one week between European summer time day and U.S./Canada summer time day. Note that WRN to North America usually keeps European summer time.) (Joel Rubin, swprograms via DXLD) ** NORWAY. Here's why the asterisk is on the Denmark/Norway schedule. Here is a reply to a letter I sent to Erik Koie of Radio Denmark... if you're wondering why there's an asterisk (*) on some of the transmissions in the A02 sked that might be cancelled at short notice, here's the answer...--Joe Erik, I've looked up the new A02 schedule for Radio Denmark in DXLD. I see you have asterisks which note that some frequencies/times may be discontinued without notice. Can you explain to me why some transmissions in the summer schedule might be cancelled? Is that a matter with NRK, or the people who run the Kvitsoy and Sveio transmitters? If this is a matter with NRK then I guess they might be cutting out some broadcasts at some point in the summer schedule to save money... (Joe Hanlon in Philadelphia, USA) Dear Joe, Radio Norway wanted to quit short wave completely by the end of last year, but the decision-makers were not aware of - for instance - the contract with Norkring, that runs the stations, and the similar contract with Denmark...so they suddenly had a problem! To make a long story short, Norway (NRK) wants to sell as much airtime as possible, and we have agreed - if necessary - to be willing to cancel the broadcasts marked with the *. If they succeed in selling airtime. OK? Regards, (Erik Koie, DR Radio [sic], March 10, via Hanlon, DXLD) ** OKLAHOMA. Subject: Programming advice To: KXOK@yahoo.com KXOK, We`ll see if this gets through, with the incomplete E-mail address in the TV Spotlight ad, and the misleading one on your website with -TV. I certainly hope Mr Faulkner will follow through with his big plans for the station, especially local production. I have yet to see any sign of it; instead, after a few days of animated IDs all day long, you reverted to MTV2, and the excruciatingly boring auctions of your predecessor. I suggest you really get a fresh start by dumping both MTV2 and the auctions, and build up a schedule of a variety of entertainment and information programming. You could probably get quality programming at little or no cost by taking some international broadcasters, such as Deutsche Welle TV from Germany (including English, newscasts), BBC World, etc., etc. Minor networks such as America-1, once carried by K32DZ, would be an improvement over the current fare. Or have you signed a long new contract with MTV-2, taking the money and running? Regards, (Glenn Hauser, Enid, Dec 23, 2001, to KXOK via DXLD) Mr. Hauser, We do hope that You have our e-mail address figured out, and that the "misleading -TV" suffix on our address is no longer confusing to you. Yes, instead of .COM there is also org, gov, and now .TV As You are most certainly aware, (especially since you write critical reviews in your newsletter about all media outlets), We recently went thru a horrible icing condition on our antennae that blew the final in our EMCEE TV transmitter. All repairs are done, and the station is transmitting once again at full power. We have recently gotten information on our class A upgrade, and will be raising power to 50 Kw in the very near future. This should increase our coverage from "barely across town" to approxiamately 50 miles all directions city grade signal. The station is currently undergoing a complete re-build of the transmitter plant (new antennae, new transmitter, new micro-wave, new processors, new line, HDTV ready!) and also putting in all new digital studios at the Oakwood Mall. We have hired newspeople and a meteorologist to augment our programming. In other words, we are a real TV station with big plans. Our engineer has seen your newsletter somewhere on the internet. We were wondering if You would be open to being interviewed on set. You are the un-official expert on all forms of broadcasting in Oklahoma, and We think it would be interesting to have an interview with You to share both locally, and with our networks. Oh yeah, the "cheesey MTV2" is gone......should make you happy! Now, maybe You can see us on your rabbit ears, and hopefully You will approve of our line up. Is it OK if Anita stays with us to do the auction? We have tried to increase the quality of our retail products. Could not find a local number for your residence, so had to e-mail you instead.............74 (KXOK-TV [sic], February 8, 2002 via DXLD) Subject: Re: Programming advice To: "Rex Faulkner" <kxoktv@yahoo.com> Dear Mr Faulkner, Thanks for your reply of almost a month ago, which I leave below to refresh your memory. I have been waiting and seeing, as well as being preoccupied with other matters. I of course took note of your tiny-print schedule last week in the Enid TV supplement, not least the final line ``All Times Are Eastern`` -- surely, that must be a misprint. Why would anyone list local programming as in a different timezone? So, silly me, I actually looked for your local morning and evening news shows as if the times given were Central, and found none of it. Besides, some of the other listings did not match anything actually transmitted. And again this Sunday, Eastern time listings! I happened to tune by after 6:30 pm Monday, and discover you are actually doing locally originated news, at that time and the announcer closes saying he will be back at 10 (not 11). Now I must try to see what you actually air at 7 am, not 8 am. I do commend you on your initiative to make something out of this property, and hope to see progressive improvements. However, Just as I rebel at OKC TV stations wasting time in their local newscasts for national and international stories (what are their networks for? They cover those so much better) -- I wonder why in the world you are bothering with news beyond Enid, and Oklahoma at the most. Give us some *depth* about what is really happening in Enid, and you could fill most of the half hour, with the remainder some OK stories perhaps the big stations are missing. Are you going to spring for a TelePrompTer? As I mentioned before, however, if you want to cover international news, you really ought to pick up something which is not available otherwise (at least on Cox basic/extended), such as BBC World, DW TV, and no doubt others. Since you ask, no, you may not keep Anita (or anyone) doing auctions, the most excruciatingly boring, wasteful, programming imaginable. But no doubt you shall anyway, if that is actually producing some income. I have plenty else to watch and hear during those hours. The continuous shot of traffic going by on Garriott you ran one afternoon was immeasurably more engrossing; I could hardly take my eyes off it. Glancing through your Eastern programming schedule, I am struck by one thing, in case this is really accurate (excepting a few hours on Sundays, and `paid programs` which are probably infomercials, but could be...), the lack of preachers!!!!!!! God bless you! Preachers here, preachers there, everywhere is the downfall of Pegasys, not to mention a number of on-air stations we are subjected to. Please keep it that way, and find a way to turn away any further preachers who may approach you. And thank you for the invitation to be interviewed on the station. I do appreciate that, but am a bit camera shy. Possibly I could be persuaded eventually as I see how things are going. I have also just looked at your website again, in faraway, sinking Tuvalu, and still can`t find a program schedule there. Given the advance deadlines no doubt in effect for the Eagle which have so far prevented you from changing the listings to accurate Central Time, the website ought to be an excellent resource for conveying your true program schedule (updated at last minute if necessary) in true local time. Strangely enough, the programming I have enjoyed most, so far on KXOK has been the ancient cartoons that A1 uses to fill out the hours of their equally ancient westerns. Ahh, the Public Domain! Naturally, those don`t appear on the schedule, as mere fillers. As you increase power, you really must get off the Broadway Tower. There is so much RF coming off that building, with yours at the top of the list, that those of us unfortunate enough to live a mile or two from it (and most Enidians do), are faced with overload problems, adjacent channel interference, etc. I understand there are some positions available on Chisholm Trail towers, if not others, to the west of Enid at a respectful distance. Regards, (Glenn Hauser, March 4, 2002, to KXOK-TV via DXLD) No reply yet, but have monitored some of the local news by now. The actual scheduling, contrary to the published schedules even when timeshifted, all Mon-Fri only, is: Good Morning, Enid 7-7:30 am (1300- 1330 UT); News 6:30-7 pm (0030-0100) and 10-10:15 pm (0400-0415 UT). I`ve barely seen the morning show, it`s so early, but on one of them I heard mention that KXOK will soon have a radio station too, on 104.7. That happens to be the frequency briefly occupied last fall by KUAL ``Cool`` as one of the nation`s very first Low-Power FMs on the air. So is there some connexion? All I know is that I continue to hear KIXR in Ponca City on 104.7, a non-LPFM which moved onto that frequency in the meantime, and it would seem inadvisable for any station as close as Enid to be on the same channel now. Will KXOK-FM have to funxion only as a low-power? It was also mentioned that the 10-foot satellite dish was about to be lowered down the outside of the Broadway Tower, presumably as part of their studio move into Oakwood Mall. That`s for incoming programming. Nothing was said about moving KXOK`s own ch 32 transmitting antenna. BTW, I never complained about KXOK`s lack of signal strength, ``barely across town``. It`s excessive as is, with the centrally-located antenna. Overloads my rooftop UHF antenna with amplifier. Have seen bits and pieces of KXOK evening news shows. It`s a start, and in a way refreshing without all the hard-sell glitz of the OKC stations. A small graphics library is evidently on hand, and used to excess, e.g. to illustrate national stories, some generic graphic which doesn`t really apply, left on the screen far too long. The weatherman is making a good effort with what he has available, e.g. showing a computer screen with animated storm fronts. On Friday night, when severe weather was threatening, he both muttered something about staying on duty into the night, and seeing us again on Monday... For the third week in a row, the Enid News and Eagle TV supplement staring March 10 still has KXOK listings in Eastern time. We noticed from one night to the next that the blue fabric backdrop had been ironed. The other newscasters seem to be quite inexperienced, but hey, what better place to get started in the business! This is the first local TV news Enid has had in sesquidecades since KGEO-TV channel 5 succumbed to the lure of the Big City. There has been none whatsoever on cable, tho we do have four reserved cable-access channels, of which a sesquichannel is actually programmed by PEGASYS: strangely, PEGASYS has never felt the urge to bother with news; instead, one gospel huxter after another, and occasional other public affairs productions. Note: I do not include Not Necessarily The News, an occasional supposedly humorous show with several friends amusing each other, if not the audience, with `news of the weird` type stories for as much as two hours, live, and it can really drag. Also, the last one suffered from `dark` video, cameras not properly adjusted. But back to KXOK. We made a point of taping the 7 a.m. (1300 UT) show on Monday, March 11. It`s strictly a one-camera show, mostly looking at Anita (Maley?) at her desk featuring a yellow rubber duckie in front, and some other artifact at stage right. The half hour was mostly continuous chat with someone strictly off-camera, at first anonymous, then referred to as Scott. Sort of like a semi-radio show, except I don`t think this was on any radio station. About the only local news was the day`s public school menu. Scott then gave a few international news headlines starting with the Zimbabwe election being protracted. And Anita had some `Bozo news` about a thief who, to his own detriment, swallowed a necklace he had just pulled off some woman. From the chatter we gleaned that Anita has a new homepage (not given); the 10-foot satellite dish previously lowered down the outside of the Broadway Tower has now been raised to the top of the (one-storey) Oakwood Mall, thanks to a crane operator who happened by and did the job by mistake instead of another company which had just been called. She will be off next Monday, but back on Tuesday, when seemingly they will be ready to operate from the new studio in the mall. The meteorologist (not to be seen in the morning) is named Tim Bradfield. Scott vowed to have KXOK go out and do stories concerning all the surrounding little towns in its coverage area, not just Enid, and think about warning them too about severe weather, not just Enid. They are still talking about the upcoming radio station (and I am still only hearing KIXR Ponca City on 104.7), where they plan to start the morning show with Anita at 6 a.m., and she will have to wear headphones along with her earrings; and then jointly telecast it from 7 a.m. At one point we got a subliminal snap of a street scene, later taken deliberately to confirm that there was traffic actually going by on Garriott, but we focused on the trash in a gutter. Not a pretty sight. And so another half hour of our life has expired, with very little to show for it (Glenn Hauser, Enid, March 11, DX LISTENING DIGEST, for OKLAHOMA BROADCASTING NEWS) http://www.worldofradio.com/oklahoma.html ** PERU. 4950.17v, Radio Madre de Diós, Puerto Maldonado, la provincia de Tambopata, el departamento de Madre de Diós. March 2002 - 1030 UT. Always heard with weak signal and lately varying in frequency between 4949.99-4950.17v kHz. Announces SW, MW and FM. Radio Bahá`í, Otavalo (Ecuador) seems to be completely inactive on SW; my last notation is from Nov 1999 on 4950.14v kHz. Info from "Ventanaperú": Provincia de Tambopata, cuya capital es Puerto Maldonado. Sus distritos son: Inambari, Las Piedras, Tambopata; con una población total de 45,773 hab. 5637.22, Radio Perú, San Ignacio, la provincia de San Ignacio, el departamento de Cajamarca. March 1 2002 - 0200* UT. The word "reactivated" has almost lost its importance concerning Peruvian radio stations but my latest note is from March last year on 5637.26 kHz. When allowed to be called "reactivated" I think the station must have been off air for at least a year. Seems to be on air only between 0000-0200 UT. Definitely active on its FM-frequency 97.3 MHz. Mentioned telephone: 80 21 02. Info from "Ventanaperú": Provincia de San Ignacio, cuya capital es San Ignacio. Sus distritos son: Chirinos, Huarango, La Coipa, Namballe, San Ignacio, San José de Lourdes, Tabaconas; con una población total de 111,070 hab. 5854.60v, Radio Americana, Nueva Cajamarca, Región San Martín. March 5 2002 - 0100 UT. I reported this new station in SWB 1468. Began around Sept 20 last year, active only a few days, and like RD Comercial below been off air until this date. ID also as "Estéreo Americana". Good signal and varies in frequency a few kHz. As a matter of fact no mentioning of provincia "Rioja" but only "Nueva Cajamarca, Región San Martín". 6324.35, Radiodifusora Comercial "La Voz del Vecino", Nueva Cajamarca, la provincia de Rioja, el departamento de San Martín. March 5 2002 - 1055 UT. Reported about this new station in SWB 1475. Started around Dec 25 last year and only active for a few weeks. Off air until this date when they told us they suffered from problems with the power distribution. Funny coincidence that two new Nueva Cajamarca-stations are "reactivated " the same date, March 5! Annoying QRM from shipborn utility. Info from "Ventanaperú": Provincia de Rioja, cuya capital es Rioja. Sus distritos son: Awajun, Elías Soplín Vargas, Nueva Cajamarca, Pardo Miguel, Posic, Rioja, San Fernando, Yorongos, Yuracyacu; con una población total de 69,231 hab. (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin March 10, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DXLD) ** PERU. 9720.6, Radio Victoria, Lima. 0752-0757 March 8. Spanish transmission. Religious program. Commentary read by male. 24232 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentine, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** PERU. RADIO MARAÑÓN A BIG STATION FROM A SMALL JESUIT VICARIATE IN THE NORTHEASTERN PERUVIAN JUNGLES by Gabriel Gómez, Coordinator General of the DX Club Montevideo, and Takayuki Inoue Nozaki, of Tokyo, Japan. Republished with the kind permission of Señor Gómez [actually, I think it`s entirely by TIN -gh] Montevideo, Uruguay, Mar 5 (DX Clube de Montevideo) Nothing can deny the special attractiveness that the Andean stations have, from the cultural point of view, for those who live in Latin America and for people on other continents, as is the case of Takayuki Inoue Nozaki, who lives in the city of Tokyo, Japan. He lived some time in Peru, where there is a large Japanese colony, to learn the Spanish language and visit most of the stations he had heard. We are pleased to share the following information, thanks to colleague and friend Horacio Nigro, of wide and substantial fame in the world of DXism, based ultimately on the Miscellaneous Section of Conexión Digital, published by members of the Platense Group of Radio Fans. In this sense it seems to me opportune to tell you the history, technical information and programming of Radio Marañón on shortwave from Perú on 4835 kHz. Radio Marañón was created with the goal of accompanying the inhabitants of the northeast region of Perú in the process of integration and development, promoting the participation of all sectors in it. It began operations August 20, 1976, in the city of Jaén as an educational station of the Vicariate of San Francisco Javier del Marañón and directed by the Society of Jesus. Two years after its launch, RM attained its two primary goals: ``Presence of Radio in the Region,`` the first, and ``Differentiated Programming,`` the second, with schedules and programs dedicated to the diverse strata of an audience principally campesino. From the beginning, RM placed emphasis on programs directed to the campesinos, orientating agricultural activities dedicated to the cultivation of local crops and the breeding of small animals. Three years after its launch, RM won the First National Prize awarded by the Center of Tele-education of the Catholic University of Perú (CETUC) to the best educational radio programs. In 1985 RM began the Literacy Program, but this was suspended after two years because of little interest on the part of the Ministry of Education. In its place it created INTERAMA (Educational Institute of Radio Marañón), which offered an informal formation. [sic] They also brought forward programs of fish culture, family orchards and rabbit raising, constructing in effect a fish farm, an orchard, and an experimental farm on the grounds of the studios of RM, where students can observe what they are being taught. In the same manner it broadcast a new model of ``Ecological Kitchen,`` destined to avoid the massive consumption of wood, building a demonstration model of the kitchen on the same grounds of the station. It has also published instructional materials, and furthered the students` learning by means of slides and audiovisuals in meetings that took place in the RM auditorium. In 1990 it began its ``University Courses over the Air,`` which lasted three years, and three basic courses: Medicine and Hygiene, Housekeeping and Farming, and Ethical and Moral formation. Given the absence of telephones and adequate means of communication in the region, it inaugurated its ``Community Service,`` providing an open microphone for listeners, over which the campesinos could broadcast their messages; this service has an average 150 callers every day in the three-hour-long program. To spread and revalidate the culture of the northeastern campesinos, a series of live broadcasts were organized to promote folkloric music and native art, characterizing them with massive participation on the part of the artists and composers of the region. Since then, their creations and compositions became well known on the part of a numerous public that met to hear them in the RM auditorium. And to help the formation of the catechists of the region, it broadcast programs on the weekends that explained the Sunday readings of the Bible, as well as the catechism and the Sunday Mass. With the purpose of reactivating the station in a manner that accords with the new circumstances and that is based on recognition of the customs of the campesinos and the marginal-urban population of the region, in 1992 the station did an audience survey through a group of specialists. It had the end of analyzing the relation that exists between RM and its listeners, to know the characteristics of radio use on the part of its audience, to identify RM`s audience share, and to know the usefulness to and the interests that the listeners have in the services of empowerment, information, entertainment, self- improvement and apostolate that the station provides. With the results of this investigation, from October 1992 to September 1993 the station began a process of reorganization and redirection towards the necessities and new characteristics of the audience and the region. At the end of 1992 a public meeting was held to choose adequate staff, and courses and training sessions in various areas were organized for the new personnel. New announcer booths, recording studios, and control rooms were constructed, and the offices were remodeled. The sound proofing material was renovated as well as the studio equipment. Among the new personnel, four teams were organized: production, information, administration, and technical, with 14 people in all. Another two people, doctors by profession, belong to the health team of the station as collaborators with the production team. Training classes are permanent and form part of the annual plans. All of the people who participate on these teams take part periodically in various training and instructional courses offered by national and international institutions. In 1993, RM completed its process of integration into the Coordinadora Nacional de Radio (CNR) and in July of 1994 was accepted as a member of the Asociación Latinoamericana de Escuelas Radiofónicas (ALER). It is also a member of the Asociación Mundial de Radios Comunitarias (AMARC). On October 4, 1993, and after having been partially off the air for almost a year, the relaunch of Radio Marañón took place with completely new programming, positioning itself more and more as a participative and popular station. During the last four months of 1994, the Asociación Latinoamericana de Escuelas Radifónicas (ALER), headquartered in Quito, Ecuador, supervised in the region an audience survey carried out by a team of specialists. The results placed Radio Marañón as the preferred and most listened to station in the region. Its programs are the most listened to and its newscasts, in addition, inspire the greatest credibility in the population. Database Jaén: Radio Marañón 580 AM (10,000 watts), 96.1 FM (250 watts), and 4835 kHz (1,000 watts). Asociación Civil Radio Marañón, Calle Francisco Orellana, 343; Apartado 50, Jaén, via Chiclayo, Perú. Tel.: (044) 73-11-47, 73-21-68. Fax (044) 73 25 80. E-mail: correo@radiomaranon.org.pe. Francisco Muguiro Ibarra, director. Lunes a viernes 0500-2200, sábados 0500-21000, domingos 0600-1300. Fundada (AM) October 4, (FM) April 3. Radio Marañón on 4385 kHz Shortwave Schedule Monday through Fridays; different programming on weekends 04:30 Carioca Songs, Agricultural topics, national music 06:00 Marañón Newsreport 08:00 Rapid Communication, personal messages 09:00 In Family, a family magazine program with topics for women, on health, and varied music 11:30 Rapid Communication 13:00 Marañón Newsreport 14:00 Musical Telegram; music to please 16:00 Rapid Communication 16:30 People Like You, magazine program with topics for young people 18:00 El Guayusero, Music: cumbias and Andean national music 20:00 Point of the Heart, romantic music 22:00 Sign Off (via Catholic Radio Update #165, March 11, via DXLD) I wonder where the name Marañón comes from, what it mean exactly; does it derive from the B.V. Mary? (gh, DXLD) ** PUERTO RICO. The AFRTS Radio Station Roosevelt Roads, PR listing is wrong in the WRTH. 1200 AFRTS Roosevelt Roads, PR is 250 Watts, not 50w. Hmm... They use a pair of Nautel ND-1's, one standby and one on-air. The FM is on 101.5 FM. 1 kw. Horizontally polarized two bay antenna. Sort of strange - two horizontal X's stacked vertically looks like a type of receiving antenna. The closest municipality is Ceba. Photos to follow of studios, transmitters, and antennae. Many thanks to Journalist Petty Officer Second Class Jennifer Peter for the Grand Tour, the run to the store for more film, and an evening with her and her husband and another sailor friend out in town at a local Mexican restaurant. She is the Program Director. They are live during AM and PM drive (Ron Gitschier, On the Road, March 10, NRC-AM via DXLD) See also USA non below for thread discussing Spanish usage ** ROMANIA. Received a QSL for my December report to Radio Romania. The report was sent to the exact same PO Box 111 address, with the exact same postal code on it. (As noted in a recent posting by me Romanian postal authorities recently returned my October reception report as having an incomplete address.) The outside of the current mailing envelope has both the P O Box and street addresses listed as found in recent postings and the major reference books (Lee Silvi, Mentor, Ohio, March 9, DX LISTENING DIGEST) To people interested in writing to Radio Romania International: I usually send my reception reports by snail mail to RRI, 60-62 General Berthelot Street, Bucharest and I always received their answer (Ramón Vázquez Dourado, Spain, DX LISTENING DIGEST) Re Georgiana Zachia: She is a young lady, and she was the mailgirl of Radio Romania International, until this B-2001 season. For decades, RRI did not have a mailgirl. Replies were taken care of by the head of the English Department, Frederica, when she had nothing better to do. This left the listeners without schedules for months into the season, and very frustrated. Frederica wanted another editor, not a mailgirl. I also wrote that the mailgirl must be Romanian, for she is the ambassador of the station to the listeners. At least [last?] Frederica found Georgiana Zachia. G.Z. was the mailgirl, office and errand girl. She was very industrious and had some common sense. QSL cards arrived promptly. Schedules arrived on time. It is very easy for a mailgirl of a radio station to get into trouble. I was forever warning her not to answer my letters with anything more than a QSL card and to stay out of trouble. They taught her some announcing. She has a good voice and her English is perfect. Romania is the most difficult country in the world for an announcer. Monologues are long, long, ever so long and they must be read at high speed. In one case, she failed and had to be replaced in the middle. She was the youngest person at the station. She presented pop music, no doubt because she was more expert on it that anybody else. She took part in Youth Club, but without a by-line. She presented other programs too. She was also very Romanian. Romanians want to be dignified. She didn`t like being called a mailgirl. She preferred ``in charge of listeners` letters``. Frederica left, for reasons of health, and the new boss is Ioana Masariu. Georgiana Zachia was no longer allowed to initial QSL cards with her G with a squiggle. This season, several people at he English department were replaced, and G.Z. is no longer there, and she was not replaced. Replies are sluggish, almost as bad as in the old days (David Crystal, Ramat Zvi, Israel, March CIDX Messenger via DXLD) ** SOMALILAND. 7530, R. Hargeisa: as usual, this was the only Somali outlet audible at my location this morning. Weak with Horn of Africa music. Tho always weak, this is usually reliable and just audible, 1845 Feb 16 (Charles Jones, Castle Hill NSW, March Australian DX News via DXLD) ** SUDAN [non]. MADAGASCAR, 12060, Voice of Hope relay via Talata 0439-0505 Mar 9, English to Sudan. "War - a time of suffering..." etc. SINPO 33333, pulser QRM (Bill Flynn, Cave Junxion, OR, DX LISTENING DIGEST) UT Sat only ** U K. Fortunately, we tuned in BBC WS early March 11 at 1500, since the Commonwealth Day Observance actually started at 1503, not 1515 as publicised in BBC ON AIR and consequently in our MONITORING REMINDERS. But we quickly fixed that in two minutes, for those constantly checking our calendar page. The announcer pointed out that the service involved six ``affirmations`` or different faiths which are involved in the Commonwealth. Only six???? Come on! And you can bet Agnostics and Atheists are left out in the cold by this supreme example of why church and state should not be mixed, something the British have yet to comprehend. No doubt they mean well, but being `ecumenical` doesn`t cut it. Of course, religion of any kind is the opiate of the masses, and there are plenty of masses in the Commonwealth to be sedated and duped, rather than enlightened. Some nice music, tho. At the very same hour, Acting Pres. Bush was speaking outside the White House about the 9/11 semi-anniversary, a bit more involved in the real world, tho with no less phony piety. Five of the six religions involved in the CD service were Hindu, Sikh, Muslim, Christian, Buddhist, and I suppose Jewish the sixth but my attention lapsed; however, there is no predominantly-Jewish Commonwealth country, tho Britain historically bears a lot of the blame for the present Israel/Palestine situation (Glenn Hauser, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. I won a BBCWS T-shirt in a "Wright Round the World" contest. He announced the winners on Dec 23, and I got the shirt in the mail last Fri. It's a pretty nice shirt, they spared no expense (P J Allen, location unknown, March 11, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U K. BBC LAUNCHES NEW NATIONAL DIGITAL RADIO CHANNEL 6 MUSIC | Text of press release from the BBC on 11 March This morning (Monday 11 March) Ash beat all competition to officially mark the birth of 6 Music, the BBC's new national radio network. Phill Jupitus opened the mic at 7.00 a.m. with the energetic chords of the award-winning single "Burn Baby Burn". In an online vote, the public awarded the punk pop trio from Belfast the honour and a place in broadcasting history as the BBC launched its first new national music radio station in 32 years. [sic] Phill Jupitus, Breakfast Show presenter, says: "To be launching not only a new radio station, but also a new technology has me feeling quite excited, then hungry and finally sleepy. It's quite an honour to be the first voice on 6 Music and then to follow that up on air with a fantastic line up and play great tunes all morning is a dream gig. I'm glad Marconi invented radio so, a century odd down the line, I get the chance to give Offshore Banking Business by the Members the airplay it so richly deserves." Gideon Coe took the reins from Phill at 10 a.m. to present his Mid- Morning Show for the first time. His warmth and engaging music complements the other shows in 6 Music's schedule, including Lunch with Liz Kershaw, Craig Charles' Funk Show, Teatime with Andrew Collins, The Sunday Lie-In with Sean Hughes, Bruce Dickinson's Rock Show and Tracey MacLeod's Sunday morning show. John Sugar, Programme Editor, 6 Music, says: "It's a passion for great music that drives 6 Music - we're all united in that, especially the production team. This network isn't dictated to by the charts or the latest thing. It draws on the best music from the past through to today, and looks for the best music of tomorrow. We play contemporary songs that other networks would deem too daring and that should be heard. 6 Music has been years in the making and it's an amazing day for all of us and for the UK radio listener." 6 Music is available through DAB digital radio, digital satellite television (channel 911), digital cable television (currently only Telewest channel 909) and the Internet. Source: BBC press release, London, in English 11 Mar 02 (via BBCM via DXLD) ** U K. SHORT WAVE MONOPOLY TO EC COMPETITION COMMISSIONER NEWS RELEASE - 11 March 2002 Trevor Brook has made a submission to Mario Monti, the EC Commissioner for Competition Policy, about the monopoly in short wave broadcasting in the United Kingdom. He is asking the Commissioner to investigate the refusal by the government to issue a licence for an independent short wave station, Radiofax. Brook has been trying to obtain a licence since 1984. In 1997 he instituted an action in the European Court Of Human Rights but it ruled that the case did not constitute a sufficient curtailment of his Human Rights. In October 2000 he approached the Office of Fair Trading which concluded that the issue was simply not covered by the Competition Act. Historically, there was one short wave broadcaster: BBC World Service transmission. On 1 April 1997 this body was privatised and became Merlin Communications International. The government made no attempt to split the several UK transmitting facilities between more than one operator. Neither was any invitation made to potential new operators. There is no monopoly for AM and FM broadcasts. BBC domestic transmission was privatised at the same time but there are several other operators. On 14 November 2001, Merlin, with its monopoly, was acquired by Vosper Thorneycroft Holdings PLC for £95 million. Trevor Brook comments: Apart from broadcasting BBC World Service, Merlin transmits programmes for overseas state radios, as well as for a variety of private organisations. This is what I have been seeking to do. It is outstanding maladministration that the government refuses to grant a licence to anybody else. Contact: Trevor Brook Tel: 01483 275 997, Mobile: 07950 549 075, Fax: 01483 276 477. s.e@ndirect.co.uk Surrey Electronics Ltd., The Forge, Cranleigh, Surrey, GU6 7BG, England (via DXLD) see also IRELAND ** U S A. Commentary --- THE PUBLIC BE DAMNED Several developments on the U.S. broadcasting scene are cause for grave concern. Some weeks ago, a Federal court told the FCC that its cap on cable system ownership was arbitrary and indefensible at the stipulated –I think it was about 35%– figure. Some weeks later another court ruled that the FCC could not forbid a corporation from owning more than one television station in a market unless there were at least eight stations in that market. While the court ruled that the FCC could indeed set limits, these could not be arbitrary or capricious. The problem now is, on what basis do we find a national standard to limit the number of stations per market, or cable systems nationwide? The FCC has a major problem given it here by the courts. This is not a matter that can be objectively determined; we are not dealing with the boiling point of water. Any number the FCC chooses will be hard to justify using the court`s decision— why 50 percent and not 66 percent? Why two stations in a market rather than three? or four? Why limit ownership to caps with six stations? Why not four? There is already speculation on how the caps on TV stations per market will affect radio. Radio is a sad example of how deregulation has changed a once vibrant business whose stations were, outside major cities at least, largely owned by individuals, married couples, and small corporations. Now, almost every important radio station in every city of size is owned by one of a handful of megacorporations. The largest is Clear Channel Communications of San Antonio; it owns over 1,200 stations and, despite, the bad economy, a decline in advertising, and diminished revenues, continues to purchase stations. One professional website reports that Clear Channel pulled in over one billion dollars in revenue last year; its nearest competitor pulled in only $400 million. It is not just a question of a handful of companies controlling the major stations. It goes far beyond this. Many conglomerates have in fact reduced once independent stations into relays of a flagship station in a distant market. ``Voice tracking`` is spreading – a star announcer in a distant city records all the local announcements, weather forecasts, public service announcements, and even song intros and outros for all the regional stations owned by the same conglomerate. Computers splice all this together seamlessly so that the local station sounds as if the corporate owner is right there in the listeners` city and involved in the community, when in fact the only presence in that community is the local sales staff. Then, the other week, the FCC decided on a new requirement to fulfill the instructions of Congress to remove television channels 51 through 69 from television broadcasting. The FCC will expedite matters by requiring all applicants with pending applications for a television station on channels 51 through 69 (some of which are almost 10 years old) to amend their existing applications within a few weeks to (1) pledge that they would operate such stations, if granted, as digital television stations (DTV), or (2) they will find another, vacant analog channel below channel 50, which they must find themselves. If as in many cases, there are several applicants with competitive applications, they must all agree on a new vacant analog channel or all their applications will be dismissed. But there is more; such channel finds must meet the FCC`s stringent requirements of protection against interference to existing stations, authorized and under construction, analog and digital. Class A community stations must also be protected. One FCC Commissioner, Michael J. Copps, was upset. He argued that the FCC was demanding more than was necessary in requiring that new stations in channels 51-59 be digital, that in fact such assignments were temporary anyway, in light of the law passed by Congress. He said that the FCC was foreclosing on any analog operations before more vacant channels opened in the bands of channels 2 through 50 as present licensees converted fully to DTV and turned their old analog channels back to the FCC. In fact, he said, his preliminary study of the list of affected applicants showed that this new requirement would eliminate a first television station to at least a dozen communities. Two consulting engineers have told me that this Federal push into DTV is something nobody wants— but the Feds. To which I add PBS, which is eagerly converting to DTV through NTIS PTFP funds and dedicated funds through the Department of Commerce and Congress; and of course, technology junkies. Nobody else seems to want DTV. Nobody. Truth to tell, for everyone else, DTV has become an expensive burden. No station has shown a profit yet with DTV; station owners have invested millions in building a second, digital station. But the public has shown very little interest in DTV; even in markets where all the stations have DTV operations up and running, DTV set sales remain small. Understandably this is so, given the astronomical prices for sets, from $1,400 to $8,000. Television stations in small markets, ranks 101-210, will have a very hard time paying for DTV conversion because their ad revenues are much smaller than big cities but the price of conversion is basically the same, at least a million dollars a station. The TV industry has released figures showing that stations in the 10 biggest markets pull in a combined $62.6 million in ad revenues, compared to only a combined $11.1 million for markets 61-70, and $6.9 million for markets 101-110. The 35 smallest markets pulled in a mere $3.7 million, all stations combined. The situation is so critical that some small owners have said DTV conversion will drive them to bankruptcy. The American public is not aware what is being foisted on them by the Federal government. All existing television sets, except for those small numbers of new DTV sets, will become completely useless in a few years, except maybe to watch old VHS tapes of movies, weddings and family events. All sets. And the high cost of new DTV sets will preclude having a second set in the bedroom, or the wife having a small set in the kitchen to watch as she prepares meals, or dad to have in the garage when he does woodwork. Then, the question arises, what will become of these millions of existing, perfectly good but perfectly useless analog sets? Most will wind up in the landfills, a thought that should drive any environmentalist wild, if only they knew about it. But few people anywhere seem to know anything about it. Say DTV and they think about the new channels being offered by cable systems, which few want anyway, as cable systems are sorrowfully learning. For that matter, sales of digital hookups to computers via phone lines or cable systems are flat and one large provider is thinking of getting out of the business. No, the public does not realize that the present system of television is being destructed by a government intent on handing over the vacated television channels to giant wireless technology businesses. Recall that 22% of the population does not subscribe to cable television or satellite television, that this percentage tracks well the percentage of poor U.S. households; that the percentage of black households not subscribing to cable or satellite TV is higher, and that of Hispanic households even higher. For the poor, African- Americans, and Hispanics, broadcast television is often their sole option. But all this does not deter the government. The Bush administration is thinking of levying large fines in the form of ``spectrum rental fees`` on stations that do not convert to digital quickly and return their analog channels. The Congress has held hearings at which they berated television executives for not converting faster. One Congressman, Billy Tauzin of Louisiana, has said that if owners do not convert, they will be made to do so. But it is clear to everyone that DTV is failing (and not just here, but in England; one news source has quoted a BBC official saying that this year will make or break DTV in England). FCC Chairman Michael Powell has formed a task force to find out why and what can be done about it, which is a more rational approach than that of the White House or Capitol Hill. One wonders in all this where the interests of the American public are being considered. Instead of locally owned radio stations with roots in the community, we get relays of faraway stations so as to enhance the profit margins of megacolossal corporations and make Wall Street analysts happy. We see the Federal courts, which ought to be the last bulwark of the public`s rights, abetting this development in cable, broadcast television and, soon, radio. We see a Congress that mandated such ownership changes and channel shrinkage under the Clinton administration continue to promote them under the present, and a present White House administration that continues the course full steam ahead. We see a Congress intent on pulling even more TV channels away from stations (recall that the TV band once ran from channels 2- 83) and giving them to lucrative cellular phone and wireless technology interests. And that, in the final analysis, is where the action is, where the money is, where the real reason for this madlong push towards a digital world is going. Forget all the political garbage about the benefits of an interconnected digital world, of untold increase of benefits for everyone when radio, television, cable, and computers are all connected in one big digital world. The real reason is to benefit the cellular and wireless technology businesses. All else is buzz. Hype. Bull. Politics. Courts, Congress, and the FCC— the American public is being ill served by them in matters of mass media. The attitude is, the public be damned. (Michael Dorner, editor, Catholic Radio Update #165, March 11, via DXLD) ** U S A [and non]. HOW SPECTRUM SALES TURNED SOUR WIRED March 5, 2002 by Joanna Glasner Even in an era of rampant privatization of public assets, it's not easy to grasp the concept that rights to cross sections of air are routinely sold off to the highest bidder. Certainly airwaves -- or the ability to use them -- aren't the sort of tangible goods, such as old equipment, confiscated property or even rights to mine on state land, that the government has traditionally sold at auction. But when it comes to raising money for the U.S. Treasury, the numbers speak for themselves. Since 1994, spectrum auctions -- in particular, auctions of airwaves for wireless telecommunications -- have constituted the most profitable asset sale ever conducted by the U.S. government. In the last eight years, the Federal Communications Commission has raised more than $40 billion from spectrum sales, including bids that have been accepted but not yet paid, to fund the U.S. Treasury. Despite the auction's financial success, however, the mechanics of the bidding process have come under fire. Fueling the criticism is a high- profile dispute between the FCC and NextWave Telecom, a bankrupt firm that is contesting the agency's decision to resell licenses it failed to pay for on time.... http://www.friendscb.org/articles/Wired/wired020305.htm (via Ricky Leong, QE, DXLD) ** U S A. A SAD STORY - CLASSICAL MUSIC ON THE WANE ON US RADIO From Andante: Radio Waves http://www.andante.com/magazine/article.cfm?id=16078&highlight=1&timeline=1&highlightterms=radio&lstKeywords=radio Peter Goodman observes that WNYC's recent cutbacks mirror a larger trend - the slow but steady disappearance of classical music from America's airwaves. The change has been brewing for years. Virtually since the day in 1995 that Laura Walker became president of the newly independent WNYC Foundation - owner and operator of New York City's famous WNYC/93.9 FM and 820 AM - the probability mounted that the FM station, home for decades of a very successful classical music format in the most competitive radio city in the nation, was eventually going to eliminate or greatly diminish the diet of Beethoven, Tchaikovsky and John Adams that the city's connoisseurs had grown to love. Their replacement would be the commercially successful format already used on the AM station: news, talk, commentary and information from National Public Radio and WNYC's own local studios. Here's how the reasoning went: we have to pay New York City $20 million to buy the two stations, and we need even more money to increase our audience and raise more money. What brings in more support, music or talk? Talk, of course. That's what the radio consultants have been telling us for years, and that's what we have found in our own fund-raising. So, gradually at first, classical programs began to disappear from WNYC FM. Then came September 11th. WNYC's share of the destruction included the loss of its FM transmitter and antenna with the collapse of the World Trade Center, as well as the temporary loss of its nearby studios and offices, due to smoke and dust damage. Immediately, in response both to the loss of the FM signal and the urgent need for news around the clock, WNYC FM dropped all its midday music and began simulcasting the AM station. It's been five months now, with no move back to music. But listeners didn't understand what was happening until 4 February 2002, when the astute weekly New York Observer detailed the unhappiness and off-air conflicts within the station, starting with Walker's $321,539 compensation package and then exploding with the news that the station was seriously considering dropping classical music almost completely. New York - that smug city that, among other things, considers itself the classical music capital of the United States - suddenly faced the possibility of a future with only one classical station. And that was the staid, middle-of-the-road WQXR/96.3 FM, owned by the equally staid Gray Lady, The New York Times. Listeners were outraged; protests poured in from highly placed, wealthy members of WNYC's own board, among many others. Walker pulled in her horns and said that the news/talk format was just one of several possibilities under consideration. All this seemed like a catastrophe of the first significance in the Big Apple. In fact it was just New York coming in at the tail end of events, as usual. Classical music has been slowly disappearing from the commercial airwaves for more than a decade. At the same time, public radio, which had become the main hope for classical listeners nationwide, was also switching from Beethoven to Bob Edwards. Everybody knew that's where the money was. The commercial story has been especially sad. The days of family-owned stations, which made enough money to be comfortable if not enough to be rich, have given way to the deregulated, consolidated era of powerful corporations whose obsessive focus is "shareholder value." They spent too much money (stations in New York and other large cities were going for upward of $100 million apiece) and owed too much money, to waste time with a piddling few millions of profit. They needed lots, lots more - and right away. So the cozy classical stations began to disappear - at first with some protest, but finally with barely a peep. WNCN/104.3 FM, New York's second upstart classical station, was sold in the early 1970s to a group that gave it a rock format. Furious fans fought back and got the signal sold to a firm that agreed to restore the old programming as long as it was in the black. But 20 years later, when that company found it could make a lot more just by selling WNCN, they did - with nary a peep. Today, there are just 34 commercial stations around the country playing classical music, down from 48 in 1992 (although the share of the total listening audience shrank only slightly, from 1.8 percent in fall 1991 to 1.5 last summer). The most recent flip came just two months ago, when Cox Communications bought Miami's venerable WTMI/93.1 FM and turned it into WPYM "Party 93.1," devoted to underground dance music. As Sean Ross, editor of the Billboard Airplay Monitory trade weekly, put it: "If 20 years ago, or even five years ago, you had gone to a major [radio] group manager and said I'd like to take your classical to underground dance and make more money, you would have been greeted with skepticism. Now dance is more in the mainstream. It seems less frightening." Still, since WTMI disappeared, the managers of a public station in nearby Palm Beach County, WXEL/90.7 FM, announced that they will broadcast 90 hours of music a week (as well as a news/information format) into Miami and Dade County, starting in early June. One way that public stations are trying to preserve some balance of both news and music has been to acquire second frequencies in the same city, as Colorado Public Radio has done in Denver. The Colorado system has even joined with the University of Southern California's KUSC to create the Classical Public Radio Network, which combines the resources of both operations to form a 24-hour musical stream that is available for syndication nationwide to other public stations. And there are rival networks: Minnesota Public Radio's Classical 24, for instance, is not happy about the arrival of CPRN. "The two signals have done magnificently in Denver," says CPRN artistic director Evans Mirageas, a former major-label record executive. "People today want more specificity, either all classical or all news. Gone is the idea of the intellectual companion, with news, lectures, jazz, classical music and so on. There are more 'genre-specific' listeners, and public broadcasters have awakened to this." The move toward niche programming mirrors the trends in commercial pop, rock and rap, for which stations have been targeting their programs at increasingly specific audiences. (WKTU/103.5 FM in New York, for example, is directed at 25-to-34-year-old women). Where do we go from here? Are American classical music lovers doomed to the eventual dripping away of our favorite sounds from the airwaves, where so many of us (especially outside the main cities) learned how to listen to and appreciate the music? Not necessarily. For starters there is the Internet, an inexhaustible resource for the dissemination of all manner of global sounds. Readers of an internet magazine such as that of andante hardly need to be reminded of how much there is to read and hear in cyberspace. Internet radio itself is increasingly a place where old music can meet new ears, and it is addressing the hunger for the music around the nation - an appetite which will surely be piqued as computers enter more households and Internet access increases. And now there's satellite radio, too, provided by two competing firms: XM Satellite Radio, based in Washington, D. C. and Sirius Satellite Radio, based in New York. The latter launched in its first four markets just last week on 14 February 2002. As one who has enjoyed an XM installation for several months now, I can report that it's great - even with a few flaws in the design of the receivers. XM and Sirius have four and three classical channels respectively, with at least one devoted to vocal music (try finding that as a steady diet, or even during a weekday, on your local station). The sound quality is superior to FM now, the reception is superb - I listened recently to one station on a round trip from New York to Vermont. It was wonderful. All these trends and new developments suggest that traditional classical radio seems to be going the way of "adult standards" from the late '30s to mid '50s and slowly disappearing from the airwaves. Fortunately, as new technologies and avenues of distribution take its place, the music's staying power seems as strong as ever (via Mike Terry, BDXC-UK via DXLD) ** U S A. March 9, 2002, Saturday, BC cycle VETERANS PUSH FOR MUSEUM AT VOICE OF AMERICA RADIO BUILDING [Bethany] A veterans group wants to open a museum on the site where Voice of America radio broadcasts from the U.S. government were beamed behind the Iron Curtain during the Cold War. The original 600-acre Voice of America site in Union Township contained a network of radio towers, an outdoor switching station and the broadcast building, which also transmitted and received broadcasts worldwide during World War II. The towers have been removed, but the Ham Radio Operators Association is considering erecting a working tower if a museum is opened in the former broadcast building, owned by the township. Fred Carroll, commander of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7696, proposed converting the building and seeking a national historic landmark designation. The museum idea has been discussed for years, but the VFW recently took over fund-raising. The group plans to solicit donations internationally, but has not determined the cost of the project. West Chester officials also plan to raise $42 million to build parks for dog-walking, skating and soccer on the grounds, 20 miles north of Cincinnati. LOAD-DATE: March 10, 2002 (AP via Artie Bigley, DXLD) ** U S A. The Corporate Director of Engineering for Crawford Broadcasting just tipped me off to their updated web site. It has a lot of facts and photos. The "stations" link shows basic info and slogans used at every one of their 30 or so stations. A few of the "stations" links have another link on them to photos of the antennas and transmitters including KBRT on Santa Catalina Island. Look way at the bottom of each page for the link. The "engineering" link has more photos (slow loading but worth the wait) and some interesting info about their Chicago cluster which anticipates going digital later this year. I'm still not sure what the creature in the microwave in the St. Louis photos is. Possum maybe? The page is at http://www.crawfordbroadcasting.com Enjoy! (Patrick Griffith, Westminster, CO, USA, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. N. COLO. ANTI-TOWER EFFORT IS ON FINAL TRY By Coleman Cornelius, Denver Post Northern Colorado Bureau Sunday, March 10, 2002 - LIVERMORE - Rural neighbors near Livermore have launched a last-ditch attempt to save the skyline from a 500-foot radio tower that would beam rock 'n' roll to northern Colorado. The tower would soar about 50 stories into the sky - complete with anchor cables and flashing lights - near the well-known landmark of Steamboat Rock in the Laramie Foothills, a historic area that's been the focus of land conservation. From some vantage points, the tower will be visible for miles. In this ranching community 25 miles north of Fort Collins, the issue of the tower has divided longtime neighbors and is a painful symbol of the conflict between progress and preservation.... Interesting story in the Denver Post today about a fight between Clear Channel and some rural property owners north of Ft. Collins. CC is putting up a 500 foot tower near Livermore, CO for an FM license in Cheyenne, WY. The tower is going up within view of the Overland Trail stagecoach route from the 1800s. It looks like CC is winning the fight. The story is at: http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1002,53%257E452939,00.html (Patrick Griffith, Westminster, CO, USA, NRC FM-TV via DXLD) ** U S A. 26350 & 26450 NBFM, KUSA Denver, Colorado, 2300 Mar 8. TV feeder for KUSA noted first on 26350 at 2300 tune in, then on 26450 about an hour later. There was much feeder activity from the Denver area due to a large snow storm. Also heard avalanche warning. Multiple 9 News IDs. Website address given over the air, at one point. http://www.9news.com/ 26400 NBFM, KMGH, Denver, Colorado, 2358 Mar 8, noted the 27th of February on 26450, but this is the first time I've heard it on 26400. Huge pile up on I-76 due to snow storm. Denver airport closed, many flights delayed. ID "7 News", see http://www.thedenverchannel.com/ 26300 NBFM, UNID TV feeder/cue, 2320 Mar 8, Traffic report mentioning "The 202". Also several mentions of Chicago. Some co-channel QRM, so unable to work with it (David Hodgson, TN, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** U S A. COLLEGE RADIO OFF AIR AFTER INSULTING TALK North Jersey News http://www.bergen.com/page.php?level_3_id=7&page=2724603 Thursday, March 07, 2002, By JUSTO BAUTISTA, Staff Writer MAHWAH - The campus radio station at Ramapo College of New Jersey was shut down Wednesday by school officials who said student broadcasters had aired insulting and racist remarks about black politicians, Hispanics, women, and homosexuals. The college administration said the 29-year-old station - WRPR - won't go back on the air until station advisers and student disc jockeys follow FCC regulations and "our own written rules," said college Vice President Pamela Bischoff. Students and teachers said there had been two inflammatory broadcasts. The first, last month, involved a talk show called "Chit Chattin' with Chet,'' hosted by John Tomaszewski, president of the student government. During the show, unidentified guests - one pretending to be Paterson Mayor Marty Barnes, the other pretending to be Newark Mayor Sharpe James - bantered in a way that suggested racial stereotypes, at least in the view of the administration. A recent issue of the college newspaper, The Ramapo News, said the first show mocked homosexuals, lesbians, and Hispanics as well. Tomaszewski, who survived a vote of confidence following the first program, could not be reached for comment Wednesday. One offended student - Brian Wilson, a junior and student government senator - called the station to complain and gave a tape of the show to school officials, the school newspaper said. The second offending show occurred Tuesday night, while college President Rodney Smith presided over a town hall meeting with students and faculty. The meeting dealt with diversity. Smith said yesterday he hoped students would be more thoughtful. "Ramapo College is an educational institution, and we hope to use this experience as an opportunity to learn and grow,'' Smith said in a statement. "As I said in last night's town meeting, we need to begin the process of healing, engage in healthy dialogue, and move beyond the personal to an understanding of these issues in the context of a broader society.'' The Tuesday show contained derogatory language and "untrue statements,'' said Bonnie Franklin, a college spokeswoman. She said she didn't know whether the controversial statements were made by callers or the DJ. Andrew Bernstein, a sophomore and WRPR program director, said he would supervise the DJs more closely from now on. "I feel like I have to be more stern with the DJs and not sit back and say, 'This is college radio,'" Bernstein said. "People are actually listening." One result of the controversy is that more students are listening - or were listening to the station - said Adam Laskowtiz, a junior who has a show. In addition to the campus, the station can be heard in Mahwah, Glen Rock, and Rockland County. "The student reaction has been stronger than anything I've seen," said Michelle Maskaly, a senior and editor in chief of the Ramapo News. "In the past, students have been apathetic about campus issues. This issue has definitely mobilized people." (via Mike Terry, UK, DXLD) ** U S A [and non]. Re: 1700 WJCC Miami Springs, FL replacing 1210 kHz Miami. I wouldn't count on 1700 here replacing 1210. The main programming is still on 1210 WNMA, with 1700 WJCC being leased out to a religious group [Voz Cristiana, also on SW via Chile –gh] When the 5 year grace period comes up for them (should be sometime around Nov/Dec of this year), we will most likely see 1700 being turned in. Won't bother me a bit, since they have been in violation of FCC rules by not being in Stereo (Tony S/Miami, NRC-AM via DXLD) In fact, 1700 is the flagship station for the entire Radio Única network. The question should probably be, "will Única make it till the end of the year?" The net is bleeding badly, with increasing losses, and the shares are around a buck, down form the $20 offering price two years ago. Oh, and did I say, "No ratings?" (David Gleason, CA, NRC-AM via DXLD) Why is Única bleeding so badly? Obviously the format isn't as popular as suspected, but do you or your broadcasting colleagues have any conjecture as to why? Just curious....73 (Neil Kazaross, IL, with an Única local on 950, NRC-AM via DXLD) Why? US Hispanics don't like a talk format done from Miami with a one- size-fits-all content. Many of the people on the air, or who have been on the air, are TV people who just don't do fun talk radio. Then there is the sports show, which has a bunch of Argentines and Uruguayans with accents most US Hispanics find either hard or impossible to understand. Única was built by ex-Univisión and Telemundo folks. It has a "TV on the radio" model. It's boring. The ratings generally make Única the lowest rated Spanish station in every market they are in. In some places, they have stations and don't even show up in the ratings! As DXers know, half their stations are real dogs, like KBLA in LA which covers Maui better than Long Beach. A good example of the lack of success would be a comparison of the Única net to the leading US Spanish language station, WSKQ in NY. WSKQ as a single station has more audience than the entire Única net. Ad buyers have stayed away, as it has no efficiency; it also is not regionalized and advertisers know you have to do different versions of Spanish commercials for different areas of the country. I'm guessing that the Única net will be bought by one of the Spanish TV nets as an adjunct to their existing operations and as a promotional vehicle. Disney is enormously happy with RD despite low ratings, given the brand reinforcement and imaging it does for the corporation, so this idea is not out of bounds. I give this about a 30% - 35% probability. After that, there is a 20% chance someone else in Hispanic radio will take the net and rework it... SBS or someone with talk experience. Then, the options are for sale to a large religious broadcaster, Salem, Crawford, etc. Then we have it being broken into pieces, in which case most of the stations are worthless for anything except religion or paid ethnic programming (Haitian in Miami, Korean in LA, etc.) One thing is understanding, another thing is enjoying radio programming in a different accent with different usages. An educated Spanish speaker from anywhere in Latin America will "understand" people from elsewhere, although many Americanisms (Spanish words indigenous to areas of the Americas) will throw almost anyone. I can not speak perfect colloquial Mexican Spanish; nor can I speak 100% Argentine everyday Spanish, despite having had 4 decades of exposure to both. It takes me concentration to listen to Argentine airchecks, it takes a bit of an effort to do same with Mexican ones. It is like hearing myself think to hear stuff from Puerto Rico. The key is enjoyment. When I hear Argentine TV shows, that extra bit of concentration needed makes them more work than pleasure. I'm pretty used to Mexican shows as I have worked with Mexico for so long and they purposely "internationalize" all shows for syndication sales. I've played an LA morning show for folks in Puerto Rico and no one could understand the show. At all. Nada. And nearly everyone not form the Caribbean has trouble with Puerto Rican Spanish, due to speed, accent, contractions and the huge, huge number of colloquial terms and Anglicisms in the language there. In the case of Única, most Mexican sports fans reject the difficult Argentine accent of the sports dorks they have because "they don't speak like I do." Hell, they don't even use the same words. There are probably more Spanish-dominant Dominicans on the East coast than Spanish-dominant Puerto Ricans. The Puertoricans came in the 50's and are 3rd generation now; the young folks don't speak Spanish. In addition, there is positive reverse migration back to the Island ever since 1970 or so. There are relatively few Cubans outside Miami, where the bulk of them are over 50. Miami (metro) under age 55 is now 52% non-Cuban among the Hispanic population... Colombians and Nicaraguans being the largest groups, followed by Dominicans, Puerto Ricans and Ecuadorians. The dominant language influence in Mexico is Náhuatl, not Mayan. The Mayans only covered the lower area from Yucatan to Chiapas, and the northern languages are not Mayan based. Words like Chocolate and Tomato come form Náhuatl (David Gleason, CA, March 10, NRC-AM via DXLD) Re Mayan language immigrants to the U.S.: I think that the Mayan languages (Tzutuhil, Quiche, Cakchiquel, etc.) aren't heard much from the Guatemalan and Mexican (Chiapas) immigrants that come to the US. The speakers of Mayan languages often have very poor Spanish (or none at all), are from the isolated highlands, tend to "stick to themselves" culturally and not have as much desire to come to the U.S. My Spanish is only good (or used to be...) as opposed to great, but in many of the villages of Guatemala I feel that I am the best Spanish speaker. The people of the smaller villages usually have little education and most haven't studied Spanish. Those that know some Spanish are really Spanish speakers, and have big trouble with the written language. I do know that there are quite a few refugees from the terrible 30 year Guatemala civil war that live in Miami. As the refugees are "indígenas" as opposed to the landed white gentry (imagine that), perhaps Miami and Texas have a little more Mayan influence than I'd think, but it has to be small (Chuck Hutton, ibid.) In researching thousands of users of Spanish radio in Miami in that last 7 years (and actually living there in the early 80's) I never came across one Guatemalan indigenous person. They most go directly to English radio; Guatemalans in the Market data done by Strategy Research Corp. are listed as "insignificant." I programmed a station for a number of years in Quezaltenango (Estéreo Rey) and did some digging at Tikal before going head-first into radio, so I know what you are talking about. There are areas in Chiapas where Spanish is not spoken, but not in the cities (Gleason, ibid.) I've talked at length with Spaniards about the differences between say Chilean Spanish and Mexican Spanish, and how that compares to the difference between Australian English, American English and English English. Everyone there feels that the differences are smaller between the Spanish speakers. I certainly believed it - Madrid was a Mecca for people from CA and SA (including many of my co-workers) and they fit right in. I never, ever witnessed anyone having to ask someone from SA or CA to repeat something. And never any puzzled looks. One explanation is that these were engineers, and their education tends to normalize their Spanish. But the explanation they believed is that for hundreds of years, there were two forces that prevented regionalization: Spain was running the show, and even afterwards the role model for language was the Castilian spanish. Even today, many of the better-offs still send their children to Spain for a while to get a dose of castellano. As for the transition from high school to college Spanish, I've yet to meet anyone that thought it was easy. And I've yet to meet anyone with just HS Spanish that could really have an entire conversation with a native and understand it all. HS Spanish prepares you only to ask "por favor, ¿dónde está el Hotel Shératon?". I don't expect that castellano versus "American" Spanish was the real problem, but you would know better. My only issues with American Spanish were Ustedes vs. Vosotros, Cuban accents and regional differences in word usages like coche vs. carro but that never stopped the show (Chuck Hutton, ibid.) Vos is unused except in Argentina and Chile and parts of Central America (El Salvador seems to have a dose of it). Ud. is hardly used in Puerto Rico where everything, even conversations with strangers, is "tú." And you are right. Educated people who have had García Lorca and Cervantes and García Márquez and such can certainly communicate using formal Spanish. The average José and María, however, find the accents daunting and have no reference for colloquialisms. I did the first station in Buenos Aires that used "vos" instead of "usted" on the air, and its speech is very, very "street." When I have a tape on or have it streaming, the folks in LA [here: Los Ángeles] are constantly asking what phrases mean. For example, during the events of December, we had a promo on the air that said "que no te pinte el bajón" meaning "don't get depressed" over the situation. No one in LA new what that meant! Another couple of fun ones: guagua is a bus in Puerto Rico; it is a baby in the Inca-Andean zone. Chaqueta is a jacket in the Caribbean; in Mexico it is Male masturbation. Somewhere at work I have an 80-page photocopied tome of words that are used somewhere in Latin America that have a negative meaning somewhere else! Even in radio: a log is a log, a pauta, a planilla. A commercial stopset is a break, a tanda and a corte. A spot is a spot, a cuña, an anuncio, a mensaje, a corto, and several more. A meeting is a reunión in some places, and a junta elsewhere. Famous saying, "Latin America has 20 nations divided by a single language." Every time I travel, I have to go into parrot mode for a day or so to get with the accent, and more so, the cadence, of local speech. You are right about regional dialects. In Mexico, national talk radio has never been truly successful ratings-wise do to the enormous accent difference between "chilangos" (those from Mexico City) and the rest of the nation. In fact, there are many colloquialisms in the DF that are unused in the rest of Mexico. In Ecuador, I could not put a Quito announcer on a Guayaquil station or vice versa as they sounded so different. In fact, quiteños called those from Guayaquil "monos" or "monkeys" because, in part, of their fast chatter. Even Puerto Rico, only 100 miles long, has distinct regional accents, particularly in the inland area around Lares! Both US nets try to use "international Spanish" as many of the programs are later sold via syndication to Latin America. Most Mexican novellas and such are also done in neutral Spanish for the same reason. When I was doing radio syndication out of Miami, it took a long time to train the announcers I used to voice track the formats so that they would sound good anywhere in the Hemisphere; it must have worked as at one time the formats were on about 70 FMs in every country but Nicaragua, Cuba, Uruguay and Argentina! It took me a couple of years, but I used to write all the promos for the stations I managed there... and I still name programs and promotions. Latest is "De Pecho con Sonya" on Salsoul; it sort of means "head on" but also refers to the female anatomy. Oh, it is a sex-talk show! There are really major differences between Puerto Rican usage and that of anywhere else (David Gleason, CA, NRC-AM via DXLD) ** U S A. WOR was not carried by WWCR 3210 at scheduled time of 0730 UT Sunday March 10 (John Norfolk, OK) EXCID, a make-good had to be inserted in that slot, but still supposed to be scheduled. Anyhow, we are back at 0100 UT Monday on 3210, confirmed March 11 (gh) ** URUGUAY. 6155, Banda Oriental, Sarandi del Yí. 0146-0205 March 10. Uruguayan folk music non stop. 44433 (Arnaldo Slaen, Argentine, DX LISTENING DIGEST) ** URUGUAY. 6010.37, Emisora Ciudad de Montevideo, Montevideo. March 2002 - 0100 UT. Heard every evening with rather weak signal and direct from carnival celebrations. I get the opinion that they relay TV/UHF channel 42 as they sometimes say "....aquí en 42". This station together with Radio Mil on 6010.00 kHz are the only stations heard in Quito on this frequency. Radio L.T.C. seems to be off air and no sign from the Chilean transmitter (Björn Malm, Quito, Ecuador, SW Bulletin March 10, translated by editor Thomas Nilsson for DXLD) ** ZIMBABWE. STATE RADIO, TV "GROSSLY BIASED" IN ELECTION COVERAGE, SAYS NGO | Text of report from South African news agency SAPA web site Cape Town, 11 March: The state-controlled Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation (ZBC) was guilty of bias and distortion "like never before" in the run-up to the presidential polls, according to Zimbabwe's Media Monitoring Project (ZMMP)